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T H E M AG A Z I N E O F H U D S O N VA L L E Y FA R M S , F O O D A N D C U I S I N E

NUMBER 78 JUNE–AUGUST 2017 VALLEYTABLE.COM


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number 78 june–august 2017

46 29 the green onion

It may look like a small market in a small town, but there’s a world of experience and knowledge behind the quaint, handpainted front door. Hillary Lindsay has lived most of her life around food—from Orange County’s black dirt region to Italy’s Piedmont, and in her new market she aims to connect local farmers and consumers over the one thing they have in common—good, fresh, honest, locally grown food. Oh, and music, too. by Kristen Warfield

34 seeding young minds

What Ava Bynum started out as a workshop in a single school in Peekskill has blossomed into one of the Hudson Valley’s largest, most comprehensive—and most requested—gardening/learning programs. Hudson Valley Seed’s programs are successful not because they get the kids out of the classroom and into the gardens they plant, maintain and harvest, but because they bring the gardens into the classroom. by David Neilsen

46 nancy fuller’s farmhouse rules

Take one kid who was born and raised on a Columbia County farm, add equal parts spunk, down-home widsom and common sense, blend with a major regional food disributor, add a dash of sassy personality and you’ve got the makings for one of food television’s most popular show hosts. And she’s happy just the way she is, thank you. a Valley Table interview

60 kids grow with mcenroe

Ray McEnroe’s organic farm is well known throughout the region and beyond. What he’s becoming even better known for, however, are the educational programs that have turned his farm and fields into virtual classrooms for countless students at all levels who learn not just the “how” of organic agriculture, but more importantly, the “why.” by John Roccanova and Kristen Warfield JUNE

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number 78

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departments

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13 Good Stuff

New Fishkill Farms cider, Farm-to-Table Award, CIA show, Beacon’s new donut shop, flowery vodka, jams, Greek yogurt, tax credits for crop donations, Tuthilltown sold, cashew ice cream, letters, events and more

23 Openings The Amsterdam, Millerton Inn, Boutique Wines & Spirits, Red House 25 Up Close: Hudson Valley Seafood, by Kristen Warfield 39 Eating by the Season Summer squash, by Marissa Sertich Velie 53 Farms, Food & Markets: Hudson Valley Farmers’ Markets 63 Locally Grown A dark road to take, by Keith Stewart 66 Drink New summer coolers, by Timothy Buzinski 68 Index of advertisers 70 Directory 80 Last Call Local legacy

recipes

41 Zucchini carbonara (Emma Rose Chudkowski / A Tavola Trattoria) 42 Grilled pattypan squash and haloumi with basil purée (James Haurey / The Grange) 43 Salmon with spring vegetables and buttermilk herb emulsion (Craig Capano / Crave) 50 Basil watermelon bisque; Corn relish and red pepper salad (Nancy Fuller / Farmhouse Rules) 66–67 More Good Gin & Spring Tonic (Jason Schuler / More Good); The Hudson (Steven Aigner / Liberty Street Bistro); Summer FUNshine (Marianne Greaves / Keegan Ales); Napoleon Summer (Jake Griffin / Irving Farm Coffee Roasters); Mint Condition (Jessica Gonzalez / Heritage Food + Drink); Cider Float (Cathyrn Fadde / Perch)

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EDITOR’S LETTER

What’s old is old again Maybe there is a conjunction of some odd stars up in the heavens that’s sending some wacky vibrations our way, because lately I’ve been running into more then just a few old friends—not two-dimensional, transient images of people I never heard of crowding my iPad, but real, live, fleshand-blood human beings who can have a conversation lasting more than 140 characters. Considering I haven’t seen some of them since, well, high school, “old” in this context takes on a whole new meaning. I won’t do the math for you, but let’s just say I was already on the downhill slide toward retirement when we started this magazine almost 20 years ago, and most of my old friends predate that by some 30 years. We don’t often speak of longevity anymore, it seems. “New” gets most of the hype, and these days, new happens almost daily. Is your phone more than a month old? You might think about getting a new one. Your watch tells you how many steps you took yesterday, but does it tell you the direction you were walking when you took them? If not, maybe you need a new one. Not that any of this is necessarily bad, mind you—we celebrate new plenty right here. What would “Good Stuff” be without new people producing new food and products? What kind of future could we look forward to without new farmers—or new marketers like Hillary Lindsay and her Green Onion market (page 29) to keep us going? On the other hand, there is something to be said for the old guard—the people and institutions that just keep doing what they’ve always done, that is, maintain. In this issue, for example, we spotlight Prospect Hill Orchards in Milton, now celebrating 200 years of growing fruit in the Hudson Valley (page 80). Two hundred years. Same place, same family. Prospect Hill, along with other long-lived farms like Hepworth and Kezialain, have lasted, for the most part, through sustainable practices—an old, old term that currently is among the first lessons every new farmer must learn. Our interview with TV cooking personality Nancy Fuller in this issue (page 46) contains some good ol’ down-home philosophy on just these points. No spring chicken herself (she admits), Fuller reiterates that we wouldn’t have anything new without the experience, wisdom and success of what came before—it’s what we build on and learn from and it’s what shows us the direction we must go. Despite advances in technology, chemistry and biology, organic farming now is basically what organic farming once was; what sustainable practices are now, they already were. We couldn’t celebrate moving into the third century of a family farm otherwise. We salute both the year-old farm market and the 200-year-old farm. After all, they both epitomize this place called the Hudson Valley. —JN

THE VALLEY TABLE THE MAGAZINE OF HUDSON VALLEY FARMS, FOOD AND CUISINE THE VALLEY TABLE, INC. 380 MAIN STREET, SUITE 202 BEACON, NY 12508 (845) 765-2600 valleytable.com hudsonvalleyrestaurantweek.com NUMBER 78 JUNE – AUGUST 2017 PUBLISHER Janet Crawshaw janetc@valleytable.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jerry Novesky jerryn@valleytable.com Managing Director Jennifer Bannan jennifer@valleytable.com Content & Comunications Coordinator Kristen Warfield kristen@valleytable.com Office Administrator Meghan Merry Graphic Design & Production Greg Simpson / Ephemera Design Nicole Tagliaferro nicole@valleytable.com Website Coordinator Nate Diedrick Advertising Representative Maryellen Case / MCaseMedia Sales@valleytable.com

Contributors to this issue Timothy Buzinski Keith Stewart Eva Deitch Sabrina Sucato David Neilsen Marissa Sertich Velie John Roccanova Diana Waldron THE VALLEY TABLE is exclusively devoted to Hudson Valley agriculture, food and cuisine. We support sustainable agricultural practices and efforts to strengthen the links among regional producers, marketers, restaurateurs and consumers. We urge you to patronize businesses that feature Hudson Valley products and to support initiatives that benefit regional agriculture and related efforts. Letters to the editor regarding magazine content are welcome and will be published as space permits. Letters should be mailed to the address above, or emailed to editor@valleytable.com. To be considered for publication, letters must be signed. THE VALLEY TABLE is published four times a year (March, June, Sept and Dec). Distribution is free at selected sites throughout the Hudson Valley or by subscription. Subscriptions are $20 per year. To subscribe, mail a check or money order payable to The Valley Table, 380 Main St., Suite 202, Beacon, NY 12508 or visit valleytable.com.

Cover: Mushroom caps Photo by David Handschuh 8

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COPYRIGHT © 2017, THE VALLEY TABLE, INC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form, mechanical or electronic, without written permission of the publishers. Advertisements designed by The Valley Table are copyrighted and may not be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission. ISSN 1257-8417


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GOOD STUFF

H ARD CURRENCY

TREASURED CIDER For the past eight years, Fishkill Farms owner Josh Morgenthau has carefully (and quietly) made his own small-batch hard cider out of nothing more than passion. “Cider making, to me, has always been captivating,” Morgenthau says. “There’s an incredible amount of history and tradition wrapped up in it. When I made my first batch back in 2008, I realized I had something special.” In September 2016, Morgenthau moved headlong into the local craft beverage scene with Fishkill Farm’s first cider release, Treasury Cider. More than 30 varieties of apples from the farm’s orchard—including Ashmead’s Kernel, a rarely grown variety— are used to create four distinct flavors: a lightly sweet and sparkling semi-dry; a sparkling dry with floral and fruit aromas; a dry, nonsparkling heirloom blend (reminiscent of white wine); and an unfiltered, bottle-fermented dry. “The plan is to stick with those four and let each season’s harvests express themselves within,” Morgenthau says.

Cider production opens a new chapter for the farm, but it also pays homage to its 100-year history. Morgenthau’s grandfather, Henry Morgenthau, Jr., started the orchard in 1914. He later went on to a career of public service, most notably serving as Secretary of the Treasury for 11 out of the 12 years of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s presidency. “My grandfather, having such an impact on the family farm and in history, was who I was thinking about with this cider,” Morgenthau admits. “Naming it ‘Treasury’ was an homage to him, and also, in a non-financial sense, to the ‘treasury’ that is the orchard and the cider house’s storeroom that holds all the abundance of a year’s harvest.” Currently, apples are picked and pressed on the farm, then transported to Slyboro Cider House in Granville (Washington County) for fermentation and production, though there are plans to build an on-farm cidery. “We have an old stone foundation from a barn that is going to be a perfect place for it,” Morgenthau says.

Fishkill Farms 9 Fishkill Farm Rd, Hopewell Junction (845) 897-4377; fishkillfarms.com

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LETTERS

MORE WASTE NOT

STOVE SAGA, PART II

To the Editor: I read the article on not letting food go to waste [“Waste not,” Valley Table 77, March-May 2017]. Great idea. I relocated from the Hudson Valley to Raleigh, North Carolina, several years ago. (I do miss New York!) They have something here that started out of a woman's garage and van and is now a non-profit organization called the Interfaith Food Shuttle. Food is collected from restaurants and venues and delivered to shelters and soup kitchens. Wonderful organization. Gina Taffe Raleigh, North Carolina

To the Editor: It took some time but after reading “The Valley Table does a kitchen” (Valley Table 74, June-August, 2016), I was inspired to upgrade my own kitchen. After 20+ years of cooking on a stovetop with solid cast iron burners, I especially liked the description of the induction cooktop. I thought it would add a sleek elegance to our 1878 farmhouse kitchen as well as offer the benefits of faster, more efficient cooking. Did I understand exactly what I was purchasing when I bought the induction cooktop? It turns out, not really. When the power is turned on, a strong, high-frequency electromagnetic field is created. This sounded fine to me, even exciting. As soon as it was installed, I sat down to read the manual. All was well until I got to page 12 and read the following: For people who have a heart pacemaker: Please note that the area immediately surrounding the cooktop is electromagnetically charged. It is very unlikely to affect a pacemaker. However, if in any doubt, consult the manufacturer of the pacemaker or your doctor. I’ve had a pacemaker for three years and I got nervous. I knew about airport scanners; I knew about MRIs. But induction cooktops? The next day I called the manufacturer of my pacemaker. The technician was unequivocal: “No, we don’t advise it—better to be safe and stay clear of electromagnetic fields.” He then added, “If you really want an induction cooktop, you must stand 2, and preferably 3, feet away while cooking to guarantee that the magnetic field will not alter the pacemaker’s appropriate therapy.” Apparently, if the pacemaker senses magnetic interference from the cooktop, its rhythm could change and cause dizziness or other destabilizing effects. “Might your husband take over the cooking?” the technician asked, perhaps facetiously. “Unlikely,” I said, “he grows the food; I cook it.” The next morning we removed the cooktop and reinstalled our old one with its cast iron burners. Michael’s Appliance in Middletown graciously accepted the return and refunded the full purchase price. Maybe they learned something also. Flavia Bacarella Westtown

THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES To the Editor: This is a comment on your article about kitchen renovation [“The Valley Table does a kitchen,” Valley Table 74, June-August 2016]. I was stunned to see the photo of the [original] stove in your story. At this very moment I have the same stove in my kitchen. I just love it; it is the second one I've had, although this is a slightly different model. It is perfect for a tiny kitchen and I hate the thought of having to replace it one day. Back in 1962, we bought a home in Arlington, Virginia, which had a tiny kitchen. This model stove was perfect. This was before microwave ovens. My stove had two ovens: The top one had a rotisserie and the large, lower oven was self-cleaning. (The design was a big mistake because using the rotisserie made a greasy mess—it really should have been in the self-clean oven. I don't think a woman designed this model.) Fast-forward to 1980, when we bought our present home in Fort Montgomery. I have a 1950s home with a galley kitchen. Again, this GE model stove was perfect—and now it has a microwave (though I would have preferred a second oven). Current update: the microwave died and cannot be repaired because the stove is one unit. The small back burner suddenly caught fire one day and cannot be used. The oven is fine and all other burners work just fine. I bought a small microwave oven, one of my all-time bargains—floor model, no box and the last of a July 4th promotion—$10. Just wanted to share the story of my beloved stove after I saw your photo. I've never known anyone else who had this model. Nancy Patrick Fort Montgomery

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L E A DE RS HIP

2017 FARM-TO-TABLE AWARD TO HVADC

Citing Hudson Valley Agribusiness Development Corporation’s “leadership and vision strengthening local agriculture,” Janet Crawshaw and Jerry Novesky, publishers of The Valley Table, present The Valley Table’s 2017 Farm-to-Table Leadership Award to HVADC Executive Director Todd Erling. “It’s rare that the words ‘agriculture’ and ‘business’ are uttered in the same sentence,” Crawshaw noted, “but since 2007, HVADC has worked with more than 180 ag-related businesses. Its list of success stories reads like a Who’s Who of signature Hudson Valley businesses, including Hudson Valley Fresh, Fishkill Farms and Stone Barns Center for Agriculture.” The award was presented at an event marking the kickoff of The Valley Table’s Spring Hudson Valley Restaurant Week. The annual award was established in 2013 to recognize leadership in building and promoting regional farm-to-table connections. Previous recipients include Dr. Tim Ryan, President of the Culinary Institute of America; Sam Simon of Hudson Valley Fresh; John Novi, chef/ owner of the Depuy Canal House; and Peter Kelly, chef/owner of Xaviars Restaurant Group.

JELLY ROLL SORT IN’

THE HILLS HAVE JAMS Sometimes, you just need to go outside and pick some fruit. That’s what pulled writer Brigid Dorsey to her backyard crabapple trees a few years back, and soon enough, small jars of radiant, garnet-colored jelly filled the kitchen of her rural Columbia County home. Fifty pounds of hand-picked crabapples later, Dorsey’s first flavor of les collines preserves was born. Now, four years since the brand premiered, Dorsey offers 16 varieties (and counting) of homemade, small-batch preserves. From the popular Meyer lemon rosemary jelly to the savory heirloom tomato butter, les collines flavor profiles break the breakfast-only stereotype. “Jelly is extremely versatile,” Dorsey notes. “One of my goals is to show people how fun it can be.” French for “the hills” and named after her late mother Coline, the brand name pays homage to multiple other aspects of Dorsey’s life. “Living where I do is incredibly special—I love taking in the misty fog in the morning light and enjoying the seasons,” Dorsey says. “les collines is very much of the place that it was made, and of what inspires me: the land, local ingredients and the farmers.” les collines jelly and preserves are available at many mid- and upperHudson Valley markets and online. Eight-ounce jars retail for $12 each, while 13-ounce range from $17 to $20. les collines Craryville (609) 915-1453; thelifeipicked.com

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P EONIES FROM HE AV E N

DRINK THIS FLOWER Former New York City attorney Leslie Farhangi was captivated by the opulent rows of peonies blooming each June on her 200-acre farm in Millerton. She dreamed about something she could craft from the pastel-colored flowers and, eventually, teamed with local master herbalist Terri Lundquist to create Three Meadows Spirits last year. Peony Vodka, its first and only product, already has won high marks from critics and wide praise in the press. Infused with tincture of peony root (harvested on the farm) along with geranium, jasmine, white pepper, gardenia, green tea and vanilla and distilled five times with American wheat, the lightly aromatic, 70 proof vodka displays a hint of the flower’s sweetness. “It isn’t intensely flavorful, which makes it extremely versatile,” Farhangi notes. “The subtle undertones are great in cocktails or on the rocks.” Peony Vodka is available at many wine and spirits outlets in Dutchess, Columbia and Ulster Counties and online (about $30/750ml). A proponent of land preservation, Farhangi notes that a portion of sales will benefit local conservation projects.

G LAZ ED AN D IN FU SED

WHAT A RUSH Warm, glazed and piled high with decadent toppings, Glazed Over Donuts, the latest addition to Beacon’s burgeoning food scene, is bringing a whole new meaning to the phrase “sugar rush." But Lisa Tompkins, who co-owns the shop with her husband, Ron, says the response to the venture surprised her. “We came in thinking, ‘We’ll start up a quiet little donut shop and maybe people will come by.’ On our first day open, lines were out the door.” “Customizable” may be the key word that distinguishes Glazed Over’s donuts from others. Customers place orders on a clipboard (with a choice of 8 house-made glazes, 13 toppings and 9 drizzles), then watch through a glass panel as their donuts are prepared—from frying to frosting. Perhaps not surprisingly, the interactive experience is a hit with kids. “We’re thinking about adding a step up in front of the counter so the little ones can see in,” Lisa says. “They get so excited about it.” While the combinations are nearly endless (you do the math), the reigning pick is maple glaze with bacon and maple syrup drizzle. If that doesn’t satisfy your sugar craving, watch for donut ice cream sandwiches this summer. Glazed Over Donuts 315 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-0505

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Three Meadows Spirits 139 Coleman Station Rd, Millerton (845) 702-3903; peonyvodka.com


NEW PART NERSHIP

SCOTS BUY IN

TR EN D IN G D ESSERT

NUTS ABOUT ICE CREAM Ten years ago, if you went looking for organic vegan ice cream at a grocery store, the number of options you’d have found would have been few and far between. In a restaurant? Forget it. But the market changed and consumers now are hungry for dairy-free items (call it a food trend). Not surprisingly, one Hudson Valley brand forecasted the demand early on. Appropriately named Cashewtopia, the raw vegan, certified organic cashew creme gelato was created in 2008 by Lisa Protter and Steve Treccase, founders of natural vegan food company Organic Nectars. Handmade in small batches using the company’s own line of raw agave syrup and coconut sugar, Protter and Treccase developed the cashewbutter frozen dessert in their weekend home, then moved production to a 5,000-square-foot facility near Saugerties to meet the demand. The company’s products, which include raw cacao, vegan coconut sugar chocolate, goji berries and more, are now marketed nationwide. “We had a feeling that organic vegan food was going to be quite a revolutionary thing when the new century turned around,” Protter says. “In the last five years, the audience for it has exploded. The food world has changed so much—even people who aren’t vegan, diabetic or gluten-free are still choosing to eat some of their diet that way.” Coming in at a light 150 to 180 calories per serving, the naturally sweetened treat is available in six flavors: vanilla bean, chocolate, mint chocolate swirl, pistachio, strawberry and chocolate hazelnut. The awardwinning dessert is widely available at local grocers, including Sunflower Natural Food Market (Woodstock); Hannaford’s (Kingston, Red Hook, Wappingers Falls and Highland); Adams Fairacre Farms (Kingston and Wappingers Falls); and at restaurants like Garden Café (Woodstock). Prices for the gelato are about $3.99 for 4-ounce cups and $7.99 for a pint.

The Scottish distilling firm William Grant & Sons has purchased Tuthilltown Spirits in Gardiner, marking the company’s first move into the American whiskey distilling sector. Citing the “authenticity” and quality of the distillery’s spirits as well as the “possibilities within the American whiskey category,” the company purchased the entire 36-acre Tuthilltown Spirits property, including the historic grist mill, distillery, visitor center and the on-site, farm-to-table restaurant, Tuthill House at the Mill. William Grant & Sons (which owns well-known scotch whiskey brands Glenfiddich, Balvenie and Drambuie) has owned Tuthilltown’s signature Hudson Whiskey brand since 2010. Company officials say Ralph Erenzo, who founded Tuthilltown Spirits alongside Brian Lee in 2006, will still be “very much involved in the business on a day-to-day basis” to collaborate and experiment with the firm’s distilling experts. “William Grant & Sons is a company that holds true family values and is home to a number of spirits brands we respect and admire,” Erenzo said in a press release. “We’ve been working with [them] for a number of years and look forward to building on that relationship to help Tuthilltown fully achieve its potential.” Tuthilltown Spirits 14 Grist Mill Ln, Gardiner (845) 255-1527; tuthilltown.com

Organic Nectars Malden-on-Hudson (845) 246-0506; organicnectars.com

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EVENT S

CR AFTED CU LTU R ES

IT’S ALL GREEK TO ME The ever-so-petite sweet Greek yogurt jars from Argyle Cheese Farmer are redefining grocery store Greek. Hand-crafted at the Randles’ family dairy farm that dates back to the 1860s, the New York State Fair award-winning whole-milk yogurt is what a small-batch, creamy and traditional Greek yogurt should be. “Commercial Greek yogurts typically can’t be made with whole, unhomogenized milk—it clogs up the machinery,” yogurt maker Marge Randles notes. “Ours is made by hand, just as the Greeks intended.” Offered in a variety of flavors (including strawberry rhubarb, blueberry, maple, raspberry, honey and chocolate mousse), Argyle Cheese Farmer yogurts are packaged in recyclable 4.35-ounce glass jars that Randles discovered at a farmers’ market eight years ago. After finally tracking them down at a French glass company, the jars have become an undeniably cute signature. “The glass packaging is something that sets us apart, and when people see and taste it for the first time, they remember it,” Randles says. While the sweet Greek yogurt is a staple at upper Hudson Valley farmers’ markets and at Whole Foods (Albany), it and the company’s cheeses, regular yogurts and cheese spreads are making their way down to the mid-Hudson Valley (most recently to Adams Fairacre Farms, in Kingston). Argyle Cheese Farmer products can also be ordered online (where the yogurt retails for $2.50 each). Argyle Cheese Farmer 990 Coach Hill Rd, Argyle (518) 638-8966; cheesefarmer.com

WASTE N OT

FARM TO FOOD BANK A new tax credit program for farmers who donate excess crops to food banks has been included in the 2017-18 state budget, approved on April 9. Unanimously passed by the Legislature but vetoed by Governor Andrew Cuomo twice previously, the “Farm to Food Bank” legislation allows farmers to receive an annual 25 percent tax credit—$5,000 maximum—to help offset the costs of harvesting, processing and transporting food to soup kitchens, food pantries or other emergency food distributors. Environmental and anti-hunger advocates note the credit is a cost-effective way of reducing food waste and increasing food options for emergency food systems. Christopher Kelder, owner of Kelder’s Farm in Kerhonkson (Ulster County) and district 10 Director of the New York Farm Bureau, was one of many local advocates for the program. “Farmers have long demonstrated their generosity by collaborating with regional food banks,” Kelder notes. “This will support even greater donations and help the New Yorkers who can least afford local food to feed their families a nutritious meal.”

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BOUNTY OF THE HUDSON ULSTER COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS June 10-11, 12-5pm Explore the finest wines of the Shawangunk Wine Trail and the greater Hudson Valley alongside local farm-totable fare. $30 one-day tasting ticket in advance, including complimentary wine tasting glass. $10 designated driver ticket in advance. bountyofthehudson.com BEER, BOURBON & BACON BARTON ORCHARDS, POUGHQUAG July 15, 2-6pm Hudson Valley breweries, distilleries and vendors serve up creative creations and combinations of beer, bourbon and bacon. $55 general admission, $100 pre-sale VIP experience. Tickets online only. beerbourbonbacon.com SUMMER SOLSTICE CELEBRATION STORM KING ART CENTER June 17, 5-9:30pm Spend the evening at this world-class 500-acre sculpture park during their premier Hudson Valley event. Featuring cocktail reception, gourmet farmto-table-dinner and private tours of grounds and current exhibitions. stormking.org BAD SEED SAUSAGE & CIDER FEST BAD SEED CIDERY, HIGHLAND July 2, 1-5pm Over 15 styles of small-batch hard cider paired with Hudson Valley Sausage Company sausages and Cake Artist Café’s bite-sized desserts. Live music and evening fireworks. Tickets range from $5 to $25. badseedhardcider.com DECLARATION OF INTERDEPENDENCE HAWTHORNE VALLEY FARM July 11, 6pm A celebratory evening featuring dining and dancing at Hawthorne Valley, guest speakers, live entertainment, farm to table cuisine and a silent auction. hawthornevalleyfarm.org WINE AND BEER FESTIVAL BROTHERHOOD WINERY July 8, 1-5pm The oldest winery in America brings their famous collection of wines and a vast number of fine craft brews from Hudson Valley breweries together for the day, paired with fare from Loughran’s Irish Pub. Ticket sales end July 7. $60 per person. brotherhood-winery.com


HUDSON VALLEY HOT-AIR BALLOON FESTIVAL BARTON ORCHARDS, POUGHQUAG July 7-9 A record 25 hot air balloons take to the skies for visitors to enjoy from the air or from the ground. $200 limited number hot air balloon rides. $17.95 weekend passes in advance. $10 Friday and Saturday afternoons. $5 Sunday afternoon. Mornings free. dcrcoc.org/balloonfestival

BIT T ERSWEET BUSINESS

TWO TASTES, ONE SHOW

BLUEBERRY FESTIVAL OLD AUSTERLITZ July 30, 9am-4pm Fill up on one of summer’s tastiest treats. Local vendors whip up a variety of blueberry creations, accompanied by 19th century craft demonstrations and wares, antiques, live music and family-friendly entertainment. $7 adults, children under 12 free. Blueberry pancake breakfast: $8 adults, $4 children under 12. oldausterlitz.com CASH, COUNTRY & WHISKEY WEEKEND WARWICK VALLEY WINERY Aug 5-6, 12-5pm Over 20 New York distilleries arrive to pour their finest whiskey, cocktails and spirits in conjunction with the winery’s ‘Cash and Country’ music festival. $15 general admission. Additional $15 for whiskey tent sampler. wvwinery.com PUTNAM COUNTY WINE & FOOD FEST WESTVIEW GOLF DRIVING RANGE August 12-13 A summer weekend showcasing New York wine, spirits and food, paired with two full days of activities and live music, plus arts and crafts, art exhibits and family-friendly entertainment. $12 general admission in advance, $17 at gate. $27 tasting ticket in advance, $35 at gate. Free admission under 16. putnamcountywinefest.com PROSPECT HILL ORCHARDS FARM DINNER 73 CLARKS LANE, MILTON Aug 26, 4pm Enjoy locally sourced cocktails and a farm fresh dinner in celebration of the family farm's 200th anniversary. Tickets: $100, or $90 if purchased before Aug 15. prospecthillorchards.com

As the first two tastes that humans perceive after birth, sweet and salty have an immeasurable impact on the development of our senses—and our culture. A new exhibit at The Culinary Institute of America explores the topic in depth, showcasing intersects of the salt and sweetener industries through individual research, artifacts and vintage memorabilia. The exhibit, “Sweet & Salty: Tastes of Cultural History,” explores various aspects of these flavor industries, including their roles in medicine, religion and economics. Also highlighted are some relatively unpublicized historic facts and events. For example, “Abolitionists considered sugar cane a tainted product because it was primarily sourced through slave labor in the Caribbean,” says Dr. Beth Forrest, professor of liberal arts, whose Food History class curated the exhibit. “They boycotted it and turned to maple syrup and maple sugar as alternatives.” The exhibit also explores the science of taste. Kelsey Malara, a food studies major from Hopewell Junction, explains that “taste” actually is instinctive. “We’re naturally drawn to sweet things, like fruit, because our body senses that it is healthy and nutrient rich,” Malara notes. “We perceive bitter things, however, as harmful or poisonous—like a natural defense mechanism.” “Sweet & Salty: Tastes of Cultural History” is located in the Donald & Barbara Tober Exhibit Room at the CIA’s Conrad N. Hilton Library. The exhibit is open Monday through Thursday, 8:30am–8:30pm, Friday 8:30am–7pm and Saturday 11am–5pm through July 19. The Culinary Institute of America 1946 Campus Dr, Hyde Park (845) 452-9600; ciachef.edu

Good Stuff by Kristen Warfield

Visit ValleyTable.com for updates

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CANTERBURY BROOK INN ZAGAT RATED “EXTRAORDINARY”

Authentic Swiss Authentic SwissCuisine Cusine $19.95 3-Course Dinner Tues–Thur Seasonal Fare Seasonal Fare 331 Main Street, Cornwall NY (845) 534-9658 www.canterburybrookinn.com HANS AND KIM BAUMANN, HOSTS RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED

The Finest Southwestern Cuisine

Paired with the Region’s Premier Selection of Tequila

www.baja328.com

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328 Main Street, Beacon, NY 845.838.BAJA


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H OTE L | RE STAU RA N T | E VE N TS

Whole-farm cuisine by Michelin starred Chef Terrance Brennan. Cocktails featuring local breweries, distilleries, cideries and wineries.

EAT • DRINK • STAY 20 South Front St • Hudson NY 12534 R E S E R VAT I O N S 5 1 8 . 8 2 8 .1 6 3 5 2 EAST M AI N STREET, BEACON NY 8 45 76 5 8 3 69 | ROU NDH OU SEBEACON.COM

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OPENINGS

The Amsterdam

6380 Mill St, Rhinebeck (845) 516-5033 lovetheamsterdam.com

Housed in a restored 1798 Dutch colonial home in Rhinebeck’s historic village center, The Amsterdam brings a touch of north Holland to the Hudson Valley just in time for warmweather dining. Opened in April by Rhinebeck couple Howard and Chris Jacobs, the restaurant blends town and country vibes through its blue-shuttered exterior, covered porch and collection of antique biergarten tables nestled along the patio outside. Overlooked by blossoming magnolia trees, the landscape is made for summer relaxation and mingling (plans for a bocci court, fire pit and outdoor kitchen are in the works). Two levels of seating span the interior, including a barroom lounge, dining room, upper level lounges and private dining spaces, all featuring antique tables and barn lights. “I’ve been passionately connected to the world of hospitality for a long time, and I liken that to amazing moments spent in tiny cafes and magical restaurants,” says Jacobs, a New York City senior marketing executive-turned-restaurateur who relocated to Rhinebeck last year. “Everything here is rooted in my collection of culinary experiences—really setting us up for moments of delight for our guests.” Jacobs is joined by the CIA-trained duo of General Manager Jeff Turok and Executive Chef Sara Lukasiewicz. The menu, which Lukasiewicz infuses with local ingredients, features re-imagined New American classics like pork terrine with spring onions, mushrooms and dill and house-smoked salmon with crispy hash browns and chive crème fraîche. Another highlight is the charcuterie board, which incorporates in-house butchered pork. “I’ve made great connections with farmers and producers throughout the valley and I’m making that a tradition here as well,” says nose-to-tail advocate Lukasiewicz, a James Beard Rising Chef semifinalist and former chef at Red Devon, in Bangall. Current menu offerings only include dinner, but Jacobs says breakfast, lunch, brunch and late night menus are all being developed. At the bar, in addition to an extensive local cocktail and wine program, New York state beer dominates—from Brooklyn hotshots to elite Hudson Valley brewers. “The Amsterdam is a restaurant for and of the community,” Jacobs stresses. “In many respects, it’s a love letter to the village of Rhinebeck.” Sun-Thu 5:30-10pm; Fri, Sat 5:30-10:30pm —KW

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Boutique Wines & Spirits Hudson Valley Towne Center, Fishkill (845) 765-1555 boutiquewsc.com

The Millerton Inn 53 Main St, Millerton (518) 592-1900 Peter Stefanopoulos, owner of Yianni’s in Chatham, the Boat House in Connecticut and co-owner of Four Brothers Pizza, has unveiled his latest dining venture—this time featuring an 11-room inn upstairs. Housed in a 150-year-old Victorian building with striking Morris & Co antiquestyle wallpaper and elegant furnishings, The Millerton Inn serves up New American and Mediterranean fare with a modern (and local) twist. Farm-to-table dishes, like local braised rabbit pappardelle, have become favorites, alongside the lineup of local meat and fish options. The Stefanopoulos family, originally from Greece, also owns an olive tree estate that they import olive oil from for the restaurant. Additionally, all of the yogurt, feta cheese and goat cheese are handmade at the family’s farm in Millerton and are predominately featured on the Sunday brunch menu. Previously the Simmons’ Way Village Inn, “The building itself inspired the creation of the restaurant,” says Director of Operations Eleni Stefanopoulos, the owner’s daughter. “People walk in and see how different it looks and just savor it for a little while.” Mon-Thu, Sun 11am-9pm; Fri, Sat 11am-10pm

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“Ciders are so much like wine,” says Paige Flori, owner of Boutique Wines & Spirits in Fishkill. Flori, who has a background in retail and Italian wine distribution, offers a curated assortment of craft hard ciders, spirits and wines at her new shop. The store has already made a name for itself thanks to its 13-foot long hard cider bar with 9 varieties on tap, from Zombie Killer (a tart cherry honey mead cider from Michigan) to Awestruck Ginger Hibiscus (the rosé-hued blend from Delaware County). Boutique’s pièce de résistance is the 15-foot tall, handcrafted tree with a built-in tap that spouts one of the store’s unique cider selections. Flori decorates the tree, currently in full bloom, to reflect the valley’s changing seasons. “We like to represent local, particularly in the cider space,” Flori notes. In addition to sourcing local ciders, she also thinks local when it comes to wines and spirits. Wine lovers will recognize mainstays like Brotherhood and Whitecliff; spirits seekers can shop vodkas from Bethel’s Catskill Distilling Company and Beacon’s Dennings Point Distillery. Mon-Sat 10-7; Sun noon-6

Red House 30 Main St, Milton (845) 795-6285 redhouseny.com Robert Pollock, owner of Henry’s at the Farm, Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa and Frida’s Bakery & Café has added an Asian-fusion spot to his Village of Milton lineup. Blending Chinese, Japanese and Thai culinary influences, Red House offers a destination-style experience without ever leaving Main Street. The menu offers fusion classics like pineapple fried rice, pad thai and Szechuan steak, along with a fullfeatured sushi menu—from salmon maki rolls to white tuna sashimi. Sit at the bar and watch the cooks prepare the food, or grab a table for a meal served family style. Boasting a full bar with wines, sake, Japanese whiskey and Japanese beer on tap, the Far East feast continues with a variety of sweet desserts, like the green tea ice cream or coconut sticky rice with champagne mango. Lunch Tue-Sun, 11:30-3:30; Dinner Tue-Sun, 5-10


UP CLOSE

hudson valley seafood company by kristen warfield photos by eva deitch

I

n the throes of pollution and overfishing issues

that have peaked over the past 50 years, today’s seafood industry has a less-than-stellar reputation. Hudson Valley Seafood Company, based in Central Valley, is working to change that— one sustainably-caught, hand-patted crab cake at a time. “We appreciate the ocean’s power,” says CEO Casey McCann, ”but we also recognize its fragility. It’s something we are all very passionate about here—and that’s why we’re strictly a sustainable fish market.” For 35 years, the company, formerly Vito Formica’s Wholesale Seafood, has been a leading force in dock-to-table connections for the area’s restaurants and markets through its hand-curated selection of seafood, chosen daily by company owner and president Tom Cuccaro. The brand expanded last year with a flagship retail store in the historic Central Valley Train Station building, and will return this summer to farmers’ markets across the valley for its second season on the road.

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With a wooden shingle exterior and eclectic nautical decor within, the market transports guests to a scene right out of an oceanside vacation on the Vineyard. A huge chalkboard behind the counter lists the daily specials and overlooks the shop’s rotating stock case, live lobster tank and in-house cutting station. Fresh wahoo, Atlantic salmon, ahi tuna, scallops, Icelandic cod, crab and more fill the case, and in the freezer are house-made chowders, bisques and clam stuffing. “People in the Hudson Valley ask questions about our seafood. That shows they care about where it comes from— and that’s a good sign for the future of our oceans,” notes McCann, a Wallkill native who got his start in the business at age 12, working part-time at Gadaleto’s Seafood & Restaurant in New Paltz. “If more people don’t start caring and continue eating unsustainable seafood, we won’t have any left in the wild in 20 to 30 years.” “Wild caught” doesn’t always mean “sustainably caught,” McCann explains. In large-scale fishery operations, netted pens are used to confine large groups of wild fish, often leaving them little space to swim, which can allow disease to spread quickly. The fish are given antibiotics and may even be treated with dyes to bring back their natural color, he adds. And this wholesale collection of a single species—as many the huge net will hold—may deplete its population in a given habitat too suddenly and drastically for it to recover. On the other hand, farm-raised seafood, which can be sustainable and lessen the harvest pressure on wild species, also can contribute to ocean pollution if farmers don’t take the right precautions. “Unsustainable fish farms dump waste from their pools right back into the ocean,” McCann stresses. “Sustainable farms will filter the used water so that it’s actually cleaner than the ocean it’s being returned to.

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You can taste the difference when seafood is raised right. It’s our job to know who to buy from.” Fishmongering (that is, selecting, purchasing and marketing seafood) is an Old World art. Using that knowledge, McCann sees an opportunity to change how the Hudson Valley eats. “We don’t just want to sell people fish—we want them to trust their fishmonger,” McCann says. “By having that trust, and by teaching them the benefits that eating sustainable seafood has on our health and our oceans, we can make a big impact.” Throughout the company, no one knows the ins-and-outs of seafood selection better than Cuccaro. Backed by 20 years of experience in the seafood business with fishmongering chops learned from his late mentor, Steve Gadaleto, Cuccaro treks at least four days a week to inspect and hand-select the company’s seafood stock from a variety of farms and purveyors. By midnight, he’s heading to the New Fulton Fish Market (the country’s largest wholesale market and the second-largest in the world next to Tokyo’s Tsukiji market). “When Tom is there, he’s looking at the eyes, the gills— literally inspecting every part of what’s out there—to ensure the freshest product,” McCann says. “That day’s selection is back by 5am, and it’s likely on a plate at a restaurant or being sold out of our case here at the store by the afternoon.” 4 In addition to products and catering options available from the retail store, Hudson Valley Seafood Company will be at several farmers’ markets this summer, including Arlington, Beacon, Goshen, Peekskill and Woodstock.

Hudson Valley Seafood Company 30 Valley Ave, Central Valley (845) 928-9678; hudsonvalleyseafood.com


MILL HOUSE BREWING

E S T.

COMPANY

2013

CELEBRATING HUDSON VALLEY FOOD, FARMS, AND BEER

Business Meetings & private Parties, Rehearsal Dinners Birthdays Bridal/Baby Showers Family Gatherings Business Luncheons

MillHouseBrewing.com

289 Mill Street, Poughkeepsie•845.485-BREW

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SEASONAL-LOCAL CRAFT FOODS ALWAYS...

AT VALLEY RESTAURANT

OPEN YEAR ROUND TO THE PUBLIC FOR DINNER, WEEKEND BRUNCH & SPECIAL GATHERINGS CALL OR EMAIL TODAY TO MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS

845.424.3604 x39 jamesb@thegarrison.com

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thegarrison.com 2015 US 9, Garrison NY


the

green

by kristen warfield photos by eva deitch

onion

H

i l l a ry l i n d s ay g r e w u p i n t h e h e a rt o f t h e

Hudson Valley’s black dirt region, where she learned a core philosophy about food at an early age: Where it comes from matters. At 14, she was a regular customer at family friend Guy Jones’ Blooming Hill Farm. By 18, she was alongside him as an employee, spending time out in the fields and simultaneously cultivating a locavore mindset. “I was doing a little bit of everything there,” she says. “I fell in love with it.” june

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Now 26, Lindsay is ringing in her second season of business at The Green Onion, a farm market and holistic community center she opened in the village of Chester last summer. With a lineup of educational workshops and events to complement the market’s array of local produce and products, the bustling agro-center has become a magnet for locals interested in food, sustainability and the arts. “I’ve had this long-standing dream of one day owning a homestead bed-and-breakfast on a farm where people can learn about agriculture, art and have good food,” Lindsay says. “The Green Onion was adapted from that.” A Tuxedo Park native, after high school Lindsey left the Hudson Valley for Connecticut College, where, in addition to international relations and dance, she studied anthropology, with a focus on food sustainability. She moved to New York City a week after graduating and found herself in “every food job imaginable,” from waitressing and wine sales to a cheesemonger gig, all while working at Blooming Hill Farm on the weekends. “I never had a day off back then,” Lindsay laughs. After two years of the grind, she decided to pursue graduate school at The University of Gastronomic Sciences in Piedmont, Italy. Located in the northern Alps, the university was founded by organizers of the Slow Food movement. The global, grassroots group aims to preserve local food cultures and traditions and promotes education among people about the food they eat, where it comes from and how food choices affect the world in general and communities in particular (see Valley Table issue 18). “When it came time for writing my thesis, I researched and wrote about agro-communities in the Hudson Valley,” Lindsay says. “I realized what I was doing was creating the whole idea for The Green Onion in the process.” After graduating, she came home and signed the lease for the building that same week. “I had already known about the space and the farm project that it would be a part of. It was perfect timing,” she says. In the height of summer, the farm market, formerly an onion-processing barn, bustles with life. Nestled between wooden bins of produce on the covered porch, the door (appropriately painted with murals of onions and other produce) welcomes visitors. Inside, a stage in one corner is set for the popular open-mic nights, while a full counter in another accepts orders at the in-house cafe. Specials are hand-sprawled across a giant reclaimed wood-and-tin chalkboard sign that overlooks a sea of tables and yellowand-grey upholstered chairs. The Green Onion market’s location, surrounded by 270 acres of rich, black dirt farmland, eases the task of helping people make farm-to-table connections. “A majority of the produce we have at the market is right from these fields,” Lindsay says. This season, fruit and vegetables from Rise & Root Farm, Dirty Boots Farm, Sun Sprout Farm and Beet of My Heart are featured at the market. The market and the farms are part of The Chester Agricultural Center, an organization that connects young farmers with land through a 30-year renewable lease arrangement.

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We’re creating a holistic approach to food in a place that connects farmers to consumers.

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The Center is transitioning the farmland to organic and sustainable farming practices. In addition to organic produce, the shop has a growing selection of artisanal and small-batch Hudson Valley products, including jams, maple syrup, coffee and tea, local meat, dairy, baked goods, spices and dried herbs. Brands like Hudson Valley Pantry, Crock & Jar and Lowland Farm contribute to the lineup. “After we opened, people were telling us that they stopped going to the grocery store,” Lindsay says. “It’s super exciting to bring all of these people together around food. Downtown Chester has

always been a very sleepy area—we like to think we’re bringing new life and energy.” This new energy is brought not just through the food sold at the market, but through its educational events. Farm dinners, documentary screenings, workshops and more move the agro-community’s mission forward into a shared experience of food, arts and learning. Out the back door, a patio spills out into the open farmland. The black dirt sets the perfect backdrop for warm weather mingling—and the various events held here, ranging from beekeeping or yoga workshops to comedy shows and live music. “We’re also starting to offer The Green Onion as a venue,” Lindsay adds. “A close friend is getting married here in the fall.” Seated at a table situated around onion crates of local products at the market, Lindsay muses, “For so many people, food is anonymous. We’re creating a holistic approach to food in a place that connects farmers to consumers, helps people see where their food comes from and [helping them] learn the importance of ‘knowing.’ That shows people that food is not a segmented factor of their life, but an integral thing that makes up where they live, who they know and how they eat.” 4 The Green Onion 8 Greycourt Ave, Chester (201) 788-6803; hvgreenonion.com

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SUMMER SOLSTICE

CELEBRATION Cocktails & Farm Dinner Saturday, June 17, 2017 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION & TO PURCHASE TICKETS VISIT

STORMKINGSUMMERSOLSTICE.ORG Mark di Suvero. Jeanne, 2014–2015. Steel and rubber tire, 40’ x 19’ 4” x 26’. Lent by the artist and Spacetime C.C., New York. Photos by Benjamin Lozovsky/BFA.com ©Mark di Suvero, courtesy of the artist and Spacetime C.C.

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by david neilsen

A

s i t s na m e i m p l i e s , h u d s o n va l l e y s e e d , a Beacon-based non-profit, works with seeds. Its most fertile plantings are not in the ground, however, but in the minds of young children. The organization works with elementary schools to engage kids about healthy food choices through a carefully designed curriculum that includes food education, outdoor play and gardening. Working primarily in the communities and schools of Beacon, Garrison and Newburgh, program educators from Hudson Valley Seed visit schools weekly throughout the school year, and during warmer months they bring students outside to the school garden to get their hands dirty.

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photos provided by hudson valley seed


“The kids in areas that we’re serving [can] face a lot of challenges in their schools and in their communities,” says Development Manager Air Nonken. “They range from not having information about nutritious food to not having access to the food itself. So, we’re helping them learn how to eat healthy and also helping them gain access to the food, both through our gardens and by working with food service managers in the school districts to help encourage the schools themselves to purchase and serve more local, fresh vegetables as part of their cafeteria lunches.” Health and nutrition are Hudson Valley Seed’s primary goals. “Kids in our programs are more likely to try, eat and enjoy vegetables than kids who aren’t in our programs, because they’ve been growing these vegetables in the garden and learning about them,” Nonken says. “They’re happy to eat them. We’re helping them make better food choices throughout their lives.”

Although Hudson Valley Seed was officially founded in 2012, Executive Director Ava Bynum had been offering the program in a school in Peekskill for many years prior. Bynum started the effort shortly after graduating from high school. She’d been working as an organic farmer throughout her teen years, and had also worked as an educator in an elementary school. With this wealth of hands-on experience, she put the two pieces together and began working with the kids in the school, working gardening time into the tight schedule of the classroom day. When the Hudson Valley Seed team enters a school for the first time, they immediately begin to cultivate and manage the school’s garden; if the school doesn’t have one, the group builds one for them. An important precept of the program is that kids get a full, hands-on experience of creating and maintaining a garden, including planting, watering, weeding and harvesting the crops. “Our

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program offers an opportunity to be outside, to learn in a different environment,” says Program Coordinator Omari Washington. “We’re really about child-centered learning.” And the people who work for Hudson Valley Seed are true educators. “We integrate our garden education and our nutritional education with the Common Core Curriculum,” Nonken stresses. “This allows us to do this as part of the school day, rather than as an after-school, club-type program. We’re not taking away from their classroom time—we’re really incorporating and boosting what it is they’re doing in a more traditional class.” Rather than a single, 40-minute block of time in which study and practice are isolated, the program creates a context for the experience in all subjects that can enrich the entire class day. “It’s a lot more exciting to be graphing something that you’ve watched grow than to just be graphing lines from

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problems on a page,” Nonken explains. “It’s a different learning dynamic, a different way of giving them the opportunity to learn. We give them the chance to apply some of the skills in a real hands-on, real-world setting. It’s having a huge impact on kids’ attention and eagerness to learn, as well as how they perform in the classroom on the topics we’ve been covering with them.” The work of Hudson Valley Seed doesn’t end when the educators leave the building. The organization works with school districts to help them incorporate healthy choices into the cafeteria menu. “As a partner of the Farmto-School program, my role is to continue the students’ exposure to fresh vegetables with the Vegetable of the Month programming in the cafeterias,” says Beacon City School District Food Service Director Karen Pagano. “We try and offer some version of the ‘vegetable of the month’ several times throughout the menu cycle, culminating with


the vegetable tasting on the last Thursday of that month. Students vote on whether they ‘like’ or ‘dislike’ the tasting recipe, giving us a way of determining if the recipe should be repeated in the cafeteria in future menus.” It’s clear that Hudson Valley Seed’s garden-based educational program receives top marks everywhere it’s been implemented. Individual educators are treated like rock stars when they walk down the halls of the elementary schools, high-fiving the students as they go. They bring something special to the students—an enjoyable introduction to healthy eating habits that the students will carry with them all their lives. The success of the Hudson Valley Seed program has begun to attract attention in other communities. “There are a number of more urban communities in the Hudson Valley that are asking for the program,” Washington notes. “Based on the schools that have contacted us, we have over 13,000 students on our waiting list. We’re looking to expand into some of the other communities, such as Kingston and Peekskill.” But for Hudson Valley Seed to expand beyond the current 3,122 students it works with during the school year, across seven different schools and three out-ofschool programs, it will need some help. “We’re in a really unusual position where we’ve got so much demand for our program,” Nonken says. “We’d like to be able to serve that demand. We would need to hire two new people at the start of the next school year if we want to reach the schools that we have lined up to join the program. But it’s entirely dependent on funding. If we can raise the money we need to hire those two educators, we’d be able to reach almost 2,000 more students.” In addition to funding, Hudson Valley Seed thrives on community volunteers to help coordinate the program, maintain the gardens and make the program lasting and sustainable in each community. Looking toward the future, Hudson Valley Seed is looking for ways to bring its message and educational model to the masses. “One thing that we’ve been talking about is how to serve so many more schools than we’ll ever be able to physically reach,” Nonken says. “How do we structure our curriculum and our teacher training? Our waiting list is going to just keep growing, so how do we make sure this program can reach everywhere?” 4 Hudson Valley Seed 380 Main St, Beacon (845) 419-3871; hudsonvalleyseed.org

The Hudson Halley Seed staff (left to right): Christine Gavin, Sam Adels, Nicole Porto, Air Nonken, Omari Washington and Ava Bynum.

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Gourmet Gourmet Bakery Bakery specializing specializing in local, seasonal and in local, seasonal and gluten gluten free. free. Soup, salad and savory specials Soup, salad and savory specials daily. daily. Gourmet Bakery specializing inGourmet local, seasonal and gluten free. Bakery specializing Gourmet Bakery specializing Soup, salad and savory specials daily. Bakery specializing inGourmet local, seasonal and gluten free. in local, seasonal and gluten free. Soup, saladseasonal and savory daily. in local, and specials gluten free. Soup, salad and savory specials daily. Soup, salad and savory specials daily. 38

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EATING BY THE SEASON

summer squash by marissa sertich velie

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T

h e wo r d s q ua s h c o m e s f r o m t h e

Narragansett Indian word meaning “a green thing eaten raw.” While some are indeed green skinned (and can be eaten raw), the broad category commonly labeled summer squash actually contains hundreds of varieties that come in dozens of different shapes and colors, from the ubiquitous green zucchini to the Black Beauty and the speckled, bulbous cousa. Whether a quaint, scalloped-edged pattypan or a comical crookneck, commercial summer squashes have two things in common—they are in season during the summer and they are harvested when they are immature and before the rind hardens, giving them a tender, edible exterior. Although most of us think of squash as a vegetable, it’s actually a fruit, more closely related to watermelon than to broccoli. Squash belongs to the genus cucurbita, native to the Andes and Mesoamerica, and they were long cultivated in the Americas before being brought to Europe during The Columbian Exchange of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. They are a good source of vitamins A and C; some of the vibrantly yellow varieties are particularly high in antioxidants, beta-carotene and lutein, which may help prevent the onset of cataracts. In the garden, summer squash is a prolific producer when given good sunlight and plenty of water. They can be planted in spring, but squash likes warm soil and is sensitive to frost, so seeds shouldn’t be sown too early. “Squash doesn’t like cold weather,” explains Gail Hepworth, co-owner of Hepworth Farms in Milton; she suggests home gardeners might have greater success growing summer squash by germinating the plants indoors before planting outside. “We start them in the greenhouse,” she explains, “then move them out into the field when the conditions are more suitable.” Hepworth grows more than 15 varieties of squash on the farm, each with a unique shape or color and flavor nuance, but she uses the familiar green zucchini as a baseline for comparison. “Just like with eggplant, it’s difficult to put into words because they’re all different, but they also have similarities,” she says. “The yellow zucchini has a softer

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edge and is very buttery, while the Magda is comparatively delicate and mildly nutty in flavor. The Zephyr is also unusually delicate, with a buttery, nutty flavor.” The spherical shape of varieties like Eight Ball and Lucky Eight can do double or triple duty at the dinner table—they can contribute seasonal flavor to a variety of dishes on the menu while being a part of a colorful seasonal centerpiece. Cut off the tops and scoop out the insides, and you’ve created a bowl to serve soup, or to roast with tasty stuffing. When it comes time to harvest squash, size matters. Many squash can grow to be arm’s length, though they tend to become bland, develop hard seeds and tough skin as they mature. To preserve that delicate, sweet flavor, smaller is better. But because summer squash is picked as an immature fruit, it can be quite delicate, easily damaged and scarred. “In a lot of ways, they are more delicate than eggs,” Hepworth says, suggesting they be handled using the “two-finger rule,” handling them as little as possible to preserve their shiny, naturally glistening skin. Additionally, summer squashes are highly perishable, with a shelf-life of only one to two weeks, and they are easily damaged when exposed to low temperatures. The recommended storage range is 41˚F to 50˚F. Luckily, there are lots of ways to use summer squash in the kitchen. They are versatile and their tender flesh and skin makes cooking quick and easy. Squashes can be incorporated into vegetarian casseroles and curries, added to a quick stir-fry, marinated and grilled, or grated raw as an addition into a fresh, seasonal salad—quick, dry cooking methods are best . Some varieties of squash also produce edible flowers. Blossoms are typically served fried—as a crunchy and salty starter or side—a sure crowd-pleaser, but the flowers can also be cut into a thin chiffonade to be served over pasta or risotto, or incorporated into soups. Ed Kowalski, chef/owner of Crave restaurant in Poughkeepsie, likes to serve pattypan squash and baby zucchini with fish on his summer menu. “We halve the squash, sear it on one side and then season with salt. We


pair it with a white, firm-flesh fish and finish the squash with a Spanish olive oil and fresh herbs.” Chef James Haurey at The Grange in Warwick grows several varieties of summer squash on the restaurant’s four-acre farm, including pattypan, zucchini and Lebanese squash. “You handle each variety a little differently. They have lots of similarities, but there are nuances,” Haurey says. He stresses the importance of “keeping it simple” when cooking summer squash. “It makes for a light appetizer, and the flavor really comes out from cooking and caramelizing it slightly,” he adds. “When you caramelize and add some color, it really bursts with flavor.” Chef Emma Rose Chudkowski, of A Tavola Trattoria in New Paltz, replaces zucchini for noodles in a fresh take on traditional carbonara. “Julienning zucchini is a fabulous way to incorporate squash into your favorite pasta dish,” she says. “Since the squash is so thinly sliced, you still get the same presentation—but it’s gluten free and has a nice healthy crunch.” 4

ZUCCHINI CARBONARA CHEF EMMA ROSE CHUDKOWSKI Ingredients 2 zucchini, julienned 1 tablespoon butter ¼ cup peas 2 egg yolks 1 whole egg 1/4 cup heavy cream ¼ cup grated parmesan cheese 1/8 cup Guanciale, diced serves one Method 1. Julienne zucchini, place on a towel and sprinkle with salt. Let sit for five minutes, then squeeze out as much water from zucchini as possible and set aside. 2. Whisk egg yolks, whole egg, heavy cream and parmesan cheese. Set aside. 3. In a sauté pan, add diced Guanciale and render. Then add butter, peas and zucchini. Keep flame low to medium heat. 4. Stir while slowly adding egg mixture, only adding enough to bind zucchini noodles. Cook 2-3 minutes until egg is fully cooked and mixture has thickened. Plate right away and enjoy. A Tavola Trattoria 46 Main St, New Paltz (845) 255-1426; atavolany.com

top photos : kristen warfield

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GRILLED PATTYPAN SQUASH AND HALOUMI WITH BASIL PURÉE CHEF JAMES HAUREY PATTYPAN SQUASH

Ingredients 1 pattypan squash, about a pound, cut into quarters 4 tablespoons fresh summer savory, chopped 2 tablespoons fresh garlic, chopped 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 4 slices Haloumi cheese, 1/4-inch thick appetizer, serves 4 Method 1. Combine squash, savory, garlic and olive oil in a mixing bowl and toss well. 2. Add sea salt and fresh black pepper to taste. BASIL PURÉE

Ingredients 2/3 cup extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons chopped garlic 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1/2 cup Parmigiano Reggiano (grated fine) 4 cups basil leaves (packed tight) 2 tablespoons sea salt (more as necessary) 1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper (more if necessary) Method 1. Place all ingredients except basil in a blender and purée until smooth, about a minute. Remove from blender into a bowl. 2. Add basil to purée—mix thoroughly to get the purée smooth.

When you caramelize and add some color on the grill, squash really bursts with flavor.

ASSEMBLY

Preheat the grill 1. Spread the basil purée onto four plates. 2. Grill the squash to get good color on all sides. Arrange squash evenly on top of the basil purée on the plates. 3. Heat the cheese on the grill. It will hold its form while being heated, but don’t ignore it. When heated, place the cheese on the plates next to the squash and serve.

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The Grange | 1 Ryerson Rd, Warwick (845) 986-1170; thegrangewarwick.wordpress.com

photos these pages : kristen warfield


SALMON WITH SPRING VEGETABLES AND BUTTERMILK-HERB EMULSION CHEF CRAIG CAPANO SALMON AND VEGETABLES

ZUCCHINI BREAD CROUTONS

HERB EMULSION

Ingredients Organic King Salmon filet 3 baby zucchini 3 yellow pattypan squash, cut in half lengthwise 4 each friseè (tender hearts only, greens removed) 1.5 pickled pearl onions serves one

Ingredients 3 cups shredded zucchini 11/2 cups all-purpose flour 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/8 cup caraway seed 1/8 cup poppy seed 1/2 cup canola oil 1/2 cup sugar 1 whole egg 1 egg yolk

Ingredients 11/2 cups cultured buttermilk 21/2 ounces reserved pearl onion pickling liquid 1 ounce ramp tops 1 ounce cilantro 1/2 ounce chervil 1/2 ounce tarragon 1/2 ounce cilantro 4 each cloves of confit garlic salt to taste

Method 1. In a sauté pan, heat canola oil until just under smoke point. Place the salmon in the pan skin-side-down and cook over medium high heat until skin is crisp. 2. Add a large tab of butter and baste, until salmon is just warm to the touch. 3. In a separate pan, toast the zucchini bread croutons in butter until warm and crisp on one side. Season with salt and set aside. 4. After croutons are removed, add a tablespoon of canola oil to the pan, place baby zucchini and pattypan squash cut-side-down and sear until golden brown. Season with salt. 5. In a small bowl, assemble two pickled pearl onions, one baby zucchini, frisée hearts and cured cucumbers. 6. Dress with reserved pickled pearl onion liquid. 7. Finish with 2 ounces of the reserved buttermilk-herb emulsion.

Method Preheat oven to 350˚F. 1. Toast poppy seeds and caraway seeds in oven until aromatic. 2. In a bowl, whisk together sugar, eggs and vegetable oil. 3. In a separate bowl, thoroughly mix together flour, baking powder, baking soda, kosher salt and toasted poppy and caraway seeds. 4. Combine the dry mixture with the oil/sugar mixture. 5. Fold shredded zucchini into the mixture. 6. Spray a loaf pan with nonstick spray and line with parchment paper. 7. Pour zucchini mixture into the loaf pan and bake at 350˚F until toothpick is inserted and removed cleanly (about 25 minutes). Remove from oven and let cool. Cube into croutons.

Method 1. In a blender, add all ingredients and blend on high speed until emulsified and smooth. 2. Season with salt and set aside in refrigerator. SALT-CURED CUCUMBER

Ingredients 1 European cucumber, seeds removed 3 tablespoons salt 11/2 tablespoons sugar Method 1. Wash and remove seeds of cucumber with a spoon. 2. Cut in half lengthwise and then slice ¼-inch thick on a bias. 3. In a bowl, mix together cucumbers, salt and sugar and let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes, mixing every 10 minutes. 4. Refrigerate and use within 24 hours.

Crave Restaurant and Lounge | 129 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-3501; craverestaurantandlounge.com

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nancy fuller’s farmhouse rules a valley table interview by janet crawshaw and jerry novesky

N

ANCY FULLER IS A RURAL COLUMBIA COUNTY FARM GIRL

who never strayed far from home. She was a farmer, then for 30 years a caterer. She is a self-described obsessive antique collector. Her grandmother (‘Grammy Carl’) taught her about life and how to cook. Gracious, hospitable, funny, sassy—it’s easy to see why television audiences enjoy watching her. Yet, this 68-yearold credits a life spent in rural Columbia County among farmers and townsfolk with shaping her ethic and values— things she is trying to pass on to her 13 grandchildren. An only child, married four times, mother of six, television personality—these events and circumstances brought their own challenges and rewards that she’s used to develop a philosophy spiked with humor and a sardonic wit.

Nancy Fuller: I was born 68 years ago and grew up on a farm. I think I was blessed to have that opportunity. It was such a different world than what we’re accustomed to today. You were exposed to so much—the reality of life, as opposed to the cocoon that we are today. My father was an only child and his mother was an only child, and I was an only child— that’s unusual for a farm family. Grammy Carl made the best chicken and the best cole slaw and the best gravy and the best cookies—she was probably the biggest influence in my life for cooking and values and nurturing. I loved those days when life was so simple, but I vowed not to be like my father, who refused to get out of the ‘50s. I relished having a big family. My kids ‘picked rock’ at five years old, and they had to weed the walk—we had this long stone walk, and the deal was weed the walk before you went swimming. Christmas, no one got a present until 46

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all the chores were done, all the cows fed, milked. Sunday mornings they were whisked off to Sunday school. That was a stressful day because who can find socks for six? But that whole Sunday school program—going to church, raising them in that environment—creates patience, faith, understanding. And that’s just what it’s all about. When all six children would get off the school bus and come in, and the children from the neighbor’s farm also would come in—there would be maybe 10 kids wanting dinner or wanting something to eat. When you put all those kids (or even just one child) around the table and ask them to look you in the eye and tell you how was their day, what was the best thing about their day, what was the worst thing about their day, what was the most surprising thing that happened to them today—once they’re able to talk to adults and look them in the eye and tell the truth, that creates conversation, that creates confidence. That’s why the dinner table is such a very important component of everyday life, especially for family. I try to teach my grandchildren kind of the basic values, create integrity, character—the epitome of what you are when you grow up on a farm—but it’s difficult because I’m not milking cows anymore, so they don’t have the opportunity to feed the calves, to be responsible for another living thing. Along with the food and the seasonal eating, that’s what I’m trying to do—getting basic, good character back and doing so around the table.

We’re going back to handcut meat, farm produce, locally grown, as much as we can. We’re moving in the right direction.

Fuller’s long tenure in the valley has given her an appreciation for those who live and work here, especially the farmers. I have a farm in Copake that my dad bought in 1947. That’s where I grew up and that’s what I’ve held on to. I have JUNE

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leased the farm for the last 30 years to Ted Berenger. He is the absolute, consummate farmer. He works 365 days a year, and when he takes a vacation it’s to go to the Chatham Fair to teach children about farming. He milks about 70 head, but he is my age and it’s not easy getting up and down under those cows with bad knees. So he’s selling off his herd. He’ll retire from farming but he’ll stay on the farm. He has a little ice cream shop and sells ice cream and yogurt—he’ll keep that and hopefully be successful. Barry Chase does a great job with his son Rory and his daughter Sarah at Chaseholm Farm in Pine Plains. Their cheese is amazing. There’s not many [farms] anymore—we get [milk] from so many places. But there’s so much that comes from that one little cow, so many derivatives of that product, if we can

College, got a 3.8 and said, ‘That’s good enough, bye-bye.’ I just didn’t like that regimen. I spent a few years worrying about what I was going to do when I got old. Having an interest in food and everything that it meant to me—from Grammy Carl, I guess—that’s where I ventured. We were big into the cattle industry as farmers. The first time we were selling cattle was when the industry was at its peak. We raised this one particular heifer and sold it to Japan for a lot of money. My friends—who were the premise and brains behind getting megapeople like John Lennon to buy herds of cattle and then getting big tax write offs for them— they were doing a big auction at Madison Square Garden. And they were serving tuna fish on Ritz crackers. I said, ‘Now boys, you cannot ask $50,000 for a vial of semen and give the people a Ritz cracker with tuna fish.’

You know what? For me, life is happiness and good energy and doing things—that’s what’s going to keep you alive.

have our own farms in our own counties, we can keep things local. That’s why I do what I do, and why I do television—to tout Chaseholm Farm, and Rory and Sarah and Rosie and Barry and Ronnie [Osofsky] and all the people that are contributing to quality in our Hudson Valley and bringing things to the table. Fuller’s experience with food, as with real estate and antique collecting, did not come via the traditional route. There was no culinary school or working up the ranks in restaurant kitchens. Her experience is linked with what she knows and does best—working with people, recognizing and capitalizing on opportunities. I’ve been in California and I’ve been in Boston and private school in Williamstown. I was not a student—didn’t like it. I said, ’Well, I’ll see if I can do it,’ and went to Santa Ana 48

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They laughed and they said, ‘What would you like to do about it, Nancy?’ and I said, ‘Well, I guess I’ll just cater your next auction.’ They had a Holstein auction coming up—you know, those black-and-white cows. I hired a staff and put them all in white shirts and black Tuxedo ties and vests, served hors d’oeuvres on sterling silver. And [the business] took off. I bought a motel and moved everything into that, then I leased the Columbia Golf and Country Club and moved out there. They wanted to get out from the constraints of running a restaurant; I needed a bigger kitchen. Knowing full well that I could cater parties there, I said, ‘Your place looks like an ice cream parlor—you’re going to have to paint it. I’ll bring in my antiques and oriental rugs and give the place a little class.’ And that’s what I did. I sent out fancy little cards and doubled their catering revenue. I did that for 30 years.


way we eat. John—raised on a farm with all those values that I spoke about earlier—he gets it, he understands that. It’s history repeating itself. I find that interesting and wonderful and amazing—we’re going back to hand-cut meat, farm produce, locally grown, as much as we can. We’re moving in the right direction. A role in a promo video for a local festival was Fuller’s introduction to the world of entertainment. Her confidence and ease with people made her a natural in front of the cameras and, as she likes to say, the rest is history. The kids—the videographers—were telling me ‘Oh you’re so natural, have you done television?’ I just looked at them and I said, ‘Honey, I’m 63 and fat—that’s as natural as it gets.’ So they did a demo. They took it to Food Network. They took it to ABC. They took it to CNN. Food Network picked it up. They were looking for personality. I went down for an interview and the young man said, ‘You know, we get a lot of videos through here but we don’t get many people who match the video. You match the video.’ They wanted [to call the show] Farmhouse in the Kitchen, or something like that, and I said, ‘That’s a little mundane—it’s Farmhouse Rules.’ They said no and I said, ‘I have a cookbook that my grandmother created, probably in the 1930s or ‘40s. Recipes were called rules. That’s where it came from.’ That’s how Farmhouse Rules was born.

Her husband, David Ginsberg, brought with him the large and well-respected food distribution service, Ginsberg’s Foods, and although she’s not directly involved in the dayto-day operations of the company, it dovetails nicely with the other aspects of her life. Sam Ginsberg opened a butcher shop in 1909 in Hudson that evolved into a grocery store that his son, Morton, took over. David and his brother Ira joined their father after college, and that became Ginsberg’s Foods. In 2006, Ira wanted to sell the business. At that time, we had around 225 employees—we were a big business in a small community. So I bought Ira out. And then I brought my son, John, back— he’s probably been there a dozen years. Ginsberg’s was like a well-greased wheel, so I didn’t make any changes. I like to put a deal together, create it, brainstorm it, tell you what to do and then go on. That worked out beautifully, because John stepped in and has been brilliant—he’s done a great job. I was always a big proponent of eating locally and eating seasonally, and I definitely brought a lot more attention to buying local product. But it’s not easy to create what I want to create for the schools and the nursing homes and facilities like that. So I’ve been going right to the manufactures for at least 10 years—asking them to come up with clean products, to get rid of the chemicals. We did it before manufacturing existed, so we certainly can do it now. Today, we’re bringing in many more local products because now everyone knows that we need to change the

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Basil watermelon bisque Ingredients 6 cups cubed watermelon grated zest and juice of 2 limes (reserve 2 tablespoons juice separately) 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 4 rings sliced pickled jalapeño (plus some brine from the jar) kosher salt freshly ground black pepper 1 cup diced peeled cucumber 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil serves 4 to 6 Method Bisque 1. In a blender, combine watermelon, lime zest, lime juice, 2 tablespoons olive oil, 3 pickled jalapeño rings and a splash of the jalapeño brine. Season with salt and pepper. 2. Blend until very smooth. Taste and adjust seasonings with a little more jalapeño brine if needed (use up to 2 tablespoons total to balance the flavors). 3. Transfer the soup to a large bowl, cover and refrigerate until completely chilled, about 3 hours. Relish When ready to serve the soup: 1. Finely chop the remaining jalapeño ring and place in a medium bowl. 2. Add cucumber, basil, remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil and remaining 2 teaspoons lime juice. Season with salt and pepper and another splash of jalapeno brine. Whisk together until smooth. To serve: Stir the chilled soup if it has separated, then ladle into bowls. Place a dollop of cucumber relish in the center. Nancy Fuller / Farmhouse Rules

Corn relish and red pepper salad Ingredients 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 2 cups corn cut from the cob (about 2 ears) 1 small red bell pepper, chopped 1 small zucchini, chopped 1 teaspoon ground cumin kosher salt 1 (15-ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained juice of 2 limes 1 ⁄2 cup corn relish or corn salsa 1 avocado, halved, seeded and diced 1 ⁄4 cup chopped fresh cilantro hot sauce serves 6 Method 1. Place 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. 2. When the oil is hot, add the corn, bell pepper, zucchini and cumin and season with salt to taste. Toss to distribute evenly and cook until the corn is just cooked, 3 to 4 minutes. 3. Remove skillet from heat and transfer the corn mixture to a large serving bowl. 4. Using the same skillet, combine the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil, black beans, lime juice and relish. Mix well, transfer into a bowl or container and allow to cool to room temperature. (Refrigerate if making ahead). 5. When ready to serve, combine the the corn and relish, add the avocado, cilantro and hot sauce to taste, toss well. Nancy Fuller / Farmhouse Rules

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PHOTOS THIS PAGE BY JAMIE PRESCOTT. RECIPES ADAPTED FROM FARMHOUSE RULES

©FOOD NETWORK.


I feel so strongly that we’re going in the right direction. My audience is so spread out—I know young kids five years old that watch me before they watch a cartoon. There’s something to be said for that. I think the most memorable show was the day I got in a biplane and flew over the Hudson River and brought a picnic to the Aerodrome in Rhinebeck. In another episode, David surprised me with a balloon ride. I just did a motorcycle show—I rode a Harley three-wheeler with a friend to raise money for hospice. The irony of me having a show on television is that I never watch television. It just doesn’t interest me. But Farmhouse Rules, which has aired since 2013, spawned a cookbook and landed Fuller a seat as a judge on one of Food Network’s top-rated amateur chef competitions—the Baking Championship series. In the expansive kitchen of her restored/reconstructed 1766 Georgian-style farmhouse, she was just finishing up a makeup and hair session in preparation for a flight to Los Angeles to tape the latest segment. I’ll go to LA and film the Holiday Baking Championship in June, then I’ll film spring in August. It’s very down-to-earth. We don’t see the people working, We are not told that we have to pick somebody or not pick somebody—we don’t see anything but what’s put in front of us. It is so legitimate and authentic. I think any time you’re natural it just shows. And it’s a big prize—$50,000. It changes somebody’s life. The recipes [in the book] are 100 percent tested. The easiest thing in the world is to buy a piece of fish and buy some fresh tarragon and a little butter—bake it, broil it, grill it, do whatever you want with it—then pour that butter on it and it’s done in two seconds. Everything’s better with butter! The corn chowder is excellent—it’s a good reminder for people to shuck [summer] corn and freeze it so they have it for the winter. I’ve been doing that for 45 years—every year I freeze enough for Thanksgiving and Christmas. It’s a tradition. Above all, Nancy Fuller is her own woman, and she approaches her life and her businesses as she does any situation—on her own terms, but with respect and a nod to those who came before. I think I leap before I really think. But not really. I’m not that frivolous that I don’t check things out a little bit. I’m blessed, I have a lot of energy. This week I just closed on a condo in Delray, Florida. The place came on the market at 8 in the morning and I went at 10 and at 10:30 I bought it. I thought when it’s so cold and my arthritis in my knees doesn’t like it— an investment, I bought it cheap. Poor David said, ‘Nancy, I guess I understand after all this time you’re just not going to settle down and sit in a rocking chair.’ It’s just not in my genes.

I’m definitely an old soul. I hang onto stuff. Grammy Carl’s cupboard. The lamps are old milk carriers, Mexican. The rack I’ve had forever—that was a shoe rack. My garlic masher is an old Mason tool. Just my stuff, my grandmother’s stuff, my great grandmother’s stuff—tools that have withstood the test of time. That, too, is what I’m about—having respect for those who came before us and gave us what we have and made us who we are today. I’m happy in my own skin. One of the fans of the show wrote in and said, ‘I would think after all these episodes on TV she could afford to get rid of her moles.’ People say, ‘Oh Nancy, you’re not gonna live very long because you’re so fat,’ ‘Oh Nancy, you need to take statins,’ and ‘Oh Nancy...’ You know what? For me, life is happiness and good energy and doing things—that’s what’s going to keep you alive. I beat myself every day for being this heavy because, you know, there’s no bathing suit that’s gonna look good! I skied for years, then I gained 100 pounds. I don’t ski anymore, but I cook and I swim, and pretty soon maybe I’ll walk. We’ll see. 4 Farmhouse Rules airs Sundays at 11:30AM on Food Network. JUNE

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farms, food & markets

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o c a l ly s o u r c e d m e at s , f r e s h Hudson Valley produce and handcrafted artisanal products are ready to be picked, packed and prepped for a sensational summer meal. Find a farmers’ market near you and enjoy the freshest in local summer fare.

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FARMERS’ MARKETS COLUMBIA COUNTY

DUTCHESS COUNTY

Chatham Real Food Market Co-op 15 Church St Open daily at 10am chathamrealfoodcoop.net

Amenia 4988 Rt 22 May-Oct, Fri 3pm-7pm ameniafarmersmarket.com

Copake Hillsdale 9140 Rt 22 May 27-Oct 28, Sat 9am-1pm copakehillsdalefarmersmarket.com

Arlington Vassar Alumnae Lawn, 123 Raymond Ave Jun 1-Oct 26, Thu 3pm-7pm arlingtonhasit.org/happenings/farmers-market/

Hudson Farmers’ Market 6th St & Columbia Apr 22-Nov 18, Sat 9am-1pm hudsonfarmersmarketny.com

Beacon Veteran’s Place, between post office and Towne Crier Apr 23-Nov 19, Sun 10am-3pm beaconfarmersmarket.org

Kinderhook Corner of Hudson & Broad St May 13-Oct 7, Sat 8:30am-12:30pm kinderhookfarmersmarket.com

Fishkill Main St Plaza, 1004 Main St May 25-Oct 26, Thu 9am-3pm vofishkill.us/calendar/2017-05

Lexington Lexington Municipal Building Pavilion May 20-Oct 21 Every other Sat, 10am-12pm New Lebanon Windswept Farm, 36 Old Rt 20 Jun-Oct, Sun 10am-2pm facebook.com/newlebanonfarmersmarket Philmont 116 Main St Sun 10am-2pm pbinc.org/revitalization

Hyde Park 4390 Rt 9, across from Hyde Park Town Hall Jun 3-Oct 28, Sat 9am-2pm hydeparkfarmersmarket.org Milan 20 Wilcox Cl milanfarmersmarket.com Millbrook 3263 Franklin Ave May 27-Oct 28, Sat 9am-1pm millbrooknyfarmersmarket.com

Upstreet Farmers’ Market Between Warren & Park Pl, Hudson Jun 7-Oct 25, Wed 4pm-7pm facebook.com/upstreetmarket

Millerton Millerton Methodist Church, 6 Dutchess Ave See website for details millertonfarmersmarket.org

Valatie 3211 Church St See website for details valatiefarmersmarket.com

Hudson Valley Farmers’ Market Greig Farm, 229 Pitcher Ln Year-round, Sat 10am-3pm greigfarm.com/Hudson-valley-farmers-market.html

Pawling Charles Colman Bld Jun 17-Sept 30, Sat 9am-1pm pawlingfarmersmarket.org Poughkeepsie Mid-Hudson Children’s Museum, 75 N Water St June 5-Oct, Mon 4-7:30pm mhcm.org/visit/poughkeepsie-waterfront-market Rhinebeck 61 E Market St May 7-Nov 26, Sun 10am-2pm rhinebeckfarmersmarket.com Taste NY Store & Farmers’ Market at Todd Hill 4640 Taconic State Pkw N, Poughkeepsie May 26-Oct 13, Fri 2pm-6pm ccedutchess.org/taste-ny-at-todd-hill

ORANGE COUNTY Cornwall Town Hall Lawn, 183 Main St See website for details cornwallny.gov/departments/farmers-market Florida Between 17A & 94 Jun 13-Oct 31, Tues 10am-4pm floridafarmersmarket.org Goshen Village Square, Main St & S Church St May 19-Oct 27, Fri 10am-5pm goshennychamber.com/ goshenfarmersmarket2015/ Middletown Cottage St at Railroad Ave Jun 3-Oct 28, Sat 8am-1pm middletownbid.org/index.php/events/farmer-smarket.html

PFM_HVT_2017.qxp_5 4/27/17 3:58 PM Page 1

Worth Getting Up For!

FARM STORE OPENS MAY 30 USDA Certified Organic vegetables, pastured meat and eggs, and selections from regional farms & food purveyors.

Grass-fed Beef & Lamb Pastured Pork Raised naturally on Warwick’s LOWLAND FARM

On-Farm Store: Open Saturdays 10 - 3 Enter at 32 Prices Switch Road (845) 461-3459 info@lowlandfarm.com Warwick, NY 10990

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Pawling Farmers Market

Tuesdays & Fridays: 2:00 pm - 6:00 pm Saturdays: 9:00 am - 1:00 pm SNAP accepted! glynwood.org/buy-our-products 845.265.3338

Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 17 - September 30 On the Pawling Green Charles Colman Blvd pawlingfarmersmarket.org


Monroe Commuter Lot at Millpond Parkway Jun 4-Nov 19, Sun 9am-2pm villageofmonroe.org/farmersmarket.html Newburgh—Healthy Orange Green Lot on Broadway (between Landers St & Johnston St) Jul 11-Oct 24, Tue 10am-2pm Newburgh Mall 1401 Rt 300, Parking Lot See website for details facebook.com/newburghmall Port Jervis Farmers’ Market Square, Corner of Pike & Hammond St Jul 1-Oct 14, Sat 9am-1pm hudsonvalleybounty.com/FarmersMarkets?product_id=477 Pine Bush Crawford Cultural Center, Corner of Main St & New St See website, Sat 9am-2pm pinebushfarmersmarket.com Tuxedo Tuxedo Train Station, 240 Rt 17 Jun 17-Nov 18, Sat 9am-2pm tuxedofarmersmarket.com Warwick Valley South Street Parking Lot, 1 block east of Main St at Bank St May 14-Nov 19, Sun 9am-2pm warwickvalleyfarmersmarket.org West Point Town of Highlands Municipal Parking Lot across from Visitor Center on West Point Highway Jun 18-Oct 29, Sun 9am-2pm facebook.com/West-Point-Town-of-HighlandsFarmers-Market-217461788363902/

ORGANIC & GRASS-FED BEEF IN BULK

info@kezialain.com • www.kezialain.com 845-683-1363 ADVANCE ORDERS ONLY

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PUTNAM COUNTY Cold Spring Garrison at Boscobel House and Gardens, 1601 Rt 9D May 6-Nov 25, Sat 8:30am-1:30pm csfarmmarket.org Family owned and organic since 1987

5409 Route 22, Millerton, NY 12546 • 518.789.4191

Farm Market & Bakery • Specialty Groceries Our Own Certified Organic Meats & Produce Daily Lunch Specials • Nursery Plant Starts Organic Soils & Compost Visit our website for hours, events & specials at: mcenroeorganicfarm.com

Rethinking tradition.

We are a fresh take on what it means to be a craft distillery in NY’s Hudson Valley. Our goal is to create and capture flavor, minding traditions of whiskey, brandy, gin, amaro and vermouth to foster innovative modern versions.

Hudson Valley Regional Farmers’ Market 15 Mount Ebo Rd, South Year-round, Sun 10am-2pm www.hudsonvalleyfarmersmarket.org Putnam Valley 729 Peekskill Hollow Rd Jun 30-Sept 1, Fri 3-6:30pm putnamvalleyresidents.com

ROCKLAND COUNTY Haverstraw 40 New Main St Jun 11-Oct 15, Sun 9am-1pm voh-ny.com/farmers.htm Nyack Main Street Parking Lot, Depew & South Broadway Apr 6-Nov 30, Thu 8am-2pm nyackchamber.org/category/farmers-market Piermont M&T Bank Parking Lot, corner of Ash St & Piermont Ave Apr 23-Nov 19, Sun 9:30am-3pm downtoearthmarkets.com Suffern Corner of Orange Ave and Wayne Ave Sat 8:30am-1pm suffernfarmersmarket.wordpress.com

SULLIVAN COUNTY

10 Ann Kaley Ln. Marlboro, NY 12542 Tastings & tours Fri-Sun 11a-5:30p 845-236-7620

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Barryville 3385 Rt 97, behind River Market May 20-Oct 28, Sat 10am-1pm barryvillefarmersmarket.com


Bethel Woods Harvest Festival Sept 3-Oct 1, Sun 11am-4pm bethelwoodscenter.org/performances-festivals/ festivals/festivals-overview Callicoon Callicoon Creek Park, A. Dorrer Dr May 1-Nov 5, Sun 11am-2pm sullivancountyfarmersmarkets.org Liberty Kansas and Leonard St May-Oct, Sat 7am-12pm, 8am-12pm (Oct) historicdowntownliberty.org/farmers-market

B I O D Y N A M I C = H E A LT H Y F A R M S , H E A LT H Y P E O P L E , H E A LT H Y P L A N E T

Monticello 211 E Broadway Year-round, Mon-Sat 7am-7pm, Sun 7am-6pm facebook.com/monticellofarmersmarket Rock Hill 223 Rock Hill Dr June 3-Sept 30, Sat 10am-1pm rockhillfarmersmarket.com Roscoe Old Rt 17 next to the firehouse May 14-Oct 8, Sun 10am-2pm scva.net/business/roscoe-farmers-market

FARM STORE 7: 3 0

am-7 pm

DA I LY | F R E S H | L O C A L | D E L I C I O U S | H V F S T O R E . O R G

Market at Todd Hill

ULSTER COUNTY Accord Saunderskill Farm Market Year-round, Tues-Sun, 7am-6pm saunderskill.com

Store Open Store Open Mon, Wed, Thu, Sat: 8 AM - 6 PM Fri: Mon, 8 AM - Wed, 8 PM | Sun: AMAM - 7 PM Thu:9 8 -6 Closed on Tuesday Fri: 8 AM - 8 PM

PM

Contact us at: 845-849-0247 tastenytoddhill.com

Ellenville Barthel’s Farm Market, 8057 Rt 209 Apr-Dec, Daily 8am-6pm facebook.com/barthels.farmmarket

Outdoor Sat,Farmers' Sun: 9Market AM - 7 PM Fridays, 2 pm - 6 pm Closed on Tuesday May 26 - Oct 14, 2017

Hurley Hudson Valley Farm Hub, 2324 Rt 209 Jun-Oct, Daily 9am-6pm hvfarmhub.org

An amazing collection of foods and products grown or made in the Hudson Valley. Located on the Taconic Parkway, 10 miles north of I-84, 1 mile south of Route 55, Lagrange, NY

Farm Market & Artisan Bazaar Sundays 9:30 - 3:00 • The OUTSIDE IN 249 Ferdon Avenue • Piermont A unique spin on traditional markets, featuring food and artisan vendors in a wooded gallery setting. Come shop & linger. The bazaar market includes food, fine art, artisan products and unusual plants in a wooded setting with sculpture, rock and moss gardens, a converted greenhouse and air conditioned gallery. Customers can come to eat brunch in a shady bamboo grove, stroll through the gallery’s interior and outdoor spaces enjoying the afternoon or pick up provisions to prepare meals at home. Organic, vegan & gluten-free choices. Proudly Sponsored by

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made from

100%

homegrown

Ales TASTING ROOM Open Daily 12 - 5 PM

Kingston Wall St, between Main St & John St May 13-Nov 18, Sat 9am-2pm kingstonfarmersmarket.org Milton Cluett Schantz Park, 1801-1805 Rt 9W Sat 9am-2pm hhvfarmersmarket.com Rosendale 408 Main St, behind Rosendale Theatre Jun 4-Oct 22, Sun 10am-2pm facebook.com/RosendaleFM Saugerties 115 Main St May 27-Oct 28, Sat 10am-2pm saugertiesfarmersmarket.com

3074 Rte 9, Valatie, NY 12184 (518) 758-1776 • harvestspirits.com

Woodstock 6 Maple Ln May 31-Oct 18, Wed 3:30pm-dusk woodstockfarmfestival.com

WESTCHESTER COUNTY

Celebrating 200 years of Family Farming

Farm to Table Dinner August 26, 2017

ly Farm Since 1817• •A Fami

Cocktails 4 pm•Dinner 6 pm Locally Sourced•Commemorative Displays $100pp, $90 if purchased before Aug. 15th

RSVP by August 15th: 845-795-2383 | 845-430-2417 info@prospecthillorchards.com|73 Clarks Lane, Milton NY

Bronxville Stone Place at Paxton Avenue May 13-Nov 18, Sat 8:30am-1pm bronxvillefarmersmarket.com Cortlandt 2267 Crompond Rd Apr 1-Dec 24, Daily, 7am-close (call 917-739-0686 for closing time) cortlandtfarmmarket.com Chappaqua Metro-North Station, Allen Pl Begins May 6, Sat 8:30am-1pm chappaquafarmersmarket.org Croton-on-Hudson Lot A behind 1 Croton Point Ave May 7-Nov 19, Sun 9am-2pm downtoearthmarkets.com Hartsdale Hartsdale Train Station, Corner of E Hartsdale Ave & Fenimore Rd Jun-Nov, Sat 8am-4pm greenburghny.com Harrison 1 Heineman Place May 20-Nov 18, Sat 8:30am-1pm downtoearthmarkets.com Hastings Hastings Library Parking Lot, 7 Maple Ave Jun 3-Nov 25, Sat 8:30am-1:30pm hastingsfarmersmarket.org

apples, pears, plums

Irvington 101 Main St Jun 4-Nov 19, Sun 9am-1:30pm irvmkt.org Katonah John Jay Homestead, 400 Jay St Jun 10-Oct 28, Sat 9am-1pm johnjayhomestead.org

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Katonah Muscoot Farm, 51 Rt 100 May 14-Nov 19, Sun 9:30am-2:30pm muscootfarm.org Larchmont Metro-North Upper Lot, Chatsworth Ave & Myrtle Ave Apr 22-Dec 16, Sat 8:30am-1pm downtoearthmarkets.com

130 Hardscrabble Rd. North Salem, NY 10560 (914) 485-1210 | hmorchard.com

New Rochelle Huguenot Park, in front of New Rochelle High School Jun 2-Nov 17, Fri 8:30am-2:30pm downtoearthmarkets.com

Farm Shop Seasonal Festivals Hard Cider Tastings Private Events U-Pick Apples Farm Shares

New Rochelle Downtown BID Grand Market 1 Library Plaza June 3-Oct 28, Sat 9am-2pm newrochellegrandmarket.com Ossining Corner of Spring St & Main St Apr 22-Dec 30, Sat 8:30am-1pm downtoearthmarkets.com

Lunch Menu Outdoor Seating Home Grown Veggies Farm Fresh Eggs Grass Fed Beef Pastured Pork

#DontBuyFoodFromStrangers Season Long Farmers’ Markets: Woodstock, Arlington, Goshen, Peekskill & Beacon

Peekskill Bank St between Park St & Main St Jun 3-Nov 19, Sat 8am-2pm peekskillfarmersmarket.com Pleasantville Memorial Plaza (next to the train station) Apri 1-Nov 18, Sat 8:30am-1pm pleasantvillefarmersmarket.org Pound Ridge 65 Westchester Ave Open year-round, see website facebook.com/PoundRidgeOrganics Rye Parking Lot on Theodore Fremd Ave May 21-Dec 3, Sun 8:30am-2pm downtoearthmarkets.com

Fresh Seafood Arriving Daily • Wholesale & Retail

South Salem 1202 Rt 35 facebook.com/GossettsFarmersMarket

hudsonvalleyseafood.com • 30 Valley Ave • Central Valley, NY • 845-928-9678

Tarrytown/Sleepy Hollow (The TaSH) Patriots Park on N Broadway See website, Sat 8:30am-2pm Tashfarmersmarket.org Tuckahoe West side of Depot Square Jun 4-Nov 26, Sun 10am-4pm tuckahoe.com White Plains Court St between Martine Ave & Main St Apr 26-Nov 22, Wed 8am-4pm cityofwhiteplains.com Yonkers Groundwork Hudson Valley, Van der Donck Park across from Yonkers Train Station Jun 2-Oct 27, Fri 12pm-5pm groundworkhv.org Yonkers St. John’s Parish, 1 Hudson St stjohnsfarmersmarket.blogspot.com

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O

n a l at e s p r i n g day at

KIDS

GROW

WITH c M ENROE by john roccanova and kristen warfield photos by john roccanova 60

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McEnroe Organic Farm in Millerton, students from Manhattan’s Columbia Secondary School stand huddled over rows of vibrant organic strawberry plants. “This is the BEST strawberry I’ve ever eaten!” exclaims the first student to take a bite, and echoes of agreement fill the crowd. Earlier, back in their urban classroom, the students learned the benefits of fresh and local food-now it comes to life as they pop justripened berries off the stem at the farm. Well known in the valley for its retail produce, meats, soil and compost, McEnroe Organic Farm is one of New York State’s oldest and most diverse NOFA-certified organic farms. As leaders in the local and sustainable food movement, owner Ray McEnroe and his son Erich have offered educational programs on- and off-farm since 2007. Whether catering to visitors from distant urban centers or from a neighboring rural school district, McEnroe offers a variety of farm tours, school programs and demos to teach students at all levels about organic gardening, farming and composting. McEnroe Farm Education Program Manager Annie Bossange leads the educational programs on the farm, and she also works with local students and teens to maintain the Webutuck School Garden and North East Community Center Garden, both in Amenia. Each winter, students gather with the education staff at a McEnroe greenhouse to start plants for the upcoming season, learning about the soil mixes produced at the farm, organic seeds and planting techniques. They return weekly to water the seedlings and transport sprouted plants into larger pots. Now in their eighth season, the gardens have grown to include 80 raised beds. Students from grades 4


We’re teaching garden-scale vegetable practices in the school garden, and farm-scale food production through tours and visits. through 12 work on the gardens during the school day, after school and during the summer to harvest produce for the school cafeteria and food pantries (and they can also bring some home). In addition to planting starts and caring for the plants through the season, students also learn about composting organic matter from the garden and the school’s cafeteria. “We have an amazing opportunity to expose Webutuck students to different parts of the food system,” Bossange adds. “We’re teaching garden-scale vegetable practices in the school garden, and farm-scale food production through tours and visits to McEnroe Farm.” For those not directly involved in the school gardening program, a farm tour covers a brief history of the farm as well as the basic principles and practices of organic farming. Groups visit greenhouses, livestock barns and the compost facility, then can opt for an educational workshop focused on seed starting, compost mixing, seed saving and seasonal pick-yourown, followed by a lunch made from produce and meats grown and raised on the farm. Groups also can walk through the self-guided “Discovery Garden,” where eight interpretive plaques along the walk explain the organic agricultural methods displayed, alongside pastures of piglets and chicken enclosures. Student or bus-tour visitor, farm tour or class project, McEnroe Organic Farm is one classroom where you never have to just sit still at your desk and raise your hand to ask a question. McEnroe Organic Farm 5409 NY-22, Millerton (518) 789-4191; mcenroeorganicfarm.com

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Whole sale fruit & Produce

Where quality rules, local comes first and taste matters

Mo NOW th O er PE Ea N I rth N K ’s IN Ca GS fé TO & N! De li

217 UPPER NORTH ROAD, HIGHLAND • 845.691.7428 • FAX 845.691.7468

Since

1978

Summer in the Hudson Valley just got SWEETER

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• Certified Organic Produce • Bulk Items • Body Care Products • Vitamins & Supplements • Homemade Desserts • Delicious Food


LOCALLY GROWN

A

DARK ROAD TO TAKE by keith stewart

H

av e yo u n o t i c e d ? i t ’ s g e t t i n g wa r m e r : 2016 was the hottest year on record for planet Earth—2015 was the next hottest, and 2014 the next. Three in a row! Where I come from, that’s called a “hat trick,” or it would be, were it viewed as a good thing. For most of us, it’s not easy to register incremental increases in temperature. You wake up in the morning, the sun is shining, maybe the high for the day turns out to be one degree above the average. So what? You still have to get the kids to school, get to work, pay the mortgage, sift through a flood of emails, Twitter messages and cell phone texts. There are still the challenges of everyday life to deal with, and the

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Being good stewards of this planet that so generously sustains us is the single most important thing we humans can do; to disregard its health is to disregard our own health and the health of so much other life.

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weather, unless it creates hazardous driving conditions, is usually the least of them. I wonder, are we like the frog in the pot of water that gets slowly hotter and hotter until the water is boiling and it’s too late to jump out? If you were living in Sydney, Australia, in January and February of this year (mid-summer for them) you might have been able to relate more easily to the frog story: Temperatures there exceeded 115°F for several days. In India it was worse—in May 2016, temperatures topped out at 123.8°F (an all-time record for India), claiming dozens of lives and melting tarmac on roads in some of the country’s largest cities. For a farmer, especially one who makes his living growing vegetables for market, it is perhaps easier to register the gradual warming that, according to those who record weather data, absolutely is taking place. The most obvious thing I notice is a longer growing season (the period between the last spring frost and the first frost in the fall). During my 30 years in the business, that period has increased by about three weeks, which, I hesitate to say, has been quite good for us. For one thing, we have highvalue, tender crops like tomatoes and basil for noticeably longer. We also benefit in the fall from an extended run of hardier crops like broccoli, kale and cabbage, which can handle moderate frosts but not frigid conditions. The warmer weather not only has lengthened our growing season but also our marketing season. For the first 10 or 15 years of my farming career, we trucked our produce to the Union Square Greenmarket in Manhattan twice a week from late May until Thanksgiving, even though the market remained open year-round. For the next 10 years, we kept up our marketing until Christmas. Even then, we often had leftover storage crops like garlic, carrots and potatoes—but we didn’t want to stand in the street and freeze our butts (or more precisely, our hands and feet) to sell them. Then we noticed that winters, on average, were getting a bit warmer and the winter markets at Union Square appeared to be bustling. Several years ago, we began winter marketing. This past January and February we made it to nine markets. At year’s end, that will definitely boost our bottom line. In addition to the storage crops, our winter offerings include baby salad greens, planted directly in the ground in two “high tunnels” (like big greenhouses but without heaters or ventilating fans). Even on cold days, the sun’s rays generate enough heat under the tunnels’ plastic covering to keep the plants growing, albeit at a slower rate. Temperatures drop rapidly most nights, but this past January and February they didn’t drop enough to cause lasting damage. Our customers were delighted to buy fresh greens from us in the middle of winter. So, why should I gripe about climate change and a warmer planet? It’s always been understood that, as this particular global phenomenon unfolds, there will be winners and losers. Let the chips fall where they may, but better in my pocket than someone else’s.


The trouble is, in this case it looks like losers will outnumber winners by a large margin. A world with dwindling resources and a few billion hot and hungry people with not much to lose is frightening to contemplate. Coupled with rising population, competition for eversmaller slices of the shrinking earthly pie will likely increase. If humanity’s checkered history is any indicator, discontent and conflict will inevitably escalate. Why, as a nation and at this point in time, we would choose to increase our use of fossil fuel rather than move more aggressively toward renewable energy is hard to fathom. The solar industry is an excellent job creator; it already employs more than twice the number of people as does all forms of coal extraction. Our new president, however, still prefers coal and oil. He has vowed to reverse President Obama’s decision to reject the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline, a project that would lead to a massive increase in the burning of fossil fuel. He has threatened to auction off public lands and off-shore waters for drilling, fracking and coal mining. The non-renewable, extractive energy sector is behind him all the way and is very generous with its support. President Trump’s selection of cabinet members reads like a Who’s Who of oil and gas men. Rex Tillerson left his position as CEO of Exxon Mobil to become our new Secretary of State. Rick Perry, one-time governor of Texas and fossil fuel enthusiast, is now our nation’s energy secretary. (He has talked about getting rid of the Department of Energy, viewing it as an impediment to free enterprise.) Scott Pruitt, who has openly stated that he doubts planetary warming is caused by burning fossil fuel (even though some 98 percent of the world’s climate scientists think otherwise), has been chosen to head the Environmental Protection Agency. He spent much of his career as a lawyer advocating for oil and gas companies, often suing the EPA on the industry’s behalf, and appears intent on rolling back carbon dioxide emissions standards for motor vehicles and power plant smokestacks. The president already has issued an executive order to this effect. More than 100 nations—including the United States—are signatories to the Paris Climate Agreement, which, after years of international negotiations, went into effect in November 2016. This accord represents a major step in recognizing and attempting to combat the reality and risks of a warming planet. Alone, it will not solve all the problems created by our profligate burning of fossil fuel, but it’s the most progressive step the global community has made thus far. President Trump has threatened to withdraw from the Paris deal. Though warmer temperatures in the Northeast may give me and other farmers a longer growing season, I’d be willing to forego this bonus in the interests of a larger good. To view the Earth merely as a resource to be mined for profit is woefully shortsighted. To my mind, being good stewards of this planet that so generously sustains us is the single most important thing we humans can do; to disregard its health is to disregard our own health and the health of so much other life. It is a dark road to take. 4

photo this page by jerry novesky

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DRINK

new summer coolers

T

by tim buzinski

h e r e i s j u s t o n e w o r d to d e s c r i b e s u m m e r t i m e

drinking: refreshment. Certainly, a cold pilsner works, as does a glass of chilled Riesling, but you needn’t drink the same old gin and tonic you drank last summer. Hit the farmers’ markets for inspiration or try new takes on

old favorites—there’s no shortage of new local cider, beer, wine, spirits or mixers out there. Local mixologists, too, are developing variations on classic cocktails and finding new combinations. Here’s a small sampling of refreshments to enjoy this summer while you kick back and watch the boats sail by.

OLD DRINK, NEW INGREDIENTS The quintessential drink of summer—the gin and tonic—takes a new turn when the mixings are local. Harvest Spirits (Valatie) has just released its Core Gin, produced entirely from apples with just three botanicals— juniper, coriander and lemongrass—imbuing the gin with a unique and focused flavor profile. Often overlooked but most influential to the flavor of the drink, though, is the tonic. Many commercial tonics contain highfructose corn syrup, but Jason Schuler and his team at More Good, a specialty syrup producer in Beacon, recently introduced Spring Tonic, made using raw organic cane sugar and organic herbs—no artificial colors or flavorings. In place of the quinine (extracted from cinchona bark) used to flavor traditional tonic, More Good’s tonic uses gentian root (the main bittering agent in cocktail bitters), which Schuler likes for its “deep, bold, lingering earthy bitterness.” Schuler is now working with Common Ground Farm, in Wappingers Falls, experimenting with anise, hyssop, mountain mint, wild bergamot and marjoram for his forthcoming summer tonic. Combine these with Core Gin and you take this classic refresher in an entirely new direction.

MORE GOOD GIN & SPRING TONIC JASON SCHULER / MORE GOOD Ingredients ½ ounce More Good Spring Tonic 1½ ounce Core gin 3 ounces seltzer water Method Place all ingredients in a Collins glass. Add ice and stir. Garnish with a sprig of hyssop.

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NAPOLEON SUMMER COLD BREW COCKTAIL JAKE GRIFFIN / IRVING FARM COFFEE ROASTERS Ingredients ¼ cup fresh blueberries 1 sprig lemon thyme ¾ ounce cold brew coffee (Napoleon Barragan Single Origin Lot or other sweet, fruit-forward coffee) 1 teaspoon honey 1½ ounce white rum 2 to 3 ounces dry sparkling wine (or substitute sparkling water for a lighter version) 1 lemon wedge Method Muddle blueberries, thyme, cold brew and honey together in a shaker until all the juice has been extracted from the blueberries. Add rum and shake with ice until cold. Pour into a small highball glass (include ice and fruit pulp; strain if you prefer). Top with dry sparkling wine and the squeeze of a lemon wedge. To cold-brew coffee: In a Mason jar, add water to coffee and stir. Cover the jar and leave it out overnight. Strain the grounds thoroughly the next day, and voila, cold brew.

CAFFEINE BREEZE While cold brew may be the latest beverage of choice for hot summer days, the complex flavors of coffee are making it a cocktail favorite, too. Millerton-based Irving Farm Coffee Roasters is set to release a new cold-brew coffee this summer. (Different from iced coffee, cold brew is “brewed” cold and never heated.) Irving Farm rep Jake Griffin chooses Napoleon Barragan (a single-origin coffee from the village of Monserrate, Colombia, known for its bright berry flavors with subtle hints of chocolate) to mix with blueberries and white rum for a summer cocktail recipe that spotlights the distinct and delicate flavors the roast offers.


FRESH AND MINTY At Heritage Food + Drink, Wappingers Falls’ newest farm-to-table restaurant, beverage director Jessica Gonzalez follows the theme of the restaurant and works with local farms to source ingredients for her cocktail creations. Mint Condition, for example, features chocolate mint from Tongore Brook Farm (Stone Ridge) for a variation on a mojito that is at once fresh yet familiar.

MINT CONDITION JESSICA GONZALEZ / HERITAGE FOOD+DRINK Ingredients 1½ ounces Mezcal ¾ ounce Fino sherry ¾ ounce lime juice ¾ ounce simple syrup dash Angostura bitters 5 chocolate mint leaves splash club soda Method Add mint and sugar to cocktail shaker and gently muddle. Add Mezcal, Fino sherry, lime juice, simple syrup and bitters; shake together. Pour into a highball glass and top with crushed ice, a splash of club soda. Garnish with chocolate mint leaves.

KEEGAN ALES SUMMER FUNSHINE MARIANNE GREAVES / KEEGAN ALES Ingredients 2 ounces vodka 1 ounce simple syrup 2 lemon wedges 2 dashes grapefruit bitters splash grapefruit juice 1 lemon wheel 4 ounces Keegan Ales FUN IPA Method In a cocktail shaker, muddle the lemon wedges. Add ice, vodka, simple syrup, bitters and grapefruit juice. Shake, then strain and pour into a Collins glass prepared with fresh ice. Top with IPA, then garnish with lemon wheel.

SUMMER FUN The (new) gin with (new) tonic is not the only (new) drink on the block. Keegan Ales recently released a new beer, appropriately called FUN. “We wanted an IPA that could be enjoyed year-round,” says Lisa Hantes, bar manager at the Kingston brewery’s restaurant. Though enjoyable on its own, the new beer also sparkles in Summer FUNshine, a cocktail that uses vodka and grapefruit to highlight the citra hops used in FUN. “It’s fresh and easy and can be enjoyed at any time,” Hantes adds.

COOL AS A CUCUMBER Looking for another twist on gin? Steven Aigner, head mixologist at Liberty Street Bistro in Newburgh, shakes it up with muddled cucumber, ginger and lemon juice for an earthy summer cocktail with just a hint of citrus. If the fresh cucumber flavors don’t relax you, the gin and chartreuse surely will. “The key ingredient in this drink is the green chartreuse,” Aigner says. “It has strong hints of herbal flavor that blend extremely well with the muddled cucumber and ginger.”

THE HUDSON

CIDER FLOAT CATHRYN FADDE / PERCH Ingredients 6 ounces Beak & Skiff 1911 Cinnamon Hard Cider 1 scoop Jane’s vanilla ice cream Method In a large mug or Irish coffee glass, place a scoop of ice cream and top with the hard cider.

STEVEN AIGNER / LIBERTY STREET BISTRO DRINK DESSERT

Ingredients 4 cucumber slices, diced 2 ginger slices 1 ounce lemon juice 1 ounce Green Chartreuse 2 ounces of Green Hook Gin 2 dashes of Cecil & Merl Cucumber Bitters

Cathryn Fadde, of Perch (Marlboro), combines two summer favorites for a memorable after-dinner offering. She floats Kingston-based Jane’s vanilla ice cream in a glass of Beak & Skiff 1911 Cinnamon hard cider (LaFayette, Onondaga County) for a summertime riff on the classic Italian affogato. Fadde says that one guest best described it as a “Fireball without the guilt,” referring to the cinnamon whiskey currently in vogue.

Method In a cocktail shaker, muddle the cucumber and ginger. Add lemon juice, Chartreuse, gin and cucumber bitters. Shake vigorously 8 to 10 seconds, then fine strain into a martini glass.

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INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

PAGE 4 Adams Fairacre Farms / adamsfarms.com 38 Aroma Osteria / 845.298.6790 / aromaosteriarestaurant.com 20 Baja 328 / 845.838.BAJA / baja328.com 78 Barb’s Butchery / 845.831.8050 / barbsbutchery.com 44 Beacon Natural Market / 845.838.1288 / beaconnaturalmarket.com 27 Café Amarcord / 845.440.0050 / cafeamarcord.com 69 Caffe Macchiato / 845.565.4616 / addressyourapetite.com 79 Café Mio / 845.255.4949 / miogardiner.com 20 Canterbury Brook Inn / 845.534.9658 / canterburybrookinn.com 78 Cheese Plate / 845.255.2444 / cheeseplatenewpaltz.com 45 Clock Tower Grill / 845.582.0574 / clocktowergrill.com C4 Cosimo’s / cosimosrestaurantgroup.com 12 Craft 47 / 845.360.5253 / craft47.com 7 Crave Restaurant & Lounge / 845.452.3501 / craverestaurantandlounge.com 07 Culinary Institute of America / 845.471.6608 / ciarestaurants.com C3 Daily Planet Diner / 845.452.0110 / dailyplanetdiner.com 69 Dino’s Vigneto Café / 845.834.2828 / www.vignetocafe.com 71 Dottie Audrey’s Bakery Kitchen / 845.915.3088 / dottieaudreys.com 3 Dubrovnik / 914.637.3777 / Dubrovnikny.com 38 Ella’s Bellas / 845.765.8502 / ellasbellasbeacon.com 28 Farm to Table Bistro / 845.297.1111 / ftbistro.com 55 Fishkill Farms / 845.897.4377 / fishkillfarms.com 21 Fresh Company / 845.424.8204 / freshcompany.net 52 The Greens at Copake Country Club / 518.352.0019 / copakecountryclub.com 27 Gino’s Restaurant / 845.297.8061 / ginoswappingers.com 58 Hahn Farm / 845.266.3680 C2 Half Moon / 914.693.4130 22 Harvest Real Food Catering / 845.687.4492 / elmrockinn.com 58 Harvest Spirits / 518.758.1776 / harvestspirits.com 57 Hawthorne Valley Farm / 518.672.7500 / hawthornevalleyfarm.org 56 Hemlock Hill / 914.737.2810 / hemlockhillfarm.com 21 Henry’s at the Farm / 845.795.1500 / buttermilkfallsinn.com/henrys 1 Heritage Food + Drink / info@heritagefooddrink.com 79 Howell’s Sunflower Café / 845.615.9135 /howellscafe.com 79 Hudson St. Café / 845.565-2450 / hudsonstreetcafe.com 44 Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union / 845.463.3011 / hvfcu.org 55 Hudson Valley Fresh / hudsonvalleyfresh.com 69 Hyde Park Brewing / 845.229.8277 11 Il Barilotto / 845.897.4300 / ilbarilottorestaurant.com 20 Jacobowitz & Gubits / 866.993.7575 / jacobowitz.com 77 Judelson, Giordano & Siegal.com / 877.740.9500 / JGSPC.com 56 Jones Farm / 845.534.4445 / jonesfarminc.com 10 Leo’s Ristorante & Bar / leospizzeria.com 52 Limoncello at Orange Inn / 485.294.1880 / limoncelloatorangeinn.com 52 Love Apple Farm / 518.828.5048/ www.loveapplefarm.com

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PAGE 79 Love Effron / 845.245.8707 / loveeffron.com 71 Marta’s Vineyard / 845.218.9672 / martasvine.com 27 Mill House Brewing Company / 845.485.BREW / millhousebrewing.com 62 Mother Earth’s / motherearthstorehouse.com 79 Mountain Meadow Bed & Breakfast / 845.255.6144 / mountainmeadowsbnb.com 3 N&S Supply / nssupply.com 79 New Paltz Wine & Spirits / 845.255.8528 79 Nic L Inn / 845.452.5649 / nliwinecellar.com 12 Nina / 845.344.6800 / nina-restaurant.com C3 Palace Diner / 845.473.1576 / thepalacediner.com 10 Pamal Broadcasting / pamal.com 52 Paula’s Public House / 845.454.7821 / paulaspublichouse.com 45 Putnam County Tourism / 845.808.1015 / www.tourputnam.org 45 Ramiro’s 954 / 845.621.3333 / ramiros954.com 62 Red Barn Produce / 845.691.7428 33 Red House / 845.795.6285 / redhouseny.com C3 Red Line Diner / 845.765.8401 / dineatredline.com 11 Redwood / 845.259.5868 / www.redwooduptown.com 75 Restaurant 1915 / 845.786.2731 x.1915 22 Roundhouse, The / 845.765.8369 38 Scarborough Fare / 845.831.7247 / www.scarboroughfarenp.com 2 Shawangunk Wine Trail / gunkswine.com 77 Skyway Camping Resort / 845.647.5747 / 800.447.5992/ skywaycamping.com 56 Stoutridge Vineyard / 845.236.7620 / stoutridge.com 11 Sunflower Natural Foods Market / 845.679.5361 / sunflowernatural.com 44 A Tavola / 845.255.1436 / www.atavolany.com C3 Table Talk Diner / 845.849.2839 / tabletalkdiner.com 57 TasteNY Store at Todd Hill / 845.849.0247 73 Terrapin Restaurant / 845.876.3330 / terrapinrestaurant.com 3 Top Drawer CC / 914.632.4222 / topdrawercc.com 21 Tuthill House at the Mill / 845.255.1527/ www.tuthillhouse.com 2 Ulster County Tourism / 845.340.3566 28 Valley at the Garrison / 845.424.3604 x39 / thegarrison.com 79 Village Tea Room / 845.255.3434 / thevillagetearoom.com 12 Walden Savings Bank / 845.457.7700 / www.waldensavingsbank.com 9, 77 Warren Kitchen & Cutlery / 845.876.6208 / warrenkitchentools.com 20 Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery / wvwinery.com 10 Westchester Tourism / www.westchestertourism.com 57 Whitecliff Vineyard / 845.255.4613 / whitecliffwine.com 27 Wildfire Grill / 845.457.3770 22 William Farm & Sons / 518.828.1635 1 Williams Lumber & Home Center / 845.876.WOOD / williamslumber.com 28 Woody’s Farm to Table / 845.534.1111 / woodysfarmtotable.com 33 Ziatun / 845.765.8265 / ziatun.com


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DIRECTORY

A C C O M M O D A T I O N S

B A K E R I E S

Elmrock Inn 4496 Rt 209, Stone Ridge (845) 687-4492; elmrockinn.com Boutique farmhouse bed & breakfast

The Alternative Baker 407 Main St, Rosendale (845) 658-3355; lemoncakes.com Sun, Mon, Thu 7–5; Fri & Sat 7–7:30; Closed Tue & Wed Celebrating 20 years of small-batch, 100 percent handmade all-butter baked goods. Offering gluten-free and allergy-friendly options, the bakery offers breakfast sandwiches; Harney Teas and JB Peel coffees (hot or iced); award-winning Belgian hot chocolate (hot or frozen); a seasonally-changing dessert menu and special occasion cakes, including weddings and birthdays. “Worth a detour”—The New York Times

Mountain Meadows B&B 542 Albany Post Rd, New Paltz (845) 255-6144 mountainmeadowsbnb.com Nestled in the foothills of the Catskills in the shadow of the Shawangunk Ridge, a cozy bed and breakfast. Hosts, Maria and Joe, welcome you to their upstate New York getaway, complete with in-ground pool and hot tub, patio and gardens. Skyway Camping Resort 99 Mountain Dale Rd, Greenfield Park (845) 647-5747; 1-800-447-5992 skywaycamping.com A traditional family-owned and operated camping resort with luxury. Amenities, include fitness workout room, giant sun deck, scenic pond, cable TV, Wi-Fi, solar-heated Olympic pool, game room, toddler romper room, paddle boats, kayaks and rowboats. William Farmer & Sons 20 S Front St, Hudson (518) 828-1635; wmfarmerandsons.com William Farmer & Sons renovated a historic boarding house in downtown Hudson and imbues it with a spirit of hospitality to provide a unique place to stay, a mercantile, a bar and a restaurant. “Stay happy. Enjoy craft cocktails and a gratifying meal.” A R T

Dottie Audrey’s Bakery Kitchen 549 Rt 17, Tuxedo Park (845) 915-3088 dottieaudreys.com Mon-Fri 7–6 ; Sat 8–6; Sun 8–4 A welcoming roadside eatery and bakery offering scratch-made, comfort food. Slow-rise, freshly baked breads, scones, pastries. Breakfast, lunch, catering and prepared foods to go. Ella’s Bellas 418–420 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8502 Mon & Wed 8–5; Thu–Sat 8–7; Sun 9–4; closed Tue Ella’s Bellas believes that an indulgence should taste like an indulgence regardless of our dietary restrictions. We specialize in gluten-free products, but we promise you won’t know the difference. B E E R

&

B R E W E R I E S

Newburgh Art Supply 5 Grand St, Newburgh (845) 561-5552; newburghartsupply.com Mon-Thu 10–6; Fri 11–7; Sat 10–6; Closed Sun See, feel and experience quality art materials in one of Newburgh’s restored landmarks in the heart of the Washington Market neighborhood. Your local source for essential creative supplies for the student, professional and enthusiast. Celebrating 9 years of service!

Beacon Craft Beer Shoppe 262 Main Street, Beacon 845-202-7470 The finest curated selection of beer in the Hudson Valley, including Saranac, Dogfish Head, Pipeworks, Evil Twin, Ommegang, Southern Tier, Peak Organic, Sam Adam's Boston Lager, Founders, Abita Purple Haze, Newburgh, Brooklyn and Upstate Brewing Stouts, Ales and Sours. Also featuring Angry Orchard, Citizen and Graft hard ciders. Call for information about upcoming tastings.

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Hyde Park Brewing 4076 Albany Post Rd, Hyde Park (845) 229-8277; hydeparkbrewing.com Mon & Tue 4–10; Wed & Thu 11–10; Fri & Sat 11–12; Sun 11–9 C A T E R I N G

Fresh Company PO Box 187, Garrison (845) 424-8204; freshcompany.net At our kitchen one hour north of Manhattan in the Hudson Highlands, we gather great local and imported ingredients for events of all sizes and pocketbooks, from grand affairs to drop-off parties. We emphasize the freshest, finest ingredients, because great food is the spark that ignites a convivial gathering. Executive chef Shelley Boris draws inspiration from cooking styles from around the world. Her distinct, warm style is reflected in meals that encourage hospitality and leisure at the table. Harvest Real Foods Catering 4496 Rt 209, Stone Ridge (845) 697-4492; harvestrealfoodcatering.com Wed-Fri 10–4 Chef Mark Suszczynski known for his culinary vision, offers farm-to-table catering and unique locations like the Elmrock Inn, the perfect setting for farmstyle celebration: weddings, rehearsal dinners, showers, birthday parties, bar and bat mitzvahs. Pamela’s Traveling Feast & Pamela’s Bird and Bottle 1123 Old Albany Post Rd, Garrison (845) 424-2333 pamelastravelingfeast.com Adding to her custom crafted cuisine with exceptional service, Pamela Resch, owner of Pamela’s Traveling Feast, announces her acquisition of the Bird & Bottle Inn. This historic, charming, and spirited 1761 colonial inn features four guest rooms with expansive grounds and permanent tent structure for weddings and private events. Offering Special Wine Paring Dinners several times a month,

please call for dates and information. Weddings, private events, corporate events and holiday parties. Terrapin Restaurant Catering & Events 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 889-8831; terrapincatering.com Enjoy the same high-quality ingredients and service that you know at Terrapin Restaurant anywhere in the Hudson Valley. Catering events of all types and sizes, Terrapin prepares custom menus for every event, using local, organic ingredients whenever possible. Contact Catering Director Hugh Piney. D I N E R S

Daily Planet 1202 Rt 55, Lagrangeville (845) 452-0110; dailyplanetdiner.com Palace Diner 194 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845) 473-1576; thepalacediner.com Red Line Diner 588 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 765-8401; dineatredline.com Table Talk Diner 2519 South Rd (Rt 9), Poughkeepsie (845) 849-2839; tabletalkdiner.com H O M E

N&S Supply, Inc. 205 Old Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 896-6291; nssupply.com Your one-stop resource for all plumbing, heating and HVAC needs, including specialty products designed and manufactured to meet your lifestyle needs; the latest innovative products, including cutting-edge bathroom technology from remote flushing toilets to hands-free faucets. Six locations: Fishkill, Brewster, Kingston, Catskill, Hudson and Danbury. Top Drawer CC 719 Main St, New Rochelle (914) 632-4222 topdrawercc.com Let’s design your dream home today!


Williams Lumber 6760 Rt 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-9663 34 Blommer Rd, Tannersvile (518) 589-5200 2424 Rt 44, Pleasant Valley (845) 605-3520 908 Rt 82, Hopewell Junction (845) 221-2751 9-11 E Market St, Red Hook (845) 758-5615 317 Kyserike Rd, High Falls (845) 687-7676 3679 Rt 9, Hudson (518) 851-3641 4246 Albany Post Rd, Hyde Park (845) 698-1004; williamslumber.com The largest independent home center in the area. K I T C H E N

Warren Kitchen & Cutlery 6934 Rt 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-6208; warrenkitchentools.com Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30; Sun 11–4:30 The Hudson Valley’s complete source for professional kitchen knives and tools, commercial quality cookware, bakeware, pocketknives and woodcarving tools. We stock the largest selection of name-brand cutlery in the region at prices well below retail. Knife sets, knife blocks and carving boards. Professional knife sharpening while you wait.

M A R K E T S

Adams Fairacre Farms 1560 Ulster Ave, Kingston (845) 336-6300 1240 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 569-0303 765 Dutchess Tnpk, Poughkeepsie (845) 454-4330 160 Old Post Rd, Wappinger (845) 632-9955 adamsfarms.com Open daily A family-owned farm market/garden center. A cornucopia of fresh produce, meats, fish, deli, and prepared foods. Featuring Hudson Valley products, a great selection of the best local cheese, meat, produce and more. Barb’s Butchery 69 Spring St, Beacon (845) 831-8050; barbsbutchery.com Mon–Fri 11–7:30; Sat 10–6; lunch Tue–Sat; closed Sun & Mon Your new neighborhood butcher shop providing local, Hudson Valley– raised meat and poultry. Practicing nose-to-tail butchery, we are proud to offer fresh and smoked meats, specialty cuts, charcuterie, house-made stocks, craft bacon and more. Beacon Pantry 382 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-8923; beaconpantry.com Mon–Sat 7–8; Sun 7–6

Providing artisan food and artisan service to Beacon and beyond, Beacon Pantry features more than 50 varieties of cut-to-order domestic and imported cheese and charcuterie. Large selection of local, Italian and hard-to-find French pantry items, grass-fed local meats and dairy. Stumptown coffee, unique chocolates, fine pastries and desserts. Serving European-style sandwiches and cheese plates. Catering for any size event. The Cheese Plate Water Street Market 10 Main St., New Paltz (845) 255-2444; CheesePlateNewPaltz.com Cheeses from around the world including our own backyard, along with everything that goes with them—pate, jam, chutney, pickles crackers and bread. Gifts too. Fishkill Farms 9 Fishkill Farm Rd., Hopewell Jct. (845)-897-4377; fishkillfarms.com Open 7 days, 9am-6pm, year-round. Organic vegetables, eco certified apples, fresh donuts and homemade pies.

A family-friendly fruit farm expanded to a full-scale agritourist destination and market. A well-curated selection of Hudson Valley products and café. U-pick apples (in season), petting zoo and playground. Scarborough Fare 8 North Front St., New Paltz 257 Main St., Beacon (845) 255-0061; scarboroughfarenp.com Olive oil and vinegar tap room. Also imported pasta, gift baskets, glassware, loose leaf tea and more. TasteNY Store at Todd Hill Taconic State Pkwy, Lagrange Located 10 miles north of I-84 and 1 mile south of Rt 55 (845) 849-0247; ccedutchess.org Open Mon, Wed, Thu, Sat 10–7; Fri 10–8; Sun 11–7; closed Tue An asset along the Taconic State Parkway, find a vast array of foods and products grown or made in the Hudson Valley. Outdoor farmers’ market open Jun–Oct: Fri 3–7, Sun 2–6. N A T U R A L

Love Apple Farm 1421 New York 9H, Ghent (518) 828-5048; (518) 567-1200 loveapplefarm.com Mon & Tue 10–5; Wed & Thu 9–5; Fri–Sun 9–6

F O O D S

Beacon Natural Market 348 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-1288; beaconnaturalmarket.com Mon–Sat 9–7; Sun 10–5

THE HUDSON VALLEY’S NEWEST FINE WINE AND SPIRITS STORE

1955 South Rd. Suite 3 Poughkeepsie, NY (Southbound, right after Poughkeepsie Galleria)

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• Live Music • Door Prizes • Small Bites • Over 20 Wines to taste, from all over the world • New Cocktail Creations

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YOUR FIRST WINE PURCHASE (5% OFF SPIRITS)

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Saturday, June 10th 2:00-6:00 PM phone: 845.218.9672 MartasVineyardWine.com

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The Hudson Hudson The Valley Valley We’re Farmers, We’re Foodies

We’re Farmers, We’re Foodies

We’re Local, We’re Legendary

Lighting the way for a healthier world. Featuring organic prepared foods, deli and juice bar, organic and regional produce, meats and cheeses. Open since 2005, proprietors L.T. and Kitty Sherpa are dedicated to serving the Hudson Valley with a complete selection of products that are good for you and good for the planet, including an extensive alternative health department. Nutritionist on staff. Catering available.

Main Street’s newest hot spot, Baja 328 offers the finest authentic Southwestern food couples with 110-plus tequilas, the largest selection in the area.

Mother Earth’s 300 Kings Mall Ct, Kingston (845) 336-5541 249 Main St, Saugerties (845) 246-9614 1955 South Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 296-1069 motherearthstorehouse.com Open daily Offering the finest natural foods, bulk spices, herbs, vitamins, supplements and organic produce. The valley’s best organic, hot and cold takeout at our Kingston and Poughkeepsie locations.

Café Amarcord 276 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-0050; cafeamarcord.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–10; Fri–Sat noon–11; Sun noon–9 Creative New American cuisine with Italian undertones, served in a warm atmosphere. Enjoy an artisanal cocktail at the onyx bar before having dinner in the bistro-style dining room or on our Main Street terrace. Bring colleagues for a casual lunch, or a date for a romantic night out.

Sunflower Natural Market 75 Mill Hill Rd, Woodstock 24 Garden St, Rhinebeck (845) 679-5361; (845) 876-0798 sunflowernatural.com Mon–Fri 8–9; Sat 9–9; Sun 10–7 The area’s most complete natural foods market, featuring certified organic produce, organic milk, cheeses and eggs, a wide range of bulk organic grains and nuts, non-irradiated herbs and spices, plus vitamins, homeopathic and body care products.

Café Mio 2356 Rt 44/55, Gardiner (845) 255-4949; miogardiner.com Breakfast & lunch Wed–Sun 8:30–4:30 A popular, casual café overlooking the Shawangunk Mountains. We are proud to offer the freshest local fare, drawing from our many surrounding farms—something that is at the core of our food philosophy. A varied selection of wines and craft beers.

Beacon Bread Company 193 Main St., Beacon (845) 838-2867; beaconbread.com Breakfast & lunch daily 7-5 pm Bakery and bistro. Everything from scratch.

R E S T A U R A N T S

Angelina’s 43 Chestnut St., Cold Spring (845) 265-7078 Lunch & dinner Mon-Sat 11–9; Sun noon-9 This family friendly eatery serves up Italian comfort foods, pizzas and burgers. Save room for the homemade tiramisu. Aroma Osteria 114 Old Post Rd, Wappingers Falls (845) 298-6790; aromaosteriarestaurant.com Lunch Tue–Sat 11:30–2:30; Dinner Tue–Thu 5–10, Fri–Sat 5–11, Sun 4–9 Voted Best Italian Restaurant by Hudson Valley magazine; Poughkeepsie Journal awards four stars. A romantic, relaxed atmosphere with an elegant cocktail bar in a beautiful setting. Here, rustic Italian cuisine is served with a unique and extensive selection of Italian wines (many available by the glass). Catering for all occasions available on or off premises.

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Baja 328 328 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-BAJA; baja328.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11–10, Fri–Sat 11–11, Sun noon–8

Caffe Macchiato 99 Liberty St, Newburgh (845) 565-4616; addressyourappetite.com Breakfast & lunch Tue–Fri 9–3; Sat–Sun 9–4 Located in the historic district of Newburgh, Caffe Macchiato is a European-style café offering an all-day breakfast and lunch along with a fair-trade coffee beverage selection. The menu focuses on seasonal items and chef/owner Jodi Cummings highlights several local farms and producers on the menu. All desserts and pastries are baked from scratch in-house. Canterbury Brook Inn 331 Main St, Cornwall (845) 534-9658; canterburybrookinn.com Dinner Tue–Thu 5–9; Fri–Sat 5–9:30 Hosts Hans and Kim Baumann offer fine Swiss continental cuisine featuring veal, duck, chicken, Schnitzel, pasta, filet mignon, fresh fish and much more. Enjoy a fabulous dessert while sipping a frothing cappuccino or espresso. We specialize in both on- and off-premise catering. Outdoor brookside dining. Reservations suggested.


Cathryn’s Tuscan Grill 91 Main St, Cold Spring (845) 265-5582; tuscangrill.com Lunch daily noon–4:30; Dinner daily 4:30–10:30; Brunch Sun noon–3; Flight Night Tue 7–9:30 Follow the red brick walk off Main Street through a landscaped garden into a romantic dining scene. Choose from an array of Northern Italian dishes such as pulled rabbit with fresh pappardelle pasta, seedless grapes and grappa sauce; and grilled partridge with blackberries, pearl onions and pancetta with a red wine sauce. Reasonably priced wines. Small private party room is a memorable, festive Tuscan accent. Clock Tower Grill Kitchen & Bar 512 Clock Tower Dr, Brewster (845) 582-0574; clocktowergrill.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–9, Fri noon–11; dinner Sat 5–11, Sun 3–9 Set in a renovated barn, the atmosphere is casual yet sophisticated; the menu “rustic American” with many ingredients drawn from area farms. Cosimo’s Restaurant Group Cosimo’s On Union 1217 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 567-1556; fax (845) 567-9246 Cosimo’s Middletown 620 Rt 211 East, Middletown (845) 692-3242 Cosimo’s Poughkeepsie 120 Delafield St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-7172 Cosimo’s Woodbury Rt 32, Central Valley (845) 928-5222 cosimosrestaurantgroup.com Lunch & dinner daily Casual trattoria-style dining with some of the world’s best wines. Old-style Italian cuisine with a New World twist. Daily specials, pasta, fish and meat dishes. Distinctive cocktail lounges, a unique wine cellar for private dinner parties and beautiful catering facilities.

Crooked Rooster 399 Manchester Rd., Poughkeepsie (845) 204-9900; thecrookedrooster.com Mon-Thu 11–7; Fri 11–8; Sat 11–4 With a fun, family-friendly vibe this new eater offers an equally fun and eclectic menu of noodle bowls, flatbreads, sandwiches, salads, burgers and wings to eat in or take out. Catering too.

restaurant | bistro | bar

The Culinary Institute of America 1946 Campus Dr (off Rt 9), Hyde Park The premier culinary college offers exceptional global cuisine in its award-winning restaurants: American Bounty Restaurant (845) 451-1011; americanbountyrestaurant.com The Bocuse Restaurant (845) 451-1012; bocuserestaurant.com Reimagines classic French cuisine using modern techniques. Ristorante Caterina de’ Medici (845) 451-1013; ristorantecaterinademedici.com The Apple Pie Bakery Café (845) 905-4500; applepiebakerycafe.com Dino’s Vigneto Café 80 Vineyard Ave., Highland (845) 834-2828; vignetocafe.com Lunch Tue-Sun 10:30-4; Dinner nightly 4–10 Intimate Italian eatery specializing in homemade pasta, gourmet personal pizza and a varied menu of chicken, veal and seafood dishes. Live music on the weekends after 6pm. Dubrovnik 721 Main St., New Rochelle (914) 637-3777; dubrovnikny.com Authentic Croatian cuisine with a farm-to-table, sea-to-table approach.

Craft 47 47 W Main St, Goshen (845) 360-5253; craft47.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–10, Fri–Sat noon–midnight; Sun noon–10 Kick back, relax and sample the best of the Hudson Valley at Craft 47. We offer small-plate American tapas, craft wine and 12 craft beers on tap, with even more in the cooler.

Essie’s Restaurant 14 Mount Carmel Pl, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-7181; essiesrestaurantpk.com Dinner Tue-Sat 5:30–10:30 A welcome and hip addition to Poughkeepsie’s Little Italy shows the chef’s American South and Caribbean roots in dishes prepared with a modern flair. Favorites include crispy jerk pork lardons; chicken and dumplings; coconut passion fruit panna cotta.

Crave Restaurant & Lounge 129 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-3501; craverestaurantandlounge.com Dinner Wed–Sat 4–10, Sun 4:30–9; Brunch Sun 11:30–3 Chef Ed Kowalski serves contemporary food with modern twists in a romantic and intimate setting located directly under the Walkway Over The Hudson.

Farm To Table Bistro 1083 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 297-1111; ftbistro.com Mon-Thu 11:30–9:30; Fri–Sat 11:30–10; Sun 11:30–9 The focus is always finding the best the world has to offer: the best produce, wine, beef and certainly, the best fish and seafood. Patio dining available.

Local, Organic, Authentic. Voted Best Restaurant in Dutchess County, Best Bistro and Best Late Night Dining 2016 lunch & dinner daily in rhinebeck 845-876-3330 terrapinrestaurant.com june

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The Hudson Hudson The Valley Valley We’re Farmers, We’re Foodies

We’reFarmers, Farmers, We’re We’re Foodies Foodies We’re

Gino’s Restaurant 1671 Rt 9, Wappingers Falls (845) 297-8061; ginoswappingers.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11:30–9, Fri–Sat 11:30–10; Sun 1–9 Serving the Hudson Valley since 1984. Traditional southern Italian cuisine in a casual environment. Only the freshest ingredients used to prepare your favorite veal, chicken, seafood and pasta dishes. Catering on- and off-premise. The Greens at Copake Country Club 44 Golf Course Rd, Copake Lake (518) 352-0019 copakecountryclub.com Mon-Thu 11–8:30; Fri & Sat 11–9:30; Sun 11–8; Brunch until 2:30 Dinner nightly from 5 Dine overlooking the stunning 160-acre golf course nestled in the foothills of the Berkshire and Catskill Mountains. Half Moon 1 High St., Dobbs Ferry (914)-693-4131; harvest2000.com Montauk seafood, Hudson Valley farm to table, sunset views, raw bar and tiki bar. Henry’s At Buttermilk Falls 220 North Rd, Milton (845) 795-1500; henrysatbuttermilk.com Lunch Fri–Sat 11:30–3; Dinner Sun– Thu 5–9; Brunch Sun 11–3 Local comes alive at this bucolic Inn & Spa, where the main ingredients are sourced from local producers and purveyors. An inventive menu features a fresh selection of large and small plates from casual burger and fries to refined New American dishes. Enjoy a pre-dinner stroll through the organic gardens and orchards or a drink overlooking the Hudson River and sweeping lawns. Al fresco dining available. Heritage Food + Drink 1379 U.S. Rt 9, Wappingers Falls info@heritagefooddrink.com New American, farm-to-table cuisine, specializing in items cooked on a wood burning grill. Opening Summer 2017.

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Howell’s Sunflower Café 18 West Main St, Goshen (845) 615-9135; (845) 294-5561 howellscafe.com Mon & Sat 7–4; Tue-Fri 7–7 We offer a wide variety of delicious dishes for lunch and breakfast. Whatever you're in the mood for, from health food to comfort food, you can find it here! Hudson Street Café 190 South Plank Rd, Newburgh (845) 565-2450 hudsonstreetcafe.com Mon-Fri 8–3; Sat-Sun 8–3

Featuring organic, locally sourced ingredients, Chef Donna Hammond and staff celebrate the café’s brand new location in Newburgh. Breakfast and lunch offered daily, while dinner, beer, wine and cider are coming this summer. Custom and corporate catering is available at the cafe or off-site venues. Ample parking, AURA rated. Il Barilotto 1113 Main St, Fishkill (845) 897-4300; ilbarilottorestaurant.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11–2:30; dinner Mon–Thu 5–10, Fri–Sat 5–11 Blending the old with the new, Eduardo Lauria, chef-owner of Aroma Osteria, transformed an historic brick building in the heart of Fishkill to a trattoria and wine bar. The fare is Italian peasant with a contemporary flair. The selection of regional wines from Italy—available by the glass or flight—is extensive. Catering on- and off-premises. Leo’s Ristorante Rt 9D, Wappingers Falls (845) 838-3446 22 Quaker Ave, Cornwall (845) 534-3446 1433 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 564-3446; leospizzeria.com Lunch & dinner Mon–Sat 11–10; Sun 2–9 A family favorite since 1981, Leo’s offers traditional classic Italian dishes, pizza, hot/cold subs, pasta, veal, chicken and appetizers. Daily specials and catering for all occasions whether in our location or yours. Great food served in a comfortable and relaxed atmosphere. Limoncello at Orange Inn 159 Main St, Goshen (845) 294-1880 Limoncelloatorangeinn.com Dinner & Lunch Tue-Sun Mill House Brewing Company 289 Mill St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-2739; millhousebrewing.com Lunch & dinner Mon, Wed-Sun; closed Tue Offers a warm, historic and visually appealing setting, with casual, yet professional service, food cooked from as close to the source as possible, and artfully crafted ales. Nic L Inn 135 N Water St., Poughkeepsie (845) 452-5649; nickelinn.com Lunch & dinner; Tue-Thu 12–9; Fri-Sat 12–10; Sun 1-9 An inviting neighborhood eatery with locally sourced menu, pouryour-own wine system and outdoor seating (in season). Nina 27 W. Main St, Middletown (845) 344-6800; nina-restaurant.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11:30–2:30; dinner Mon–Sun from 5; brunch Sun 9:30–2


New York City–trained chef Franz Brendle brings an elegant flair to classic American cuisine. Features include filet mignon Roquefort, shrimp asparagus risotto and seafood specials. Nice selection of wines in various price ranges. Friendly staff, cozy décor. Hearty Sun brunch. Paula’s Public House 2186 New Hackensack Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 454-7821 paulaspublichouse.com Mon & Tue 4–11; Wed & Thu 11–11; Fri & Sat 11–1; Sun 12–6 An inviting gastro pub sporting a cozy and friendly environment complemented by the warmth of a fireplace and a rustic ambiance. Paula’s offers lunch, supper and latenight fare and features live music, open mic and karaoke nights. Perch 1 King St, Marlboro (845) 236-3663 Lunch & Dinner; Closed Mon New from the owner of Cathryn’s Tuscan Grill in Cold Spring, offering a globally inspired, locally sourced menu. The eclectic list of wine and beer represents the best of the Hudson Valley. Ramiro’s 954 954 Rt 6, Mahopac (845) 621-3333 ramiros954.com Tue–Thu 3:30–9; Fri & Sat 3:30–10; Sun 1–9 A family-friendly food destination for locals and visitors, offering Latin American fusion cuisine. Chef Ramiro takes a modern approach to traditional recipes, flavors and textures, incorporating seasonal ingredients. Parents relax and dine while kids eat and play in the unique “Jan’s Place.” Red House 30 Main St, Milton (845) 795-6285; redhouseny.com Tue-Sun 11:30–3:30, 5–10 Red House Asian Fusion offers a menu showcasing the fresh flavors of Thai, Japanese and Chinese cuisines. The renovated space offers the ambiance of a lounge with a fullservice bar, and includes an eclectic selection of Asian wines and liquors. Redwood 63 N. Front St., Kingston (845) 259-5868 Lunch 11:30–3; Dinner 5–10; Sun Brunch. Closed Tue. The best of California cuisine and the Hudson Valley in a fun and relaxing atmosphere. Rooftop dining in season. Restaurant 1915 55 Hessian Dr, Bear Mountain (845) 786-2731 ext. 1915; visitbearmountain.com Thu–Sat 5–9, Sun 11–9

Located at the historic Bear Mountain Inn, enjoy a seasonal menu in a beautiful lodge setting. The Roundhouse 2 E Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8369; roundhousebeacon.com Lunch & dinner Wed-Sat 11:30Close; Sun Brunch 11-3; Lunch 3-8 Set in a historic textile mill transformed into boutique hotel, the restaurant serves elegant, locally inspired American fare and offers a well-curated list of craft beers, cocktails and wines. The main dining room, lounge and seasonal patio all overlook Beacon Falls. Sweet Pea’s Cafe 318 Blooming Grove Tpke, New Windsor (845) 391-8034 sweetpeascafeinc.com Sweet Pea's Cafe is a locally owned full service cafe with a fun, funky atmosphere. Inspired by our love of music, art and food we developed our cafe culture. A Tavola Trattoria 46 Main St. New Paltz Th-M 5:30-10pm (845)255-1426 Seasonally inspired Italian cuisine with a focus on fresh, local produce and ingredients in a rustic, familystyle atmosphere. Terrapin Restaurant & Red Bistro 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-3330; terrapinrestaurant.com Lunch & dinner daily 11:30– midnight; dining room daily 5–9pm From far-flung origins, the world’s most diverse flavors meet and mingle here. From elements both historic and eclectic comes something surprising, fresh and dynamic: dishes to delight body and soul. Choose fine dining in Terrapin’s dining room or casual fare in Red Bistro & Bar. From good burgers and quesadillas to wild salmon and local filet mignon. Terrapin’s local organic and authentic menu satisfies all. Tito Santana Taqueria 142 Main St., Beacon (845) 765-2350; tacosantana.com Lunch & dinner Mon-Sun 11–9 Classic tacos and Mexican food in a colorful setting. The $2 taco Tuesday can’t be beat. Valley at the Garrison 2015 Rt 9, Garrison (845) 424-3604; thegarrison.com/restaurants Valley: Dinner Thu–Sun 5–9; midday menu Sat–Sun 11:30–2:30 Terrace: Mon–Thu 8–6; Fri–Sun 7–7 The Garrison’s signature fine-dining restaurant offering seasonal American

NOW OPEN AT

BEAR MOUNTAIN INN

Local, sustainable, farm-to-table fare

Local, sustainable, farm-to-table fare

For reservations, call

845-786-2731 ext. 1915 www.visitbearmountain.com june

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Cuisine and an extensive international wine list of great accolade. Regional and NYS Craft breweries and distilleries to match the seasonal-regional focus of the kitchen. Our spectacular view will enhance any dining experience.

The Hudson Hudson The Valley Valley We’re Farmers, We’re Foodies

We’reFarmers, Farmers, We’re We’re Foodies Foodies We’re

Tuthill House at the Mill 20 Grist Mill Lane, Gardiner (845) 255-1527; tuthillhouse.com The finest cuisine with the best bourbon in the Hudson Valley. Enjoy fresh, local ingredients and craft spirits in the rustic splendor of our historic mill. The Village Tearoom 10 Plattekill Ave, New Paltz (845) 255-3434; thevillagetearoom.com Breakast, lunch & dinner Tues–Sat 8–9, Sun 8–8 The Village Tea Room is a unique gathering place, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as a variety of teas. Tantalizing cakes and cookies. Organic honey, pot pies and roast chicken. Zagat survey says “Irish ex-pat Agnes Devereux has a real winner.” Wildfire Grill 74 Clinton St, Montgomery (845) 457-3770; wildfireny.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11:30–3; Sun noon–3; dinner Sun–Thu 5–9; Fri & Sat 5–10 Eclectic is the buzzword at this popular local eatery, where patrons can feast on a predominantly American menu with Asian, Mexican and Italian influences in a rustic Victorian setting. Woody’s Farm to Table 30 Quaker Ave, Cornwall (845) 534-1111; woodysfarmtotable.com Open Wed–Mon 11:30–8:30; closed Tue A “new old-fashioned” burger joint located in a restored 1910 building in picturesque Cornwall. Casual, family place offering fast, simple meals for people on the go using fresh, wholesome ingredients with a local emphasis.

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Xaviar’s Restaurant Group Chef-owner Peter Kelly offers his signature service and exceptional cuisine to four locations. Critics agree: Dining in the valley will never be the same. Xaviar’s at Piermont 506 Piermont Ave, Piermont (845) 359-7007 Lunch Fri, Sun noon–2; dinner Wed–Fri 6–9, Sat seatings 6 & 9, Sun 5–8 Freelance Café & Wine Bar 506 Piermont Ave, Piermont (845) 365-3250 Lunch Tue–Sun noon–3; dinner Tue–Thu 5:30–10, Fri 5:30–10:30, Sat 5:30–11, Sun 5–10

Restaurant X & Bully Boy Bar 117 North Rt 303, Congers (845) 268-6555 Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2:30; dinner Tue–Thu 5:30–10, Fri 5:30–10:30, Sat 5–11, Sun 5–8; brunch Sun seating 1pm X2O Xaviars on the Hudson 71 Water Grant Way, Yonkers (914) 965-1111 Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2; dinner Tue– Fri 5:30–10, Sat 5–10, Sun 5–9; brunch Sun noon–2 Ziatun 244 Main St., Beacon (845) 765-8268; ziatun.com Lunch & dinner Thu-Mon 11-9 From the owners of Beacon Bread Company comes this little gem, serving authentic Palestinian-ArabicMiddle Eastern fare with many vegan and vegetarian options. S E R V I C E S

Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union (845) 463-3011; hvfcu.org Full-service financial cooperative serving individuals and business in Dutchess, Orange, Ulster and Putnam Counties. 17 local branches and contact center avaiulable late on weekdays and all day on Saturdays. Over 82,000 conveniently located surcharge-free nationwide ATMs and a full siute of online, movile and text banking services. HVFCU is federally insured by the NCUA and is an Equal Housing Lender. Jacobowitz and Gubits, LLP 158 Orange Ave., Walden (845) 778-2121; jacobowitz.com Mon-Thu 8:30-5:30 Expert legal services for restaurateurs includes business planning, succession planning, licenses and permits, employment, immigration, real estate, financing, contracts and taxation. Judelson, Giordano & Siegal 633 Rt 211, East Middletown 3 Neptune Rd, Poughkeepsie (877) 740-9500 JGSPC.com More than an accounting firm, full business advisors. Our philosophy is one of collaborative effort, as we work along side you to solve the problems and address the needs of your specific business. Walden Savings Bank (845)457-7700; waldensavingsbank.com S P E C I A L T Y P R O D U C T S

ImmuneSchein 43 Basin Rd, West Hurley (828) 319-1844 immune-schein.com Thu 1–7; Fri-Sun 11–7


Warren Kitchen & Cutlery’s

Summer Sale. The lowest prices of the year on everything for the kitchen!

Professional cutlery from around the world • Cookware Bakeware • Grilling tools • Glassware and Barware Kitchen Appliances • Serving pieces and accessories Coffee makers • Unique kitchen gadgets Wednesday through Sunday

Wine tastes Sweeter

*selected, store in-stock only.

The Hudson Valley’s best selection of fine cutlery, professional cookware, appliances, serving pieces and kitchen tools.

at Skyway Camping My Way, Your Way, Skyway. A nightcap will taste better in front of a campfire after a long day of swimming, fishing, or hiking. You’ll sleep better here too. Sure, you can pitch a tent, but you’ll find another level of camping comfort in our rental RV’s and park model cottage-style trailers. At Skyway, camping means being close to nature... and ready to relax. www.skywaycamping.com

$25 OFF

Skyway Camping Resort

MID-WEEK IN JULY Use coupon code VAL500

Call (845) 647-5747 for more details. Restrictions apply. New reservations only.

6934 Route 9 Rhinebeck, NY 12572 Just north of the 9G intersection

Follow us on Social Media! #StaySkyway @skywaycamping

@skywaycamping

845-876-6208 Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30, Sun 11–4:30

@skyway_camping

(845) 647-5747 • 99 Mountain Dale Rd, Greenfield Park, NY 12435 • skwaycamping.com

Visit us on the web, or order on-line, at www.warrenkitchentools.com

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Taste what everyone’s talking about Your neighborhood purveyor of local Hudson Valley-raised meats Nose-to-Tail · Grass & Grain Finished Angus · Specialty Cuts Charcuterie · Smoked Meats · House-made Stocks · Craſt Bacon

Created with a passion and appreciation for pure whole food ingredients, ImmuneSchein Ginger Elixirs promote wellbeing and health. If you are in search of the purest, highest quality, small-batch ginger elixir on the market for a detox, great taste and flexibility of use, then ImmuneSchein Ginger Elixirs will be for you.

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Dutchess Tourism 3 Neptune Rd, Suite A11A, Poughkeepsie (845) 463-4000; dutchesstourism.com

Taste what everyone’s talking about

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’ neighborhood purveyor of local Hudson Valley-raised meats bYour

Putnam County Tourism (845) 808-1015; Tourputnam.org

County Tourism Nose-to-Tail · Grass & Grain Finished Angus · Ulster Specialty Cuts 20 Broadway, Kingston (845) 340-3566 Charcuterie · Smoked Meats · House-made Stocks · Craſt Bacon ulstercountyalive.com

Westchester County Tourism (800) 833-9282; visitwestchesterny.com

Lunch Served Daily

W H O L E S A L E

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Red Barn Produce 217 Upper North Rd, Highland (845) 691-7428 Full-service, family owned and operated wholesaler servicing restaurants and institutions with a complete selection of fruits and vegetables for 20 years. A proud distributor of local, New York, highquality produce at competitive prices emphasizing reliable and personal service. Pick-up or delivery available to Dutchess, Columbia, Ulster and Orange counties.

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69 Spring Street, Beacon, NY 12508 845.831.8050 • www.barbsbutchery.com

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Mon - Fri Mon -Fri11am 12pM- 7:30pm -7pM Sat & Sun 10-7 Sat & Sun 10am - 6pm

Lunch Served Daily

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Marta’s Vineyard

Mon - Fri 11am - 7:30pm1955 South Rd Suite 3, Sat & Sun 10am - 6pmPoughkeepsie (845) 218-9672

martasvine.com 69 Spring Street, Beacon, NY 12508 Open 7 days 845.831.8050 • www.barbsbutchery.com This new shop features favorites and well-known producers of wines and spirits alongside a notable selection of organic and biodynamic wines. Each product is chosen by the owner, Marta, who holds internationally recognized certifications in wine and spirits. Check back for wine, spirits and cocktail classes. Fundraisers and events scheduled monthly. New Paltz Wine 245 Main St., New Paltz (845) 255-8528; newpaltzwine.com Mon-Sat 10-9; Sun noon-6 Full-service wine and spirit shop. Large local selection. Friendly, knowledgeable staff. Case discounts. Special orders.

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Shawangunk Wine Trail (845) 256-8456; (845) 291-1927; gunkswine.com Nestled between the Shawangunks and the Hudson River, just 60 miles north of NYC is a trail of 14 familyowned wineries from New Paltz to Warwick. The wineries offer tours and tastings amidst scenic beauty. A complete listing of wineries and events is available on our website. Stoutridge Vineyard 10 Ann Kaley Ln, Marlboro (845) 236-7620; stoutridge.com Many of our wines and spirits are locally grown, and all are from New York fruits and grains. Our wines are sold exclusively at the winery. Enjoy an authentic taste of the Hudson Valley at our winery, distillery and grounds. Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery 114 Little York Rd, Warwick (845) 258-4858; wvwinery.com Daily 11–6 for tastings Food & Wine magazine calls our draft cider “clean, vibrant” with a “sweet finish.” We produce wine for every occasion: Chardonnay, Riesling, Harvest Moon, Black Dirt Blush and Red, Cabernet Franc, Pinot Noir. As the Valley’s first distillery, we produce a line of fine brandies and liqueurs. Bakery Café serves lunch and fresh breads on weekends. Whitecliff Vineyard 331 McKinstry Rd, Gardiner (845) 255-4613; whitecliffwine.com Daily 11:30–5:30; Sat til 6 One of the valley’s largest vineyards boasts beautiful views of the Shawangunk Ridge. Owner/wine maker Michael Migliore produces award-winning wines from European vinifera varietals such as Chardonnay, Cabernet Franc and Riesling, as well as new hybrids. Visit our friendly tasting room. Winery tours 4 by appointment, special events.

LOVE YOUR TABLE VA L L E Y TA B L E . C O M


Breakfast & Lunch Daily Available evenings for catering

Custom Catering 190 S. Plank Road, Newburgh 845.565.2450 www.hudsonstreetcafe.com

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LAST CALL

Local Legacy

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H I S Y E A R M A R K S T H E B I C E N T E N N I A L O F P R O S P ECT H ILL O RCHARDS , one of the Hudson Valley’s oldest farms. The farm has been owned and operated by the Clarke family continuously since 1817, when Nathaniel Clarke and his wife moved from Cornwall to settle on 55 acres in Milton. One of the first orchards in the region to utilize low-spray, integrated pest management (IPM) practices, the sixth and seventh generation family members now running the farm continue to experiment with organic growing methods. The property is a popular pick-your-own destination for thousands of visitors, who come for cherries, peaches and apricots in the summer, and apples and pears in the fall. The Clarke family will commemorate the anniversary with an on-farm dinner in August, with more events scheduled for fall. 4

Prospect Hill Orchards 340 Milton Tnpk, Milton (845) 795-2383; prospecthillorchards.com 80 80

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PHOTOS FROM THE CLARKE FAMILY COLLECTION


If you like it put a ring on it 1202 ROUTE 55 LAGRANGEVILLE, NY 12540 T: 845.452.0110 DAILYPLANETDINER.COM OPEN DAILY 6AM-12AM

194 WASHINGTON ST POUGHKEEPSIE, NY 12601 T: 845.473.1576 THEPALACEDINER.COM OPEN 24 HOURS

2521 C SOUTH ROAD (RTE 9) POUGHKEEPSIE, NY 12601 T: 845.849.2839 TABLETALKDINER.COM OPEN FRI-SAT 6AM-12AM MON-THURS 6AM-11PM

588 ROUTE 9 FISHKILL, NY 12524 T: 845.765.8401 DINEATREDLINE.COM OPEN 24 HOURS

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cosimosrestaurantgroup.com NEWBURGH (845) 567-1556

CENTRAL VALLEY (845) 928-5222

POUGHKEEPSIE (845) 485-7172

MIDDLETOWN (845) 692-3242

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