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Johnson County Park & Recreation District

Legacy Plan Johnson County, Kansas | August 2015


SWT Design Team Jay Wohlschlaeger, Project Manager Laura Barrett, Production Leader Doug Pickert, Indigo Design, Inc. Vance Rzepka, VSR Design Darin Barr, Ballard*King & Associates Ron Vine, ETC Institute


Acknowledgments Board of Park and Recreation Commissioners George J. Schlagel, Chair Paul W. Snider, Vice Chair Nancy Wallerstein, Secretary Michael Pirner, Treasurer Steven L. Baru, Assistant Secretary Chris Carroll, Assistant Treasurer Leslee Rivarola, Board Member Steven C. Klika, BOCC Member R. Eric Hughes, 2014 Chair JCPRD Administration Leadership Team Jill Geller, Executive Director of Parks & Recreation Jo Ann Courtney, Administration and HR Manager Dan Field, Superintendent of Safety and Outdoor Education and park police Chief David Grant, Human Resource Director Becky Jones, Finance Manager Randy Knight, Community Relations Manager Bill Maasen, Superintendent of Parks & Golf Courses Cliff Middleton, Planning & Development Manager and JCPRD Legacy Plan Project Coordinator Rhonda Pollard, Superintendent of Recreation Ted Tartenaar, ITS Manager JCPRD Working Committee Jill Geller, Executive Director of Parks & Recreation Dan Field, Superintendent of Safety and Outdoor Education and park police Chief Kelby Hellwig, Senior Park Manager Becky Jones, Finance Manager Randy Knight, Community Relations Manager Bill Maasen, Superintendent of Parks & Golf Courses Bill McGowan, Outdoor Education Manager Cliff Middleton, Planning & Development Manager Rhonda Pollard, Superintendent of Recreation Shannon Sonnier, Sports & Facilities South Manager Jim Wilson, Landscape Architect Legacy Plan Advisory Group Terry Anderson, park police Captain, JCPRD Sean Cairns, Urban Trail Co. Chris Carroll, JCPRD Board of Park and Recreation Commissioners Brian Daniel, Sertoma Club of Johnson County Chris Engel, Assistant City Manager, City of Merriam Matt Garrett, Biologist, JCPRD Elaine Giessel, League of Women Voters, Sierra Club Jim Hix, Former Overland Park Councilman Chris Iliff, Johnson County Planning Commission Kent Lage, Urban Services Engineer, Johnson County Public Works Linda Lehrbaum, KC Wildlands Nancy Wallerstein, JCPRD Board of Park and Recreation Commissioners Danni Livingston, Manager Planning & Design Group, Johnson County Facilities Management Dean Palos, Director of Planning, Johnson County Planning and Codes Cover Photos: Greg Ruether, Director of Park Services, City of Overland Park Top: Buttonbush and Bumblebee - photo by MGE Jim Wilson, Landscape Architect, JCPRD Bottom: Camp Paddleboaters at TimberRidge Nancy Wallerstein, JCPRD Board of Park and Recreation Commissioners

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Legacy Plan

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PAGES

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Introduction Context, History, Objectives

Process and Approach Research and Resulting Framework

Legacy Elements Actions and Recommendations

Capital Investment Plan Funding Timeline and Priorities

Appendix Documentation and Resources

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01 Introduction 02

Process and Approach

3.01 Regional Parks

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ii.

Snapshot

Supporting Analysis

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2.01

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Our JCPRD is...

Framework > Plan

3.02 Trails and Connectivity

Snapshot

Supporting Analysis

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2.02

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Executive Summary

Community Engagement

3.03 Recreation and Cultural Resources

Snapshot

Supporting Analysis

3.04 Connecting with Nature

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ii.

Snapshot

Supporting Analysis

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Snapshot

Supporting Analysis

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Snapshot

Supporting Analysis

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Snapshot

Supporting Analysis

1.03 Change since MAP2020

3.05 Stewardship

3.06 Identity

03 Legacy Elements

3.07 Teamwork


Content Map | Legacy Plan iii. Actions + Recommendations

05 Capital 04 Appendix Investment Plan

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4.01

5.03

5.08

Actions + Recommendations

Funding the Legacy

Data Collection Submittal

Benchmark County Precedents

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5.09

Actions + Recommendations

Investment Summary

Survey Findings Report

Regional Maintenance Facilities

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Actions + Recommendations

Implementation

Market Analysis

Meadowbrook Open House Input

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Actions + Recommendations

CIP Budget Workbook

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Actions + Recommendations

Modes of Care Example

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01

Introduction

The legacy of a community is its collective knowledge at work in the actions of current and future generations


Introduction

08-11

Our JCPRD is

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Executive Summary

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Changes since MAP 2020

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Introduction The Johnson County of 2015 is a different county than it was when the last comprehensive parks and recreation strategic plan was prepared in 2000. In the fifteen years since the MAP 2020 plan, Johnson County has grown not just in total population, but has become a more diverse community with rising interests in natural resources and active living. During this same period, the landscape of parks and recreation within Johnson County has seen a significant evolution both at the municipal and district levels as well as within the private sector. Throughout this growth, the Johnson County Park & Recreation District has remained at the forefront of the field as stewards and recreation service innovators, acquiring environmentally significant land holdings, and providing residents with new and relevant offerings. The JCPRD Legacy Plan seeks to continue these traditions and harness the district’s capabilities to focus the organization’s future and growth on work that is responsive to an evolving Johnson County.

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Legacy (noun): A Gift Handed Down from the Past Community leaders as early as the 1950’s recognized the role that Johnson County would play as a primary area for growth extending from the metropolitan center of Kansas City. Led by its first superintendent, John Barkley, members of the Shawnee Mission Sertoma Club, and its sister organization the LaSertoma Club, the Johnson County Park & Recreation District was established in 1955 as the Shawnee Mission Park District. They immediately began the work of preserving large open spaces for the benefit of future residents in what they correctly predicted would be a rapidly growing county. From those early purchases of Antioch Park and Shawnee Mission Park, to the recent acquisition of streamway properties and future parkland including the future Big Bull Creek Park and the Rieke Lake future park property, JCPRD has operated a step ahead of development. Now, as patrons enjoy the open space provided by this planning foresight, participate in programming operated within these spaces, and benefit from the ecosystem services protected within the parkland, they are enjoying the legacy passed down by the civic minded individuals who have voted to support the Johnson County Park & Recreation District throughout its history. The JCPRD Legacy Plan outlines a framework of elements, actions, and recommendations that can guide the district as it builds from the strengths and accomplishments of the past 60 years to provide a future that serves an evolving Johnson County.

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Our JCPRD is...

The prescribed burning in Shawnee Mission Park is an example of disturbance ecology at work

Our Legacy In 2015, the Johnson County Park & Recreation District celebrates its 60th anniversary. In the decades since its inception, the organization has become an integral part of the lives of countless patrons and their families, each of whom have a personal relationship with JCPRD. Ultimately the legacy of JCPRD is the sum of these individual experiences. Throughout the changes that the county has experienced and will face in the future, the Park & Recreation District is committed to evolving to maintain its relationship with the community as partners and providers of the types of services residents and visitors value. The 2008 financial crisis had a profound impact nationwide. Within JCPRD, the market changes resulted in lower levels of funding for park and recreation services. The crisis represented a disturbance, but just like the prairies that JCPRD manages with prescribed burns, the Park & Recreation District is a complex ecosystem capable of adapting to survive, and emerge stronger from, disturbance events. The Legacy Plan presents guidelines for the strengthening of core functions and capabilities whose presence will prepare JCPRD to weather future events. The strategies promoted within this document also call for innovative programs, informed by a system of operation that is highly responsive to JCPRD patrons and partners. These secondary functions are recommended to be thought of as responsive to a current need or opportunity, but flexible in the long run.

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Executive Summary The Legacy Plan A legacy is defined as a gift handed down from the past. JCPRD has been building a legacy of parks and recreation for Johnson County since 1955, and this plan is intended to provide a framework for JCPRD to continue that legacy forward. In the 15 years since the last system-wide strategic planning effort, the landscape of parks and recreation within Johnson County has continued to grow and change. One of the key drivers for the creation of this plan is the need to assess the appropriate roles and responsibilities for JCPRD within this landscape, now and into the future. Where the previous plan, MAP 2020, had a focus on growth to meet the parks and recreation needs of Johnson County, this Legacy Plan is more inward-focused. It looks to invest in and strengthen the current JCPRD system, and strategically grow to expand existing parks, trails, natural resource areas, and recreation services. The Legacy Plan establishes roles for JCPRD in county-wide parks and recreation that are grounded in the district’s mission and vision. At the same time, the framework of the plan provides flexible strategies to fulfill these roles and enable JCPRD to be responsive and adaptive as Johnson County continues to grow and evolve. Change Since MAP2020 Johnson County has experienced continued growth in population, diversity, and development from 2000 through 2014. The county population has increased by approximately 26 percent, and is projected to grow another 30 percent over the 15-year window of this plan. With this population growth, Johnson County has become a more diverse community. Racial or ethnic minority residents accounted for 80 percent of the population growth between 2008 and 2012, and the county poverty rate more than doubled between 2000 and 2013 while the overall population grew by 26 percent. The growth has resulted in an increased demand for public parks and recreation services, and the diversity has created a community with a broader range of needs and desires for these parks and recreation services. As the county has continued to grow, so have municipal park and recreation departments. Expanded services, athletic complexes, and recreation centers provided by municipalities now assist in meeting the needs of local residents. This municipal growth has addressed some of the recommendations from MAP 2020 anticipated at the time to be the responsibility of JPCRD. Over this same time period, the Johnson County Park & Recreation District has also grown. Guided by MAP 2020 and subsequent individual park master plans, JCPRD has continued to expand through parkland acquisition, streamway trail development, and strategic acquisition of regional recreation facilities. Since 2000, JCPRD has acquired nearly 3,400 acres of parkland and natural resource areas, developed 25 miles of streamway trail, and added four recreation facilities. The impact of the 2008 economic downturn was felt throughout Johnson County and the country. JCPRD felt the effects most significantly through reduced funding for capital investment, from which the district has yet to fully recover. As a result, JCPRD has been forced to delay the opening of a large percentage of its undeveloped parkland, and the last purchase acquisition of streamway corridor by JCPRD was in 2008. Currently 4,358 of the district’s 9,780 acres of parkland are undeveloped. Available funding has focused on efforts to address maintenance and replacement needs at existing parks, trails, and facilities.

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Legacy Framework The Legacy Plan contains seven legacy elements that define roles for the district that align with the tenets of the JCPRD Vision Statement. Within each element a series of action items identifies goals for the 15-year window of this document, and associated recommendations guide the implementation of the action items. The recommendations are based on needs and opportunities identified during this planning process. This framework structure provides for flexibility in the implementation of the plan as Johnson County, and JCPRD, continue to grow and evolve. Regional Parks is a focus on opening and managing undeveloped parkland, investing in existing parks, protecting natural resource areas, and defining legacy standards to guide future development and acquisition. Priorities include opening the four undeveloped park properties and the Meadowbrook property within the first five years of the plan and adding one Planning and Development project manager to assist with the implementation of these parks. Along with the park openings, JCPRD will need to add maintenance staff and park police to manage parks. Priorities for existing parks include lake improvements and the development of a park police substation at Heritage Park, and marina improvements at Shawnee Mission Park. The 15-year capital and operations investment identified for Regional Parks is $54.5 million for undeveloped parkland and $27.1 million for existing developed parks. Trails and Connectivity is a focus on continuing acquisition of streamway corridor for natural resource protection and trail development. Balancing JCPRD-funded acquisition and development with partnerships for acquisition and development is required to achieve this legacy element. Priorities include developing streamway trails within existing park properties and JCPRD streamway corridor landholdings to continue development of the Streamway Parks System, and providing access and connections to municipal trail and sidewalk systems. Additional streamway park maintenance staff are included to manage the new trails. Strengthening partnerships for streamway corridor acquisition and trail development is a priority for long-term success and regional connections. The 15-year capital and operations investment identified for Trails and Connectivity is $57.8 million. Recreation and Cultural Resources is a focus on growing programming and partnerships through the addition of new facilities and identifying opportunities to expand enterprise services. Recreation priorities include identifying and strengthening core programs and services, investing in existing facilities and athletic complexes, and evaluating existing partnership agreements to best meet community needs and support the enterprise model. Cultural resource priorities include expanding programs and partnerships through the planned addition of the Regional Arts and Heritage Center, Johnson County Museum, and Meadowbrook community center to the JCPRD system by 2017. The 15-year capital and operations investment identified for Recreation and Cultural Resources is $20.7 million. Connecting with Nature is a focus on expanding nature based services and outreach opportunities through passive recreation amenities and outdoor education programming. This legacy element will also focus on improving the health of natural resource areas through comprehensive planning and increased emphasis on natural resource management. Priorities include protecting existing natural resources within the district and developing an updated natural resource management plan. The addition of five natural resource staff are recommended and phased in over the 15-year plan to support the one full-time biologist currently on staff. Priorities also include investment in existing outdoor education sites at Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center and TimberRidge Adventure Center, and the development of an additional outdoor education site at Oakridge Farm. legacy plan | 15


The 15-year capital and operations investment identified for Connecting with Nature is $8.6 million. Stewardship is a focus on addressing current deferred maintenance and capital replacement priorities and establishing a program for long-term proactive maintenance and adaptive management of parks, trails, and facilities. The priority for this element is addressing deferred maintenance and capital replacement in parks and facilities. To address this priority, a district-wide maintenance and management plan must be created. This plan will establish system-wide level of care expectations, replacement schedules, and baselines for valuing maintenance tasks. Additional staffing (costs included in Regional Parks and Tails and Connectivity) and establishment of regional maintenance zones, are additional priorities to provide appropriate maintenance of new parks and trail s proposed in this plan. The 15-year capital and operations investment identified for Stewardship is $51.3 million. Identity is a focus on improved public awareness and increased accessibility of information regarding JCPRD to enhance the district’s brand and visitor experience. Actions to accomplish this include increased emphasis on social media, emphasizing patron recognition, and enhancing key outreach methods including the Activities catalog, word of mouth, website, and message boards. Priorities include adding a social media coordinator position to manage these community outreach and engagement tools, and updating the JCPRD website to improve user experience and accessibility to information. The development of a JCPRD app for mobile devices is recommended to increase real-time access and communication with patrons, and reinforce the JCPRD brand experience. The 15-year operational investment identified for Identity is carried in the Regional Parks investment costs. Teamwork is a focus on engaging JCPRD staff, supporting one another, and cultivating mutually beneficial relationships. This legacy element is the nucleus of “One JCPRD’ which recognizes that by working together, the strength of JCPRD and the benefits it provides are greater than the sum of individual entities or departments. A focus on strengthening the internal JCPRD team will strengthen outside partnerships as well. Priorities include the addition of a deputy director to strengthen the JCPRD leadership team and provide the executive director with a representative to assist with internal coordination and management. Additional priorities include identifying internal partnerships to expand or enrich curricula and programs, exploring opportunities to improve internal JCPRD communication, and engaging staff to participate as members of decision making teams comprised of internal and external partners. The 15-year operations investment identified for Teamwork is carried in the Regional Parks investment costs. Funding the Legacy The 2016-2030 capital investment approach identified in this plan is focused on maintaining and protecting existing JCPRD resources, investing in new parks, trails, and recreation services, and establishing the operational investment necessary to support the district vision. This approach will allow JCPRD to move forward with a clear direction as a regional park and recreation leader, an innovator, and a stronger partner to Johnson County municipalities, stakeholders, and residents. A $219.9 million investment plan in 2015 dollars is identified to fund the capital and operational items in the Legacy Plan. The distribution of these investments over the 15 years of the plan includes $103.4 million (47 percent) in New Development, $98.8 million (45 percent) for Maintenance and Capital Replacement / Investment in Existing Parks and Facilities, and $17.8 million (8 percent) to fund Operations associated with existing needs and new development. Current funding sources will generate an estimated $80 million over the 15-year plan with $43 million in mill levy funding, $30 million in scheduled debt payoff, an existing $1 million gift for Kill Creek Park, and $6 million anticipated in Meadowbrook Park TIF funding. When factoring an anticipated five percent escalation of the 2015 values, these totals equate to $338.3 million in plan

16 | introduction


costs, with $108.9 million in existing anticipated funding. Therefore, a net difference of $229.4 million will be needed to accomplish this vision by 2030. While outside funding sources including grants, donations, and partnerships will provide opportunities to implement specific projects and accelerate implementation timelines, the investment identified in this plan requires a steady and dedicated funding source for success. An anticipated $92 million of the escalated cost is funding for ongoing long-term maintenance and operations, and these are costs that will carry beyond the life of this plan, emphasizing the need for increased dedicated funding for JCPRD. A mill levy increase is recommended to fund the steady schedule of capital and operational investment over the next 15 years and beyond. Understanding that mill levy increases at the level to fully fund the plan is not a certainty, three scenarios were evaluated. These scenarios were: 0.75 mill, 1.0 mill, and fully funded increases in funding. These funding scenarios provide JCPRD with a tool for adaptive five-year Capital Improvements Planning based on a dedicated property tax mill levy funding and scheduled debt payoff. Actual mill levy funding will dictate the schedule and feasibility of overall plan implementation. Conclusion The JCPRD Legacy Plan is a framework created to provide the district with a clear vision of its roles as a leader and partner in the landscape of parks and recreation within Johnson County, and strategies to accomplish these roles. These strategies provide flexibility for JCPRD to adapt to the county’s inevitable change over the next 15 years while staying focused on the priorities defined in the legacy elements. Attention to each of the plan’s seven elements is critical to continuing the legacy of JCPRD. Accomplishing this plan requires additional support from increased mill levy funding, along with partnerships and outside funding sources. Successful funding and implementation of the plan will solidify JCPRD’s role as an industry leader, and allow the district to achieve its mission to enhance the quality of life in Johnson County by providing high quality parks, services, and recreation programs.

Fall Hayride at Shawnee Mission Park

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Change Since MAP 2020 The MAP 2020 plan emphasized the development of recreation facilities and provided systemwide and park-by-park recommendations for improvement. These recommendations, along with individual park master plans prepared post MAP 2020, were reviewed and evaluated with JCPRD staff. Following evaluation, relevant components were integrated and expanded upon in the Legacy Plan to reflect the key changes that have occurred within the landscape of park and recreation services since 2001. Continued Parkland Acquisition and Streamway Trail Development Since 2001, JCPRD has made significant strides in parkland acquisition and achieving the park system envisioned in MAP 2020. The plan proposed the addition of at least one large regional park of 1,000 to 2,000 acres, as well as at least three sub-regional parks ranging in size from 40 to 250 acres. Between 2000 and 2014, JCPRD added over 3,300 acres of parkland to the county parks system. This included expanding the Cedar Niles future park property to 955 acres and fulfilling the regional park recommendation, and three sub regional scale parks with the future Camp Branch Park and Camp Branch Glade, Stilwell Community Park, and Rieke Lake future park property. This does not include the former Meadowbrook Golf Course and Country Club property, as it was yet to be finalized during the completion of this document. Even with the significant funding challenges, the percentage of total parkland open for public use has remained relatively constant, down to 55% (5,422 acres out of 9,780 acres) from 57% (3,648 acres out of 6,394 acres) in 2000. Currently, 4,358 acres of parkland are undeveloped and yet to be opened to the public. MAP 2020 laid out a vision of 116 miles of streamway trails providing a seamless system of parks and connectivity throughout Johnson County. Since 2001, JCPRD has added 25 miles to the 43 miles of trail that were in place during MAP 2020. The additional 25 miles were accomplished by JCPRD and through partnerships with municipalities. This development included completion of the Indian Creek and Tomahawk Streamways, additional development along Turkey Creek Streamway, and initial development along the Blue River and Kill Creek Streamways. As of 2014, there were 68 miles of streamway trail developed for public use. The acquisition of streamway corridor and development of an additional 64 miles of streamway trail to complete the current streamway plans is a priority of JCPRD, local partners, and Johnson County residents. When completed, the currently identified streamway trails will provide approximately 130 miles of streamway trail and corridor protection, exceeding the proposed system in MAP 2020.

1960

18 | introduction

1980

2000


Decrease in Overall Funding The current JCPRD mill levy rate of 2.349 has not increased since 2004 and is currently less than 2% of the annual county property tax distribution. 2009 was JCPRD’s highest year for funding at $19.2 million. Over the past five years the district has received $11.4 million less in total funding compared to funding having held steady at the 2009 level over this period, and annual funding is still no back to the 2009 level. This decrease in funding was largely the result of the 2008 economic downturn, the impact of which was felt throughout the county. With the reduced funding and increased parkland and population, JCPRD has been required to “do more with less.� While they have adapted and persevered, the impact is being felt most significantly in deferred maintenance and delayed opening of undeveloped parkland. Johnson County Demographic Changes The population of Johnson County has increased by over 25% from 2000 to 2014 with a 2014 estimated population of 574,272 and is projected to increase by an additional 30% in the next 15 years to 752,881 in 2030. Cultural and economic diversity within Johnson County continues to grow. According to the United Community Services of Johnson County, the county poverty rate more than doubled between 2000 and 2013 while the overall population grew by 26%. Racial or ethnic minority residents accounted for 80% of population growth between 2008 and 2012. The percentage of non-white residents almost doubled in the twelve years leading up to 2012, up to nearly 20% compared to 10% in 2000. Mid-America Regional Council (MARC) projects continued growth and reinvestment within developed areas of the county, including significant development along the K-7 corridor north of K-10. The planning agency also anticipates substantial growth in southeast and southwest Johnson County through 2040. Rise in Municipal and Private Park and Recreation Services As the municipalities within Johnson County have grown in terms of development and population, both the need for park and recreation services and available tax-generated funding have risen. As the market for these services expanded, the opportunity for private sector services grew as well, especially related to youth athletic leagues, programming, and fitness. While the recommendations in MAP 2020 were written for the Johnson County Park & Recreation District, there was a level of service component that municipalities have since filled, specifically, multi-purpose recreation centers. MAP 2020 recommended four facilities be built in strategic locations and include basketball and volleyball courts, cardio and weight fitness areas, meeting rooms, an indoor track, and multi-use spaces, with one recommended to be a partnership with a municipality and include an aquatics component. While JCPRD has added several indoor facilities including New Century Fieldhouse, Okun Fieldhouse, and Mill Creek Activity Center, they have not contained the elements and scale identified in MAP 2020. Municipalities have filled this role with several facilities including Mission, Olathe, and Overland Park developing one or more facilities. JCPRD has a partnership with Overland Park for programming and office space in the Matt Ross Community Center.

Parkland Acquisition + Population Growth JCPRD has consistently acquired parkland prior to major growth and population shifts. Parkland acquired, once developed, will serve a growing residential base in the south of the county. Future land acquisition opportunities should be considered before development significantly reduces available land.

2010

2030

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02

Process and Approach

Smart planning strategies build upon existing strengths


Process and Approach

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Framework > Plan

24-29

Community Engagement

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Process and Approach This vision that the Johnson County Park & Recreation District is working to achieve is one which allows the organization to be responsive to the needs of its community. In support of this vision, the process of developing the Legacy Plan was driven by feedback received from JCPRD team members of all levels, park and recreation partners, community partners, and county citizens. The approach to the document was aimed at producing a set of recommendations that can be adapted depending upon available funding and partnership opportunities while maintaining focus on the elements that JCPRD stakeholders determined to be critical to the long term success of the Park & Recreation District.

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Tour of JCPRD Parks and Facilities The Legacy Plan process was kicked-off with a system-wide tour of JCPRD parks and facilities. At this time, an initial assessment of conditions was conducted and park and facility managers, who led the tours, provided insight into current performance successes and challenges. Review of MAP 2020 Recommendations MAP 2020 recommendations served as a starting point for the formation of the framework document. A working group comprised of JCPRD administration, division superintendents and managers worked with the planning team to identify the recommendations which had not yet been accomplished, but were still relevant priorities for implementation. Park and facility managers and staff contributed to the evaluation of recommendations related to the locations they regularly maintain and operate. Data Collection and Research In addition to confirming the progress made since the previous strategic plan was adopted, the data collection process included a statistically valid survey of Johnson County residents, extensive stakeholder engagement, and research into local and regional plans whose intentions overlapped with the future roles of the Johnson County Park & Recreation District. Ongoing Review and Coordination with JCPRD The early and continuous involvement of JCPRD staff and advisory groups in feedback interviews, reviews, and workshops was critical to the planning process. The communication derived has helped tailor the document as a tool capable of serving the Johnson County Park & Recreation District of 2015, as well as the organization that team members imagined JCPRD would become within the next 15 years.

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Framework > Plan

The parks and recreation landscape of Johnson County has experienced significant demographic, economic, and recreation changes in the past 15 years. Perhaps even more importantly, it will continue to evolve. The framework identified in this Legacy Plan will serve JCPRD, its partners, and county residents as a flexible organization of relevant, actionable, and routinely evaluated strategies. The approach, to build upon years of success towards an adaptive, community focused vision is a sustainable one because, unlike a traditional plan, it has the capacity to respond to developing needs be they environmental, social, financial or political. The Legacy Plan contains seven legacy elements that define roles for the district in Johnson County parks and recreation, and align with the tenets of the JCPRD Vision Statement. A framework of action items and recommendations supports each legacy element. The action items identify goals for the 15-year window of this document, and the recommendations provide strategies to implement the action items. The recommendations are based on needs and opportunities identified during this planning process, and this framework anticipates that these strategies may change over time to meet needs and opportunities as Johnson County continues to evolve.

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Traditional organizations may be designed using plans

unforeseen unforseen obstacle

new plan strategies developed

Web

A traditional planning approach dictates a singular course of action that, when challenged, stalls progress until a new plan is formed.

deliberate strategy realized strategy

unrealized strategy

adaptive strategy

A framework of recommended strategies includes decision-making criteria and recommendations for monitoring and review that can inform ongoing operations within an organization so that as unexpected issues do arise, progress towards a goal can continue.

How Do You Solve a Problem Like a Solution? Legendary journalist Eric Sevareid covered topics ranging from the German occupation of France to the way in which America portrays business. Out of these experiences, Sevareid penned an observation which is as applicable to county-wide parks and recreation strategizing as it is to international peace politics. He writes, “the chief cause of problems is solutions.” Too often, plans project outcomes or impacts beyond an organization’s control and, when future events inevitably deviate from expected conditions, recommended courses of action must be hurriedly edited or abandoned altogether until a new plan can be developed, proposed and formally adopted. In the meantime, progress is often suspended. Priorities for JCPRD’s next 15 years of operation are detailed within a framework consisting of seven legacy elements. The framework approach is a structure in which defining elements remain over time, but specific actions and recommendations may be adjusted in response to changes in needs and opportunities without losing site of the Legacy Element vision and end goal.

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role: responsive leader “To be a leader in park management and recreation services, to be responsive to our community and the people we serve, to impact the character of our community in a positive manner, to serve as a catalyst for program and land use innovation, and to function as a responsive steward of all our resources.” role: steward role: innovation catalyst role: coordinator

JCPRD Vision Statement

The Johnson County Park & Recreation District mission and vision statements were developed as a part of the MAP 2020 strategic planning effort. Although these statements were first adopted in 2001, the philosophy which they promote has long been practiced by JCPRD. The mission statement describes the district’s primary purpose as to “Enhance the quality of life in Johnson County by providing high-quality parks, services and recreation programs.” The vision statement above describes the goals that will guide JCPRD towards the achievement of its mission. Within the 15 years since the last system-wide strategic effort was undertaken, the landscape of park and recreation within Johnson County has changed dramatically. One of the key drivers for the creation of the Legacy Plan was the need to assess the appropriate position and responsibilities for JCPRD within this landscape, now and in the future. Although the actions recommended within this framework represent a shift from those found in MAP 2020, the roles that these actions exemplify are consistent with those described within the JCPRD vision statement. As the county continues to grow, and actions and recommendations within the plan are achieved, the JCPRD mission and vision will remain constant.

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d ar ew st st ly ta ca r n o at tio va din no or er in co ead l

siv on sp re

e

3.01

Regional Parks 1.1. Action: Open Undeveloped Parkland 1.2. Action: Establish Minimum Development and Legacy Standards 1.3. Action: Invest in Existing Regional Parks and Golf Courses 1.4. Action: Define Regional Parks 1.5. Action: Evaluate Future Acquisition and Development Opportunities

3.02

Trails and Connectivity 2.1. Action: Prioritize Acquisition of Streamway Corridor 2.2. Action: Continue Steady Development of Streamway Trails 2.3. Action: Strengthen Partnerships for Long-Term Success 2.4. Action: Connect Regional Parks and Communities

3.03

Recreation + Cultural Resources 3.1. Action: Classify Recreation Services 3.2. Action: Evaluate Services and Programs 3.3. Action: Expand Opportunities for Enterprise Services

3.04

Connecting with Nature 4.1. Action: Enhance Nature-based Experiences and Outdoor Education Sites 4.2. Action: Prioritize and Expand Natural Resource Management

3.05

Stewardship 5.1. Action: Address Deferred Maintenance and Capital Replacement 5.2. Action: Establish Maintenance Regions and Additional Staffing 5.3. Action: Implement Modes of Care and Maintenance Standards 5.4. Action: Develop Organizational Standards

3.06

Identity 6.1. Action: Increase Emphasis on Social Media 6.2. Action: Emphasize Patron Recognition 6.3. Action: Enhance Primary Public Outreach Methods 6.4. Action: Embrace Role within Larger Parks and Recreation Network

3.07

Teamwork 7.1. Action: Evaluate Staffing Needs 7.2. Action: Enhance Internal Coordination / Recognition 7.3. Action: Expand Partnerships legacy plan | 27


Like the canopy of a forest, regional parks provide an ideal space which fosters new growth.

Regional Parks

Trails connect patrons with diverse nodes of recreation opportunities just as waterways act as corridors between ecosystems.

Trails and Connectivity

Understory layers contain a range of niche habitats suited for specific species. Similarly, within recreation + cultural resources patrons find programs which suit their needs.

Recreation + Cultural Resources

Opportunities to connect with nature link users with the resources JCPRD parkland contains just as stems and trunks carry nutrition to living plants.

Connecting with Nature

3.01

3.02

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3.03

3.04


The litter layer of the forest ensures continual return of resources back into the ecosystem; stewardship strategies do the same for JCPRD as a system.

Stewardship

JCPRD’s Identity invites and directs users. Similarly, outdoorsmen rely on one another’s descriptions of environmental features to navigate new territories.

Teamwork functions as the root system of the “One JCPRD” ecosystem: a network which holds the ground in place.

Identity

Teamwork

3.06 3.05

3.07

One JCPRD: The Whole is Greater Than the Sum of its Parts The Johnson County Park & Recreation District was originally founded as a special parks district with a primary purpose of land acquisition and development. Since then, JCPRD’s roles have diversified to meet the needs of the growing Johnson County. The coordination of the current divisions and programs within the Park & Recreation District is no longer as easy as it once was. However, if each element within the system is promoted using a “One JCPRD” approach, which underscores the importance of a central vision, and internal and external collaborations, the organization may function as a healthy ecosystem. Ecosystems are described to have emergent properties when the system or habitat as a whole produces benefits greater than the sum of those which could be produced by each of its parts in isolation. Within a wetland ecosystem for example, the diversity of chemical and physical interactions result in a more complete and efficient nutrient cycle. If diverse JCPRD elements are understood in tandem, rather than within operational silos, the district may expect increased organizational efficiency and performance.

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Community Engagement

The interviews, presentations, online input, statistically valid survey, and open houses which comprised the stakeholder and community engagement process served a dual purpose. This process collected staff, park and recreation patron, and partner feedback, while establishing a familiarity with the Legacy Plan among the individuals who will play key roles in the implementation of the recommended actions.

Stakeholders Engagement Process The Johnson County Park & Recreation District administrative team identified approximately 100 stakeholder groups. The strategic planning team reached out to all identified parties and ultimately met with 63 individual stakeholder organizations and groups including 29 JCPRD working groups, eight Johnson County governmental partners, 16 cities, nine recreation and programming partners, and one large public planning agency. The planning team also received 17 online input responses: four JCPRD groups, three Johnson County Governmental partners, four cities, and six partners and agencies. These stakeholder types included partners associated with the following departments and organizations: • • •

JCPRD: Administrative Services, Safety & Outdoor Education, Parks & Golf Course Operations, and Recreation Johnson County: Human Services, Central Services, and Infrastructure Cities: municipalities with and without parks and recreation departments JCPRD Partners: sports clubs and leagues, recreation organizations, community services, regional planning agencies, school districts

Stakeholders were asked a consistent set of questions related to the role of JCPRD in providing park and recreation services to the Johnson County community, the changes to parks and recreation within Johnson County as a whole, past and current partnerships with JCPRD, and their own organizational goals and desires for future relationships and partnerships with JCPRD. The feedback provided is summarized within the Data Collection Submittal section of the appendix. This stakeholder input guided legacy actions as a component of the supporting analysis. A diverse range of partners were selected to represent their stakeholder types on the Legacy Plan Advisory Group that also included members of the JCPRD Legacy Plan Working Committee. The advisory group was established to provide input from outside stakeholders, and to be advocates for the process and final document. An initial engagement included providing insight in the form of a SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, Threat) workshop. As the development of the framework progressed, the advisory committee reviewed the draft recommendations and provided feedback prior to the April 2015 open house, at which the action items and recommendations were first publicly presented.

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Excerpt from the statistically valid mail survey distributed to residents

Public Engagement Process: Statistically Valid Survey A mail survey was sent to a statistically valid distribution of Johnson County households in order to: • • • •

Assess resident usage and satisfaction with JCPRD services Assess needs, met and unmet, and priorities for parks, trails, and recreation facilities Gather input from residents to help set priorities Determine tax support to fund the citizen vision

This survey was seven pages long and took approximately 10-15 minutes to complete. Residents had the option to complete the survey by mail, web or phone. A total of 1,041 resident households completed the survey, including at least 150 households in each of the six county districts. This level of participation resulted in findings with a confidence level of 95% and a margin of error +/- 3.2%. Overall satisfaction with the value of services provided by JCPRD is considerably higher than benchmark levels, as are reported rates of usage. At least 77% of respondent households in all six districts were willing to pay some additional tax contribution to fund the future of the Johnson County Park & Recreation District. A full report of the survey results is included in the appendix to this document.

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JCPRD patrons provide feedback and discuss the Legacy Plan with the planning team at an open house event.

Participants were invited to note their suggestions for the future of JCPRD on a map of Johnson Count.y

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Public Engagement Process: JCPRD Patron Feedback In addition to the mail survey, several other opportunities were provided to participate in the Legacy Plan development. These opportunities included a total of five open house events hosted at two phases within the strategic process, as well as in-park feedback and online input forms. These input opportunities were promoted to Park & Recreation District users through email blasts and on the JCPRD website. Each of these feedback forums accepted input specifically related to the following questions: 1. In the past year, which JCPRD parks and facilities have you visited? Approximately how often do you visit these parks and facilities? Why do you visit these parks and facilities? 2. In the past year, which JCPRD recreational/educational programs have you and/or your family participated in? Do you know if these programs or activities were available through other public or private recreation providers? Why did you select to participate in or attend these programs through JCPRD? 3. What would be your top 3-5 priorities for the future of JCPRD? Why? How soon do you believe these priorities should be acted upon? 4. Please provide any thoughts regarding the current or future role of JCPRD in Johnson County parks and recreation, or specific JCPRD parks, facilities, programming, and events. Additionally, at each open house participants were able to contribute their comments through engagement techniques including providing a personal definition of JCPRD, marking recommendations on a systemwide map, completing feedback forms, and providing feedback on boards of draft recommendations. Board of Park and Recreation Commissioners Engagement Process The Johnson County Board of Park and Recreation Commissioners is a seven member board, including a county commissioner, who govern JCPRD. In this planning process the board members were engaged participants and stakeholders with a strong role in the realization of this plan due to their position as the governing body for JCPRD. Following an initial kickoff meeting, a SWOT workshop was held to engage the board in discussion of their vision and perspective of JCPRD and their role in Johnson County parks and recreation. A presentation of the community survey findings and review of the draft recommendations in March 2015 provided the board an opportunity to assess the direction of the plan, engage the planning team in discussion, and provide input in preparation for the public presentation of draft recommendations. In May 2015, the board was presented the final capital project and investment recommendations. Later that same month, the recommendations and capital investment overview were presented to a joint meeting of the board and the Johnson County Board of County Commissioners. A presentation of the final draft document was made to the Board of Park and Recreation Commissioners on August 2015.

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03

Legacy Elements

When the organization operates as “One JCPRD� the performance of each element, and of the system, is elevated


Legacy Elements

34-37

Regional Parks

38-65

Trails and Connectivity

66-87

Recreation + Cultural Services

88-105

Connecting with Nature

106-119

Stewardship

120-147

Identity

148-163

Teamwork

164-177


Legacy Elements

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JCPRD’s roll as a parks and recreation service provider has changed significantly in the 15 years since MAP 2020. While municipal systems and private providers have grown and filled a layer of service at the local level, JCPRD has continued to grow in parks, facilities, and programming. The funding to provide, maintain and expand these services has not grown along with the district, and in some instances has been reduced. This has resulted in challenges for JCPRD staff while striving to meet the needs of a growing county and working to maintain the level of service provided to, and expected by, the Johnson County community. The needs assessment has identified key roles and expectations for JCPRD based on input from stakeholders, public input, and the statistically valid survey. This analysis identified internal needs and opportunities to expand the services provided by JCPRD, while increasing efficiencies and building a stronger, more efficient JCPRD. Seven focus areas have been identified that together create a framework to define legacy roles for JCPRD in county-wide parks and recreation, and reinforce JCPRD’s position as a leader and partner to county departments, municipalities, schools, sports organizations, and residents of Johnson County. This legacy framework is anticipated to define the roles for JCPRD beyond the life of this plan as they are general guiding statements that provide direction for JCPRD planning and role definition. Within each legacy focus area, or element, is a set of action items. These items define specific actions to be taken over the 15-year focus of this plan in support of each Legacy Element. The action items are specific to this plan and this point in time for JCPRD based on the input received and needs assessment performed during this planning process. Accomplishing these actions is the intent of this plan. Action Items include a series of recommendations that define more focused steps to accomplish action items over the life of this plan. These recommendations are more specific and fluid within the life of the plan, and provide the basis for the capital investment summary presented in Section 4 of this document. Prioritization and implementation of the recommendations will be impacted by future opportunities and challenges presented to JCPRD. Factors that may impact implementation include the continued growth of the county and municipal parks and recreation, the needs and desires of staff and the community, and available funding. Each Legacy Element is presented on the following pages. The elements are presented with an overview snapshot followed by the supporting analysis related to that element . The specific action items and recommendations identified for each element follow the supporting analysis.

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3

.01

Regional Parks


Family Canoeing at Shawnee Mission Park

“Parks connect people to the great outdoors and to each other.” The Trust for Public Land “Parks for People”


Snapshot Regional Parks

Kill Creek Streamway Park

One JCPRD Regional parks are not defined by size. The classification describes a site’s ability to serve the Johnson County community and meet recreation needs. Within the JCPRD ecosystem, this element functions as the “canopy” layer of the forest. The successful acquisition, development, and operations of regional parks, and the resulting volume of visitors, create a dynamic atmosphere for recreation, programming and events, and cultural activities. Definition of Regional Parks Regional parks provide high quality park and recreation experiences and provide spaces where people want to be and want to spend time. Existing and future regional parks within the JCPRD inventory shall provide regionally significant services that meet one or more of the following criteria. •

Identified and developed in partnership with community and stakeholders, including municipalities and school districts.

Protect natural resources and open space; JCPRD Natural Resource Management Plan to define what resources qualify for this distinction.

Address unmet needs/opportunities that are not or cannot be met solely through other providers; needs may be specific, niche, or otherwise suited to JCPRD resources.

Innovative approach to acquisition and development where long term properties may be transitioned to a municipality. Transitions may occur if appropriate based on size or location of parkland, and the ability of the municipal parks department to incorporate the parkland into their system.

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Legacy Framework Goal: We will promote a legacy of regional parks through a focused effort to invest in outdoor spaces which provide regional services.

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

Action: Open Undeveloped Parkland Outcomes: The undeveloped regional park properties currently in the JCPRD system will be opened to the public in phases of various development levels over the next 15 years. Once opened to the public, the parks will provide community members throughout Johnson County access to the recreation amenities and the county’s rich natural resources. Action: Establish Minimum Development and Legacy Standards Outcomes: A set of standards will provide clear understanding of an initial park development program for internal planning and to set public expectations. These standards will provide a consistent visitor experience throughout the JCPRD park’s system. Parks of excellence will attract visitors, new businesses, and residents to Johnson County. Action: Invest in Existing Regional Parks and Golf Courses Outcomes: Continued improvements to existing regional parks and Golf Courses will bring each site closer to achieving its mission, extend the life of cherished amenities, and improve park safety. A network of updated parks will attract existing and new visitors, and set a strong foundation for future acquisition and development. Action: Define Regional Parks Outcomes: These offerings will be defined by JCPRD Mission and Vision, not size or amenity types. JCPRD regional parks and facilities are strategic and purposeful in their locations and development, provide high quality experiences, and are spaces where people want to be and want to spend time. Action: Evaluate Future Acquisition and Development Opportunities Outcomes: A set of criteria based on the JCPRD approach to regional parks and facilities which define an evaluation and selection process for future acquisition and development.

Case Study In coordination with JCPRD, The Trust for Public Land has developed “The Economic Benefits of Johnson County Park & Recreation District” report to quantify the many benefits that the community receives in the form of increased tourism revenue, property value, ecosystem services and human health impacts.

Capital Investment Priorities

SUMMARY

Within existing developed parks, prioritization will be given to improvements which ensure user safety, elevate site conditions to acceptable baseline levels, and address issues which can erode value over time. Within unopened parkland, phased development which provides additional amenities to residents without overextending JCPRD resources is recommended. Acquisition of properties adjacent to existing parkland or located within the northeast and south central regions of Johnson County should be priorities for acquisition. total 15-year capital investment

$ 81, 529, 620

spending area: Undeveloped Parkland

$ 54, 418, 000

spending area: Existing Parks

$ 27, 111, 620

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Supporting Analysis

Regional Parks are a key service to be provided by JCPRD to support quality of life and meet the recreation needs of Johnson County residents and visitors. JCPRD has the expertise and existing landholdings to acquire, develop, and operate county-wide regional parks, trails, recreation facilities, and natural resource areas. These amenities have been shown by a recent study by The Trust for Public Land study to be a driver in residents’ decisions to buy property as well as a top reported reason for visitation to the county.

Mail Survey Q11 Functions that are most important for the Johnson County Park & Recreation District to provide to respondent households

JCPRD Now JCPRD and Johnson County staff, and municipal, regional, and private park and recreation partners agree that the management of large parkland is a JCPRD strength. Municipalities identify parks, trails, and land preservation as JCPRD’s primary role. However, in order to fill this role in the long-term, the true value of regional parks must be conveyed to Johnson County residents. Their support is needed to address the deferred maintenance issues that JCPRD staff and advisors recognize as a current weakness. The statistically valid mail survey results indicate that 84% of residents are willing to pay some additional tax to support parks and recreation improvements important to their household (Q18). This same survey has collected responses that show a majority of residents believe providing large parks is the first or second most important function of JCPRD (Q11). These findings suggest that public support exists for increased funding, especially if additional resources will be dedicated to the care and development of large parks.

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Mail Survey Q10a Importance of providing large parks that serve citizens throughout the county with outdoor facilities

JCPRD Recent History In the past 15 years, Johnson County has experienced continued growth in population and diversity. This trend has coincided with an increasing desire among Johnson County residents to open some or all of the 4,358 acres of undeveloped parkland. Since 2001, JCPRD has added over 3,300 acres of parkland with acquisitions including: the Rieke Lake future park property, future Camp Branch Park, Camp Branch Glade, Mid-America West Sports Complex, Stilwell Community Park, Mildale Farm, and expansions to the future Big Bull Creek Park and Cedar Niles future park property. Although development has been delayed by limited funding levels following the 2008 economic downturn, the acquisition of this parkland along with streamway corridor purchases and donations has enabled JCPRD to preserve land for public use. JCPRD parks experienced over 7.7 million visitations in 2014. An impact of high visitation and limited funding for maintenance and new park development is a decline in condition of many park amenities and facilities as they are being “loved to death” by park visitors. This decline adds to a growing backlog of deferred maintenance.

JCPRD Future Johnson County and municipalities envision a future in which JCPRD is more distinct from municipal parks and recreation. JCPRD staff members and municipal parks and recreation partners agree that this distinction may be enhanced by JCPRD’s ability to provide regional draws, including the opening of new regional parks. Several private sector stakeholders expressed a desire for higher quality facilities. The JCPRD leadership team and the parks maintenance team described a need to update aging facilities and infrastructure. The development and opening of currently undeveloped parkland can relieve some of the pressure on highly visited areas of JCPRD’s most popular parks. This can extend the life cycle of park assets and reduce maintenance costs. The Mid-America Regional Council (MARC) projects continued population growth throughout Johnson County with an anticipated population increase of nearly 30% from 2015-2030. These projections include growth in the southeast and southwest regions of the county, growth along the K-10 and K-7 corridors and continued density in northeast Johnson County. Many of the northeast Johnson County communities have minimal resources available for park and recreation services, and look to JCPRD for partnership to provide parks and recreation services.

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Actions + Recommendations Regional Parks have long been identified as a primary role of JCPRD in providing parks and recreation services for Johnson County. To define an approach for the legacy of regional parks in Johnson County this plan focuses on actions that create a clear understanding of the JCPRD role in providing county-wide parkland and protecting natural resources. This role becomes the basis for continued parkland development and acquisition. Regional Parks action items are:

1.1 Action: Open Undeveloped Parkland

1.2 Action: Establish Minimum Development and Legacy Standards

1.3 Action: Invest in Existing Regional Parks and Golf Courses

1.4 Action: Define Regional Parks

1.5 Action: Evaluate Future Acquisition and Development Opportunities

1.1. Action Open Undeveloped Parkland 1.1.1. Rieke Lake Future Park Property - First Phase Development 2015/2016 1.1.2. Meadowbrook Golf Course and Country Club - Master Plan 2015/TIF Funded Development 2016 1.1.3. Future Big Bull Creek Park - Master Plan 2015-16/Phase One Development 2017 1.1.4. Future Camp Branch Park - Master Plan 2017/Phase One Development 2023 1.1.5 Cedar Niles Future Park Property - Phase One Development 2020 1.1.6. Sunflower Ordnance Works Future Park Property - Timeline Undefined Undeveloped Parkland

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Existing Parks


1.1. Action: Open Undeveloped Parkland Opening current undeveloped parkland is a priority for the next 15 years. With 4.358 acres, or 45%, of JCPRD parkland currently undeveloped and not open to public use, there is significant potential to increase recreation opportunities throughout Johnson County. This can be realized through opening of the four currently undeveloped park properties and the former Meadowbrook Golf Course and Country Club property, a portion of which is identified to become a new JCPRD park property. Successfully opening these parks will require a plan for funding, phased development, and natural resource management. The first step to defining budgets, funding, and development phases is to create a comprehensive master plan for each park property. An initial phase of this planning process should include site analysis to identify natural resource protection areas and development areas. Additional components of the planning process should include public engagement to define current needs and partnership opportunities, a county-wide assessment to identify how the park development can complement existing JCPRD and municipal parks, and a future growth analysis to ensure the master plan considers the expected needs of the growing Johnson County. This planning process will not only provide a direction for the vision of each park, but also identify priorities for phased implementation with budgeting. Identification of a first phase of development within each park shall consider more than just the capital investment to construct and open park amenities. The initial and long-term maintenance, operations, and safety of the parks need to be accounted for in each project phase while creating a destination within each park through a minimum development standard. Previous minimal development efforts have received negative public comment focused on the perception of potential for operational and safety concerns within these parks. The following recommendations define prioritized phase one investments in undeveloped parkland, and the opening of the five currently undeveloped park properties within the 15-year window of this plan. A timeline for two significant development phases in each of these parks has been included in the capital investment section of this document.

1.1.1. 1.1.2. 1.1.6. 1.1.5.

1.1.4.

1.1.3.

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1.1.1. Rieke Lake Future Park Property - First Phase Development 2015/2016 The Johnson County Board of Park and Recreation Commissioners allocated $1.5 million in 2015 to be invested in opening one of the undeveloped parks. The Rieke Lake future park property was selected for this investment to fund first phase development of a new regional park. This future park property was selected due to its location within the county, existing lake amenity, and the presence of a current master plan defining program elements for this implementation phase. A first phase of the master plan development will include lake access, a loop trail with trailhead, and the possibility of multiple destination amenities developed through various partnerships. A focus on the lake with parking, boat ramp, and dam improvements will open this existing destination within the park to day use and special events. A trailhead and loop trail around the lake will enhance the lake amenity and provide shared parking. Additional development in this phase of the park will focus on existing and new partnerships to add expanded park uses. Opportunities include multi-use fields and associated parking in partnership with the City of De Soto, crosscountry course with the De Soto USD, and disc golf in partnership with the Flying Disc Club of Kansas City. While not part of the park master plan, the development of singletrack trails in partnership with Urban Trail Co., or other partners, is also a possibility within this park. A program overview of the proposed first phase includes: •

Paved Entry and First Phase Parking - Located off Sunflower Road, this entry should include signage with JCPRD branding and access control gates. The entry drive and parking should bring visitors into the park and provide lake access and amenity parking. Two first phase parking areas are proposed totaling 84 vehicle spaces and nine boat pull-through spaces.

Trailhead - This amenity is located near the lake and lake parking, and should include a shelter, restroom, playground, and information kiosks. The trailhead will provide a gathering point for the visitors and create a destination node for picnics and day use at the playground.

Lake - An existing amenity within the park, the 28-acre lake will provide fishing and water-based recreation opportunities. A boat ramp will provide day use access and parking. Repair work will be required on the dam, and at the time of this document JCPRD is in the process of assessing these efforts and costs.

Multiuse Loop Trail - As a first phase of trail development, a 1.5-2 mile loop is proposed around the lake connecting to the parking lots and trailhead. The route will provide access to fishing locations and include small picnic shelters strategically located around the lake to take advantage of views and provide a variety of experiences along the trail.

Mulituse Fields - As a partnership opportunity with the City of De Soto, the development of 2-4 proposed sports fields along the east side of the park will provide an additional amenity and soil potentially needed for dam repairs. Along with the fields, parking for approximately 100 vehicles should be developed with this partnership.

Disc Golf Course - The addition of a disc golf course will increase user base and provide an additional destination amenity with low impact. Partnering with KC Flying Disc Club for the design and construction is recommended.

Cross-Country Course - This amenity is a partnership opportunity with the De Soto USD. This park development will provide a home course for the school district, and could incorporate clearings for the disc golf course routing and hole locations.

Singletrack Trails - While not identified in the master plan, the inclusion of these trails will add a destination amenity and broaden the user base of this initial phase. Singletrack trails also provide a partnership opportunity for development with stakeholders such as Urban Trail Co.

Following this initial investment to open the park, additional development phases are required to fully implement the master plan.

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1.1.2. Meadowbrook Golf Course and Country Club Master Plan 2015 / TIF Funded Development 2016 In February 2015, the City of Prairie Village, Van Trust Real Estate, Johnson County, and JCPRD announced the planned renovation of the 136-acre Meadowbrook Golf Course and Country Club to include residential development and an approximately 80-acre park to be developed and maintained by JCPRD as a new park within the JCPRD system. The existing golf course clubhouse should be evaluated for possible reuse as a community center. JCPRD will lead the master planning and development of this park and assume responsibility for its long-term management and maintenance. At the time of this document, a final timeline for master planning and development of the park improvements had not been finalized. It is expected that implementation of the park master plan will follow the master planning process and clarification of TIF funding available (current anticipated funding is $6 million for the park and community center) for these capital improvements. Based on funding and the master plan vision, the park may be developed in a single phase, or this initial development may just be a first phase of improvements with future phases to follow as funding or partnerships are identified. Initial community input sessions for the Meadowbrook development were held on March 10 and March 11, 2015 at the Meadowbrook clubhouse. Organized by the City of Prairie Village and VanTrust Real Estate, JCPRD participated to discuss with residents their initial desires and concerns with the proposed park development. Below is a summary of community input received during the March 10 and March 11, 2015 open house events (for the complete summary of comments, please see the appendix). Park Ideas

Community Center Ideas

Trails

Pool (outdoor)

Green Space / Gardens / Natives

Pool (indoor)

Sports Fields / No Sports Fields

No Pool

Playgrounds

Gym (fitness)

Off-Leash Area / No Off-Leash Area

Indoor Courts (volleyball, basketball)

Disc Golf / No Disc Golf

Tennis

Waterfalls / Fountains

Fitness / Exercise

Splash Pad

Kid’s Classes and Camps

Golf / No Golf

Coffee Shop

Fishing

Pickleball

Bocce Courts

Movies / Concerts

Concerts

Meeting Rooms / Rental

1.1.3. Future Big Bull Creek Park - Master Plan 2015-16 / Phase One Development 2017 Scheduled for master planning in 2015, this plan will provide a community input-guided vision for the development of this new park. Located in southwest Johnson County, the park is a significant component in The Southwest Johnson County Area Plan (2013) and will serve a segment of the county expected to see significant growth. The population of Gardner alone is projected to nearly double over the next twenty years, around the development of the Intermodal and Logistics Park. While the planning process will define goals and recommendations for the development of this park, below are recommendations identified based on input received during this county-wide planning process. These recommendations should be considered in the 2015 master planning effort. •

The park is critical to the protection of the Big Bull Creek/Hillsdale Lake watershed. The future Big Bull Creek Park property and Mildale Farm property contain over 4 miles of the Big Bull Creek Streamway and protect over 2,000 acres of the surrounding watershed. The 2012 Hillsdale/Big Bull Creek Watershed Protection and Restoration Strategy identified Big Bull Creek as the highest

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priority of the three watersheds feeding the lake. The 2013 Southwest Area Plan recognized the importance of the Big Bull Creek corridor and the potential impact of planned development within the watershed and recommended a comprehensive watershed approach to natural resource management. Both of these plans and their recommendations should be referenced during the master planning process. •

Identify and preserve wetland mitigation areas along Big Bull Creek within the park properties for resource protection and habitat preservation.

This area of Johnson County is still growing and expanding with the construction of the Intermodal and Logistics Park. Public input and engagement will be critical to a successful planning process that defines a vision for the park, meeting local needs, and the regional focus of JCPRD parks and facilities.

The size of this park and location in the less densely populated southwest area of the county provides opportunities for regional amenity inclusion not found elsewhere within the JCPRD system. These amenities, including public camping and hunting, will expand the resources available through JCPRD, and provide opportunities for expanded programming and outdoor education. The addition of these amenities will require close coordination with park police for management of these activities and possible revisions to the JCPRD Code of Regulations.

1.1.4. Future Camp Branch Park - Master Plan 2017 / Phase One Development 2023 The opening of the 58-acre Camp Branch Glade in November 2014 was the first of four park properties in southeast Johnson County to be opened to the public. The second, the 55-acre Stilwell Community Park opened in June 2015. The two remaining properties are the future Camp Branch Park and the Camp Branch Streamway which will link the future Camp Branch Park and Stilwell Community Park to the Blue River and Coffee Creek Streamways. The streamway trail development is planned to precede the Camp Branch Park development as an initial phase to opening this park. The streamway trail development is addressed in more detail in the Trails and Connectivity Legacy Element section of this document (3.02). Future Camp Branch Park is a 300-acre linear park property stretching approximately 1.5 miles north to south with 80% (240 acres) of the park acreage located at the south end between 175th Street and 183rd Street. North of 175th Street the park narrows to a 350-foot wide corridor along the Camp Branch Streamway. Preparation of a community input-driven master planning process is the number one priority for development of this park property. A master plan is recommended in 2017 with a first phase of development to follow in the mid-2020s. While the planning process will define goals and recommendations for this park development, below are recommendations identified based on input received during this county-wide planning process. These recommendations should be considered in the master planning effort. • Focus active recreation amenity development at the south end of the park property. • Preserve and manage Camp Branch Streamway corridor within the park. • Plan for trails and connectivity: Internal park trail system including the Camp Branch Streamway Trail, local community and public transit connections. 1.1.5. Cedar Niles Future Park Property - Phase One Development 2020 Cedar Niles future park property is a 955-acre property located west of K-7 along the Cedar Creek Streamway. Master planned in 2008, the property is planned to provide a mix of active and passive recreation opportunities designed around the natural resource features of the Cedar Creek Streamway corridor and restoration prairies. With early development of the Rieke Lake future park property and the future Big Bull Creek Park, along with the addition of Meadowbrook Golf Course and Country Club to the investment and development schedule, a significant phase one master plan development in Cedar Niles future park property is planned for 2020. Similar to the future Camp Branch Park, development of the streamway trail within the Cedar Niles future park property will precede the park master plan development and provide for public access to the park. This streamway trail development is planned to begin in 2017 and is discussed in more detail in the Trails and Connectivity Legacy Element section of this document (3.02). With the anticipated schedule for master plan implementation extended 15-20 years beyond the 2008 master planning process, the Cedar Niles future park property master plan should be revisited prior to development of a

48 | legacy plan


first phase. A master plan review will ensure the vision for the park is consistent with the current needs and desires of the community and present opportunities for the park development. This review will also provide an opportunity to update a portion or all of the 2008 master plan as deemed appropriate. As part of this planning process, the discussions regarding Cedar Niles future park property development remain consistent with the master plan. Opportunities regarding destination amenities and system-wide elements (see 1.2 Action) should be incorporated into the future development phases of the park property. A first phase of development has been identified based on analysis and public input received during this planning process. A focus on the east side of the park due to higher development density will provide access to neighborhoods and schools with connections to City of Olathe sidewalks and trails along W 127th St., and opportunities for future connections within existing utility easements. A loop trail in this initial phase of development opens a significant amount of the park to visitors with limited infrastructure requirements, and includes partnership opportunities for singletrack trail development. This loop trail will provide opportunities for trail connections to neighboring communities and link to the streamway trail within the park. A program overview of this proposed first phase includes: •

Paved Entry and First Phase Parking - Located near the intersection of 127th Street and S. Clare Road, this location provides opportunities for connections to residential neighborhoods, schools and existing City of Olathe sidewalks and trails infrastructure. This location also allows for future connections to residential development, Olathe parks, including Prairie Center Park and Lake Olathe, as well as JCPRD’s Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center. This entry should include signage with JCPRD branding and access control gates, and the parking lot should accommodate 20-30 vehicles.

Trailhead - This amenity should include a shelter, restroom, playground and information kiosks near the parking lot. This will provide a safe gathering point for visitors and create a destination node for picnics and day use at the playground.

Multiuse Loop Trail - A 2.5-3 mile loop is proposed as a first phase of trail development on the east side of Cedar Creek. The routing will take advantage of the topography and ridge without the need for bridge crossings, provide woodland and glade experiences, and include overlooks to the valleys north and west within the park. The routing will allow for future expansion within the park, connection to the streamway trail, and links to the community from the south and east.

Singletrack Trails - Identified in the master plan, these trails will add a destination amenity and broaden the user base of this initial phase. Singletrack trails also provide a partnership opportunity for development with stakeholders such as Urban Trail Co.

Following this initial investment to open the park, additional development phases are required to fully implement the master plan. 1.1.6. Sunflower Ordnance Works Future Park Property - Timeline Undefined This property is 2,000 acres of the former Sunflower Ordnance Works Property identified as a parkland transfer to JCPRD. An early transfer has provided JCPRD with 133 acres on the north side of Kill Creek Park to allow for future development of the Kill Creek Steamway Trail. However, the timeline for the transfer of the remaining acreage is yet to be determined. It is important to acknowledge this property as a potential expansion of the JCPRD system. Located south of K-10 and directly west of Kill Creek Park, the 2,000 acres stretch approximately 12 miles along the eastern, southern, and western edges of the former plant site. This linear configuration follows parts of three creek corridors, Kill Creek and Spoon Creek on the east, and Captain Creek on the west. When the transfer is complete, this property will be seen as an opportunity for recreational development and westward expansion of the Kill Creek Streamway Trail including a potential link to Douglas County and other regional connections.

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1.2. Action: Establish Minimum Development and Legacy Standards This action defines a set of standards to guide the JCPRD priorities of providing parks and recreation and protecting natural resources. The standards address initial park development processes and typical park elements that create a recognizable JCPRD brand experience. They establish a baseline and a set of program elements residents of Johnson County can anticipate in first phase park development, and typical elements patrons can expect to find in JCPRD parks. Combined, these items can provide JCPRD an internal process to identify and protect natural resources, program and open parkland, and provide residents of Johnson County with clear expectations for parks within the district. Recommendations are: 1.2.1. Minimum Development Standards (Initial Park Development) 1.2.2. Additional Park Police Officers and Park Police Substations in Regional Parks 1.2.3. Legacy Standards 1.2.1. Minimum Development Standards (Initial Park Development) The opening of undeveloped parkland for public access and use requires a balance of amenities and infrastructure to attract patrons and meet the expectations of a JCPRD park or facility. In recent years, the inventory of undeveloped parkland has resulted in pressures to open properties to public access with limited funding available for development, operations, and maintenance. In response to these pressures, a minimal development approach was employed at two new park properties: Camp Branch Glade and Stilwell Community Park. These recent park openings have received critical response from the surrounding community as having not met the JCPRD brand experience. A standard for initial park investment should be established, and this standard cannot be defined by only a budget number. The key to successful park investment phases requires communication and understanding. Available funding and community expectations need to be communicated to result in parks that provide destination amenities meeting the JCPRD brand expectations from the initial opening. There needs to be an understanding of what can be accomplished in a development phase and what partnerships may allow for amenity development beyond the JCPRD development budget. Recommendations below identify actions and development standards that define a process for initial park development. 1.2.1.1. Master Plan: Prior to any phase of development, a current master plan for the park should be in place. This master plan will provide park-specific direction regarding natural resource protection and amenity development to meet local needs and county-wide expectations, resulting in a purposeful implementation phase that will attract a significant user base. This plan and the public planning process will also convey to the community the bigger vision for the park, and enable them to see how this initial phase is a building block for the greater plan. Master plans are critical to guide improvements of existing amenities and development of new JCPRD parks and facilities. It is recommended that all park properties have a current master plan prior to implementing major renovations or new development.

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•

JCPRD properties without master plans: The future Big Bull Creek Park is scheduled for master planning in 2015, and the future Camp Branch Park is scheduled for master planning in 2017. The Meadowbrook property should be master planned in 2015 or 2016 depending on timeline for implementation.

•

As noted previously, all parks will require master plan updates within the 15-year period of this plan. The Kill Creek Park and TimberRidge Adventure Center master plan was prepared in 1998 and will need to be updated prior to major renovations.


Other existing parks should have master plan reviews prior to major renovations as their current plans are over five years old : 1.

Antioch Park (2003)

2.

Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center (2003)

3.

Heritage Park / Heritage Park Golf Course (2003)

4.

Shawnee Mission Park (2003) / Oakridge Farm (2007)

1.2.1.2. Partnerships: Successful phased development can be enhanced through partnerships for funding and development of park amenities. JCPRD should look to leverage existing partnerships and develop new partners for future park development. These partnerships can occur internally, with other Johnson County departments, municipalities, and/or stakeholders. Examples of potential partnerships include: •

Internal - Partnership with Facilities Management for design and program development of indoor facilities to comply with County Guide to Sustainability.

Internal - Partnership with Developmental Supports and Health and Environment for county-wide programming needs that can be met within the new parks, and grant funding opportunities that can be strengthened by partnerships. Resources are available through these departments to prepare and submit the grant applications.

Municipal - Partner with municipalities for development of athletic practice fields or cross county course within the initial development phase of a park. The municipality may provide project funding to cover the cost of the fields and course development with the understanding that when not in use for organized activities the amenities are available for use by park visitors.

Municipal - Municipality-provided trails and walks from surrounding neighborhoods, schools, and commercial development to the new park is a partnership opportunity that will increase community access and connectivity to the park.

Stakeholders - Organizations such as Urban Trail Co., Kansas City Flying Disc Club, and KC Wildlands bring resources in the form of amenity expertise, funding, and volunteers to projects. With their participation, additional development beyond JCPRD funding may be possible to increase user base and impact of first phase development.

1.2.1.3. Include True Cost of Development: When considering phasing of development, consult with maintenance staff, park police, and recreation managers to determine the additional annual costs for operations, maintenance, and policing of the proposed park development. Together with the design and construction costs, this figure will represent the true cost of park development to be budgeted and funded. 1.2.1.4. Minimum Development Program Items: Providing public access to new parkland is a priority of JCPRD. To accomplish this in a feasible way that meets the expectations of JCPRD and the residents of Johnson County, a program for the initial phase of development should be created for each new park. The program should be unique to each park, but consistent in standard items that define the JCPRD brand to the public upon opening. These program items will provide a purposeful base level of development to attract appropriate visitors and include destination amenities that will be expanded in future phases. Minimum development programs will allow for efficient true cost development and opening timeline, and establish a consistent level of expectation for partners and the community when new parkland is opened.

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Minimum development program items may vary slightly based on the mission of each park and partnership opportunity, but at a minimum should include: •

Gated entry and park signage that meets the JCPRD signage and brand standards.

Paved drive and parking lot for vehicular access.

• •

Shelter and full-service restroom with utility services. Playground and/or open play lawn in close proximity to the shelter and parking.

Trailheads and trails providing access to amenities for park patrons and providing access to amenities and natural features within a park. Trails may be contained loops within the park, or a portion of a loop linking trailheads, or connecting to regional streamway trails and municipal trail systems.

1.2.2. Additional Park Police Officers and Park Police Substations in Regional Parks Safety is a critical component of a successful park system, and is necessary to provide the community with parks and facilities they want to visit. JCPRD park visitor surveys show that people feel safe in the parks and facilities with approximately 97% of respondents indicating that safety within the parks is either excellent or good. With the expanded parks and recreation system and continued investment proposed in this plan, the current organization of park police operating out of Shawnee Mission Park is limiting to park police officers. Time spent commuting to and from park police headquarters is time they are not in the parks and engaging with park users. To address this concern and establish a more permanent park police presence, substation development is recommended in selected parks across the JCPRD system.

Park Police Headquarters at Shawnee Mission Park The location of three proposed JCPRD Park Police substations are shown above: Heritage Park, Kill Creek Park, future Big Bull Creek Park

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Substations will reinforce minimum design standards and provide park police with a location to report daily within their patrol area, reduce travel time, and allow more time to be spent on patrol within the parks. These facilities should include a small office, interview room, restroom, locker room, armory, and other necessary support for park police to operate comfortably and safely from within the park. Park police will still report to headquarters as necessary. A substation in Heritage Park has been a capital planning item, but funding for the implementation of the substation has not been available within the current mill levy funding structure. This plan recommends the development of the Heritage Park substation, as well as a substation in Kill Creek Park and a third in the future Big Bull Creek Park. In addition to substations, the plan recommends the hiring of additional park police officers as the JCPRD system continues to grow. Five additional officers are identified beginning in 2016 and phased in over the 15-year plan as needed to align with park openings and park police needs. 1.2.3. Legacy Standards Legacy standards identify park and facility amenities and programs that will become typical elements in new and existing parks. Unlike a unique destination amenity that sets an individual park or facility apart from others, these elements provide a consistency that visitors recognize and begin to anticipate when they visit a JCPRD park or facility. The standards are built on JCPRD’s innovative leadership roles enhancing patron experience, and becoming part of the JCPRD parks and facilities fabric. As a brand component, patrons can anticipate these amenities being present in all JCPRD parks and facilities. These amenities can be phased into existing parks or included in the planning and development phases of new parks and facilities. These elements are dynamic and will change as the needs and opportunities of park users evolve over the life of this plan and beyond. The recommendations below include amenities identified in previous planning efforts that shape the role and mission of the parks, and in this process remain goals for the parks. Additional recommendations are included as identified in this planning process to advance or focus the overall role of each park within the district. 1.2.3.1. Identify and Protect Natural Resource Areas Regional parks and facilities contain various levels of development to provide a range of recreational services. A key service of JCPRD to the Johnson County community is its ability to protect significant amounts of natural resource area within regional parks. These efforts align with the JCPRD Vision, and promote biodiversity, protect wildlife habitat protect watersheds, and increase efficiencies in operations and maintenance throughout the district. It is critical that the identification of passive use and natural areas be a priority in all regional parks and parkland acquisition and these efforts should guide the planning for park amenity development. The level of public access provided to these areas should be evaluated to balance education and recreation with protection and natural resource management. Natural resource management is a priority for JCPRD, and is discussed in more detail within the Connecting with Nature Legacy Element section of this document. As a Legacy Standard, the protection and celebration of natural resources is a defining characteristic of JCPRD regional parks and facilities. Until an updated natural resource management plan and maintenance plan are in place, the current Natural Areas classification structure from the 2009 Natural Resource Management Plan should be applied to park and facility natural resources for definition and management. A summary of these Park Use Area Types from the JCPRD Natural Resource Management Plan 2009 is provided below. • Passive-Naturalistic (Moderate Use) Areas – Class III

The general nature of the recreation experience is a restorative escape from the urban landscape to participate in less structured, low intensity activities. Characterized by mixed landscapes supporting a wide array of uses requiring no on-site agency personnel - lightly programmed, self facilitated recreation areas.

Examples include: Disc golf course; singletrack trails; cross country course (nonevent days); special event

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parking (nonevent days); substantial segments of open park space adjacent to higher use areas. • Natural Areas (A) – Class IV Dual purposes: resource protection and more primitive/dispersed recreation experiences Examples include: Streamway trail corridors; streamway parks; and areas as natural buffers. • Natural Areas – Water (B) – Class IV JCPRD manages several ponds (less than two acres in size) and lakes (greater than two acres in size), stream segments and wetlands on its properties; primarily with a focus on biodiversity. Exception - Zones in larger bodies of water may be managed for relatively intense active use. Example - Shawnee Mission Park Lake. • Natural Areas - Special Status (C) – Class IV Within larger natural areas are possible sites/features deemed worthy of additional protection. These sites may be so designated for the presence of threatened and endangered species, archaeological, cultural or historic features; designation as a mitigation site; presence of research plots; and certain renovation and sensitive biodiversity sites. Examples - Meade’s Milkweed site buffer - Kill Creek Park and Ogg Prairie - Shawnee Mission Park. 1.2.3.2. Parkland Use for Income Generation In the past, JCPRD has entered into agreements allowing revenue-generating uses within developed and undeveloped parkland. These uses have included agricultural leases and cell tower leases, which generate income from dedicated access to district landholdings. In recognition of current and anticipated fiscal challenges, and understanding the quantity of still undeveloped parkland within the JCPRD system, incomegenerating uses of parkland was noted during the course of stakeholder discussions. While generating income from developed, or undeveloped, parkland may provide some funding assistance for capital investments, these uses can negatively impact the park property. The potentially negative impacts may be visual, environmental, or use-limiting in nature. Seeking out income-generating opportunities derived from landholdings should not be a focus of JCPRD. It is important to recall that the primary charge of JCPRD is providing public access to parks and recreation opportunities, and protecting natural resources within Johnson County. These should be the primary focus for all district properties, and the guiding consideration when any income-generating use is proposed for JCPRD parkland. Parkland acquisition methods, including tax exempt bonds or donations, may also impact the potential use of parkland for opportunities other than parks and recreation, due to stipulated restrictions attached to the transfer. Consideration of revenue-generating opportunities should focus on the impact the use may have on the property and park patrons. Opportunities should not be considered that fundamentally conflict with the use of the land for parks and recreation purposes, have a negative impact on visual quality or natural resources, or may negatively impact the long-term use of the land for parks and recreation after the revenue-generating use is removed. Opportunities may be considered for further evaluation if, in the assessment of JCPRD, the use would complement or enhance - or at a minimum be neutral to - the use of the property for parks and recreation purposes and associated visual and environmental impacts. 1.2.3.3. Bike Share Program JCPRD has taken the initiative to lead a county-wide effort to educate and encourage youth on the importance of health and wellness through JCPRD U. In addition, the evolving demographic profile of Johnson County shows a population that is growing in size as well as economic diversity. Reinforcing district-wide programs and initiatives to provide opportunities for all sectors of the community and reinforce health and wellness is a goal of this plan. Establishing a bike share program at regional parks and facilities is one such program that could meet this goal. Growing in popularity across the country, bike share programs vary in structure and intent, and include some membership program. An example of this program is Kansas City B-cycle in Kansas City, Missouri, part of the national B-cycle bike-sharing program. A recreational day-use bike share program may begin at specific locations within parks or at access points along streamway Trails. Over time the program could grow beyond JCPRD to establish an alternative transportation

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system for Johnson County using the trail system and bike route network to link recreation, retail, commercial, and residential destinations. Opportunities associated with a bike share program include: •

Expanding health and wellness initiatives within JCPRD parks and facilities.

Leadership in parks and recreation services to Johnson County.

Partnership opportunities for establishing the program with healthcare providers and corporate partners to promote health and wellness.

Providing biking day use opportunities within parks for families and individuals.

Partnership with Johnson County Transit to coordinate location of mass transit stops and bike share stations.

1.2.3.4. Destination Pavilions All regional parks that support activities for large groups of patrons should include a destination pavilion adequate for large gatherings and special events. These pavilions should be rental facilities and provide corporate donor naming opportunities similar to the sponsorship program started for sports fields and fieldhouse advertising. Presence of these pavilions illustrates a component of the JCPRD regional park brand. Examples of destination pavilions within the district include the pavilion at The Theatre in the Park with its scale and architecture, and Whispering Pines shelter at the TimberRidge Adventure Center shelter with its location and views. Characteristics of this pavilion type include: •

Destination pavilions should include architectural detail that is consistent with the character of the park, but unique from the standard shelter style within the park.

Destination pavilion locations should complement its setting and encourage use without negatively impacting natural resources or other destination amenities within the park.

Destination pavilions will add a “Destination Pavilion” category to the existing shelter schedule with a maximum capacity of 200 or more, and include an appropriate rental rate. Shawnee Mission Park has two shelters with a maximum occupancy of 200 (#8 and #12), but they are standard in style, and do not provide the added character intended with the destination pavilion. These shelters will remain classified as large shelters as will future shelters of similar size and standard type.

Destination pavilions should include convenience items and support facilities to meet the needs of park patrons. These include, but are not limited to: adequate parking, restrooms integrated into the pavilion, lockable storage, grills, fire rings, electricity and lighting, technology charging, drinking fountain, and a playground or open play lawn in close proximity.

1.2.3.5. Safety Recommendations The following recommendations are general safety recommendations for regional parks and facilities that have been identified from stakeholder discussions as appropriate to increase efficiencies for JCPRD staff, improve coordination, and address concerns from park police regarding existing operations and park and facility standards. Implementation of these recommendations within existing parks and inclusion in future park planning and development will reinforce a JCPRD identity and enhance the safe recreation environment provided to park and facility visitors. Trail Signage: All trails should include a consistent distance marker program. The distances should be designated from one end of the trail or a trailhead with JCPRD logo and the park or trail name for user reference. These markers will also give park police a more accurate location reference to increase their response time in the case of an emergency. Standard distance spacing for signage

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is every quarter-mile, but tenth-mile intervals may be desired along internal park loops due to prominent use by pedestrians or remote park and streamway trails requiring more frequent reassurance. Key Cards: Consistent with the greater Johnson County initiative to replace keyed doors at police and security access areas with a key card system, it is recommend that a similar program be put in place for park police secure access areas. This will be more convenient for police access and provide greater control and security with reduced concern of duplicate keys for secure areas. Reservation Notification: Evaluation of new recreation management software should look for a platform that addresses current and future needs of JCPRD. This software should be adaptable and upgradeable over time. It is recommended the implementation configuration include digital notification of park police and park maintenance for shelter, facility, and special event rentals. The current process requires physical notification of police. Security Cameras: Include security cameras at entries and major parking lots of all parks and facilities to provide video feed to park police headquarters and officer laptops. Cellular signal for wireless connection may be an issue with rural park locations initially, but should be added to the system as soon as technology allows for implementation. Security Lighting: Provide adequate level security lighting at all existing and new parking lots and park entries to aid park police on patrol and deter undesirable behavior. Shelter Lighting: Provide enhanced lighting at remote shelters and pavilions to aid park police in patrol. May include motion activation following park closing or variable level lighting that can be controlled by officers. Electronic Gates: Add electronic gates at all park and facility entries that restrict access at closing. Electronic gates will simplify opening and closing of parks and provide park police simplified remote or key pad access to parks 24 hours a day. Gate aesthetics should complement the character of the park or facility entry. 1.2.3.6. Technology Recommendations The needs and desires of park and facility patrons are ever changing as new technology becomes available. In an effort to respond to these changing needs, the following list of technological recommendations should be considered in all new parks and facilities, and can be phased into existing parks and facilities.

Wireless Access: Provide WiFi access at all facilities, destination pavilions, and gathering areas (i.e. destination playgrounds, athletic complexes, etc.). Explore partnership opportunity with local wireless service providers. Electric: All shelters and pavilions should provide electric outlets for park users. Quantity and location of outlets should be appropriate for size of shelter and average demand during events typical of the location. Lighting: Include lighting for security, user convenience, and safety at all shelters and pavilion. Dusk to dawn lighting

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should suffice in most locations, but larger shelters and destination pavilions should include higher level of lighting for special events. Electronic Charging Stations: Provide wired or solar-powered charging stations within parks and facilities for visitor phones, tablets, eReaders, etc. Electric Car Charging Stations: Provide electric car charging stations at parks and facilities. JCPRD is participating in KCP&L’s 2015 Clean Charge Network Plan. That plan calls for the installation of 1,001 public electric chargers in KP&L’s Missouri and Kansas service territories. Sustainable Design: Partner with Johnson County Facilities Management for programming and design guided by the principles established in the County Guide to Sustainability. This collaboration will provide

1.3. Action: Invest in Existing Regional Parks and Golf Courses This category of recommendations focuses on the existing parks managed and operated by JCPRD. The recommendations in this section include items identified in previous planning efforts that shape the role and mission of the parks, as well as items identified during public engagement and the community-wide survey performed during this process. Items identified focus on improvements to existing amenities and conditions, clarifying the overall role of each park within the JCPRD system, and identifying items to address in updated master plans for the park. Existing indoor facility and recreation programming recommendations are located in the Stewardship and Recreation and Cultural Services sections respectively. Recommendations are: 1.3.1. Antioch Park 1.3.2. Heritage Park 1.3.3. Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center 1.3.4. Shawnee Mission Park 1.3.5. Thomas S. Stoll Memorial Park 1.3.6. Sunflower Nature Park 1.3.7.Kill Creek Park and TimberRidge Adventure Center 1.3.8. Golf Courses 1.3.1. Antioch Park As the oldest and most urban park in the JCPRD system, recommendations for this park focus on managing the balance between active and passive uses, and addressing concerns derived from the “loved to death” condition facing several of the district parks. A new master plan for this park will provide additional direction on the items below, as well as recommendations regarding long-term improvements and management of this park. Priority recommendations for Antioch Park include: •

Evaluate Oak savannas due to signs of decline. Prepare an action plan to address this situation. Action plan should include removal of underbrush and native understory restoration as components of addressing this issue.

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Complete the stream improvements below the south lake.

Address poor condition of maintenance facility. Due to relatively small size of this park and desire to maximize public recreation space, a new facility should be located remote from the park.

Evaluate completed lake and stream improvements to identify and address issues and performance.

Continue evaluation and improvements to park water quality.

Complete rose garden improvements project.

1.3.2. Heritage Park Priority recommendations for park elements in Heritage Park are focused on lake improvements. The current 2003 master plan should undergo a review and potential update prior to any significant changes to existing park programming and configuration. Priority recommendations for Heritage Park include: •

Protect and improve natural areas and habitats within the park.

Dredge and improve lake to increase water holding capacity, reshape the east shoreline, and improve fish habitat. These improvements will also address irrigation water supply issues currently being experienced due to lost lake capacity from silting in of lake.

1.3.3. Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center (See Legacy Element 3.04 Connecting with Nature) 1.3.4. Shawnee Mission Park Recommendations for this park focus on incorporating acquired adjacent parcels into the Shawnee Mission Park, and addressing existing needs identified in this planning process. Last master planned in 2003 this plan should be reviewed when planning the adjacent parcels, and update the plan for select areas of the park in association with the expansion properties if appropriate. If significant improvement projects are desired within the park, an update of the complete park plan should be developed prior to implementation. Priority recommendations for Shawnee Mission Park include: 1.3.4.1. Existing Park Recommendations:

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Protect and improve natural areas and habitats within the park.

Continue archery range improvements including raised platforms for bow-hunting practice and provide shade for shooters.

Add a paved multi-purpose trail along the south side of the park for access in lieu of unpaved trail identified in the 2003 master plan.

Continue development of singletrack trails within the park. This has been a very successful low impact use. Trails may be developed to accommodate cyclo-cross and other racing events.

Improve, or relocate, existing dog off-leash area. Existing issues with hillside erosion, beach damage, the inability to rest any of the lawn area, and conflicts with non off-leash users are increasing in frequency and cost for repairs. Consideration should be given to significant improvements to address these issues and protect the park resources and patrons. The cost and impact of these improvements should be compared to relocating the off-leash area. The Hutton Property could be consideration for an alternate location.

Explore expansion of JCPRD Administration Building and relocation of Recreation Administration and Registration to Shawnee Mission Park.


1.3.4.2. Oakridge Group Retreat Recommendations: (See Legacy Element 3.04) 1.3.4.3. Quarry Property Recommendations: Prepare a formal master plan for this 70-acre addition to Shawnee Mission Park. Due to the adjacency of the quarry property and the Hutton property, this master plan should be performed concurrently with the Hutton Property to identify the highest and best use for these future park properties. The master plan should include a vision to protect and improve natural areas and habitats within the park property. 1.3.4.4. Hutton Property Recommendations: This latest addition adjacent to Shawnee Mission Park is 75-acres in size and completes the southern boundary of the park linking the quarry property and the park along W. 87th St. The priority for this property is to prepare a formal master plan. Due to the adjacency of the Hutton property and the quarry property, this master plan should be performed concurrently with the quarry property to identify the highest and best use for these future park properties. The master plan should include a vision to protect and improve natural areas and habitats within the park property. 1.3.5. Thomas S. Stoll Memorial Park Renovating underused ball fields and enhancing successful amenities is the recommendation focus for this park. The master plan for this park is 10 years old and has provided a solid guide for the park improvements to date. The north end of the park should be the next focus of improvements. The current master plan identifies a maintenance facility at the north end of the park. With the current, and proposed, remote maintenance of park from Heritage Park, this master plan vision does not represent the true opportunities for this area of Stoll Park. A review and update of the park master plan is recommended to provide a clear vision for the future of this park. While focused on the north end of the park, the updated plan should take into consideration future improvements to fields A and B, and the impact of the off-leash area popularity on the program and use of the park. Priority recommendations and consideration for the master plan update of Thomas S. Stoll Memorial Park include: •

Protect and improve natural areas and habitats within the park.

Renovate underutilized ballfields at north end of the park. Remove the fences and grade the area to create multiuse fields for sports and practices. Explore partnership opportunities for use of these fields with Johnson County Community College and recreational sports organizations.

Consider need for concessions and restrooms with reconfigured fields. The existing structures are in need of maintenance.

Consider need for parking renovation and reconfiguration with redeveloped fields.

Establish wildflower meadow and lake edge improvements to increase biodiversity and provide stormwater management of overland flow to the lake. These improvements will be implemented in 2015.

Add shelter(s) and restroom for off leash support of expanded off-leash area and adjacent parking lot. These improvements are included in 2015 capital projects.

Replace existing playground. Playground replacement should include accessible walks and a design process to create unique play experiences for park patrons and increase recreation value of other park amenities including fields and shelters.

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1.3.6. Sunflower Nature Park The 2008 master plan establishes the recommendations for this park. These recommendations are intended to see additional elements from the plan and a management plan for natural resources implemented. Priority recommendations for Sunflower Nature Park include: •

Implement natural resource management and restoration plan for this park.

Examine the dam to determine repairs necessary for stabilization.

Remove existing parking and trail connection at east end of the park, and implement new parking and walk per master plan. The new location is better aligned with existing park development and provides direct access to loop trail and restroom.

Study the condition of the existing water body for possible wetland establishment.

1.3.7. Kill Creek Park and TimberRidge Adventure Center Opening in 2001 and 2002 respectively, the infrastructure amenities in both of these parks are still relatively new. Recommendations are focused on additive elements in both locations and are derived from the original parks master plans and this planning process. Any significant improvements that will change the nature and education focus of these properties should be included in an updated master plan prior to implementation. These recommendations are discussed in the Connecting with Nature Legacy Element (3.04) section of this document. Priority recommendations for Kill Creek Park and TimberRidge Adventure Center include: 1.3.7.1. Kill Creek Park: •

Protect and improve natural areas and habitats within the park.

Prior to proceeding with implementation of Phases II and III of the 1998 park master plan, an updated master plan should be prepared.

Renovate existing park house or expand existing park maintenance facility to provide a park police substation within the park. This will provide officers a location to complete tasks while remaining in their patrol area. (Safety recommendation 1.2.2.4)

Complete trail connections including Kill Creek Streamway connection and an internal loop trail at the south end of the park. This loop may provide additional access to TimberRidge Adventure Center depending on the long-range vision for increased public access and use of this amenity.

Renovate existing beach house into a destination pavilion with occupancy for 200+, retaining restrooms and kitchen to support events at the pavilion. This pavilion will overlook the lake and provide access to the beach and water. A fishing pier extending out from the pavilion will provide fishing access to the deeper pockets in the lake and possible water access for events.

Develop a nature-based play experience adjacent to the renovated beach house to provide a unique play destination and reinforce the natural resource focus of this park. Inclusion of a Nature Explorer Classroom (National Arbor Day Foundation and Dimensions Educational Research Foundation), or similar component, in this play environment will provide an opportunity for expanded educational programming.

1.3.7.2. Kill Creek Capital Improvement Project:

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Funded through a generous gift, JCPRD has a $1 million development fund to implement the next phase of improvements within the park.

This investment should reinforce the passive, nature-focus of the park and represent the power of private donations to JCPRD park improvements.

Projects that meet the intent of the donation as well as address community and stakeholder desires and park opportunities include:


• Heritage and environmental trail that enables park visitors to experience the biodiversity within the park and learn about the ecologies and the history of the park property. • Visitor Center - Provide a location for interpretative displays regarding the park elements and the property history. There is a range of possibilities for how this may be incorporated into the park and should be explored further to determine the best approach for the park. Several of these include: • A stand alone element near the entry of the park where visitors could pause. This center may include restrooms and an open-air display with a basic level of protection. • Include this amenity within the renovated beach house and destination pavilion to increase visibility, expand the natural resource education opportunities at the pavilion, and consolidate capital investment projects. 1.3.7.3. TimberRidge Adventure Center: Update of the master plan should be the first action taken. See the Connecting with Nature Legacy Element section (3.04) of this document for recommendations related to TimberRidge Adventure Center. 1.3.8. Golf Courses Nationwide and in Johnson County, golf has seen a decline in participation in recent years. The recommendations below will direct the future approach to golf at Tomahawk Hills and Heritage Park and attract a greater and more diverse user-base to the golf courses through increased opportunities and shorter play times. These recommendations have shown to be successful in and around Johnson County as well as in national case studies. Long-term success of these courses is dependent on a renewed view of golf as a form of recreation and providing a community-wide focus. Priority recommendations for golf courses include: •

Develop natural resource management and protection plans for the golf courses. These plans should include existing conditions and opportunities to enhance the future role of the courses in natural resource management.

Continue Junior Golf program and tournaments as an outreach to introduce youth to the game.

Explore establishment of The First Tee youth development program at one or both of the courses to provide opportunities for youth throughout the community to learn the game and life skills.

Market 9-hole rounds with special rates or incentive packages. Encouraging 9-hole rounds can assist in reducing play time, increase the number of daily rounds, and bring more families to the courses.

Consider the addition of a 9-hole executive course at Heritage Park or Tomahawk Hills. This addition to one of the existing courses will enable shorter rounds and more family play opportunities.

Experiment with 15 inch (or 8 inch) diameter holes on the courses to encourage more recreational play and speed up a round of golf. These could be used on regular days or for special events.

Add foot golf to Tomahawk Hills and define a schedule for its play. This will expand the market and bring a more diverse user-base to the courses. This can be accomplished without changing or negatively impacting the course for traditional rounds of golf.

Renovation of the green at Heritage #16 to create an island green for more interest and increased play.

Build a new cart storage building for Heritage Park.

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1.4. Action: Define Regional Parks Throughout data collection and discussions with stakeholders and the community, the role as a provider of “large regional parks” was near the top of responses when asked about their vision for the future role of JCPRD. 79% of survey respondents identified large regional parks as a very important function of JCPRD. While the answer was consistent, the needs identified by individual stakeholders and residents varied greatly based on the level of municipal parks and recreation infrastructure present, development and population density of the community, and their existing relationship to JCPRD. These factors also impact the available space within a community to provide regional parks and recreation services. Understanding that the need and opportunity related to regional services varies across Johnson County, it is recommended that the definition of regional parks provided by JCPRD for the residents of Johnson County not look to traditional population-based standards as used in previous master planning. It is also recommended to not limit the opportunity for JCPRD to meet the needs of the community through a definition of regional parks based on a minimum total acreage or a defined program of amenities. Regional parks for JCPRD should be reflective of their Mission and Vision. JCPRD Mission: “To enhance the quality of life in Johnson County by providing high-quality parks, services, and recreation programs.” JCPRD Vision: “To be the leader in park management and recreation services, to be responsive to our community and the people we serve. To impact the character of our community in a positive manner, to serve as a catalyst for program and land use innovation, and to function as a responsive steward of all our resources.” To fulfill the role described by these statements throughout Johnson County, the following definition of regional parks provided by JCPRD has been created: JCPRD Regional Parks: •

Are strategic and purposeful in their locations and development.

Provide high quality park and recreation experiences.

Provide spaces where people want to be and want to spend time.

In addition to the physical amenities JCPRD regional parks have, the services they provide are also defined by mission and vision. JCPRD regional parks and facilities provide the following regional parks and recreation services:

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Develop in partnership with community and stakeholders.

Protect natural resources and open space.

Enhance, connect, and/or complement municipal amenities and/or facilities.

Provide flexible use spaces for recreation and programs.

Address unmet needs/opportunities that are not, or cannot be, met solely through other providers; needs may be specific, niche, or otherwise suited to JCPRD resources.

Provide a community-wide destination that is not feasible or appropriate for development at the municipal level of parks and recreation services providers. (i.e. size and scale, connections, unique features or ecosystems)

Innovative approach to parkland development where, long-term, properties may be transitioned to a municipality or private entity based on the size or location of the parkland and/or continued growth of municipal parks departments or private sector.


1.5. Action: Evaluate Future Acquisition Development Opportunities Parkland acquisition following MAP 2020 has resulted in an additional 3,350 acres added to the JCPRD landholdings. While this total acreage is not at the level recommended in MAP 2020, which required an additional 7,539 acres by 2020, or an additional 4,189 acres in the next five years, JCPRD has accomplished a significant amount of the intent of the MAP 2020 recommendations. The quantity of parkland acreage was derived from traditional population-based standards for parkland identifying 40 acres of parkland per 10,000 people, with JCPRD providing 22 of the 40 acres. This standard was used in the 1979 “Comprehensive Development Plan for Future Parks” and refined in MAP 2020. These standards have become less popular in recent years as they are not reflective of true community situations and needs. The better benchmark of the MAP 2020 recommendations is the Proposed Park System. This divided the county into six planning zones and identified JCPRD park types of Regional Parks (1,000 -2,000 acre parks), Sub-Regional Parks (40-250 acre parks), and Multi-Use Centers across these planning zones. While JCPRD has not amassed the total park acreage recommended, it has successfully followed the intent of the acquisition to achieve the distribution of park types within the system. The plan identified four regional parks and a recommendation for a fifth to be added to the system. The JCPRD parkland acquisition of an additional 795 acres at Cedar Niles future park property has provided the fifth regional park to complement Shawnee Mission Park, Heritage Park, Kill Creek Park, and the future Big Bull Creek Park. New subregional parks were also identified, and the JCPRD acquisition of new parks and undeveloped parkland since MAP 2020 have fulfilled, and in some cases exceeded, these recommendations. These acquisitions include: future Camp Branch Park, Camp Branch Glade, Stilwell Community Park, Rieke Lake future park property Mid-America West, and Mildale Farm. Municipal parks and recreation systems have increased parkland and opened recreation centers and community centers (multi-use centers) throughout Johnson County as recommended in MAP 2020. JCPRD fieldhouses and activity centers have supplemented services to meet recreation needs. Combined with the efforts of JCPRD parkland acquisition, the proposed park system vision has been followed through a more balanced combination of JCPRD and municipal providers than envisioned in MAP 2020. Recommendations are: 1.5.1. Future Acquisition 1.5.2. Define Selection Process and Criteria 1.5.1. Future Acquisition It is recommended that JCPRD continue a program of parkland acquisition based on projected population growth in Johnson County and JCPRD’s history of proactive land-banking. Additional acquisition received support from the community in the survey with 34% of households very supportive and 34% somewhat supportive of open space acquisition to leave undeveloped for future generations. In addition, 32% were very supportive and 42% were somewhat supportive of acquisition of open space and development for passive uses (Survey Q12). Acquisition over the life of this plan is intended to be strategic and not county-wide as in previous plans. All parkland and facility acquisition should be grounded in the regional park definition presented in the previous Action Item 1.4. Priorities for future acquisition are based on the anticipated growth of Johnson County along with remaining goals from MAP 2020 that have not been fully realized through JCPRD acquisition or municipal park system growth. These priorities are:

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1.5.1.1. Additional Parkland in Northeast Johnson County An underserved area of the county due to limited open space in these smaller communities with limited parks and recreation resources. JCPRD should prioritize parkland acquisition within this area of Johnson County and work with the community to program and develop this parkland. The recently proposed Meadowbrook project with the transfer of an approximately 80 acre park and community center (existing clubhouse) to JCPRD as a part of this development will address this recommendation. In addition, partnerships for trail connectivity should be a priority for northeast Johnson County. 1.5.1.2. Additional Parkland in South Central Johnson County: An undeserved area of the county by JCPRD and municipal parks and recreation services, this region was identified as Planning Area #4 in MAP 2020 and is a region of the county that has not seen additional parkland acquisition or development. Continued population growth, proximity to the US-169 and K-7 corridors, and public and stakeholder input during this planning process reinforce the continuation of prioritizing this area of Johnson County for future parkland acquisition and development. 1.5.1.3. Natural Resource Protection and Existing Parkland Expansion: Acquisition that will expand an existing park or facility property, or property acquisition that will include significant natural resource areas as identified by JCPRD Natural Resource Management staff should be priorities.

1.5.2. Define Selection Process and Criteria Use an evaluation structure with three (3) levels to inform and prioritize acquisition and development decisions. The tool may be used to evaluate parkland, streamway property, and future facility acquisition or development. The following levels of acquisition and development criteria are recommended for use with individual properties or when prioritizing multiple opportunities to identify the most beneficial use of available resources for acquisition. Each level builds upon the previous with more refined and added criteria to weigh the strengths and weaknesses of each opportunity, build an understanding of the true investment required for acquisition and/or development, and the potential return on that investment. When evaluating a single opportunity, the levels provide a check list for opportunity strengths and an understanding of the full impact the acquisition/development will have on JCPRD. When evaluating multiple opportunities for prioritization, each level provides criteria to clarify and review side by side comparisons of strengths and weaknesses. Proposals which do not meet Level 1 criteria are not recommended for implementation as they do not appear to support the JCPRD Mission and will not add value to the Johnson County community if provided at a regional level. Criteria Level 1: •

Protect Natural Resources

Complement Existing Inventory

Address an Identified Unmet Need and/or Opportunity

Enhance or Expand Existing Park and Facility

Criteria Level 2: •

Evaluate True Cost / Long-term Cost

Include Opportunities for Public Input / Opportunity was Identified in Previous Public Input

Evaluate Timeline Impact of Acquisition and Development

Identify Connections/ Adjacencies

Criteria Level 3: •

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Investigate Partnership Opportunities for Acquisition, Development, and/or Programming and Operations


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3

.02

Trails and Connectivity


Family Bike Ride on Mill Creek Streamway Park

“If the greenway movement can help us get back a bit of honest natural beauty and our heritage of historic place, we shall owe it much.” Charles Little, Author “Greenways for America”


Snapshot Trails + Connectivity

Wilder Drive Access on Gary L. Haller Trail

One JCPRD Across all forms of community engagement – stakeholder feedback, public engagement, the mail survey – the continued growth of trail and streamway facilities was a desired future function and a perceived strength of JCPRD. Within the JCPRD ecosystem, trails and streamways function as a corridor through which patrons access and expand their use of the Johnson County Park & Recreation District. Similar to the biodiversity found in healthy streamways, the system of connectivity will serve a range of users.

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Legacy Framework Goal: We will promote a legacy of Trails and Connectivity through a focused effort to acquire streamway corridor and develop trail systems.

2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4

Action: Prioritize Acquisition of Streamway Corridor Outcomes: JCPRD will prioritize acquisition of property along streamway corridors for the protection of natural resources and continued development of streamway trails. Action: Continue Steady Development of Streamway Trails Outcomes: JCPRD will steadily grow its streamway trail network through development within existing parklands and land holdings, and collaborative projects with community partners. Action: Strengthen Partnerships for Long-Term Success Outcomes: Continue to build working relationships with municipalities, private property owners, and developers to enhance opportunities related to acquisition, funding, development, maintenance, and connections along streamway trails and community connections. Action: Connect Regional Parks and Communities Outcomes: Provide internal park trail systems of variable lengths and establish connections to surrounding community trail systems, streamway trails, and regional transportation agencies.

Case Study The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority has a long history of integrating bicycle accommodation into its service of the Washington, DC metro area. From its early “Bike n’ Ride” program in the 1980’s to its support for a system wide bike mode share system, bike lockers at stations, and guidelines for the safe use and storage of bicycles at Metrorail stations, the agency has proven that the two modes of transit can be complementary. The agency also supports its active transportation users by facilitating transit oriented development. In a region such as Johnson County, JCPRD cooperation with Johnson County Transit and other regional transit organizations could enhance the area’s capacity for active transportation with programs modeled on those like the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority initiatives.

Capital Investment Priorities

S U M M A RY

The capital investments made to support the Trails and Connectivity Legacy Element represent a quarter of the total, 15-year Capital Investment Plan budget. The majority of this funding is associated with continued development of streamway corridors and the additional maintenance personnel and equipment which the growth will necessitate. Investment in additional parkland acquisition becomes a higher priority following initial investments in existing parks and parkland. However, JCPRD should consider opportunities as they become available within the next 15 years to protect open space. total 15-year capital investment

$ 57, 792, 620

s p e n d i n g a r e a : land acquisition by JCPRD

$ 18, 782, 000

s p e n d i n g a r e a : trailheads and connections

$ 2, 228, 980

s p e n d i n g a r e a : system growth through partnerships

$ 8, 600, 000

s p e n d i n g a r e a : trail construction and operations

$ 28, 071, 640

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Supporting Analysis

Trails and Connectivity is an area of park and recreation services that community stakeholders and Johnson County residents almost uniformly recognize as a core service of JCPRD to be continued in the future. Streamway development recommendations were a key component of MAP 2020 and, according to feedback from JCPRD staff, partners, and patrons, trails and connectivity remain a high priority in 2015.

Mail Survey Q3 Parks and recreation facilities that respondent households use the most often

JCPRD Now The topic of trails and connectivity is at the forefront of parks and recreation development within Johnson County as well as the larger region. The majority of municipalities reported a current interest and action on projects related to on-road or off-road trail facilities, and look to JCPRD as the leader for county-wide connections. JCPRD is also a valuable partner to municipalities for trail planning and implementation and county connections. According to the statistically valid mail survey, Johnson County residents identify long and short walking and hiking trails as the most important facilities provided by JCPRD. 74% of respondent households visited paved walking, hiking, biking trails within the past 12 months (Q2). 77% of respondent households reported having a need for short walking trails (0.5 to 2 miles long) and 64% reported a need for walking and hiking trails greater than two miles in length (Q8). Of these respondents, 60% report their walking and hiking trails needs are met by existing trail facilities (Q8b).

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Mail Survey Q2 Recreation facilities respondent households visited at the parks sites they visited over the past 12 months

JCPRD Recent History As Johnson County continues to grow and diversify, so does the number of one-car households and households without access to a car. The rising public interest in trail development in recent years has been primarily driven by a focus on the importance of recreation in health and wellness. The increased need for active transportation facilities is expected to contribute to an even greater demand for trails and connectivity to link communities to parks, cultural and recreation facilities, as well as business centers and schools. 15 years ago, MAP 2020 recommended a focus on streamway acquisition for stormwater management and future trail development. To serve the current population, stakeholder discussion regarding the role of streamway trails identified a need to expand the focus to include their role in county-wide alternative transportation. With rising interest in streamway trails and continued recognition of their role in stormwater management, there is an opportunity for increased partnership between JCPRD and Johnson County Public Works. This expanded partnership may focus on acquisition of streamway properties and development requirements for the integration of JCPRD streamway parks into a regional stormwater management strategy. JCPRD Future JCPRD advisory groups, internal teams, and municipal partners agree that there is an opportunity for JCPRD to serve as a regional trail coordinator and partner. All participating municipalities place high value on JCPRD’s future role in corridor acquisition and development of trails throughout the county. Many of these cities report that they welcome opportunities for trail development partnerships and coordination with JCPRD. These partnerships will be critical to steady acquisition and development of county-wide trails. Continued and expanded partnership opportunities with MARC, neighboring counties, and other planning agencies will allow JCPRD to lead the continued growth of the county-wide trail system with regional connections. Continued streamway acquisition and trail development will perform double duty: first, by providing facilities for recreation, fitness, and transportation, and secondly it will act as preservation against threats to open space and natural resources.

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Actions + Recommendations

Trails and Connectivity was the number one community survey response when participants were asked what JCPRD amenities they use the most often, when asked what amenities they have the greatest need for, and when asked what amenities are the most important to them. Providing trails was second to providing large parks when asked about the most important functions provided by JCPRD. The importance of trails was also noted by stakeholders and informal public input throughout the process. The streamway trails are the backbone of the county trails system, providing cross-county connections and linking municipal trail systems to a county-wide system and regional connections. Acquisition of streamway corridor and continued development of streamway trails is the focus of the Trails and Connectivity recommendations. The role of JCPRD as a leader is clear in this Legacy Element, but this role goes beyond trail development. Continued protection and restoration of natural resources, corridor acquisition, connections to existing and future regional systems including MetroGreen, and building strong partnerships are all important outcomes of the JCPRD Legacy in Trails and Connectivity. Trails and Connectivity action items are:

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2.1. Action: Prioritize Acquisition of Streamway Corridor 2.2. Action: Continue Steady Development of Streamway Trails 2.3 Action: Strengthen Partnerships for Long-term Success 2.4 Action: Connect Regional Parks and Communities


2.1. Action: Prioritize Acquisition of Streamway Corridor Strategic land acquisition is a priority for the continued development of the streamway trails. The development of regional trails is a unique service provided by JCPRD and was identified as a priority in this planning process. While streamway corridor acquisition has been a priority and budget item in the JCPRD CIP on an annual basis, the impact of the economic downturn starting in 2010 and increased deferred maintenance needs have resulted in reallocation of these budgeted funds. The last purchase acquisition of streamway corridor by JCPRD was in 2008. During this time JCPRD has continued to obtain land donations along streamway corridors and partner with municipalities for streamway trail development. The donation of the 42-acre Verhaeghe property for streamway trail and trailhead development along Coffee Creek in March 2015 is an example and the most recent donation received. The Streamway Park System corridors include:

Completed Streamway Trails Partially Completed Streamway Trails Undeveloped Streamway Trails

Completed Streamway Trails 1. Mill Creek Streamway - 17 miles (Gary Haller Trail) 2. Indian Creek Streamway - 17 miles 3. Tomahawk Creek Streamway - 13 miles

Partially Completed Streamway Trails (additional corridor acquisition required) 1. Turkey Creek Streamway 4.5 miles complete / 3 miles future 2. Rock Creek Streamway 1.5 miles complete / 3 miles future 3. Kill Creek Streamway 7 miles complete / 9.5 miles future 4. Blue River Streamway 1.4 miles complete / 31.6 miles future (Coffee Creek, Blue River, Camp Branch, Wolf Creek)

Undeveloped Streamway Trails (minimal corridor acquisition complete ) 1. Cedar Creek Streamway - 20 miles 2. Big Bull Creek Streamway - 8 miles 3. Little Bull Creek Streamway (Little Bull Creek, Bain Creek) - 13 miles

Recognizing JCPRD’s role in providing regional trails and connections, and the natural resource value of streamway corridor, any opportunities presented to JCPRD for the acquisition of additional streamway corridor within Johnson County should be approached as a priority for acquisition. If funding is available and the opportunity is determined to be in the best interest of JCPRD and Johnson County, streamway corridor acquisition should be pursued and banked if needed, regardless of its position in capital planning and implementation priorities. JCPRD Streamway corridor acquisition recommendations include: 2.1.1. Protect Natural Resources Through Streamway Acquisition 2.1.2. Identify Acquisition Sections for Infill along Existing Streamway Corridors 2.1.3. Identify Acquisition Sections to Complete Significant Segments of New Streamway Trails 2.1.4. Identify Trailhead and Access Opportunities

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2.1.1. Protect Natural Resources Through Streamway Acquisition Natural resource protection and flood plain management are central to the Streamway Park System mission. Acquisition of land for streamway development should consider opportunities to protect the stream corridor and maintain the flood plain free of development for natural flood protection. Recommendations for natural resource protection when identifying streamway corridor acquisition include: •

• •

Maintain the MAP 2020 recommendation of a 400-foot average minimum width for streamway corridor acquisition. The minimum acquisition width should include the stream, both banks, and sufficient area for a streamway trail alignment without impacting floodway or sensitive natural resource areas. Expand acquisition area when necessary to ensure natural resource protection. Prioritize flood plain acquisition for streamway trail alignment and riparian habitat protection. Prioritize wetland acquisition and wetland development in streamway trail alignment.

2.1.2. Identify Acquisition Sections for Infill along Existing Streamway Corridors Opportunities for streamway corridor acquisition to infill current landholdings is a priority when assessing and defining an approach to acquisition. Infill acquisition will allow for development of streamway trail segments and strengthened connections along the corridor. Existing Streamway Corridor Acquisition Section for Infill

2.1.2.1. Kill Creek Streamway

2.1.2.2. Coffee Creek Streamway

Map for 2.1.2.1. Kill Creek Streamway & 2.1.2.2. Coffee Creek Streamway

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2.1.2.1. Kill Creek Streamway (1.3 miles) • 0.7 miles of streamway within the Sunflower Ordnance Works “early transfer” property. This streamway is directly north of the current early transfer property and should be pursued as additional early transfer or development easement access. •

0.6 miles of streamway between W 135th Street and W 143rd Street. Acquisition of this property will complete ownership of this 1.5 miles corridor linking the end of the existing trail at W 135th Street to W 143rd Street.

2.1.2.2. Coffee Creek Streamway (1.25 miles) 1.25 miles of streamway in several pieces between U.S. Highway 69 and S. Pflumm Road (Heritage Park). Acquisition of this property will complete ownership of this 5.3-mile corridor linking U.S. Highway 69 and Heritage Park. 2.1.3. Identify Acquisition to Complete Significant Segments of Streamway Trails In addition to trail development and land holdings along Kill Creek Streamway and Coffee Creek Streamway, JCPRD currently has landholdings along three streamways with no streamway trail development. Most of this streamway corridor is within existing or undeveloped park properties, and while not developed or open to public use, it is still recommended that acquisition of property along these corridors continue to ensure future development and protection of the streamway corridor. Existing Streamway Corridor Acquisition Section for Infill

Map for 2.1.3.1. Cedar Creek Streamway

Map for 2.1.3.2. Coffee Creek Streamway

2.1.3.1. Cedar Creek Streamway (3 miles) Current JCPRD land holdings along this streamway consists of approximately 4 miles of Cedar Creek Streamway within the Cedar Niles future park property, and a half mile of Little Cedar Creek within Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center. Additional acquisition recommendations include:

Cedar Creek (3 miles) •

3 miles from Kansas River to K-10

2.1.3.2. Blue River Streamway (11.4 miles) This streamway includes four significant stream corridors; Coffee Creek, Camp Branch, Blue River and Wolf Creek. The Coffee Creek corridor contains the largest amount of stream corridor holdings with approximately 5.8 miles, including 1.5 miles within Heritage Park. Camp Branch contains 2 miles of streamway within the future Camp Branch Park; Blue River contains 2 miles of which 1.4 miles is developed at Wilderness Valley, adjacent to Blue Valley Middle School. Wolf Creek corridor includes 1.5 miles within City of Overland Park owned property at the Overland Park Arboretum and Kemper Farm.

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Additional acquisition recommendations include: Camp Branch (4.2 miles) • •

1 mile from fork at Blue River to future Camp Branch Park 3.2 miles from future Camp Branch Park to Stilwell Community Park

Blue River (3.7 miles) • •

0.95 miles Mission Road to 163rd Terrace 2.7 miles from Wilderness Valley to U.S. Highway 69

Wolf Creek (3.5 miles) • •

1 mile from fork at Blue River to Overland Park Arboretum 2.5 miles from Kemper Farm to S. Pflumm Road

2.1.3.3. Big Bull Creek Streamway (3.5 miles) Of the proposed 8 miles of streamway trail along this streamway corridor, 4.5 miles will be contained within the Big Bull future park and Mildale Farm properties. Additional recommended JCPRD corridor acquisitions include: 1• 2•

2 miles from the future Big Bull Creek Park to 183rd Street 1.5 miles from 183rd Street to 175th Street

2.1.3.4. Little Bull Creek Streamway (13 miles) This streamway park includes two significant stream corridors; Little Bull Creek and Bain Creek. There are no current JCPRD or municipal land holdings along these corridors. Recommended acquisitions along these corridors include: Little Bull Creek (8 miles) 3• 4• 5•

3 miles from the Johnson / Miami county line to 199th Street 3.5 miles from 199th Street to I-35 1.5 miles from I-35 to New Century Fieldhouse

Bain Creek (5 miles) 6• 7•

2.4 miles from fork to S. Hedge Lane Parcel 2.6 miles from S. Hedge Lane to Nottington Creek

5 2 7 1

4

6 3 Map for 2.1.2.3. Big Bull Creek Streamway

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Map for 2.1.2.4. Little Bull Creek Streamway


2.1.4. Identify Trailhead and Access Opportunities In addition to streamway corridor acquisition for streamway trail development, property acquisition for trailheads and access points is critical to the development and use of the future trails. Property for these elements may be part of the corridor acquisition, or may be additional acquisition adjacent to the streamway, further removed from the environmentally sensitive streamway corridor. Recommendations for trailheads and access points include: •

Consider trail access when identifying acquisition properties to ensure adequate space for trailhead development at strategic locations along the streamway corridor.

Locate near densely populated areas to encourage the use of trails where municipal trail connections to streamways are not readily available.

Locate near schools, residential neighborhoods, commercial and retail centers, and municipal recreation destinations.

Determine size based on anticipated intensity of use and amenities to be included. Program should include parking with gated entry, information kiosk with JCPRD brand, accessible trails and access to streamway trail, restroom, and drinking fountain. Additional amenities may include playgrounds, shelter, open event lawn, or other park elements.

Identified trailhead locations along undeveloped corridors include: •

Coffee Creek Streamway: Verhaeghe Property - 42 acres to be developed as Streamway Park and access point.

Bain Creek: South Hedge Lane - 60 acres with potential for Streamway Park and access point.

Wilder Drive Access on Gary L. Haller Trail

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2.2. Action: Continue Steady Development of Streamway Trails Growing the Streamway Trail system to include development along undeveloped streamways, continuing development along corridors with existing trails, and developing community connections are priorities in this plan. The existing trails have served as county-wide recreation destinations, alternative transportation routes, and catalysts for expanding municipal trails systems with connections to streamway trails and other communities. National recognition of the streamway trail system includes the 2010 designation of the Gary L. Haller Trail, along the Mill Creek Streamway, as a National Recreation Trail by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior. Continued implementation of streamway trails is a priority based on public and stakeholder input, and a JCPRD desire for additional protection and preservation of streamway corridor ahead of future development. The approach to expanding the streamway trails system starts with building on what is in place in both existing trail developments and streamway park landholdings, and focusing on streamway trail development as prioritized implementation in several undeveloped parks. This development will create a destination within the parks, attracting patrons and encouraging connectivity from municipal trail systems. Streamway Trail development recommendations include: 2.2.1. Streamway Trail Development within Existing Parkland 2.2.2. Streamway Trail Development of Existing JCPRD Streamway Land Holdings 2.2.3. Streamway Trail Development through Partnerships 2.2.4 Additional Streamway Trail Acquisition and Development Sections 2.2.1. Streamway Trail Development within Existing Parkland Development of streamway trails within existing parkland provides a high use amenity to complement existing park development, or they can be an initial phase of development to activate an undeveloped park. Four parks contain proposed streamway trail segments and all four are proposed for development within this plan. Streamway Corridor Potential for Streamway Development within Parkland

Map for (L to R) Camp Branch, Cedar Niles, Heritage, BBC, Maps not to Scale.

Recommendations for streamway trail development within existing parkland include: 2.2.1.1. Future Camp Branch Park (2miles - 2016/17) This streamway trail development will represent the first phase of development within the park and open it to the public. Continuation of this two miles of streamway trail beyond the park will focus first on a connection north to the Blue River, and then south to Stilwell Community Park. These connections are planned to follow later in the 15-year window of this plan.

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•

0.6 miles of streamway trail north of 175th Street in 2016

•

1.4 miles of streamway trail south of 175th Street in 2017


2.2.1.2. Cedar Niles Future Park Property (4 miles - 2017/18) An initial phase of this streamway trail development will represent the first phase of development within the park and open it to the public. This trail will provide opportunities for connections from neighboring development and from City of Olathe trails and sidewalks. Continuation beyond the park will focus first on connections south to Lake Olathe and Cedar Lake, and then proceed north from the park to K-10 and then to the Kansas River at the Cedar Creek Boat Ramp. A connection east will link to Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center. •

4.0 miles of streamway trail in 2018

2.2.1.3. Heritage Park (1 mile - 2019) This section of streamway trail along the Coffee Creek corridor will link the trail across the park east and west and allow for a continuous trail alignment along the corridor. This section of trail will also provide connections for a future south loop trail within Heritage Park. •

1.0 mile across Heritage Park in 2019.

2.2.1.4. Future Big Bull Creek Park (4.5 miles - 2023-2025) Streamway trail development within the future Big Bull Creek Park is anticipated to follow several phases of park amenity development. This trail within the future Big Bull Creek Park will expand the existing park development upon completion. •

3.0 miles of streamway trail in 2023/24

1.5 miles of streamway trail in 2025

2.2.2. Streamway Trail Development of Existing JCPRD Streamway Landholdings In addition to focusing development within existing parkland, identification of streamway corridor segments with a significant amount of existing JCPRD owned streamway corridor is a priority for development. These sections may require additional acquisition as noted in the previous Action (2.1), but when developed, will provide significant additions to the Streamway Park System. Development of these trail segments will link to existing trails and existing and future parks. Streamway park development will create opportunities for additional access and connectivity from municipal trail systems, parks, schools, and neighborhoods, increasing the impact of this trail development.

Streamway Corridor Potential for Streamway Development within JCPRD Landholdings

Map for 2.2.2.1. (L) and 2.2.2.2. (R) Caption needed

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Recommendations for development of existing streamway landholdings include: 2.2.2.1. Kill Creek Streamway (3.65 miles) Opportunities for continued trail development along Kill Creek Streamway will extend the existing trail from Kill Creek Park to the north and south, linking developed sections of the streamway trail and providing over 10.5 miles of continuous trail from De Soto to W. 143rd Street in unincorporated Johnson County. Development recommendations include: •

2.15 miles - Infill north of Kill Creek Park linking developed segments of the trail. This development will require additional Sunflower Ordnance Works “early transfer” property, or easement access, for the development of approximately 0.7 miles of the trail. Development of this trail section may require fencing or other barriers to prevent access to the Sunflower Ordnance Works property from the trail within early transfer and easement property.

1.5 miles - Continuation of the trail south of Kill Creek Park requires acquisition of an additional 0.6 miles of infill and will link W. 135th Street and W. 143rd Street.

2.2.2.2. Coffee Creek Streamway (4.45 miles) Development within existing land holdings along the Coffee Creek Streamway corridors will link regional parks to the greater streamway system and provide approximately 5.3 miles of continuous streamway trail linking Heritage Park and US 69. This section of the Coffee Creek Streamway will include development of the Verhaeghe Property. Development recommendations include: Camp Branch (1 mile) • 1 mile - Connection from fork at Blue River to future Camp Branch Park Blue River (0.95mile) • 0.95 miles - Mission Road to 163rd Terrace will link future Camp Branch Park to Blue Valley Middle School and existing streamway trails at Wilderness Valley and on-street connections. Coffee Creek (2.5 miles) • 2.5 miles - US 69 to Switzer Road. This segment of trail will complete the approximately 5.3-mile stretch from Heritage Park to US 69 Highway, and will require an additional 0.9-mile acquisition. An initial 3.5 miles of this development is budgeted for 2015/16 and will connect Switzer Road to Heritage Park. •

Verhaeghe Property - This 42-acre donation to JCPRD from the Verhaeghe family in 2015 is planned to be a streamway park and trail access point. Implementation of this plan will occur following the streamway trail development.

2.2.3. Streamway Trail Development Through Partnerships Continued development of the streamway trails will require partnerships for acquisition and implementation if steady and continuous development is desired within Johnson County. These recommendations are prioritizing municipal partners as they will be the most influential in long-term acquisition and development assistance. Other partnership opportunities should be explored and incorporated into the development process when applicable including the State of Kansas, federal government, universities, developers, corporate partners, and individuals. Streamway Corridor Potential for Streamway Development within Parkland

Map for (L to R) 2.2.3.1 (Cities of Mission, Fairway, Mission Hills), 2.2.3.2 (City of Gardner), 2.2.3.3 (City of Olathe), 2.2.3.4 (City of Overland Park)

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Recommendations for development through partnerships include: 2.2.3.1. Cities of Mission, Fairway, and Mission Hills (6 miles) Continued streamway trail development along the Turkey Creek and Rock Creek Streamways offer partnership opportunities with several communities in northeast Johnson County. Development along these corridors will include partnerships with the City of Mission, the City of Fairview, and the City of Mission Hills. Development section opportunities include: •

Turkey Creek Streamway (Mission) - 1 mile from Metcalf Avenue to Lamar Avenue

Turkey Creek Streamway (Mission) - 2 miles from 75th Street to 87th Street

Rock Creek Streamway (Mission, Fairway, and Mission Hills) - 3 miles from Johnson/Roeland Drive to State Line

2.2.3.2. City of Gardner (5.7 miles) Continued development along Kill Creek Streamway south of Kill Creek Park will provide connections to Gardner parks and schools as well as access from residential neighborhoods and unincorporated Johnson County. Development section opportunities include: •

Kill Creek Streamway - 5 miles along the west fork of the creek to 167th Street at Quail Meadow Park

Kill Creek Streamway - 0.7 miles from 167th Street to Madison Avenue. This section of trail along 167th and Waverly Road will provide access to Madison Elementary and Gardner Edgerton High School along with connections to residential neighborhoods along Waverly Road.

2.2.3.3. City of Olathe (15 miles) Development of the Cedar Creek Streamway north, south, and east of the Cedar Niles future park property provides partnership opportunities with the City of Olathe. This trail development will provide access to schools, parks and neighborhoods, and link the streamway trail to municipal walks and trails. This partnership will also provide an opportunity to link the Cedar Niles future park property and Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center. Development section opportunities include: •

Meadowlane Trail - Approximately 3 miles of community connection to Gary L. Haller Trail with links to multiple parks, schools, residential neighborhoods, retail destinations, and employment centers. The City of Olathe has been awarded Kansas Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) funding through Mid-America Regional Council (MARC) for 2016/17 for this trail development.

Cedar Creek Streamway - 4.5 miles from Lake Olathe to Cedar Lake. This section will require 2.3 miles of acquisition for trail development with the remaining 2.2 miles included in Olathe park property at each lake.

Cedar Creek Streamway - 6 miles from K-10 to Cedar Niles future park property. This segment of streamway will provide a significant connection along what is currently the east extent of development within Olathe, and link the Cedar Creek Streamway Trail to the City of De Soto.

Little Cedar Creek - 2.75 miles from the fork at Cedar Creek to Cedar Niles future park property and from Cedar Niles future park property to Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center. This link between JCPRD parks along S. Clare Road and the City of Olathe Prairie Center Park will also provide connections to surrounding neighborhoods.

2.2.3.4. City of Overland Park (9 miles) The Coffee Creek Streamway, Blue River Streamway, and Wolf Creek all provide acquisition and development partnership opportunities for JCPRD and the City of Overland Park. Development of these streamway trails will improve connectivity, link JCPRD and municipal parks, and provide opportunities to link Coffee Creek Streamway Trail to the Indian Creek and Wolf Creek Streamway Trails. Development section opportunities include: •

Blue River Streamway - 2 miles from State Line to Mission Road.

Coffee Creek Streamway - 2 miles from Heritage Park to Ridgeview Road.

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Wolf Creek - 1 mile from fork at Coffee Creek / Blue River Streamway to Overland Park Arboretum and Kemper Farm. This will be a priority connection from the Coffee Creek Streamway to these Overland Park facilities.

Wolf Creek - 1.5-mile trail connection through Overland Park Arboretum and Kemper Farm. This will need to be led by Overland Park and approved by these facilities.

Wolf Creek - 2.5 miles Kemper Farm to Pflumm Road and eventual connection back to Coffee Creek Streamway at Heritage Park along Pflumm Road.

2.2.4. Additional Streamway Trail Development The previous sections discussed approximately 57 miles of priority trail segments for development within the life of this plan. These sections have been prioritized based on their location within existing JCPRD parkland (11.5 miles), the opportunity to develop significant sections of trail within existing landholdings with minimal additional acquisition required (8.1 miles), or the opportunity for partnerships with municipalities for acquisition and development (35.7 miles). An additional 22.7 miles of streamway trail is recommended that will require more significant levels of streamway corridor acquisition and, therefore, will require more time for development. A majority of these streamways are located within unincorporated Johnson County resulting in limited municipal partnership opportunities for acquisition and development. As identified previously, acquisition opportunities for identified streamway corridors should be a priority. While development of these trails may not be as high a priority as other streamway sections, JCPRD should be pursuing acquisition along these corridors for future development of the Streamway Parks System. Recommendations for additional streamway trail development include: 2.2.4.1. Cedar Creek Streamway (3 miles) 1•

3 miles - Kansas River (Cedar Creek Boat Ramp) to K-10

2.2.4.2. Coffee Creek Streamway (3.2 miles) 2•

Camp Branch - 3.2 miles - Future Camp Branch Park to Stilwell Community Park

2.2.4.3. Big Bull Creek Streamway (3.5 miles) 3• 4•

2 miles - Future Big Bull Creek Park to 183rd Street 1.5 miles - 183rd Street to 175th Street

2.2.4.4. Little Bull Creek Streamway (13 miles) 5• 6• 7• 8• 9•

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Little Bull Creek - 3 miles - County Line to 199th Street Little Bull Creek - 3.5 miles - 199th Street to I-35 Little Bull Creek - 1.5 miles - I-35 to New Century Fieldhouse Bain Creek - 2.3 miles - Fork from Little Bull Creek to S. Hedge Lane Parcel Bain Creek - 2.6 miles - S. Hedge Lane Parcel to Nottington Creek (W. 175th St. and S. Lone Elm)


1

2

Map for (L to R) 2.2.4.1. (Cedar Creek Streamway) and 2.2.4.2. (Coffee Creek Streamway)

4

7

3

9

6 8 5 Map for (L to R) 2.2.4.3. (Big Bull Creek Streamway) and 2.2.4.4. (Little Bull Creek Streamway)

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2.3. Action: Strengthen Partnerships for Long-Term Success The value of trails and connectivity is recognized county-wide and was expressed at all levels of engagement throughout this planning process. Looking forward, JCPRD and Johnson County have an opportunity to expand the existing trail system ahead of projected county growth. This expanded system includes streamway trails as a backbone providing access to JCPRD regional parks, linking municipalities and all of Johnson County, and providing a framework for connections regionally to MetroGreen, Kansas City regional greenway system plan, as well as future connections to Douglas, Miami, and Franklin counties. Accomplishing a continued steady development of the Streamway Parks System will require maintaining and strengthening existing partnerships with municipalities, regional planning agencies, developers, and private property owners. Each partnership brings opportunities to advance implementation of the regional trail system and the long-term management of this amenity. Recommendations for strengthening partnerships include.

2.3.1. Acquisition •

Municipalities - Work with municipalities to build development regulations and zoning codes that encourage or require land dedication or easements for the development of trails and sidewalks. Municipal partnerships should also play a strong role in streamway corridor protection and acquisition for continued development of streamway trails.

Developers - Communicate with and provide education for developers regarding the importance of streamway corridor protection, streamway trail development, and community connections from development to local and regional trails. Pursue dedication and development partnerships and opportunities for developer recognition for advancement of streamway trail development.

Private Land Holders - Continue public outreach from JCPRD regarding the impact of parks and trails and the value they bring Johnson County. This outreach will increase public awareness of partnership opportunities and make JCPRD a priority consideration for future land or funding donations. Identify property owners along prioritized streamway trail development routes to initiate discussions regarding long-term dedication or acquisition with immediate development easements to allow for continued streamway trail development.

2.3.2. Funding

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Municipalities - Work with municipal parks and recreation and public works departments to leverage partner funding and strengthen funding requests or grant applications for continued trail development. Outside funding sources for trail development include the Kansas Department of Transportation’s Federal Transportation Program and National Recreation Trail Designation Funding Opportunities.

Johnson County Agencies - Internal county partners bring resources, opportunities, and a shared mission of serving the Johnson County community to partnerships with JCPRD. Aligned services provide opportunities for shared funding, joint programming, and opportunities for funding eligibility that neither may be strong enough to qualify for alone. Partnerships with Facilities Management, Johnson County Transit, Planning and Development, and Public Works may offer strength and opportunities with focused growth and longterm success of streamway trails.

Regional, State, and Federal Planning Agencies - Provide resources to assist in expanding the Streamway Parks System through the identification of funding sources for trail development and programs. Partnership examples include MARC (Mid-America Regional Council) as an advocate for funding and growth, KDOT for coordination and updates related to Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) funding, and the State of Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism for shared development and connectivity to the Prairie Center to the regional Streamway Parks System.


Donations and Gifts - Sharing the vision of connectivity and streamway trail growth can inspire groups or individuals to financially support future development. Celebration and recognition of these partnerships may inspire others, and opportunities including marketing and naming rights can provide mutually beneficial returns. The Parks and Recreation Foundation of Johnson County may play a significant role in these partnerships.

Business Community and Institutions - Projects that align with philanthropic and internal wellness initiatives provide opportunities for investment partnerships. Naming or interpretative signage provides recognition of the partner investment as well as announcement to future potential partners. Healthcare systems or facilities, corporations, retail, and others along or near streamway and municipal trails should be a focus. The Parks and Recreation Foundation of Johnson County may play a significant role in these partnerships.

2.3.3. Development •

Municipalities - Parks and recreation and public works departments provide opportunities for shared planning and implementation of streamway trails and municipal connections.

Developers - Along with land and access dedications, developers can initiate trail construction as a component of their site plan and built project. Establish partnership early in planning of site to integrate best practices and preferred alignment of trails.

Regional Planning Agencies - Regional planning agencies provide resources to expand the impact of the Streamway Parks System beyond the limits of Johnson County and guide future development of the regional trails system to best serve the Johnson County community. Partnerships include MARC for regional coordination and United Community Services of Johnson County (UCS) as a partner for social impact and opportunities of trail development within Johnson County.

2.3.5. Ongoing Maintenance •

Municipalities - Agreements for municipal maintenance of shared development trails within city boundaries.

Homeowners Associations and Neighborhood Groups - Residential development adjacent to streamway corridors and trails provide an opportunity for volunteer groups to assist with trail cleanup and build relationships with JCPRD staff.

Community Organizations - Trails and natural resource focused organizations can provide grass roots assistance with trail maintenance and natural resource management along streamway corridors and community connections. Organized trail walks for trash pick-up, workdays for removal of invasive species, and other volunteer opportunities bring value to the long-term health of the streamway trails.

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2.4. Action: Connect Regional Parks and Communities Trails and connectivity at the individual JCPRD regional park level is just as important to the role of JCPRD in meeting the needs of the Johnson County community as the Streamway Trail System. Internal trails systems support many aspects of park use including access and circulation, education, recreation, and improving health and fitness. The Legacy of Trails and Connectivity at the individual park level will support these roles and ensure that future parks provide opportunities within the individual park setting. Recommendations for Regional Parks and Community Connections include: 2.4.1. Internal Park Trail Systems As identified in the community survey there is a desire for trails 1/2 mile to 2 miles in length. All JCPRD parks should provide internal trail systems for use by park visitors. The extent, materials, and character of the trail systems can vary based on the park type and location, but they should all use a consistent sign package as identified in the regional park safety recommendations. In addition, the design of internal park trail systems should incorporate the recommendations identified below: 2.4.1.1. Accessible Routes Paved accessible routes should be provided from identified accessible parking spaces to destinations within the park as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act and to the fullest extent reasonable for JCPRD. 2.4.1.2. Loops Layout and alignment of trails in existing and future parks should provide a minimum of a single loop with a desire for multiple loops of varying lengths from 1/2 mile to 2 miles and longer in larger parks. Loops should provide access to destinations within the park, allow for interaction with natural resources, and provide opportunities for educational experiences through signage or programming where appropriate. A perimeter loop trail of the park is not required, but loop trails should provide connections to the perimeter of the park at strategic locations for access and connectivity. 2.4.1.3. Connections Internal trail systems should provide gateways and park access points to encourage walk-in use and connection of the park trail system to surrounding sidewalks, municipal trail systems, and the Streamway Parks System. Identity markers and entries like those used in several existing parks including Thomas S. Stoll Memorial Park can reinforce the JCPRD brand and provide easily identifiable elements along the perimeter of the park. These connections are important for recreation users, but also provide access and opportunities for individuals to commute via alternative transportation. 2.4.1.4. Partnerships Municipal and private partnerships adjacent to the parks can provide opportunities for connections and continued growth of the trail systems. Coordination with these partners during planning and pre-development of parks and adjacent site development can facilitate beneficial and logical connections from the park to the community. A partnership with regional transit organizations to coordinate trail access with bus stops and routing can meet the needs of a changing demographic within Johnson County who depend on mass transit. Combined with the county-wide trail system, this partnership will provide alternative transportation routes and connections to recreation services. A successful partnership will also see ridership increase along these routes, and an education of the community regarding the opportunities of mass transit and alternative transportation.

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50= Plus In Step In Shape

Prairie Overlook and Trail at Kill Creek Park

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3

.03 Recreation

+ Cultural Resources


The Theatre in the Park - photo by MGE

“Parks support community engagement by providing residents with a venue for participation in and attachment to their communities.� American Planning Association City Parks Forum


Snapshot Recreation + Cultural Resources

One JCPRD The Johnson County Park & Recreation District began as a parks district but has grown to offer an extremely wide range of programs, activities, and events. As municipal park and recreation departments expand the services offered at a local level, the JCPRD Recreation Division will continue to serve a key role within the county, providing the types of services only possible within a county-wide district and the types of programs for which JCPRD’s staff and facilities are uniquely suited. Within the understory layer of a forest, new generations of vegetation is able to grow, protected by the shade of a large canopy. The litter and debris created by this layer adds nutrients back into the environment. Within the JCPRD ecosystem, innovative programs as well as those associated with market needs and core values, are able to develop within this respected brand and established organization; their implementation and continued responsiveness to community needs enriches the ecosystem as a whole.

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Legacy Framework Goal: We will promote a legacy of Regional Parks through a focused effort to strengthen core services and emphasize innovation.

3.1 3.2 3.3

Action: Classify Recreation Services Outcomes: The classification of Recreation and Cultural Resource programs as “Core,” “Market,” or “Incubator” services can support long-term planning efforts and hiring practices. The system integrates JCPRD’s responsive nature within a formal operational approach.

Action: Evaluate Services and Programs Outcomes: Standards and processes for the evaluation of services and programs will best equip JCPRD to adaptively manage these initiatives, improving and reclassifying as recommended based upon measured performance and user feedback.

Action: Expand Opportunities for Enterprise Services Outcomes: The implementation of recommendations that maximize JCPRD’s potential for enterprise services will support community-enriching events and programs that cannot effectively be fully funded through participation fees.

Case Study In cooperation with the Hiwan Homestead Museum, the Jeffco Open Space Parks and Trails Division, of Jefferson, Colorado, presents history programming in the parks and the museum itself, which transport patrons “back in time to sample life at a different pace.” Museum staff conduct the programming at their own facility as well as locations within the open space system. Programming includes activities related to the arts of the tribal southwest. Due to the division’s focus on natural resources as well as heritage, patrons are exposed to a definition of local culture that speaks to the history of the region’s ecology as well as its people.

Capital Investment Priorities

S U M M A RY

The majority of Recreation and Cultural Services costs are dedicated to the improvement of athletic facilities, including sports fields, courts, and support facilities. The development of the Meadowbrook community center is an early priority of the Legacy Plan CIP. This facility will help JCPRD to fill a recreation and cultural service gap in Northeast Johnson County.

total 15-year capital investment

$ 20, 678, 015

spending area: community space

$ 5, 965, 000

spending area: athletic facilities

$ 13, 157, 575

s p e n d i n g a r e a : s a f e t y, a c c e s s , a n d o p e r a t i o n s

$ 1, 555, 440

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Supporting Analysis

Recreation and Cultural Resources offered by Johnson County Park & Recreation District have historically provided innovative programs, and responded to community and market demands. Input received from a wide range of stakeholders and patrons calls for this practice to continue with core services complemented by a flexible set of services which meet the shifting needs of the county population.

Mail Survey Q5a Primary reasons respondent households have participated in fee-based programs

JCPRD Now Most stakeholders agreed that JCPRD operates several unique core services that cannot be provided at a municipal level. These services include 50+ travel programs, Corporate Challenge, day care, and the Out of School Time (OST) program. According to the statistically valid survey, 34% of respondent households have participated in one or more JCPRD programs in the past 12 months (Q5). 64% of participating households report location of fee-based programming as the primary reason for participation, and this was the top response county-wide (Q5a). The second most commonly cited factor is economical fees, reported by 45% of respondent households as the primary driver for participation (Q5). In this same survey, residents report that improved physical health and fitness is the benefit of JCPRD offerings, which is the most important to households (Q15). Respondents rated “making Johnson County a more desirable place to live� as the most important benefit to the future of Johnson County (Q16).

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Have Participated in Over the Past 12 Months by percentage of respondents

7 to 10 programs 4 to 6 programs 1% 2 to 3 programs 5% 11 or more programs 12% 1%

Mail Survey Q5 1 program 15%

Number of fee-based programs offered by the Johnson County Park & Recreation District respondent households have participated in over the past 12 months

None 66%

urce: Leisure Vision/ETC Institute for Johnson County Park and Recreation District (December 2014)

JCPRD Recent History Significant changes have occurred since the completion of the MAP 2020 plan. Two areas of change which impact recreation services are: the introduction of more providers of recreation services and the introduction of more community recreation centers and fitness providers into the market. Since MAP 2020, JCPRD has acquired the following facilities: Okun Fieldhouse, Mill Creek Activity Center, and New Century Fieldhouse. Operation of these facilities has provided venues for increased JCPRD recreational programming including leagues and tournaments. However, JCPRD managers report a decline in usage of JCPRD sports facilities, across all sports. In contrast, the desire for locations and programs which can serve the entire family, at one time, have grown. Parks and recreation service providers across the public and private sector are in agreement that the 50+ demographic is a growing population with an expanding and evolving range of needs and desires, and that JCPRD is uniquely situated to adapt to this demographic and meet these needs county-wide, and in some locations supplement programs offered at the municipal level. Municipalities report that residents in Northeast, Northwest, and South Central Johnson County have limited park and recreation options. Most cities do not have an expansive recreation budget and many residents cannot afford private clubs. Recent partnership opportunities for JCPRD to expand recreation and cultural programming in northeast Johnson County include the county purchased Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center (King Louie) and the former Meadowbrook Golf Course and Country Club in partnership with Johnson County and the City of Prairie Village.

JCPRD Future Nationwide, the baby boomer generation is redefining 50+ programming. Locally, growth in low-income county households requires a new model of service. An overall trend in municipal feedback shows that city park and recreation departments have a range of resources and capabilities, and therefore desire different levels of autonomy or involvement from JCPRD in providing services to local residents. Municipalities, especially those found in Northeast Johnson County, are actively planning for programs that engage the multi-cultured nature of the current and future Johnson County, and are looking for partnerships at the county level. The JCPRD team and advisory groups have expressed a desire to grow this sector of services. Public feedback at open houses and input from Johnson County governmental partners both pointed to JCPRD as a potentially unifying force for health and wellness programs within the county.

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Actions + Recommendations

Recreation and Cultural Resources is an element that includes the focused growth area of cultural arts and services. These expanded programs complement the diverse recreation programs that JCPRD currently operates. Because the recreation services are largely enterprise funded, their operation experiences certain challenges which are common locally and nationally in similar organizations. The approach outlined within this section recommends strategies that strengthen core services and support innovation. As the recommendations detail, criteria for the evaluation of programs and systems of monitoring and measuring performance are critical to the continued success and expansion of recreation and cultural services within Johnson County. Recreation and Cultural Resources action Items are:

3.1. Action: Classify Recreation Services

3.2. Action: Evaluate Services and Programs

3.3 Action: Expand Opportunities for Enterprise Services

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3.1. Action: Classify Recreation Services As JCPRD continues to move forward in providing recreation services and facilities to the residents of the county, the current staffing structure of the JCPRD Recreation Division needs to be continually evaluated and appropriately expanded or contracted to consolidate duties associated with expanded services. Retirement or transition are opportunities to evaluate jobs and job descriptions prior to posting. This provides an opportunity to assess the position and skill sets needed for the position. It also provides JCPRD an opportunity to ask whether or not the position has changed due to internal or external factors. Organization of recreation services can assist in defining staffing focus and providing consistency by aligning staffing classifications, levels, and titles within the recreation services structure. Recommended services are: 3.1.1. Core Services 3.1.2. Market Services 3.1.3. Incubator Services 3.1.1. Core Services These are mission based services that JCPRD excels at and is uniquely suited to provide as a county level organization. These are services that JCPRD is committed to offering long into the future based upon demand and facility availability. These services should be protected in that they should receive significant resources especially as it relates to enterprise dollars and staffing. These services should also look to incorporate partnerships and cross marketing opportunities when possible. 3.1.2. Market Services These are services that respond to the market demand and can be met within existing facilities. These services should be continually evaluated so as to determine if they are becoming more or less profitable and if they should move into the Core Services. As they become more profitable and the market and trend continues to grow it will be important for JCPRD to evaluate available facilities and ability to expand. Conversely, if the market begins to decrease for these programs, JCPRD will need to determine at what point they discontinue offering the service or move the service back to a designation of “incubator.” 3.1.3. Incubator Services These are innovative services explored ahead of market demand. These services are a direct result of the continual evaluation and engagement of program participants and recreation trends. These services have the potential of moving into market services, but may only be offered for a short period of time. The goal of these programs should be the same as the market and core services, to operate at a break-even level. However, given the unique nature of an emerging market, JCPRD will need to be prepared to support these programs financially. The benefit of these programs is that it allows JCPRD to “try” new things and to diversify the services that they offer to the general public. As JCPRD continues to move their recreation programs and facility offerings forward, it needs to be acknowledged that there is a sensitivity to competing with other providers in the county. Other communities, along with private and non-profit providers, are quick to follow the lead of JCPRD as an innovator of recreation programs. Those same organizations are also quick to point out that JCPRD is duplicating services after they have followed JCPRD in providing these services. While JCPRD needs to be sensitive to not oversaturating a specific market, it needs to be acknowledged, and proven through the market analysis, that there is significant market in many of the activities. JCPRD is currently a leader and innovator in recreation programming within Johnson County. Staff should continue to work to embrace this position through the development of new programs and services. The focus on core services that JCPRD provides should not be lost in embracing the role of an innovator.

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Designation of recreation services as Core, Market, or Incubator is a process that should be performed by Recreation Division leadership and include input from front line full-time programmers. Classification areas are not a priority or importance order, as all levels are critical to the success of JCPRD recreation programming. Evaluation and organization are based on the program roles in meeting the needs of the Johnson County community, and enterprise return to JCPRD. Key components in defining which area programs fall into should be cost recovery, longevity, and community impact. Core services will tend to score highly in all three criteria, while Market and Incubator programs will be more likely to meet one or possibly two of these criteria.

3.2. Action: Evaluate Services and Programs The reality of Recreation and Cultural Resource services, and their role as an enterprise operation, is that there needs to be regular evaluation of services and programs. Although there is currently a significant amount of evaluation taking place within the Recreation Division, the process needs to be enhanced and standardized to serve JCPRD as the market continues to change. The purpose of putting these evaluation measures in place is to help JCPRD focus their efforts on core services, determine what programs and facilities may be moving into the core that are currently not there, and assess the programs and services which may be moved out of the core. JCPRD as an enterprise operation does not have the luxury to offer programs regardless of life cycle, market or profitability, and will need to be able to make difficult decisions if programs are coming to the end of their life cycle. The use of participation statistics and evaluations will assist in that process. Recommendations for evaluation are: 3.2.1. Minimum Evaluation Areas 3.2.2. Evaluation Process 3.2.1. Minimum Evaluation Areas Evaluations should assess the following areas, at minimum: facility, value, instruction (when applicable), and source. •

Facility: In providing participants an opportunity to evaluate the host facilities, JCPRD gathers data which may be used to build and enhance their Capital Improvement Project (CIP) plans to meet patron needs.

Value: Questions should be posed to the participants or renters of facilities that measure how they view the value of the program or facility. Resulting information will inform an assessment of appropriate fee structure. This data will show whether JCPRD has undervalued programs and services or if they are reaching a ceiling for fee structure.

Instruction: The quality of instruction can build or destroy a participant base at a rapid rate. By asking about instruction, JCPRD staff can use feedback to frame professional development opportunities for staff and make informed instructor reviews and re-hire decisions.

Source: JCPRD is focused on increasing the marketing of their programs and services. As such, it will be important that they ask participants and facility users how they found out about JCPRD and where they typically seek information. This allows JCPRD to continue to focus on specific markets and market tools or adjust based upon feedback.

3.2.2. Evaluation Process The evaluation process as a whole should incorporate technology as often as possible. Getting program participants or parents of program participants to complete evaluations on site is an efficient use of time. This evaluation process includes programs, services and facilities to be evaluated on a regular basis. The evaluation process should also extend to events and athletic fields.

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3.3. Action: Expand Opportunities for Enterprise Services JCPRD has a long history of offering high quality, cost sensitive programs to the residents of Johnson County and the surrounding area. A key component of the Recreation Division is the limited tax dollars allocated to support the operation and administration of the programs. The Recreation Division operates as an enterprise arm of JCPRD. This practice of operating as an enterprise is not uncommon as it relates to recreation programming across the country. In fact, most organizations offering recreation programs look to recover, at a minimum, the hard costs associated with offering the program. Some organizations, like JCPRD, also look to incorporate many of the soft costs associated with recreation programs which include full-time staffing, facility expenses and administration. This absorption of soft costs through recreation programming is less common. Moving beyond recreation programming and into recreation facilities, there are few full-service recreation centers across the country that recover 100% of their operating costs. Those facilities that do absorb 100% of their operating costs typically do not include debt service or depreciation in that equation. Further, it varies from organization to organization whether all of the administrative or maintenance/custodial services are reflected in the facility budget. JCPRD staff and administration have skillfully and seamlessly operated the respective parks and recreation divisions. The Recreation Division has been successful in operating facilities, like the New Century Fieldhouse, at a break-even or cash positive level. The same could be said for the various programs that are offered. The Parks and Golf Course Division, while tax-dollar supported, has also been asked to approach their day-to-day tasks and long-term planning with more of a business mindset. Being asked to do more with less, JCPRD has continued to make efforts to maintain parks, both passive and active elements, and meet the needs of patrons. The framework of the Legacy Plan points to a business-like model for both sides of the operation while still focusing on services provided to the public at large. The continual evaluation of business practices, level of care, facilities, programs, and services will become ingrained in both operations to ensure that they continue to be wise stewards of resources. JCPRD has immediate and new opportunities to expand their services and programs through partnerships and facilities. A select number of the services detailed below represent ventures that are completely new to JCPRD. The majority describe an expansion of current offerings or increased programming to be operated out of existing, JCPRD-managed facilities. Consideration of market demands, demographic trends, and JCPRD institutional capabilities should inform the decision of which new opportunities to take on, and in what order. In order to provide residents with a diversity of offerings, and avoid the duplication of tax funded services, continued partnerships and response to the market demand should guide programming offerings and locations. Recommendations for the expansion of enterprise services are: 3.3.1. Evaluation of Opportunities within the Enterprise Model 3.3.2. Recommendations by Program 3.3.3. Recommendations by Facility 3.3.4. Evaluate Realignment of Recreation Athletic Field Maintenance

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3.3.1. Evaluation of Opportunities within the Enterprise Model The combination of low median age and high median household income makes it possible for Recreation within JCPRD to operate as an enterprise venture. From the 2000-2010 Census, Johnson County saw an increase of 20.6% in its population, with a population of 544,179 in the 2010 Census and a projected population of 592,125 in 2019. In addition to the total population seeing exponential growth, it is also important to point out that the median age is lower than the state and national number and the median household income is significantly higher than the state and national number. Expanding further on the median income, in 2014 it was projected that 69.9% of the population would make more than $50,000 and only 11.6% would make less than $25,000. These median household income statistics, when compared to the State of Kansas and national number, indicate that within Johnson County there are significantly more households making more than $50,000 per year and significantly less making $25,000 per year. Further, those income levels are a primary factor in the Recreation Division being able to operate as an enterprise fund within JCPRD. The income level combined with the youth in the county also point to the significant user base for the increase in municipal recreation centers that have been developed in the past 20 years. This higher median household income also provides a strong correlation to the entertainment and recreation spending in the county. When that rate of spending is averaged by household, and then placed on an index with 100 being the national average, Johnson County has an index of 141, approximately 40% higher than the national number. Regardless of the programs that are being discussed, JCPRD needs to be bold but calculated when offering new programs and services into the market. Because of the enterprise nature of the division, there needs to be full accounting of costs associated with a program prior to doing so. Once those costs have been identified it will be equally important for the division to determine if the proposed market is one they should enter and from there, determine if they have the facilities to offer said program. If all of those items - market, cost accounting and facility align - JCPRD should move forward with marketing and executing the program. It should be the goal of JCPRD to offer a small percentage of new or enhanced programs on a season by season basis. In addition to offering those new programs, JCPRD should also evaluate programs they have been offering and determine if they should continue. 3.3.2. Recommendations by Program Market analysis for JCPRD focused on activities that take place indoor, outdoor and both. As JCPRD takes this information and moves towards implementation, it will be important to focus on programming that addresses these activities in two ways: one, which programs impact the largest portion of the population, and two, determining what programs can be offered that utilize existing JCPRD program facilities and locations. Programming focused on areas where the population demand is limited or investment is needed in new or upgraded facilities, JCPRD should seek out additional partnerships to help make those programs a reality. Impact on market share is a common concern that other providers in the county have with JCPRD moving into the market of providing group exercise classes or opportunities for individuals to use weight/cardio equipment. For the past 5-10 years, exercising with equipment, exercise walking, and swimming have been the top three activities within the National Sporting Goods Association (NSGA) survey, and these will continue to be highly ranked because they touch such a broad age spectrum. It is recommended JCPRD focus on programs that build off that popularity. (All participation numbers in this section were developed using the 2013 National Sporting Goods Association survey.) •

Based upon the data in the market analysis, in 2019, participation in Johnson County is anticipated to be: 7,000 individuals participating in aerobics, 109,000 individuals exercising with equipment, 49,000 individuals participating in yoga, and 68,000 individuals working out at clubs. These numbers indicate there is a significant market for these services, especially if JCPRD builds on their current 50+ and youth sports focus.

•

Approximately 188,000 participate in exercise walking, 91,000 participate in swimming, and 85,000 participate in running/jogging. These numbers point to the renewed and continual emphasis that JCPRD should have on their trail system and look to incorporate programming concepts that utilize that system. It also points to the heavy use that can be anticipated on the trails that exist in current and future parks.

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Swimming numbers are important, but it should be noted that the Kansas City Blazers are in the category of swimmers who participate in the activity more than 110 times per year. This category represents 6.4% of the total swimming participants.

It is recommended JCPRD look to expand programs that build off this popularity. Additional key market service opportunities for JCPRD focus in the next 15 years include: 3.3.2.1. Recreational Facilities and Fieldhouses A hallmark of JCPRD is operating large regional facilities. If JCPRD were presented with an opportunity to run another fieldhouse style facility in Johnson County they should thoroughly examine that opportunity. JCPRD should continue to offer strong recreation programs countywide. Focusing on their core services, moving more programs to the core, and continuing to innovate as it relates to programs and partnerships should be the focus. 3.3.2.2. Youth Programming Another key demographic reality of Johnson County is age distribution. Of the total population within the county in 2014, 23.2% of the population was less than 18 years of age, which is approximately 143,000 individuals. This supports the concept of further investment in youth sports and youth sports venues within the county. It also points to the fact that there is a significant population that will be in need of after school services and a large portion of the population that will potentially participate in arts and enrichment activities, in particular as thetrend within school districts is to phase those programs out. 3.3.2.3. 50 Plus Programming In addition to there being a significant under 18 population in the county, there is also a significant 55+ age group population - 24.8% of the total population in 2014 is aged 55 or older which equates to 138,000 individuals. The 55+ age population in Johnson County, while less than the national distribution, is significant. It is also important to point out that this population will continue to grow and that this population is not only staying active longer, but they have significant resources to spend on entertainment and recreation. They will be strong supporters of the arts, but they will also be interested in the physical pursuits that JCPRD can offer. It is recommended JCPRD continue this focus and evolve the programming efforts aimed at this demographic. 3.3.2.4. Programming to Serve a Diverse Population The county is becoming more ethnically and racially diverse; approximately 8.0% of the population identifies as Hispanic and another 5.0% as Black. In addition, there is growth in the Asian population and individuals who have identified themselves as “other” or “multiple” races via the 2010 Census. JCPRD should monitor how the diversity of the population is changing, and engaging these sections of the population to assess and meet their needs. This will help build the incubator programs and, as the population grows, potentially move those programs into market or core services. 3.3.2.5. Arts Related Programming According to the National Endowment for the Arts, participation in the wide range of pursuits that fall within this category is decreasing on a national level. However, many recreation departments are finding themselves becoming an outlet to supplement the offerings that once took place through school districts. The arts and associated programs are another strong programmatic offering of JCPRD and should continue to be such. These programs should focus on areas with wide appeal to the population, and take calculated risks with an incubator mindset. It should be a focus to cross promote as many activities as possible and not simply as art programs promoting art programs, but truly cross promotion across all program markets. Through this promotion, patrons of JCPRD will be engaged and aware of all that JCPRD has to offer residents of the county.

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3.3.3. Recommendations by Facility The following are recommended for specific JCPRD recreation and cultural facilities and programs: 3.3.3.1. Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center This recommendation refers to the facility formally known as the King Louie building. The facility presents a unique opportunity for JCPRD as it provides a recreation enrichment opportunity. The Theatre in the Park and other enrichment programs are a core service that JCPRD currently offers, and the addition of the Arts and Heritage Center will allow JCPRD to continue this core service and expand it based upon this facility and staffing. Participation in the arts as a whole (music, drama, painting, etc.) has been on the decrease on a national level, due in large part to the limited availability of facilities such as these. Between the years of 19822008 activities such as attending performances of jazz, classical music, opera, musical plays, non-musical plays and ballet saw an average decrease of approximately 20% according to the National Endowment for the Arts. While the attendance of those activities has decreased, it can also be said that the median age of participants has increased. JCPRD should market these facilities, services and programs to current and potential users. Providing artists and performers opportunity and exposure throughout the JCPRD system and partner locations will be a key marketing tool for JCPRD. 3.3.3.2. Johnson County Museum The incorporation of the museum and its staff into the overall inventory of JCPRD provides similar opportunities as the Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center. JCPRD should strategically build programs around this facility and the amenities they offer. These programs should appeal to the 50+ age category, which continues to grow at an exponential rate, as well as the youth of Johnson County. 3.3.3.3. Meadowbrook Park and Meadowbrook Clubhouse Renovation This potential park and facility presents several opportunities for JCPRD in the coming years. Initial community input was received at the March 10-11 open house event as noted in section 1.1.2. A more complete master plan process for this future park will be performed by JCPRD in 2015. Items identified in the market analysis that should be addressed and vetted in this master plan process include: •

Athletic Practice Fields: There are no large green spaces in this part of Johnson County that are not school owned which can be used as practice fields. JCPRD should consider developing a large green space that can be configured in multiple ways to accommodate various sizes of rectangular fields.

Community Center: The current clubhouse could be configured into a quasi-community or wellness center. Such a community center could include classrooms that could support the 50+ programming and preschool offerings that JCPRD already excels. Additional opportunities for this structure include rental meeting / banquet rooms, or the incorporation of fitness equipment and group exercise space. If JCPRD does move towards fitness equipment in this location, packaging the equipment purchasing with Roeland Park and Mill Creek will increase purchase power and create consistency from location to location.

Pool: There is an outdoor pool at this location, however it is not recommended that JCPRD continue to offer aquatics or aquatics programming at this location. One of the main programs the Roeland Park Aquatic Center supports is the Kansas City Blazers swim team. It is able to do so because the facility operates on a year-around basis. The Meadowbrook pool will not support, in a significant fashion, the expansion or further enhancement of that program. While the pool will allow for JCPRD to expand their swim lesson/aquatic reach, most traditional, flat-water, aquatic venues in the midwest do not operate at a break-even level. Most aquatic centers have a goal of operating in a 50-75% cost recovery mode. In the JCPRD enterprise model, this recovery rate is not self-sustaining.

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This location is another example of JCPRD leveraging partnerships with public partners. JCPRD is viewed by municipal governments within the county as programmer and provider of large regional facilities. Continuing to look for these opportunities, in particular in areas where JCPRD does not have a significant physical or programmatic presence, will be important. A future step for developments such as this will be a thorough analysis that answers three key questions: •

Is this a business that JCPRD is currently in?

•

How does this business correlate to the core services that we offer, and can this service build upon those?

•

If this is a new venture, can JCPRD make it profitable?

3.3.3.4. Mid-America and Mid-America West Sports Complexes In the case of both of these facilities, JCPRD needs to become more focused on evaluating the rental agreements and tournaments. There needs to be an accounting of the resources that are necessary for upkeep and maintenance of these facilities, and if the tournament fees and rental agreements are staying true to the concept of the Recreation Division operating as an enterprise operation. In looking to continue to assess fees and rental agreements associated with youth sports facilities and tournaments, there are no national or industry standards to use as guidelines. Individual agencies typically develop these guidelines based upon the cost recovery philosophy of their organization. In the case of JCPRD, they should be focused on recovering as many of the hard costs associated with operating these facilities as possible. Costs such as: staffing (full-time and part-time), facility rent, equipment, field/facility prep time (set-up, tear-down, lining). It should also be noted that in the case of tournaments, JCPRD should also receive a portion of any admissions associated with contests in addition to the rental fees. At minimum, JCPRD needs to have full control of these facilities and maintain the scheduling so as to ensure maximum playability and use of the spaces. JCPRD should also consider the consolidation of the management and maintenance of these two properties. In consolidating these operations, a great deal of efficiency could be gained and the two facilities could be looked at as one inventory facility. Prior to investing in the infrastructure of these two properties, it is recommended JCPRD update the master plan for both properties. The evaluation of rental agreements and tournaments should play into the master plan process, evaluating whether it is best to continue in the business of baseball and softball, or to diversify and add rectangular fields. In master planning and reconfiguration of these spaces, resources should be allocated for improved parking, improved restroom facilities, and additional storage. In addition, the irrigation systems for both complexes are in need of replacement, as are the infields. If it is determined that baseball and softball are the preferred activities at Mid-America, both baseball fields should be renovated and the existing south quadplex should be renovated. If diversification is needed, the north quadplex and east fields should be converted into a multi-use field complex. Any improvements to Mid-America West will require vehicular access improvements including a second point of entry and egress to the west. 3.3.3.5. Heritage Park Heritage Park is one of the larger parks in the JCPRD inventory and it houses significant recreation elements in the football complex, soccer complex, and softball complex. The football complex is a partnership with the Football and Cheerleading Club of Johnson County while the soccer complex is a partnership with Heartland Soccer Association. Up to this point, JCPRD has been in the practice of signing long term agreements with these organizations for rental and maintenance fees. A significant

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change that JCPRD should look to adopt with the Legacy Plan is agreements that are in the three to five year range. This allows the youth sports organizations to plan appropriately, but also provides flexibility for JCPRD to react to changing markets and costs associated with maintaining these facilities. Another control JCPRD may look to employ is the establishment of standards of care for these facilities to determine the condition to be provided by JCPRD. Any level of care requested beyond the identified JCPRD level of care will be the sole responsibility of the league or organization, with JCPRD retaining full ownership and programming rights of the fields and facilities. 3.3.3.5.1. Heritage Park Football Complex Within this facility, JCPRD will need to continue to address ADA issues. Significant improvements could be made to the bleachers, along with parking lot improvement and expansion. The concession and restroom areas should be improved and/or replaced, and the irrigation systems on all fields should be replaced. These recommendations encompass a significant capital investment and should be made over time, not all at once. It is not uncommon for youth sports agencies to share in the cost of improvements such as these. It is important to understand that the market for youth football is decreasing in tackle, flag, and touch. The number of participants at this location has not decreased, but the geographical reach of the program has grown exponentially. As such, JCPRD will need to move forward cautiously with capital investment and expansion of this facility. 3.3.3.5.2. Heritage Park Soccer Complex This facility currently houses 18 natural grass fields, and is programmed in partnership with Heartland Soccer Association. Continuation of this partnership will require a significant investment in the facility by JCPRD. Based upon the need for additional practice fields and game fields, JCPRD may want to invest in two to four synthetic turf fields at this location. The addition of one turf field is equal to adding two to three natural grass fields in regards to the amount it can be used over the course of a season. If additional synthetic turf fields are added at this location, serious consideration should be given to also adding lights and extending the time that the field can be used over the course of the day. Beyond the addition of synthetic turf, investment will also need to be made in the current natural grass fields. This investment should come in the form of grading, over-seeding and continuing the process of taking each field off-line, allowing time to recover and regenerate. In contrast to football, soccer is seeing an increase in participation, especially in the greater Kansas City area. Synthetic turf fields and re-investment in the natural grass fields may create the opportunity for partnership in pursuing tournaments with the Overland Park Soccer Complex. 3.3.3.5.3. Heritage Park Softball Complex As an activity, baseball and softball have seen significant decreases in participation. Many agencies are struggling to fill their weekday leagues and have turned more towards weekend tournaments and outside providers renting their fields. If JCPRD is going to continue to maintain these fields as softball fields, they will need to re-evaluate improvements to expand the size of the fields. Along with expansion, there will be the need to repair and replace fencing and lighting. If the interest in soccer continues to increase, JCPRD may consider in converting these softball fields into two to three multi-use fields that could be configured in a number of ways and used as practice fields. These could then be supported by the existing restrooms and concession facilities. 3.3.3.6. Roeland Park Recreation Campus Roeland Park Community Center is owned by the City of Roeland Park and operated by JCPRD. The sports dome and aquatic center are owned and operated by JCPRD. The community center supports 50+ programming, along with enrichment activities and fitness. The aquatic center supports the Kansas City Blazers Swim Team year-round, and provides program and recreation opportunities to the community. Finally, the sports dome provides opportunity for basketball, volleyball, futsal and pickleball activities. These facilities meet community needs and should be a continued focus of JCPRD.

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3.3.3.6.1. Community Center Within the community center there should be a continued focus on fitness and providing fitness opportunities. JCPRD will benefit from looking at the weight/cardio equipment in the community center and Mill Creek Activity Center, as well as the possible community center at Meadowbrook, and replacing all of this equipment with one purchase for cost savings opportunities. Leasing options and maintenance contracts should be explored. The emphasis on fitness and wellness will continue to grow in Johnson County, and there is enough market share for JCPRD to be committed to offering these quality programs and services throughout the county. Also within the community center, there is a significant amount of 50+ programming and a location for children’s services. These program offerings should be continued and enhanced when possible to serve these growing demographics within Johnson County. Community center programs could be impacted by the addition of Meadowbrook to the JCPRD inventory. JCPRD should offer programming at Meadowbrook to complement the offerings at Roeland Park to encourage use of both facilities. 3.3.3.6.2. Aquatic Center Swimming as a pursuit is an activity that individuals can participate in from birth to grave and, as such, has a wide appeal. The Roeland Park Aquatic Center as a facility has shallow water for youth and those interested in the social aspect, along with deep water, lap lanes, and in particular 50-meter lap lanes for recreation and competitive swimming. As long as JCPRD is going to continue to support and administer the Blazers Swim Team, they will need a facility comparable to this body of water. JCPRD will need to continue to monitor developments within the county as it relates to competitive water and seek out potential partnerships when appropriate. A best case scenario for JCPRD is another entity developing an aquatic center with 50-meter lanes, of which JCPRD, i.e. the Blazers, become a primary renter of space. If that reality were to come to fruition, it will give JCPRD the option of getting out of the year-round aquatic operation business and provide summer operations only. Because the Recreation Division is an enterprise operation, JCPRD should strongly evaluate any other year-round aquatic operations opportunities and the financial impact it will have on the division. Typically, competitively geared indoor aquatic facilities do not fully cover the expenses associated with operations. Those facilities do generate a significant positive economic impact, but need significant indoor, dry-side components to begin to close the operational deficit gap. The aquatic center will require a significant investment in the dome itself and the infrastructure of the pool operation. 3.3.3.6.3. Sports Dome The air-supported structure of this facility, like the dome for the aquatic center, needs to fit into the capital improvement plan of JCPRD. The facility plays an integral role in sport court activities offered by JCPRD. As the facility ages and trends shift, JCPRD will need to evaluate whether this facility remains focused towards sport court activities or moves towards synthetic turf activities. An additional challenge of the sports dome is the location and the lack of visibility. Due to this location, increased marketing to benefit the sports dome should be considered. 3.3.3.7. New Century Fieldhouse New Century Fieldhouse is the newest indoor facility within the JCPRD inventory and combines court space and indoor turf space. While it is the newest facility, JCPRD will need to plan for improvements to the subfloor and the playing surface. Currently the court surface is a synthetic surface, and while acceptable, the more competitive athletes/tournaments may look for a hardwood surface for basketball. In addition to planning for the flooring and court space, JCPRD will need to plan for the replacement of the synthetic turf as well.

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In evaluating the playing surfaces within New Century Fieldhouse, it is not outside of the realm of possibilities that the facility could be converted to all court space or all turf space. This conversion should be based upon trends, demand and combined usage of New Century and Okun fieldhouses. As activities like basketball and volleyball continue to show decreases on a national level, soccer maintains it popularity, and lacrosse realizes exponential growth. Information such as this should play into the decision making process and renovation/ capital investment planning. Given New Century Fieldhouse’s Gardner location, it is important that JCPRD continues to advertise the facility as a regional sports facility, not a community recreation center. This will continue the focus of JCPRD as a primary provider of regional facilities within Johnson County. 3.3.3.8. Okun Fieldhouse Okun Fieldhouse is one of the older indoor properties managed by JCPRD. It is a primary location for basketball, volleyball, pickleball and other indoor sport pursuits both on the youth and adult level. Given the age of the facility and the number of events that take place there, improvements to the facility that should be considered. Improvements to the HVAC, lighting, and court netting should be a priority, along with improvements to the playing surface. In evaluating the playing surface, JCPRD will need to determine whether to maintain the wood courts or move towards a synthetic surface. Because JCPRD operates two fieldhouse facilities, when playing surfaces are replaced, consideration should be given to continuing to offer courts at both, or moving towards indoor turf in one location. Okun Fieldhouse could very easily move from a court facility to a turf facility based upon demand. This discussion of new playing surface vs. inclusion of turf should o take into consideration the potential expansion of the facility to include additional square footage for activities. Based upon the programs, leagues, and tournaments that take place in this facility, a significant investment needs to be made in the entrance and lobby area. This area needs significant expansion, as well as circulation improvements related to concessions and restrooms. The potential for expansion and moving this area south towards the ball diamonds will provide enhanced indoor services for those outdoor amenities as well. The Recreation Division should always be in the practice of assessing and prioritizing when making decisions about facilities and staffing. One area where staffing realignment should be considered is the administration of the fieldhouse operations. Efficiencies may be realized with both facilities operating under one administrator and pooling those resources. This consolidation of fieldhouse administration will allow for a change in recreation manager focus to facility type, fieldhouse or athletic fields, from the current focus by location. 3.3.3.9. Mill Creek Activity Center Mill Creek Activity Center is one of the newer indoor facilities to have come on-line prior to the implementation of this Legacy Plan. Site improvements to address the parking lot drainage issue are still needed. This location is serving as a test site for a library book exchange. This is a continued opportunity for partnership with the library, and JCPRD should continue to evaluate the success of this venture before implementing similar ventures in other locations. Mill Creek Activity Center has potential for increased programming and activities requiring additional financial investment into the facility. JCPRD should consider enhancing the indoor offerings and investing in adjacent outdoor amenities. In doing so, JCPRD should create identity for the location. Expanding on the Natureplay preschool and wellness focus of JCPRD U are two possible identities for growing services. Beyond the preschool offerings, Mill Creek Activity Center offers a significant gymnastic component, weight equipment, cardio equipment and group exercise and dance space. As activities, all of these are seeing increases on a national and regional level. Also, based upon the size of Johnson County, it is completely acceptable that JCPRD duplicate some of the services being provided by non-profit, private, and public providers. This facility currently offers programmed fitness classes and drop-in use of fitness equipment and walking track. Merit for membership operation should be continually evaluated to support enterprise operation. JCPRD should continue to make upgrades to the weight and cardio equipment within Mill Creek Activity Center.

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As a step in that process, JCPRD should investigate the associated costs of replacing the equipment at Mill Creek Activity Center, Roeland Park Community Center, and the potential Meadowbrook community center. There will be greater purchasing power if the quantity of equipment for all three locations were combined. Equally important to the replacement of this equipment will be the maintenance of the equipment. If a bid package were assembled for this equipment, it will be important to look at a service contract and/or the potential of renting the equipment. The group exercise space and dance studio in Mill Creek Activity Center should be properly outfitted to have hard wood floating floors with mirrors on as many sides as possible. This will enhance the facility and create additional opportunities for fitness programs focused on all age groups. The main space within Mill Creek Activity Center is geared specifically for gymnastics. This market is very specific and, while growing, it will be important for JCPRD to monitor the market and ensure that this is the best use of the space. JCPRD should use the facility to get as many individuals introduced to the sport as possible, while still offering higher level courses for those with greater abilities. 3.3.3.10. The Theatre in the Park The Theatre in the Park is a core service of JCPRD and should continue to be managed as a valuable community asset. Not only are the programs and performances unique, but the facility is one of a very few in the region. JCPRD should continue to look for partnership opportunities to enhance the theater and its program offerings. One such opportunity is with the Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center. JCPRD should investigate the possibility of bringing other groups in to enhance the overall offerings of the facility. Enhancement of offerings and partnerships are all intended to generate additional revenue and assist The Theatre in the Park with achieving break-even status. While the concept of a break-even operation should be a goal, it is important to note, most theater-or-performance based venues are subsidized on some level and provide community-wide cultural and recreation benefit. The Theatre in the Park continues to offer quality services and facilities, and it will be important to continue to invest in the infrastructure of the facility. Continued improvements to “back of the house� amenities will need to take place along with ensuring the stage and performance areas can maximize performance potential and attract outside groups. JCPRD offers a wide variety of activities around the county. Some of the activities are sporting activities and others, like The Theatre in the Park and Natureplay preschool, are enrichment activities. The Theatre in the Park is one of the few activities that JCPRD offers that brings thousands of individuals to one location. As such, JCPRD should work to continue to market other programs, facilities, services and special events through The Theatre in the Park events. Equally important will be cross marketing to increase awareness of The Theatre in the Park. 3.3.4. Evaluate Realignment of Recreation Athletic Field Maintenance Identifying opportunities to expand enterprise services and partnerships will require providing recreation managers with the availability to perform these efforts. Relocating the supervision of recreation athletic complex maintenance to parks maintenance should be explored as an option to provide this availability. This realignment will remove the day-to-day coordination and oversight of these crews from recreation managers, and allow them to expand their roles in enterprise service growth and partnership development. This alignment should maintain athletic field-focused maintenance crews for consistency and efficiency during field seasons. Communication will be critical between recreation managers and park mangers to ensure recreation needs are met for enterprise events while managing the longterm health and care of the parks.

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3

.04 Connecting with Nature


Trout Stocking at Shawnee Mission Park

“Crime and the fear of crime do not flourish in an environment of high energy and healthy interaction among law abiding community members.� Kevin Scully, former Chief of Police South Burlington, Vermont 1997


Snapshot Connecting with Nature

One JCPRD A tree’s sapwood is where minerals and water are transported from the root system up to its crown. The Connecting with Nature element is the sapwood of the JCPRD ecosystem. Programs and locations which foster the community’s engagement of nature, and practices which keep the native landscapes healthy, make the resources that JCPRD invests in accessible to patrons. These functions also help to instill the appreciation that is necessary to garner support for the long term care and protection of natural spaces and education sites within the district. Protection of these areas is important as development and population within Johnson County is projected to continue over the next 15 years.

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Legacy Framework Goal: We will promote a legacy of Connecting with Nature through a focused effort to expand services and outreach opportunities.

4.1 4.2

Action: Enhance Nature-based Experiences and Outdoor Education Sites Outcomes: The continued improvement and expansion of outdoor education sites within the district. Investment at TimberRidge Adventure Center and Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center will enhance these locations, address functional needs, and allow the facilities to provide opportunities and serve an expanded set of users. The development of additional outdoor education sites at Oakridge Farm and a destination nature playground with day camp area are identified in this plan. These amenities will provide JCPRD staff additional program and activity locations, and provide patrons additional opportunities to actively and creatively play and engage with nature. Action: Prioritize and Expand Natural Resource Management Outcomes: A set of standards and dedicated staff will focus the management of native landscapes to optimize ecosystem services, protect habitat, and preserve the heritage of the Johnson County landscape.

Case Study In celebration of its 100th anniversary, the Forest Preserves District of Cook County released “The Natural and Cultural Resources Master Plan” in March of 2015. The intent of the plan is to provide the guidance necessary to achieve the goals laid out in the district’s “2014 Next Century Conservation Plan.” The Cook County plan is unique in that it addresses natural and cultural resources as connected, linked assets. The plan is accessible to a general audience and includes recommendations related to developing a base of educated citizens.

Capital Investment Priorities

S U M M A RY

Capital investments related to planning and operations include an update of the district’s natural resource management plan, updates of the master plans for all outdoor education sites, and the phased implementation of additional natural resource management FTE positions and equipment. These costs make up the smallest spending area within the Connecting with Nature element of the CIP, but they are high priorities. Once the standards for level of care are set, and the ability to plan for and execute labor associated with the care of native landscapes is enhanced, the implementation of reinvestment and development projects within outdoor education spaces are recommended to occur. Improvements to vehicular circulation infrastructure as well as existing facilities will enhance the visitor experience and provide the appropriate space for expanded services.

total 15-year capital investment

$ 8, 620, 000

spending area: outdoor activity space

$ 4, 405, 000

s p e n d i n g a r e a : vehicular + facility improvements

$ 2, 575, 000

spending area: planning and operations

$ 1, 640, 000

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Supporting Analysis

Connecting with Nature is a focus area within JCPRD that continues to rise in importance among patrons and partners who place greater emphasis on land preservation, restoration, conservation, human health and well-being, and education - all services a connection with nature can provide.

Mail Survey Q13 Level of importance respondent households place on options for open space strategies to be undertaken by JCPRD

JCPRD Now Community stakeholders and patrons consistently recognize nature education, outdoor learning locations, programs, and interpretation as a defining role of JCPRD. As captured in the statistically valid survey, 51% of respondent households strongly agree that the protection of natural resources and environment is a benefit that they receive from JCPRD parks, trails, and recreation facilities and services (Q14). JCPRD park police are well known among park visitors for their role in park safety and community outreach. Johnson County Park & Recreation District staff have observed a correlation between this level of familiarity with law enforcement and a safe park system in which mutual respect between patrons, natural resources, and park staff is present.

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Mail Survey Q15 Potential benefits that are most important for the Johnson County Park & Recreation District to provide to respondent households.

JCPRD Recent History JCPRD published a natural resource plan in 2009 to establish guidelines for natural resource management and guide implementation of the JCPRD biodiversity policy. The resulting report addressed immediate needs and established groundwork for a district-wide maintenance and management plan, but further study is needed to develop this long-term strategy. Internal and external park and recreation professionals note that in the 15 years since MAP 2020 was published, public awareness of environmental concerns has increased. This shift provides an opportunity to expand public understanding of natural resources, and the role they play in healthy communities, beyond individual plant and animal species. Among surveyed residents, the most popular course of action for currently undeveloped parkland is to open the properties with a first phase of passive recreation (Q13). The support behind this option indicates an appreciation of access to natural resources and amenities present in undeveloped parkland. The survey also showed support for preservation of open space with 34 percent of respondents strongly supportive and 34 percent somewhat supportive of acquiring additional open space and leaving it undeveloped for future generations (Q12). JCPRD Future Additional staff and resources will be needed to accommodate future development and natural resource management efforts. In particular, opening additional parkland will increase the need for natural resource management staff as well as park police, both as educators and as law enforcement officers. Survey results and stakeholder input align with JCPRD’s desire to place an emphasis on natural resource management and education, and expand natural resource and cultural/heritage education. JCPRD should look to play an increased role in school age education activities, resulting from changes in school district regulations and limitations regarding travel for school field trips and activities. Johnson County governmental partners expressed a desire to explore “out of the box� partnership collaborations such as an edible fruit tree garden, community garden, or a program for integration of nature at the workplace.

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Actions + Recommendations

Connecting with Nature is a focus on expanded nature-based services and outreach opportunities, as well as improving the health of those natural areas. Natural resource management, protection, restoration, and education are core to the role JCPRD plays in parks and recreation within Johnson County and the region. For this plan’s 15-year vision, the role of strengthening residents’ connections with nature is a vital effort. Thus, the recommendations focus on enhancing the integration of nature and natural resource management into the JCPRD experience through passive amenities, outdoor education programming, and management practices. This approach is intended to increase emphasis on the preservation and restoration of natural resources, establish parks that provide and encourage access to natural areas, and increase the role and presence of nature in the JCPRD parks and recreation experience. Connecting with Nature action items are:

4.1. Action: Enhance Nature-based Experiences and Outdoor Education Sites

4.2. Action: Prioritize and Expand Natural Resource Management

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4.1. Action: Enhance Nature-based Experiences and Outdoor Education Sites The following recommendations are intended to increase and improve access to a variety of nature-based experiences within the JCPRD system: •

Update master plans to guide improvements at Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center and the TimberRidge Adventure Center. These nature-focused program centers will benefit from increased opportunities for nature-based learning and activities.

Renovate and add facilities at Oakridge Farm in Shawnee Mission Park to provide expanded opportunities for outdoor education, interpretative displays, and nature-based programming.

Utilize the new Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center, in collaboration with the Johnson County Museum and The Theatre in the Park facilities, as an additional programming site.

Provide a unique destination amenity containing play-based elements, experiential and interpretative elements, and an outdoor classroom/education area. This amenity will provide opportunities for public day use, JCPRD Day Camp activities and programs, and JCPRD Children’s Services activities. This destination play amenity may be programmed for non-JCPRD camps and school outings, and will draw daytrip patrons from beyond county lines.

Recommendations are: 4.1.1. Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center 4.1.2. TimberRidge Adventure Center 4.1.3. Oakridge Farm 4.1.4. Destination Nature Playground and Day Camp Area 4.1.5. Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center

4.1.1. Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center As a nature center, the recommendations are focused on enhancing the natural features, education programming, and interpretative components of the outside environment. Interior renovations and exhibit enhancements are currently underway, and additional programming expansion is anticipated. The Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center master plan is 12 years old and should be reviewed and updated prior to major improvements. General recommendations presented below should guide the updated master plan: •

Relocate the existing amphitheater to a location closer to the Nature Center for improved access, program logistics, and better drainage.

Explore long-term lease (or purchase) with the City of Olathe for expansion of park and preservation of open space north of the Nature Center.

Incorporate new wetland cells with an accessible trail and boardwalk in the riparian woodland south of the current amphitheater location. These amenities will help address on-site stormwater quality and provide interpretative features along the accessible park trail.

Continue to enrich the park’s primary role as a nature park. Classify the park as a Natural Area (A) – class IV per the 2009 Resource Management Plan. Park branding should remain Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center for clarity of park elements to patrons, but marketing emphasis should be put on the nature park and nature center elements of the park.

Continue an aggressive approach to invasive plant removal program as part of the system-wide maintenance and management plan recommended in the Stewardship section of this document.

Explore means to provide additional general parking, improved circulation, and accessible and short-

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term parking close to the Nature Center with minimal impact on the natural resources of the site. Consider Olathe property as possible overflow parking site. •

Evaluate with staff the site’s capacity for new camps and associated demand on the Nature Center and park’s program spaces. Evaluate if some programming will be best served by relocating to the renovated Oakridge Farm (see below).

Confirm with staff additional indoor programming space and animal care facility needs anticipated at the Nature Center and identified in the Phase IV expansion. Lab and office space have not been updated since 1992, and over this time full-time staff, part-time staff, and volunteers have increased by over 25 percent. Determine if some additional programming space will be best served at Oakridge, similar to discussion described above.

Develop a nature play area and relocate the outdoor classroom near the existing shelter. Consider allowing public reservation of this area to generate additional revenue.

Evaluate need and revenue opportunities for additional staff to support expanded programming and facilities.

4.1.2. TimberRidge Adventure Center As with Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center, an update of the TimberRidge Master Plan should be the first action taken. The current master plan has a broad vision for lodging and other features, which should be evaluated in light of, and tailored to, the anticipated long-term regional market and potential public desire for innovative nature-based experiences. The plan update should include a consideration of the following: •

Consider additional development including adult, youth, and family accommodations for overnight activities. These may take the form of a lodge and/or cabins, which should seek to be designed as unique experiences in a natural park setting (e.g., treehouse-like spaces) that are not available in standard accommodations or at other group event/retreat locations.

Pursue expansion of teamwork and team-building activities (i.e., challenge course features) to create more program opportunities and expand the potential user base, especially seeking new trends or improved versions of existing activities. As well, the plan should explore innovative concepts that will provide incentive for return trips and enhanced marketing opportunities.

Improve the canoe launch operation, general water access, and improve access-related slope issues. Water access is a primary component of many successful nature-based events and the provision of safe and effective water access opportunities is of utmost importance for this facility.

Explore opportunities for additional indoor and/or weather-protected gathering space, as well as related program storage.

Evaluate need and revenue opportunities for additional staff to support expanded programming and facilities.

4.1.3. Oakridge Farm The Oakridge area of Shawnee Mission Park is a gem awaiting a focused implementation of natural resource enhancements and nature education programs and facilities. Public access to and appreciation of this view and experience-rich ridge will greatly benefit from the following set of recommendations: •

Continue and enhance the on-going natural resource management and restoration activities for this rich natural environment.

Incorporate new interpretative walking/hiking trails to support both programmed and unprogrammed learning experiences.

Maintain and consider expansion of existing hayride program.

Develop a new nature education programming facility, located near Ogg Road, to include but not be limited to: 1. A main pavilion that can provide an appropriate level of protection from weather for large or small groups, and will function as a program base.

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2. Restrooms (flush toilets, if possible, or composting toilets). 3. Water and electricity, including ample safety lighting and some provision for program lighting. 4. Parking to support the anticipated use-level of the main pavilion. This should include bus access for group transportation. •

Develop a new nature education programming and support facility, to replace the Mack House structure, to include but not be limited to: 1. A secondary pavilion/shelter that can provide an appropriate level of protection from weather for smaller groups and will function as a program base location or a stop within a larger experience. 2. Recognition of the Mack family and the farm history. 3. Restrooms (composting toilets). 4. Water and electricity. 5. Minimal parking (for staff and/or special needs).

Confirm the need for a full-time naturalist staff for program development, staff training, and program implementation at this new outdoor education site.

4.1.4. Destination Nature Playground and Day Camp Area A significant challenge for the Children’s Services summer camp programs is a lack of local destinations capable of providing a half-day or full-day’s experience. As well, some of the nature education programming and camps conducted by JCPRD interpretive staff struggle to balance learning time with outside “down-time/play time” due to a lack of open space around the Ernie Miller environs. In addition, playgrounds within the JCPRD inventory are generally perceived as appropriate for an hour or two of play, with the notable exception of Antioch Park. An outdoor environment that encourages longer outdoor experiences is desired to help children and families “connect with nature,” away from constant technology and distractions. An approach to increasing children’s access to and awareness of nature is bolstered by the Children’s Services successful Natureplay preschool addition at Mill Creek Activity Center. JCPRD regional parks are “destination” attractions, where many patrons expect and desire to spend significant blocks of time. In light of the programming and public service needs noted above, as well as the opportunity to expand the “destination” qualities of the park system, the Legacy Plan calls for the implementation of a regional nature play and education amenity capable of attracting and sustaining extended outings. This place will contain nature-based play elements, experiential and interpretative elements, and a program-managed outdoor classroom/education area. This amenity will provide opportunities for public day use, JCPRD day camp activities and programs, and JCPRD Children’s Services activities. This destination play amenity may also be available for non-JCPRD camps and school outings. A secondary intent is to draw daytrip patrons from beyond county lines. The basic features to be explored are as follows, with other new ideas expected to come forth when a detailed master plan is developed: •

Provide a large-scale play environment, incorporating mostly natural features and materials, creating play circuits for balancing, climbing, exploring, and hide-and-seek type games. Ageappropriate play areas will be developed to cater to the broad range of abilities and activity levels.

Design the play spaces to encourage adults and children to play together, and provide plenty of seating for rest as well. Picnic facilities, drinking fountain, and restrooms will be provided.

Include natural exploration areas and water access to enhance the passive outdoor experiences for both children and adults. The intent of these spaces will be to “decompress,” slow down, and enjoy the sounds, textures, smells, and views of nature. Exploration areas will also serve as a program element for day-camp and education experiences. It is recommended this area include an outdoor classroom integrated into the nature experience for use by schools and groups.

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Nature playground at Prospect Park in Brooklyn, New York provides a sensory play and learning experience

Architectural rendering of the proposed Johnson County Museum

Include protection from weather in pavilion facilities. This will provide flexibility for group activities, be it JCPRD programs or others, by allowing for successful gatherings over a broad range of seasonal conditions. Electricity and water will be available at these structures.

Determine location in future planning efforts. An existing park or future park are possible locations. Initial evaluation during this planning process identified Cedar Niles as a potential site due to the park location and variety of experiences planned for the park.

4.1.5. Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center The soon-to-be renovated King Louie building provides a collaborative opportunity with the Johnson County Museum and opportunities for expanded The Theatre in the Park activities. This will be a convenient outreach location, close to the core of the county’s population, where certain nature programming may be brought and presented to the public. The potential synergy between nature education, cultural education, and fine arts provides tremendous potential for unique and attractive new programs that are of interest to a broad cross section of user groups.

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4.2. Action: Prioritize and Expand Natural Resource Management Natural resource management, protection, restoration/reclamation, and education are core activities JCPRD undertakes for the benefit of residents within Johnson County and the region. The recommendations in this plan section are intended to improve the quality of JCPRD natural places - prairies, woodlands, riparian corridors, streams, and lakes - allowing them to provide healthy plant, animal, and human environments. Through this effort, our collective community and general quality of life will be improved in many beneficial ways, from water and air quality to mental rejuvenation. A refocus on this JCPRD role began following completion of the 2009 Natural Resource Management Plan document and recommendations from staff that included the addition of a district biologist. Natural resource management efforts have continued to increase since 2009. Recent natural resource efforts in 2014 included: •

Removal of cedar trees from Cedar Niles prairie and Shawnee Mission Park (13 acres).

Scout group projects including removal of over two miles of barbed wire from park properties.

Successful workday partnership with KC Wildlands.

First prairie restoration at Shawnee Mission Park in over 10 years (8 acres).

472 people cut their own Christmas trees at Mildale Farm.

Opened Camp Branch Glade to the public.

First woodland prescribed burn in district history (14 acres).

The recommendations below, to be implemented over the 15-year life of the plan and beyond, are designed to carry forth and enhance these past natural resource efforts: 4.2.1. Update Natural Resource Management Plan 4.2.2. Continue Park Maintenance Staff Education 4.2.3. Emphasize Natural Resource Education and Partnerships 4.2.4. Provide Additional Natural Resource Staff 4.2.5. Protect Current Natural Resources

4.2.1. Update Natural Resource Management Plan The continued growth and evolution of natural resource management within JCPRD, and in response to this plan’s recommended increase in public access to more parkland, will require an update to the 2009 Natural Resource Management Plan. This updated plan should be developed in partnership with an updated park and facilities maintenance plan, and the two should complement each other with a focus on efficient management of parks, trails, facilities, cultural resources, and natural resources. The current plan looks only at existing parkland and provides recommendations specific to managing and maintaining these locations. An updated plan should look not just at the individual parklands of JCPRD, but at the complete natural and cultural resource context of Johnson County, JCPRD’s role in preserving and reinvesting in these ecosystems, and the importance of this management and reinvestment to all of Johnson County.

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4.2.2. Continue Park Maintenance Staff Education Use the updated plan, in conjunction with the parks and facilities maintenance plan, as an opportunity to continue education of parks maintenance staff regarding the needs of natural resources and best practices for their management. 4.2.3. Emphasize Natural Resource Education and Partnerships Continuing the focus on the greater county-wide impact of JCPRD natural resource management, it is recommended there be a renewed emphasis on natural resource education and partnerships: •

Expand partnerships within JCPRD by increasing collaboration between outdoor education, natural resource, and Natureplay preschool staff.

Expand education opportunities with Johnson County Museum at the new Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center.

Expand partnerships with Johnson County government agencies and departments.

Expand partnership with the State of Kansas via the Kansas Department of Parks, Wildlife and Tourism and the Prairie Center, specifically aimed at a functional connection to the Cedar Niles future park property and potential for shared resources within the Prairie Center.

Expand partnerships with regional colleges and universities, seeking research and maintenance program staffing possibilities, at a low cost with high direct benefit.

Provide volunteer opportunities for JCRPD staff to participate in natural resource management activities.

4.2.4. Provide Additional Natural Resource Staff Provide additional natural resource staff to support the plan implementation needs for fieldwork, paperwork, and oversight of volunteer efforts: •

Currently, one biologist manages all natural resource programs within JCPRD. Efforts rely heavily on existing park maintenance staff, other staff, and volunteers to implement management plans and programs.

Recommend additional full-time natural resource management staff to expand the role of JCPRD in countywide natural resource management and specifically within JCPRD parks and facilities. Implementation of this recommendation includes: 1. Add one additional full time-staff at each of the regional maintenance facilities to oversee management and programs within those parks and facilities while working to support efforts of other natural resource management staff (total of four additional staff). 2. One initial additional full-time natural resource management staff added within the next five years, and remaining three phased in as appropriate based on need and opportunity, but no longer than one every five years. 3. Build strength through these additional positions to support one another and relieve the demand on park maintenance staff to implement management plans. 4. Increase opportunities for outreach and partnership building within community and with volunteer organizations. 5. Increase education opportunities regarding natural resources and strengthen existing outdoor education programs.

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Native prairie area managed by JCPRD within Kill Creek Park

6. Ensure skill set of additional staff complement existing natural resource staff. 7. Define specific skills and needs of staff for inclusion in the updated Natural Resource Management Plan. 8. Addition of a fifth natural resource management position may be considered if responsibilities of the district biologist grow significantly. This sixth natural resource management staff would step into a regional maintenance headquarters with the district biologist and assume the natural resource management role for that maintenance region while the district biologist would provide district-wide coordination and oversight of natural resource management. 4.2.5. Protect Current Natural Resources The following are specific tasks that should remain at the forefront of the natural resource management efforts: •

Remove and control invasive Bush Honeysuckle.

Continue conversion of mowed lawn to native prairie.

Manage woodlands and invasive species in existing parks and undeveloped parkland.

Identify and protect natural resources in future property acquisition. As noted in regional parks, natural and cultural resource preservation is a priority criterion for new parkland acquisition. In addition to the presence of natural or cultural resources, whether woodland, prairie, water body, wetland, historic site, etc., a management plan for the property should be developed and in place upon acquisition. This plan will provide a course of action to manage and protect the resource, inform master planning for the parkland, and allow JCPRD to put a cost to these efforts. This cost should be included in the acquisition funding to ensure proper management upon acquisition.

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3

.05

Stewardship


KC Wildlands Workday at Shawnee Mission Park

“The historical and cultural foundations of the nation should be preserved as a living part of our community life and development in order to give a sense of orientation to the American people.� National Historic Preservation Act 1966


Snapshot Stewardship

One JCPRD Within a forest, the layer of debris above the soil returns nutrients to the system as it decomposes. Extreme events, such as a flood that leaves the soil saturated will slow the process of decomposition. Within the JCPRD ecosystem, the Stewardship element functions as a litter layer. As assets age, consistent care ensures JCPRD amenities are able to positively contribute to the health of the system. Following the economic downturn, this function was reduced and annual maintenance and replacement schedules were extended or unachievable. Additional funding will be required to stabilize maintenance programs and balance the initial investment in resources with the long-term care needed to realize its full return.

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Legacy Framework Goal: We will promote a legacy of Stewardship through a focused effort to practice proactive care and adaptive management.

5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4

Action: Address Deferred Maintenance and Capital Replacement Outcomes: A focus to meet all current deferred maintenance needs within the next 15 years. Future needs will be mitigated with the development and implementation of a district-wide maintenance and plan. Action: Establish Maintenance Regions and Additional Staff Outcomes: Maintenance of the Johnson County Park and Recreation District will be managed within five zones. Each zone will have a headquarters, an approach that will minimize back of house development costs for new and future parks, and support district-wide maintenance standards. Additional park and facility maintenance staff will be added over time, as development is implemented, to meet additional needs of the district. Action: Implement Modes of Care and Maintenance Standards Outcomes: Defined level of care expectations will support balanced and appropriate resource allocation, minimize future deffered maintenance gaps, and provide visitors with a consistent JCPRD experience. Maintenance standard examples include pavement, shelter, and playground replacement schedules. Action: Develop Organizational Standards Outcomes: Design standards and centralized purchasing will complement one another to make JCPRD operations more efficient. The centralized purchasing strategy will be supported by the maintenance region structure.

Case Study The report “Unleashed,� published by Playcore in 2014, describes the value and benefit of dog parks, location guidelines, design consideration, and strategies for planning, implementation, marketing, and programming of dog park facilities. The study compares membership-based and free dog park models. The findings indicate that paid dog parks are generally larger and more likely to contain seating, shaded areas, rinse centers and other capital amenities. The study also notes that a portion of membership fees usually fund a maintenance crew. This can lead to a higher level of maintenance, reducing the severity of recurring maintenance items.

Capital Investment Priorities

S U M M A RY

Stewardship capital costs are primarily concentrated in the first half of the 15-year Legacy Plan investment window. Throughout this plan, and beyond the year 2030, regular, preventative care spending defined by the maintenance and management plan will ensure a high level visitor experience. To meet the expanding maintenance needs of the district as it opens new parks and amenities, the maintenance and management plan is a priority spending area. total 15-year capital investment

$ 51, 323, 008

spending area: site maintenance

$ 11, 624, 762

spending area: shelter and facility maintenance

$ 10, 071, 280

spending area: roads, trails, and infrastructure

$ 25, 392, 966

spending area: planning, operations, equipment

$ 4,234, 000

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Supporting Analysis Stewardship impacts first impressions of JCPRD parks, trails, and facilities. These needs are often visible first to the teams responsible for maintaining JCPRD assets and, if not addressed, may lower the overall perception and appreciation of JCPRD parks, trails and facilities among patrons.

Mail Survey Q4 How respondent households rate the physical condition of all the parks, amenities, and indoor recreation sites in the Johnson County Park & Recreation District they have visited

JCPRD Now The national average benchmark for parks and recreation system assessment of condition is 31% Excellent, 54% Good, 12% Fair, and 2% Poor. The statistically valid survey for JCPRD showed an overall average of 32% Excellent rating, with parks receiving 43% Excellent rating and indoor facilities receiving 26% Excellent rating (Q4). Condition rating for Good averaged 49%, which is below the national benchmark of 54% (Q4). These ratings reflect the concern identified by JCPRD team members regarding a backlog of deferred maintenance throughout the system. This deferred maintenance, estimated at over $30 million, needs to be addressed before conditions of parks and facilities continue to decline and become more noticeable to JCPRD patrons. Opening new parks will add to the demand for maintenance. Respondent households rated the option to develop some of the existing undeveloped open space for passive uses as the top strategy for JCPRD to address existing undeveloped open space (Q13). Other options included (not the complete list): develop some open space for active uses, acquiring additional open space to leave undeveloped, and sell undeveloped open space (Q12). Although development is clearly a priority of the community, the JCPRD team notes that it must not come at the expense of addressing the critical deferred maintenance needs of existing parks and facilities. Even without the burden of additional acreage, JCPRD maintenance staff is already stretched between existing parks, trails and golf course maintenance, as well as significant support of facilities maintenance and natural resource management.

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Mail Survey Q4d How respondents rate the physical condition of outdoor facilities

JCPRD Recent History The Johnson County Park & Recreation District has not had an increase in its mill levy since 2004. The 2008 economic downturn has compounded the impact on maintenance with reduced budgets and staffing, while the parks system and Johnson County population have continued to grow. The combination of reduced funding and staffing, combined with the heavy use of popular parks and facilities, has resulted in situations where amenities within the parks are being “loved to death.� The cost of addressing deferred maintenance issues can be many times more expensive than if a routine maintenance program is in place. The sooner preventative and corrective care can be planned for and budgeted, the greater the long term savings associated with the extended life cycle of existing JCPRD amenities. With a focus on preventative maintenance and adaptive management, JCPRD has an opportunity to develop an updated maintenance and management plan for parks, trails, facilities, and natural resources. JCPRD Future As the Johnson County population continues to grow, park use and the burden on facilities will also increase. The long term viability of JCPRD parks, facilities, and trails, including those as of yet undeveloped, will require a consistent and manageable level of care approach. Maintenance procedures, training, and replacement tasks may be simplified with the use of design standards. Likewise, JCPRD staff noted that centralized purchasing for the district and the centralization of park maintenance schedules may improve operational efficiencies. The current quality of parks, facilities, and trails will decrease if development, investment and maintenance needs are not balanced with one another. To ensure a high quality of care post-development, park and facility planning must include long-term operations and maintenance needs.

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Actions + Recommendations

Stewardship is a focus on responsible management of JCPRD resources. These resources include the development and maintenance of parks, trails, facilities, and natural areas throughout the district. The role of stewardship will continue to evolve and grow with JCPRD and Johnson County. Successful implementation of the actions and recommendations in this section will require additional funding above current levels. For the 15-year vision of this framework document, the role of stewardship is focused on existing needs and defining an approach to implement proactive management of current and future natural resources, parks, trails, and facilities. This approach is intended to establish increased efficiencies, provide a better understanding of maintenance needs and the value of these efforts, and support a focus on natural resource management and facility maintenance. A holistic approach to maintenance and management will be required to define the vision and funding necessary to establish this legacy of stewardship. A similar plan was identified as part of the 2014 CAPRA accreditation review, and is the overall driver of the stewardship action items in this plan. While a complete maintenance and management plan is not within the scope of this document, the action items identified below begin to define priorities and recommendations that can lay the groundwork for the development of a JCPRD parks, trails, facilities, and natural resource maintenance and management plan. In addition, allowances have been included in Section 04 Capital Investment for these plans. Stewardship action items are:

5.1. Action: Address Deferred Maintenance and Capital Replacement

5.2. Action: Establish Maintenance Regions and Additional Staffing

5.3 Action: Implement Modes of Care and Maintenance Standards

5.4 Action: Develop Organizational Standards

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5.1. Action: Address Deferred Maintenance and Capital Replacement Establishing a program of adaptive management and proactive maintenance for JCPRD begins here. Until deferred needs have been addressed, or are within a funded maintenance schedule to be addressed, available resources cannot be allocated to establish proactive parks and facilities management. Within the 15 years of this plan, resources invested in opening undeveloped parkland are balanced with the need for deferred maintenance and replacement. If deferred maintenance and replacement is not addressed in existing parks, it will become an even larger issue once the new parks are opened. The leading contributors to deferred maintenance and replacement issues are available funding and staffing levels. As identified in Section 02, the tax funding for JCPRD saw its highest level in 2009, with JCPRD receiving approximately $19.2 million (1.96% of the total County Property Tax Distribution). In the five fiscal years since 2009 total funding has been approximately $11.4 million less than if it had held steady at 2009 level. This significant decline in funding over a prolonged period of time has contributed to an estimated $30 million in deferred maintenance, as budgets have been tightened and staffing workloads have significantly increased. Several key deferred maintenance and capital replacement items are consistent throughout JCPRD parks and facilities. In addition, each park and facility has unique items to be addressed. Below is a summary of these deferred maintenance and capital replacement items, and recommendations to address the identified priorities. Once these items have been addressed, the foundation will be in place to build an adaptable and proactive long-term maintenance program. Recommendations are: 5.1.1. Identify District-wide Deferred Maintenance and Capital Replacement Items 5.1.2. Identify Location-specific Deferred Maintenance and Capital Replacement Items 5.1.1. Identify District-wide Deferred Maintenance and Capital Replacement Items In discussions with maintenance staff and review of park, trail, and facility conditions, several common items appeared as district-wide maintenance and capital replacement needs. Establishing an approach to address these deferred work items and a process for adaptive management and proactive maintenance will have a positive impact on the future of JCPRD. Several ways this effort will impact JCPRD include: improved visitor experience, enhanced JCPRD brand image, reduced ongoing maintenance costs through programs for regular maintenance and replacement, and increased efficiencies of staff and resources through regular maintenance programs. Deferred maintenance and replacement items include: 5.1.1.1. Roadway and Parking Lot Pavement With approximately 130 acres of parking lots and roads throughout the system, a total expected to quickly increase with new park development, establishing a feasible and proactive funding plan for maintenance and replacement is important. Addressing deferred pavement maintenance is also a priority due to the overall amount of deterioration that has occurred, and the high visibility and impact this has on patron experience and perception of JCPRD. Staff has developed an internal review and rating system in an attempt to fully understand priority and resource needs, and to create a maintenance and replacement schedule reflective of needs and resources. Even using conservative overlay and renovation cycles, the current 2015 capital funding will fund less than 50% of the anticipated annual need to meet the projected maintenance schedule scenarios. Recommendations to address roadway and parking lot pavement maintenance are: •

Dedicate funding and staffing to meet the maintenance schedule and bring pavement quality and condition to a defined baseline for inclusion in a proactive annual maintenance schedule.

•

Build on current evaluation process and maintenance schedule with the adoption of a standard

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evaluation and rating system, such as the PASER (Pavement Surface Evaluation and Rating), scale developed by the University of Wisconsin - Madison Transportation Information Center. This rating system can be used to establish benchmarks and desired maintenance schedules to meet JCPRD and Johnson County expectations and available resources. Incorporation of a recognized standard will provide:

A quick assessment process that can be performed by various staff to efficiently, and consistently evaluate pavement throughout the JCPRD system, and establish maintenance standards based on the 10-point rating system.

A standardized and defensible evaluation and needs determination process for budgeting, resource and staffing allocation, long range planning for existing or new development, and funding need justification.

A process and program that can establish benchmarks and provide flexibility for adaptive management of budgets and resource needs.

Consider strategic replacement of asphalt paving with concrete due to the high life cycle maintenance and replacement costs and labor. Recommended use in areas of high vehicular traffic, areas of significant vehicular or large truck/equipment loading and turning, and any pavement within floodway or adjacent to creeks and wetlands.

5.1.1.2. Trails and Walkways Similar to roads and parking lot pavement, JCPRD has been unable to keep up with maintenance needs of trails and walkways as a result of funding and staffing limitations. With over 40 miles of trails to maintain, the 2015 capital budget for trails and walkway maintenance does not fully fund the estimated annual maintenance need identified by the internal maintenance program. Recommendations to address trails and walkway deferred maintenance include: •

Dedicate funding and staffing to meet the maintenance schedule and bring pavement quality and condition to a defined baseline for inclusion in a proactive annual maintenance schedule.

Build on current evaluation process and maintenance schedule with the adoption of a standard evaluation and rating system, such as the PASER scale, as identified above in 5.1.1.1.

Consider strategic replacement of asphalt paving with concrete due to life cycle maintenance and environmental impact. Use of concrete for trails should be evaluated for return on investment based on potential cost for site access as well as consideration of user preferences for trail surface. Concrete use is recommended in flood plain and flood way locations where leaching of asphalt petroleum base can enter waterways and other environmentally sensitive areas. Additional use locations may include areas prone to flooding or standing water where asphalt paving will deteriorate more rapidly, and remote or hard to access areas along trails to minimize the need to access for maintenance and repairs over the life of the pavement.

5.1.1.3. Park Shelters JCPRD currently provides 39 shelters within parks and streamway parks. All of these shelters are available for reservations with the exception of Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center Shelter #2. Shelters are classified by size and capacity. Medium shelters have a maximum capacity of 100 or less, and large shelters provide space for 100 visitors or more. The Theatre in the Park Pavilion is a unique space within JCPRD and can accommodate groups up to 400 with seating for 240. This pavilion has not been included in the proposed replacement program as it is a new pavilion and its scale and amenities will require a specific capital funding program for future replacement. Regular maintenance of this pavilion is included in current and planned funding. Overall, the shelters within JCPRD parks are outdated and in need of replacement. Many are timber structures based on early designs for JCPRD shelters. Condition and quality of shelters is important for rental use and to meet staff and public expectations for JCPRD facilities. Deteriorating condition of the shelters requires additional maintenance annually, maintenance that is not covered in the rental cost. This additional maintenance pulls

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staff from their regular tasks and extends the deferred replacement of the shelter and maintenance cycle within parks. To address this district-wide issue, staff has been identifying specific shelter replacement in the annual capital budget, but a majority of these planned replacements will require funding above the current level to complete. The result is that shelters needing replacement are required to stay in use until there is room in the capital plan, or until they need to be taken out of service to be replaced. This plan looks to provide a replacement approach with identified funding for annual shelter replacement and maintenance. Recommendations for shelter replacement and maintenance include: •

A thirty-year replacement schedule is recommended. This schedule will allow for an average of two shelter replacements per year and full replacement of all JCPRD shelters within the thirty year cycle. Current shelters should be assessed by staff based on condition and level of usage, and prioritized for replacement within the 30-year program. Kill Creek Park shelters and all recently replaced shelters should be planned in the middle and end of the 30-year replacement schedule.

The 30-year schedule allows for an additional 15-20 shelters of similar sizes as the current inventory to be added to the system over the next 15 years with new park development.

5.1.1.4. Park Playgrounds Playgrounds are an important amenity within JCPRD parks. They provide support and enhance the recreation value of other amenities including shelters or athletic fields, and can provide a destination within a park. The survey showed that 43% of households with children under the age of 10 use playgrounds, and playgrounds were listed most often in the top three responses of these households. JCPRD has included regular playground and surfacing replacement in capital planning with an average of one replacement per year. This plan looks to define that schedule, account for new playgrounds, and provide a replacement approach with identified funding for annual playground and surfacing replacement and maintenance. Recommendations for playground and surfacing replacement and maintenance include: •

A 15-year replacement schedule is recommended. This schedule will allow for an average of one playground replacement per year and full replacement of all JCPRD current playgrounds within the 15-year cycle.

As additional playgrounds are added, the replacement schedule provides the flexibility to be expanded to 20-years, or to evaluate annual budgets and increase the number of annual replacements to two in a staggered year system.

Beyond the addition of another five playgrounds, the annual capital budget for playground replacement should be increased as deferred maintenance costs are reduced over the life of this plan.

Replacement playgrounds should consider the complete user experience. They need to provide accessible routes to the playground area from parking and nearby shelters, providing unique play experiences and ties to the park setting. All replacement playgrounds should include resilient surfacing and support elements including shade, benches and trash receptacles, etc.

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5.1.2. Identify Location-Specific Deferred Maintenance and Capital Replacement Items Park maintenance staff has been presented with the challenge of “doing more with less” in recent years. One of these challenges has been to balance regular maintenance and capital improvements with recognized recurring and deferred maintenance items. Budget and staffing level limitations prevent many of these items from being addressed at appropriate intervals to maintain a proactive, or preventative, maintenance program. This results in increased maintenance needs and a growing backlog of deferred maintenance and replacement within the parks. Below is a list of priority deferred maintenance and capital replacement items for each park and facility as identified during park visits, public and stakeholder input, and discussions with JCPRD staff. This list is an attempt to document recurring and priority items in each location, and will require further evaluation and determination of corrective actions. These items need to be addressed through a combination of additional resources, including increased budgets and available staffing, and a comprehensive plan for adaptive maintenance, management and replacement. Initial measures should include corrective action, identification of the cause, and documentation of the issue and efforts to address it for integration into the long-term maintenance and replacement plan. Individual park and facility items include: 5.1.2.1. Antioch Park Priority deferred maintenance and replacement items for Antioch Park include: •

Stone Walls - These walls are experiencing deterioration due to age. Signature element of the park, but labor intensive and unable to maintain a regular repair schedule. Establish a process to evaluate and restore these elements, and define long-term care.

Wood Fencing - As a park element, fencing is a recurring maintenance item. Establish a program to preserve the wood or replace with more durable material. Initiate evaluation program per section 5.4 of this plan.

• •

Wood Boardwalks - Continuous maintenance item. Explore composite material as replacement material. Composite material will have increased initial costs, but provides significant reduction in long-term maintenance and replacement costs. Establish a program to preserve structural integrity of the boardwalk structure.

Erosion - Explore best management solutions with natural resource management staff to reduce runoff and protect slopes. Establish understory areas with hearty, native plant material. Perform soil testing and evaluation, if an ongoing issue.

Basketball Court - The court is in need of removal, repair, or replacement. If court is replaced it should be designed with proper north/south orientation for use.

Electricity - Most electrical systems within the park are direct bury and present issues when digging. Service lines should be placed in conduit with tracer wire for protection and location identification.

5.1.2.2. Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center Priority deferred maintenance and replacement items for Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center include: •

Nature Trail - Surface erosion is a maintenance issue. The trail system should be evaluated and renovated using best management practices for trail design.

Bridge Replacement - Bridge should be relocated with redesigned trail system.

Erosion - Explore best management solutions with natural resource management staff to reduce runoff and protect slopes. Establish understory areas with hearty, native plant material.

Invasive Plant Control - Noxious and invasive plant material control is a priority. This management should be coordinated with natural resource management staff.

Water Quality - Pond has water quality concerns and should be addressed to enhance storm water recharge and storm water management within the park.

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5.1.2.3. Heritage Park Priority deferred maintenance and replacement items for Heritage Park include: •

Lake Improvements - Dredging and lake edge improvements needed for water quality, lake function, and park irrigation.

Off-leash Area - Perform turf renovation program and implement water quality improvements.

Sports Complexes: •

Define a standard of care and best practices for maintenance.

Establish a bleacher evaluation and replacement program.

Replace irrigation systems.

Replace perimeter fencing.

Soccer - Field grading and turf condition repair or replacement.

Softball - Fencing and lighting require replacement.

Concessions - Buildings at the football and soccer complexes need improvements or replacement.

5.1.2.4. Kill Creek Park Priority deferred maintenance and replacement items for Kill Creek Park include: •

Building Repairs and Roof Replacement - Regular roof maintenance and repairs needed. .

Invasive Plant Control - Bush honeysuckle and sericea lespedeza are issues on west side of park. Explore best management solutions with natural resource management staff.

Equestrian Trail Damage and Erosion - Explore best management solutions with natural resource management staff to reduce impact of trails and protect slopes. Review trail alignment and routing to reduce impact within park.

5.1.2.5. Mildale Farm Priority deferred maintenance and replacement items for Mildale Farm include: •

Custom Nature of Property - All details are unique requiring significant time and effort for maintenance and replacement. Evaluate the custom details that are paramount to the character of the property, and determine priorities for custom or standard replacement of these items.

Brick Roadway - Significant maintenance and replacement efforts are required to maintain this detail of the property, and creates maintenance challenge with snow removal. Consider options for replacement that maintains the character of the property while reducing the regular maintenance needs.

PVC Fence - Significant maintenance effort due to amount of fencing and issues with damage from line trimmers, exposure to sun light, and mold growth in low, wet areas. Internal fencing should be removed to reduce the maintenance efforts as it does not serve a functional purpose. Perimeter fencing should remain for aesthetic and designation of property boundary. Removed fencing that is in good condition should be stored for repairing perimeter fence.

Estate House Patio - Repair brick patio.

Main Pond - Explore solutions to provide emergency spillway to protect integrity of the dam.

Estate House and Carriage Barn - Perform roof repairs as needed.

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5.1.2.6. Mill Creek Activity Center Priority deferred maintenance and replacement items for Mill Creek Activity Center include: •

Site Drainage - Identify improvement options to address parking lot drainage and ground water impact on site and building.

Irrigation System - Identify and implement irrigation maintenance items.

Fire Suppression System - Evaluate existing system and repair or replace.

Lighting - Implement efficiency study and system upgrade.

HVAC - Evaluate timeline for anticipated system replacement within the next 10 years.

5.1.2.7. Mill Creek Streamway Priority deferred maintenance and replacement items for Mill Creek Streamway include: •

Erosion and Bank Stabilization - Address stream banks for preventative maintenance and stabilization.

Low Water Crossings - Remote locations are hard to access for improvements. Consider realignment of trail to remove these locations due to safety concerns.

Prairie Star Parkway Access - Periodic flooding resulting in damage, debris clean-up and inconvenience to streamway users.

Invasive Plant Control - Johnson grass issues at 90 acre prairie restoration. Explore best management solutions with natural resource management staff.

5.1.2.8. New Century Fieldhouse Priority deferred maintenance and replacement items for New Century Fieldhouse include: •

Roof - Repair roof to address leaking.

Soccer Turf - Evaluate flooring surface and grind inconsistencies in subfloor and reinstall turf with replacement of worn sections.

Entry Sub-Floor Cracking - Evaluate replacing concrete slab with an improved base to prevent concrete shifting and cracking.

Parking - Identify additional parking to accommodate large events.

5.1.2.9. Okun Fieldhouse Priority deferred maintenance and replacement items for Okun Fieldhouse include: •

HVAC - Replace HVAC system.

Gym Floors - Replace and upgrade flooring system.

Lobby and Concessions Area - Renovation and circulation improvements needed.

Water Pressure - Address high water pressure (150 psi) causing recurring issues with irrigation and building plumbing. Explore the need for pressure reducer/regulator at meter.

5.1.2.10. Shawnee Mission Park Priority deferred maintenance and replacement items for Shawnee Mission Park include:

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Tree Inventory - Overall tree health is a concern. Engage natural resource management staff to evaluate and determine course of action.

Native Landscape Restoration - Continue conversion of mowed lawn to native landscape restoration areas to reduce maintenance needs and enhance biodiversity. Efforts require significant labor investment from an understaffed natural resource management staff.


Beach Building - Needs improvements or replacement.

Marina Circular Drive - Identify improved layout to address functional circulation issues.

Dock - Improvements required independent of marina improvements.

Observation Tower – Implement preventative maintenance to extend useful life.

Fencing along Renner Road - Maintain existing fence as needed. Initiate evaluation program per section 5.4 of this plan.

Maintenance Shop - Evaluate layout and configuration based on regional maintenance recommendation in this plan.

Stone Walls – These walls are deteriorating due to age. Establish a process to evaluate and restore these elements, and define long-term care.

Bus Parking - Identify an improved activities bus access and overnight parking location to address logistical and coordination issues with activity bus access and overnight parking.

Shawnee Mission Lake - Perform further study into cause and recommendations to address south shore trail recurring erosion and wear this issue.

Shawnee Mission Lake - Perform further study into cause and recommendations to address issues along north lake edge waterline.

ADA - County assessment of will provide guidelines for improvements.

Electricity - Most electrical systems within the park are direct bury and present issues when digging. Service lines should be placed in conduit with tracer wire for protection and location identification.

Tennis Courts - Existing courts have been removed. Consider trail compatible development in this location. Evaluate relocation and replacement of tennis courts and courts specific for pickleball play.

Off-leash Area – Perform turf renovation program and implement water quality improvements.

5.1.2.11. Sunflower Nature Park Priority deferred maintenance and replacement items for Sunflower Nature Park include: •

Dam and Wetland - Consider modifications to dam to enhance the wetland environment.

5.1.2.12. Thomas S. Stoll Memorial Park Priority deferred maintenance and replacement items for Thomas S. Stoll Memorial Park include: •

Off-leash Area - Perform turf renovation program.

Multiuse Fields (A and B) - Implement grading and drainage improvements.

5.1.2.13. TimberRidge Adventure Center Priority deferred maintenance and replacement items for TimberRidge Adventure Center include: •

Lake Access and Canoe Launch - Address slope and access issues to lake edge.

Inadequate Storage - Existing storage does not meet needs for operations and programming, impacting efficiencies and function of the adventure center facility.

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5.2. Action: Establish Maintenance Regions and Additional Staffing A focus of this plan is the opening of undeveloped parkland and the continued development of streamway trails. Developing and opening these amenities will require additional park maintenance staff and maintenance facilities to care for these parks and trails. Additional parks maintenance staff for each park and for streamway trails combined with a regional approach to park and streamway trail maintenance will allow JCPRD to meet the maintenance needs of the new development while leveraging the capital investment required for maintenance to maximize the investment in park amenity development. Recommendations are: 5.2.1. Establish Maintenance Regions 5.2.2. Add Maintenance and Natural Resource Management Staff 5.2.1. Establish Maintenance Regions The opening of five new parks within the first five years of this plan, and significant amenity and trail development within each of the parks over the first ten years will require substantial capital investment. To continue the current standard of individual maintenance shops in each park will require a significant percentage of the capital development costs allocated for each new park, with the exception of the Meadowbrook property which contains an existing maintenance facility. An estimated cost for maintenance shop design and construction in the four remaining parks (Rieke Lake and Cedar Niles future park properties, and future Big Bull Creek and Camp Branch Parks) is $1,500,000 - $2,000,000 per location, or $7,500,000 - $10,000,000 total in 2015 dollars. In this proposed scenario, the future Big Bull Creek Park is the only new park to receive a maintenance facility. With the additional parks providing critical mass to the open JCPRD parkland throughout Johnson County, a regional or zone based approach to district-wide park, trail, and site maintenance is recommended. A map of proposed maintenance zones, as well as a description of service areas and related drive times, are found in the appendix to this plan. With the number of new parks and timeline for development, the capital investment savings of this approach will allow for more investment in recreation, education, and natural resources within each of the parks. This savings will also provide for additional investment of capital funding into maintenance, staffing, and operations of the new and existing parks and facilities. Five regional maintenance headquarters are identified throughout the JCPRD system, and these five locations will coordinate site maintenance for all 22 of the existing and proposed JCPRD parks and facilities, and the streamway trails system. Indoor facility maintenance will remain a function of the facility’s staff. The regional maintenance approach will provide an organizational structure that promotes efficiencies in management and more consistency in maintenance and construction practices. Costs of this approach are in travel from the maintenance headquarters to regional parks, time lost to load and unload equipment, and additional wear on vehicles. A quick analysis of this impact shows 17 total park commutes from the five regional maintenance headquarters, with an average travel distance of seven miles and an average travel time of 12 minutes. The longest anticipated travel is from Kill Creek Park to Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center, with a travel distance of 13 miles and an estimated average travel time of 15 minutes. While loading and unloading occurs even for travel within a park, we have included an additional time loss of 30 minutes a day for this effort. Estimated time lost for loading and unloading twice a day is 30 minutes, with 15 minutes to load and unload at the beginning and end of the day. This equates to an average daily time loss for travel and loading of approximately 60 minutes per remote park per day. Based on an average hourly rate of $25/hour and an average of three employees per trip, it amounts to $75 a day per park, or just under $350,000 a year and approximately $5.2 million over the 15 years of this plan. This cost is less than the low range of maintenance facility construction within the parks, and is allocated over the life of the plan where the facility construction cost is seen upfront during park development and at the expense of park amenity development. It is also anticipated that efficiencies will be gained as the program organizational structure is implemented, potentially reducing the cost impact of regional maintenance.

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Regional maintenance facilities identified in the plan include: •

Heritage Park - This regional maintenance headquarters will manage maintenance for Camp Branch Glade, future Camp Branch Park, Stilwell Community Park, and streamway trails including Blue River, Camp Branch, Coffee Creek , and Wolf Creek.

Shawnee Mission Park - This regional maintenance headquarters will manage maintenance for MidAmerica Sports Complex, Mid-America West Sports Complex, Okun Fieldhouse, Mill Creek Activity Center, and Mill Creek Streamway.

Kill Creek Park – This regional maintenance headquarters will manage maintenance for Sunflower Nature Park, Rieke Lake future park property, Cedar Niles future park property, Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center, Sunflower Ordnance Works future park property, and streamway trails including Kill Creek Streamway, and Cedar Creek Streamway.

Future Big Bull Creek Park – This new park will include a maintenance facility in a future phase of development. The service zone for this maintenance headquarters contains a significant percentage of future development parkland. Mildale Farm and New Century Fieldhouse are the only existing parks and facilities within this region, and maintenance at these locations can be managed internally for the immediate future by Mildale Farm maintenance for the initial development phase of Big Bull Creek Park, depending on program items. Other parks and facilities within this maintenance region include the S. Hedge Lane property and streamway trails including Big Bull Creek, Little Bull Creek, and Bain Creek.

Meadowbrook Park – Taking advantage of the new park location within northeast Johnson County and the existing maintenance facility within the park property, this is an optional fifth headquarters location to relieve some pressure from Shawnee Mission Park and Heritage Park regional maintenance facilities. As mentioned, the Meadowbrook maintenance facility will support northeast Johnson County and include Antioch Park (in place of a new facility), Roeland Park Recreation Campus, and Thomas S. Stoll Memorial Park. Organizational structure within this regional maintenance alignment will be determined by JCPRD, but the example structure below shows proposed positions and roles that may be included in this regional maintenance structure: •

Regional Manager - Reports to Superintendent of Parks and Golf Courses, and is responsible for coordination of parks managers, streamway managers, and natural resource management staff within their region. This position will coordinate with other regional managers for consistent maintenance programs, design standards, and purchasing efforts. The regional managers will oversee the implementation of the maintenance and management plan and modes of care for tracking and benchmarking within the parks.

Park/Streamway Manager - Roles are similar to current positions only they will now report to the Regional Manager. This position will be responsible for maintenance coordination and modes of care tracking for their individual park, and with other regional park managers. Park/Streamway managers will oversee the implementation of maintenance standards and natural resource management plan within their park, and with assistance from natural resource management staff. Park managers will coordinate with recreation managers and oversee recreation maintenance crews within their park.

Senior Park Workers - Same responsibilities as current position with the addition of modes of care and performance data tracking.

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Park Workers - Same responsibilities as current position with the addition of modes of care and performance data tracking.

Seasonal Staff - Same responsibilities as current position with possible addition of modes of care performance tracking.

5.2.2. Add Maintenance and Natural Resource Management Staff The regional maintenance approach will minimize the maintenance infrastructure investment within the new parks. In addition to increased capital investment in the new parks, a capital investment in additional parks maintenance staff will be needed. This investment focus should be on providing adequate staffing levels to establish an adaptive and proactive maintenance program for the parks, trails, facilities and natural resources. Additional staff recommendations include: 5.2.2.1. Additional Parks Maintenance Staff •

Additional staffing for each new park and streamway trail system expansion should be determined based on the development phasing schedule and amenity development within each phase.

As a minimum level of staffing for each new park, a Senior Park Worker and Park Worker should be anticipated, along with necessary operations and equipment resources.

Over time, as additional phases are implemented, additional staff, including a Park Manager, should be added to meet the additional maintenance and operations needs.

5.2.2.2. District-wide Facilities Maintenance Staff •

A full time district-wide facilities maintenance staff person should be located in the Shawnee Mission Park maintenance facility to assist with coordination of maintenance for JCPRD facilities. This position will report to the Superintendent of Parks and Golf Courses while coordinating directly with regional managers and recreation managers.

This position will support current recreation facility maintenance staff positions in performing maintenance duties. They will oversee contracting and bidding of certain maintenance and replacement items to allow on-site recreation facility maintenance staff to focus on their day-to-day tasks. This position may be supported by part-time or seasonal employees.

The position will coordinate maintenance for the following facilities: Okun Fieldhouse, New Century Fieldhouse, Ernie Miller Nature Center, TimberRidge Adventure Center, Mill Creek Activity Center, Roeland Park Recreation Campus, Antioch Park administration buildings, The Theatre in the Park buildings and pavilion, Meadowbrook Community Center, park maintenance facilities, and JCPRD Administration Building.

This position will relieve existing parks maintenance staff from many of the recreation and facilities maintenance roles they are currently asked to fill, and allow them to focus on their parks tasks.

5.2.2.3. Additional Natural Resource Management Staff •

Regional maintenance headquarters will also include a natural resource management staff who will report to the district biologist and work directly with the regional manager and park managers within their region. The current JCPRD biologist will fill one of these positions and oversee district-wide natural resource management initiatives.

Additional natural resource management staff is identified in more detail in 4.2.4. These positions will relieve existing parks maintenance staff from natural resource management roles they currently assist with, in addition to their park maintenance responsibilities.

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5.3. Action: Implement Modes of Care and Maintenance Standards Park, trail, and facility maintenance has felt the impact of reduced tax funding over the past five years resulting in increased deferred maintenance and stretched resources to keep up with maintenance needs. Level of care is a critical element in visitor experience. The standard of maintenance plays a significant role in establishing the image of a parks and recreation district. Public perception of parks and facilities, whether accurate or not, can impact patron decisions regarding use of parks, participation in programming, sense of safety, and how they talk about JCPRD amenities to friends and families. Balancing expectations for appearance, maintenance needs, and available resources, is a challenge faced by all parks and recreation agencies. An additional challenge in balancing these expectations for JCPRD is that no system is currently in place to track labor and costs associated with maintenance tasks. There is coordination and teamwork between park workers, park managers, and with the superintendent, but in general, each park operates independently within a defined annual budget, and sets priorities and levels of care for their park(s). While this current process allows each park manager to meet individual needs or levels of care within their park, it does not provide system-wide expectations for appearance and condition of the parks. It can also lead to compounding deferred maintenance as a result of unclear expectations for maintenance levels and unbalanced allocation of resources throughout the district. This inconsistency in level of care makes it difficult for administration to prioritize maintenance tasks and define baseline levels of care when evaluating budgets and need. Implementing maintenance standards and modes of care can define desired baseline conditions and appearances for JCPRD parks, trails, and indoor facilities, and quantify the effort to achieve these conditions and appearances. The maintenance standards define the frequency of use and visibility, while the modes of care define the desired conditions and resources required to achieve and maintain these condition. Objectives of defined maintenance standards and modes of care include: •

Communicate the condition of the parks, trails, and indoor facilities to JCPRD administration, staff and board members, county leadership, and the public.

Develop and communicate JCPRD goals regarding maintenance and standards.

Assist park maintenance staff in scheduling and prioritizing maintenance functions and resources.

Improve park, trail, and indoor facility conditions through efficient resource allocation.

Provide a measuring tool to evaluate the condition of the parks, trails, and indoor facilities compared to the defined standards.

Other public service departments such as public works, fire, etc., use standards to document costs of doing business. For example, a public works department will use standards to demonstrate that with every new mile of road to maintain, it will cost their department a certain amount of funds. This is a tangible cost of doing business that everyone, from a board of commissioners to the voting public, understands. This holds true for expressing the impact of budget cuts and expanded services. Recommendations to implement modes of care and maintenance standards are: 5.3.1. Identify Modes of Care and Maintenance Standards Strategies 5.3.2. Define Modes of Care Organization 5.3.3. Implement Modes of Care and Maintenance Standards

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5.3.1. Identify Modes of Care and Maintenance Standards Strategies To optimize Johnson County Park & Recreation District financial resources, the establishment of maintenance standards for all existing and proposed parks, trails, and facilities is recommended. These standards will provide a framework for maintenance schedules and a foundation for the evaluation of district-wide park conditions and maintenance costs. 5.3.1.1. Goals for Modes of Care and Maintenance Standards •

Identify JCPRD system-wide maintenance standards for parks, trails, and indoor facilities to increase maintenance efficiencies and consistencies across the district.

Create a tool for accurately tracking and understanding labor and costs associated with maintenance. Evaluate current and future development based on the identified maintenance standards.

Provide standards-based data from labor and cost tracking associated with identified standards. Incorporate data to determine needs and support requests for funding to provide maintenance at identified levels (modes) of care.

Ability to more accurately assess the impact of changes in funding or staffing on budgets and district-wide maintenance levels.

Create a living document for adaptive management and proactive maintenance throughout JCPRD.

Provide a tool to expand involvement with NRPA PRORAGIS and enhance outreach and education opportunities for JCPRD.

5.3.1.2. Tools for Modes of Care and Maintenance Standards Identified below are several publication and resource recommendations for developing modes of care guidelines. These resources will provide a professional baseline for guidelines, but should be supplemented with existing processes and procedures, as appropriate, to create a modes of care model that is right for JCPRD. •

“Park Maintenance Standards” - A cooperative project of the American Park and Recreation Society and the National Society for Park and Resources, professional branches of the National Recreation and Park Association. This document will provide overall standards for maintenance related to parks landscape, hardscape, and infrastructure.

“PASER Manuals - Pavement Surface Evaluation Rating” - University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Engineering Professional Development. These documents will provide guidelines for rating and assessing of paved surfaces.

The International Society of Arborists and the National Arborist Association - Resources for tree pruning and woody plant maintenance standards and best practices.

Existing codes, statutes, or bylaws that dictate development or site improvements.

5.3.2. Define Modes of Care Organization The information below is an excerpt from the “Park Maintenance Standards” that provides an overview of modes of care and establishing maintenance costing standards: Mode is meant to mean “the way of ” maintenance ranging from the most intensive to the least intensive. Some park systems have parks that match only one or two of the defined modes. Some systems may have maintenance approaches that almost match the system but leave one or two elements out. An exact match is not necessary, but this system is

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intended to give a wide enough set of options that a general match-up can be achieved. Some park departments may even designate a part of a park at one mode and the rest of the park as another mode. Costs per unit for maintenance can vary largely from locality to locality because of labor rates, costs of materials, extent of design, length of season, moisture availability, transportation costs and intensity of public use. It should be possible, however, to establish a local maintenance cost standard for each mode and chart those unit costs year by year. It should also be possible to come up with a maintenance cost forecast for new development by assigning the proper mode to the new development. At higher maintenance modes, it is assumed that the administering agencies will have adequate time and properly trained personnel to accomplish the quality that should accompany the quantity of work done. •

Many departments utilize various levels of care, each defined to meet local needs. For example, in Forest Park (St. Louis), six modes of care are necessary due to the diversity of amenities within the park. Many cities have found that half of that number is sufficient and three modes of care is easier for the public to understand.

Modes of care are not designed to give greater importance or significance to a particular park area. Their purpose is to indicate the level of maintenance needed to sustain the viability and appearance of an area. These standards will not only guide daily maintenance activity, but will also provide the guidelines for acceptable and unacceptable park conditions, and adaptive management evaluations.

The 2009 Natural Resource Management Plan looked at defining “Park Use Areas” classifications within the parks to establish maintenance needs based on intensity of use, visibility, and landscape typologies. These five Park Use Areas are still used internally by natural resource management staff, but never took hold for maintenance organization. These areas could become a starting point for identifying modes of care within the updated maintenance and management plan.

Below is a list of typical maintenance components addressed with modes of care. This list may be the same or similar for JCPRD, or a unique list to meet identified needs may be developed. (See Appendix for example modes of care matrix and standards list). Parks and Trails

Facilities / Building

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • •

Turf Athletic Fields Fertilization Disease and Insect Control Irrigation Ornamental Landscape Areas Woody Plants Aquatic Plans Pruning Playgrounds Restrooms and Shelters Surfaces Paved Surfaces/Roadway Lighting Underground Utilities Repairs Litter Snow Removal Special Events/Features Nature and Fitness Trails

Foundations Exterior Walls Interior Walls and Ceilings Doors and Windows Floors Gutters/Down Spouts/Roof Drains Roofs HVAC Interior Plumbing Interior Electric Building Lighting

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5.3.3. Implement Modes of Care and Maintenance Standards •

Develop modes of care and maintenance standards as components of an updated parks, trails, and facilities maintenance and management plan prior to the Commission for Accreditation of Park and Recreation Agencies (CAPRA) accreditation review scheduled for 2019.

Integrate natural resource management staff into the modes of care and maintenance and management plan development process for a holistic approach to parks and open space.

Engage all parks maintenance and natural resource management staff in the modes of care identification and standards determination.

Integrate modes of care into the maintenance regions operational processes. Concentration of maintenance oversight makes the regional manager position a good fit for management and oversight of the program within their region, and coordination of standards with other regional managers, natural resource management staff, and the Superintendent of Parks and Golf Courses. Park managers will be responsible for day to day management of field work and tracking accuracy.

Integrate modes of care to clearly define roles and responsibilities within maintenance staff, reducing the need for coordination with regional manager on a daily basis. Park workers may be able to report directly to work location based on an understanding from established modes of care.

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5.4. Action: Develop Organizational Standards The introduction of design standards and centralized purchasing are opportunities to create efficiencies within JCPRD operations and maintenance while maintaining unique characteristics of individual parks and facilities. Similar to maintenance standards, creating a set of standards for the design of park amenities and products for use in JCPRD parks and facilities will provide consistency and efficiency for long-term maintenance and replacement. Implementation of design standards can become a legacy that grows and evolves with JCPRD. The items included in this document are recommendations based on recurring items observed and discussed during this planning process. This list and standards should be expanded upon by JCPRD to increase the implementation of design standards, as appropriate, while maintaining flexibility for individual park identity. Once design standards have been implemented, the opportunity to initiate centralized purchasing becomes more beneficial to JCPRD maintenance and operations efficiency. If supplies and replacement parts are uniform across the system, products can be ordered in quantities that provide a cost benefit, and will be distributed to parks and facilities in a timely manner. Implementation of maintenance regions will support coordination and distribution necessary with centralized purchasing. Uniformity will also increase efficiencies with maintenance and replacement efforts. The more systemwide consistency of functional and labor intensive amenities, the more efficient park maintenance staff will become in addressing these items. Regional maintenance zones will also provide structure to support implementation of design standards and centralized purchasing with oversight from the regional manager positions. Recommendations to establish organizational standards are: 5.4.1. Establish Design Standards 5.4.2. Define Operational Standards 5.4.1. Establish Design Standards In evaluating maintenance needs, several recurring items were observed and mentioned by staff that provide an opportunity to more clearly define design standards. These standards will guide current and future development of these items within JCPRD parks and facilities. Design standards for these items should focus on reducing capital costs, eliminating recurring maintenance, and increasing maintenance efficiencies when applied to existing and future development. Areas identified for the development of design standards include: •

Park Fencing

Off-leash Areas

Facility Fixtures and Site Furnishings

Site Pavement

5.4.1.1. Park Fencing Most JCPRD parks contain some level of fencing. This element within the parks is a key maintenance concern due to the variety of fencing types used throughout the district, the time required to repair and replace the fencing, and the age/condition of the fencing in many of the parks. There is currently no standard fencing style or material for JCPRD. Materials and styles include wood two-rail, PVC tworail, ornamental, and wire and post. In addition to fence material and style, the use of corner piers or mid-line markers is inconsistent in style, material, and use. Fencing can be a branding element for JCPRD. Due to its high visibility, a standard for fencing should be established. Fencing is a high

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maintenance park element, and accordingly, its use should be focused to areas of functional need and high visibility. Recommended standards for fencing locations and types are: •

All fence styles should adhere to local municipal codes.

Ornamental fencing at urban locations with limited street presence, as implemented along 119th St. at Thomas S. Stoll Memorial Park.

Two-rail fence of composite material in place of cedar, pressure treated lumber, and white PVC, in rural locations with more significant length of street presence.

Stone masonry corner and mid-line piers are a consistent element in both styles and should be used at property corners, entries, and regular intervals along fence lines.

Recommended standards for JCPRD fencing use are: •

Use of fencing should be aesthetic and functional.

Internal fencing should be removed from parks when no longer needed to serve a functional purpose. This removal will reduce long-term maintenance efforts. Removed fence material may be used to repair or replace fencing in other locations.

Functional fencing should be used only where needed, and may include fencing along a single side, multiple sides, or all sides of a park. Internal park use of functional fencing should be minimal in its use.

When not required for functional purposes, fencing and corner markers should be incorporated to define park limits and as visual keys for park entries. Recommendations include: •

Install markers at property corners to identify park limits.

Install markers at pedestrian park entries. These may be smaller in size than park corner markers, but maintain the same style and character.

Incorporate markers and fencing at park entries. Fencing with mid-line columns should extend in both directions from the entry as a visual cue that you are approaching a JCPRD park or facility. The fencing should extend an appropriate distance for the park size and entry location and, as a standard, should extend a minimum of 250 feet either side of the main entry.

5.4.1.2. Off-leash Areas Off-leash areas are the fastest growing amenity within urban parks with a 34% increase in development from 2005-2010 in the 100 largest U.S. cities (Unleashed, 2014). It is estimated there are over 1,200 dog parks in operation in the United States (Park and Recreation Magazine, May 2015). JCPRD currently offers four off-leash locations totaling 106 acres. The existing off-leash areas are located in Shawnee Mission Park (53 acres), Heritage Park (30 acres), Thomas S. Stoll Memorial Park (seven acres) and Kill Creek Streamway Park (16 acres). These amenities are some of the most popular within the parks system with 28% of surveyed households having visited a JCPRD off-leash area within the last year. This equates to 59,600 households. In addition, 32%, or 67,500 of respondent households identified they have a need for off-leash areas. Off-leash areas are heavily used amenities within a parks system, with users visiting multiple times a week and in some cases multiple times a day. While JCPRD does not track use of the off-leash areas, the impact of this use and the demand is evident when reviewing the existing conditions, reviewing the JCPRD capital improvements project list, and in talking with maintenance and operations staff. The level of maintenance and

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repair required within these areas is significant and continues to grow, while resources available to maintain these areas are not able to increase at nearly the same rate. In the JCPRD 2015 - 2020 CIP, over $1 million in investment and replacement projects are identified for off-leash areas, in addition to the cost of increased maintenance, which is not currently tracked. The off-leash amenities, specifically Shawnee Mission Park and Heritage Park, are being “loved to death” through the level of use. JCPRD is addressing an identified need with these amenities. The demand for off-leash areas is increasing and anticipated to continue growing in popularity as the Johnson County population continues to grow. The Cedar Niles future park property master plan includes an off-leash area, and planning of future parks may include off-leash areas. To reduce use impact and address deferred and recurring maintenance, it is recommended that JCPRD establish design standards for off-leash area development. JCPRD should consider retroactively modifying existing off-leash areas, or relocating existing areas, to incorporate these standards. Off-leash areas range in size and design, but they share the same mission of providing dogs a place to play and socialize, where they are safely off-leash and can run freely. Design standards will provide a recognizable brand for JCPRD off-leash areas, and incorporate design decisions to increase maintenance efficiencies and reduce overall use impact and maintenance requirements. Guidelines and design considerations that can begin to establish standards for JCPRD off-leash areas include: •

Site Selection - Flat sites or sites with significant flat areas are preferred due to the impact of use and potential for erosion on steep slopes. Location should be outside the main circulation of the park when possible, to minimize impact on vehicular and pedestrian flow.

Enclosure - Entire off-leash area should be fenced for dog safety, to reduce the impact on the park outside the off-leash area, and to prevent conflict between off-leash users and park users. Each fenced area should include multiple access points with vestibule and double gate to keep dogs from running loose. Fencing should avoid 90 degree corners as these create locations where dogs can be cornered and trapped.

Multiple Enclosures - Dividing an off-leash area into multiple fenced zones will allow for separation of large and small breed dogs. Typically this separation occurs at 25 pounds. Separation of space can also provide locations for timid and shy dogs, or for annual resting and reestablishing turf.

Resting - Similar to soccer fields, which off-leash areas have been equated to with regards to level of maintenance, a key to long-term success and health of off-leash areas is to rest sections for maintenance, repair, and recovery. It is recommended that off-leash areas be divided into a minimum of three zones with the ability to rotate closing one or more of the zones annually.

Surfacing - With the size of JCPRD off-leash areas, turf is recommended as the primary surfacing. Consideration of irrigation systems in high use open turf areas can impact the long-term health of the turf and assist in reducing maintenance. Select appropriate surfacing for specific areas based on use patterns. Consider paved walks in high traffic areas to reduce impact and wear, and to provide a clean walking surface during and following inclement weather.

Water Source - It is recommended to provide a water source within the off-leash areas for drinking and washing. Provide adequate drainage or the use of a paved surface around the water source to reduce damage surrounding the water source.

Natural Water Element - Lakes, ponds, and streams provide an enjoyable play element for many dogs, but this water and the water edges can become significant maintenance items. Reinforced stream and lake edges will reduce the erosion and wear caused by continual water access. Adequately sized and aerated water elements will reduce the chance of water quality issues.

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Wildlife and Natural Areas - Locations of off-leash areas should avoid physical, visual or auditory impact on, or conflict with, wildlife and wildlife habitat, and natural areas within the parks. This includes the location of the off-leash area, access to the off-leash area, and run-off or waste from the off-leash area. The presence of toxic plants should be avoided in off-leash areas, and regular review of the areas should be performed. 5.4.1.2.1. The Value of Off-leash Areas With the identified demand and use of JCPRD off-leash areas, and the potential for continued development of additional off-leash areas in new parks, consideration should be given to establishing a membership and registration program for use of the off-leash areas. Adding a revenue generating component to off-leash area use could provide a dedicated source of funding for maintenance and capital investment to meet the needs and desires of off-leash users. Precedent for user supported maintenance and capital improvement investment is established with the athletic complexes within JCPRD parks. Similar to off-leash areas, athletic fields are designated areas within parks that are set aside for a special use group and maintained at a higher level of care and effort than typical green space. While off-leash users are not organized associations or generating revenue for themselves from the use of the park, they are receiving a benefit above and beyond those received by patrons who do not use the off-leash areas. This registration and permit process is similar to those in place for special uses within the parks including fishing, boating, and archery. The community-wide survey provides household responses that can be used to estimate a potential number of off-leash area users. An approach is defined below: Looking at the number of households who identified off-leash areas as one of their top three most used facilities in JCPRD parks indicates: •

234,168 households have visited the four parks with off-leash areas in the past 12 months (Q1) and 28% (65,567) of these households visited an off-leash area in the past 12 months (Q2).

13% of households identified dog parks as one of their top 3 most used facilities. (Q3)

This equates to 8,524 households who use and prioritize off-leash areas.

Looking at need based users indicates: •

67,484 households have identified a need for dog parks(Q8).

44% of these households say that need is 100% met by JCPRD off-leash areas (Q8b).

These households could represent 29,693 potential members.

Averaging the 8,524 and 29,693 potential member households there area an estimated 19,000 potential member households within Johnson County. Setting a membership rate at $50/year, which is less than $1/ week for first dog registration only, JCPRD could potentially generate $950,000 a year from off-leash use. Investment of this revenue back into the parks and off-leash areas could include:

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Funding to cover operational costs of managing the registration process.

Funding for additional park maintenance staff to focus on off-leash area maintenance and management.

Funding for additional park police assigned to off-leash areas, especially if the number of areas increases.


Funding for maintenance and capital investment for improvements to off-leash areas.

Implementation of off-leash and pet-focused programming as actions of appreciation for members and to recruit new members.

A membership program for the off-leash areas will require further market study and analysis. However, based on evaluation of level of use, maintenance needs, and potential expansion of the off-leash areas within JCPRD, addressing it as a potential and justifiable revenue source is an appropriate recommendation within this plan. 5.4.1.3. Facility Fixtures and Site Furnishings Establishing a standard for items to be used throughout parks, trails, and indoor facilities can lead to efficiencies in purchasing and maintenance, while maintaining the JCPRD brand and individual park character. These items will simplify design and maintenance processes, and can integrate into a centralized purchasing program for replacement and supplies. Examples of design elements for standardization throughout JCPRD parks and facilities include, but are not limited to: •

Door Handle and Lock Sets - Uniform sets will allow for easy change out and replacement as well as simplified access for staff.

Drinking Fountains - Included throughout the district, a standard for drinking fountains will allow for efficient maintenance and replacement when necessary.

Restroom Fixtures - Develop a consistent design package to be used in all park and trail restrooms. A similar package can be selected for indoor facilities. When possible, align these fixture packages for consistency and efficiency in staff access and maintenance.

Site Furnishings (Park Benches and Trash Receptacles/Recycling Containers) - Selection of a standard line of furnishings will not preclude the use of other styles in select locations when appropriate.

Parking Lot and Site Lighting - A standard fixture in consistent locations can aid in wayfinding and simplify maintenance and replacement. Exploring solar and LED options will reduce long-term maintenance efforts and costs, but typically require a higher initial cost.

Energy Efficient Design - In alignment with the Johnson County initiative for sustainable design and energy efficiency within county facilities and new construction, consideration should be given to selecting energy efficient fixtures and furnishings as a component in JCPRD standards.

5.4.1.4. Site Pavement Consideration of life cycle replacement costs and environmental impact of pavement types is recommended when addressing deferred maintenance, replacement, and new development. Increased initial capital investment will vary based on location and area of replacement, but will lead to reduced maintenance costs, longer life expectancy, and reduced environmental impact in most locations. Strategic replacement of asphalt paving with concrete or permeable pavement will extend maintenance and replacement schedules in high traffic areas and reduce impact in environmentally sensitive locations. The use of permeable paving in select locations will reduce impact on stormwater systems and provide environmental educational opportunities within the parks and facilities. Recommended areas of focus for strategic pavement replacement are parking lots, streamway trails, and golf courses. •

Replace asphalt golf cart paths with concrete paths for longevity and durability.

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Install concrete parking lots at streamway parks and access points to protect water quality and lengthen life cycle when located in flood prone areas.

Replace asphalt streamway trail with concrete in floodways and adjacent to delineated wetlands to reduce the environmental impact of degrading and leaching asphalt pavement. This will provide a more durable material in these wet locations, reduce maintenance needs, and increase the pavement life span.

Replace asphalt parking lots that have high traffic and high turn wear with concrete pavement for durability and increase the pavement life span.

5.4.2. Operations Standards In evaluating maintenance needs, several recurring items were observed and mentioned by staff that provide an opportunity to more clearly define operational standards to guide current and future procedure and policy within JCPRD. Operational standards for these items should focus on reducing capital costs and increasing operational efficiencies when implemented. Areas identified for operations design standards include: •

Fuel Management

Centralized Purchasing

5.4.2.1. Fuel Management Fuel management was identified as an area where additional organization and efficiencies can be achieved. A full evaluation and plan for fuel management should be included in the updated management and maintenance plan to align with the larger vision for long-term maintenance. Items to consider when preparing the fuel management plan include: •

Explore ways to reduce the number of fuel types managed by JCPRD. Currently stores multiple fuel types for use in equipment, vehicles, and transportation buses used for Children’s Services.

Remove Antioch Park in-ground storage tank. This is last remaining in-ground storage tank in the district. Low fuel demand at this location, and the potential for environmental contamination from a leaking tank are additional reasons to remove this tank and replace it with more appropriately sized above grade storage to match other maintenance facilities.

Explore consolidation of fuel storage with regional maintenance facilities.

Consider a fuel system at regional maintenance locations to track, monitor, and administer fuel usage in a single database.

Consider conversion to B20 biodiesel for fleet and transportation vehicles. Benefits of biodiesel include extended vehicle life cycle, reduced emissions, and biodiesel can be used with existing diesel vehicles.

Consider conversion of mowers and maintenance equipment to propane, and explore storage requirements for propane and tanks. Benefits of propane include: reduced emissions, operational savings, fuel savings per gallon, price control, safety, reduced possibility of theft, and potential rebates/funding assistance for implementation and conversion of existing equipment.

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5.4.2.2. Centralized Purchasing Centralized purchasing has been discussed and evaluated in the past, both within JCPRD and as part of the Johnson County purchasing program. Concerns associated with implementation at these times included coordination of the program, distribution of the materials, and storage of bulk materials for individual parks and facilities. While some of these previous concerns may remain roadblocks to a purchasing program, recommendations within the Stewardship legacy element establish a structure for JCPRD operations and maintenance where consolidation and standardization provide an opportunity to evaluate centralized purchasing from a district-wide perspective. •

Regional maintenance structure and design standards address many of the previous concerns. They identify a path of distribution through regional maintenance facilities to individual parks and facilities, and consistency will allow for streamline supply orders in larger quantities that can be allocated system-wide.

•

The need for storage is reduced with the shared resources, and standard replacement parts can be ordered to have in the system as parks and facilities will share these common components. Additional storage space at select regional maintenance facilities may be beneficial to provide temporary storage or warehouse parts and supplies.

•

Consideration should be given to establishing a centralized purchasing process for JCPRD. This could be coordinated between the Administrative Services Division, recreation managers, and parks regional maintenance staff to consolidate and place orders.

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3

.06

Identity


Bluebird at Kill Creek Park - photo by MGE

“A famous writing challenge is to write a story in only six words. These six words— conservation, health and wellness, social equity— hold the story of an entire field working in thousands of communities and touching the lives of millions of people.” National Recreation and Park Association Pillars of Our Communities, 2013


Snapshot Identity

One JCPRD JCPRD assets, locations, programs, patrons, staff, and partners collectively comprise the district’s identity. Similar to the technique practiced by indigenous people and, later, pioneers, in which a tree was bent to direct trail users to water sources, the implementation of identity recommendations will empower community stakeholders with the ability to positively shape and guide one another’s experience. The result: a responsive JCPRD that represents the legacy, meets the needs of the community, and is prepared to adapt with an evolving Johnson County.

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Legacy Framework Goal: We will promote a legacy of identity through a focused effort to improve public awareness and increase accessibility of information regarding JCPRD news, events, programs and services.

6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4

Action: Increase Emphasis on Social Media Outcomes: Between 2005 and 2013 social networking site use has increased by over 900%. A more formal approach to social media will allow JCPRD to better reach these users within the Johnson County community. The engagement possible with social media can strengthen the district’s relationships with patrons. Action: Emphasize Patron Recognition Outcomes: Programs and activities which show appreciation for park and facility users may provide incentives to continue and expand patronage. Events and services that operate across multiple JCPRD locations raise awareness of the district as a whole and encourage visitation. Action: Enhance Primary Public Outreach Methods Outcomes: Define approaches to public awareness that center on enhancing JCPRD’s four most popular methods of outreach. These approaches direct focus on programs which will have the largest impact in educating the community about the diverse opportunities offered by JCPRD. Action: Embrace Role within Larger Parks and Recreation Network Outcomes: Continued and increased coordination between JCPRD and other parks and recreation providers will allow for an exchange of experiences and best practices that can elevate parks and recreation services available to residents and visitors.

Case Study The individuals who have shaped and will continue to shape JCPRD as users, advocates and professionals are a key part of the legacy of the district. The ability to learn from their experiences and capture their stories through listening is one which can provide a great resource to future generations. StoryCorps is an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to the mission of growing “a digital archive of the collective wisdom of humanity.” The organization hosts a variety of programs ranging from the original StoryCorps booth to a recently released StoryCorps mobile application. These programs, including initiatives focused on memory loss and partnerships with libraries and local schools, share a common program. A 40-minute interview is conducted by a friend, neighbor or loved one with the oversight of an oral historian. One copy of the interview is archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., and each participant receives a copy of the session. With permission, a copy may be saved at a local institution. This is a program JCPRD currently offers with the Johnson County Library. Consideration should be given to expanding this offering to the Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center and expanding promotion as a link to county heritage.

Capital Investment Priorities The primary costs associated with this legacy element are the funding of a social media coordinator and any improvements to the website and social media. Within the Legacy Plan CIP, the identity capital costs are captured within regional parks operations.

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Supporting Analysis Identity is an element of the JCPRD legacy that has become less clear among district patrons with the expanded municipal and private sector services. Public interface technologies that streamline communication and personal outreach to patrons are strategies to communicate and reinforce the JCPRD brand. These technologies also provide for responsive and collaborative management of assets and programming.

Mail Survey Q17 Ways respondent households learn about Johnson County Park & Recreation District programs and activities.

JCPRD Now The statistically valid mail survey showed the Activities catalog remains the primary resource for the community to learn about JCPRD programs and activities(Q17). This is true for households with and without children, and across all demographic age groups with the exception of 65+ who indicated from friends and neighbors as their primary resource. From friends and neighbors is reported as the second most popular means for information gathering. In fact, 27% of patrons indicated that their friends’ participation was a primary reason for their own participation in a fee-based program (Q5a). These findings suggest a peer-based effect that can be enhanced by the current popularity of social media platforms. As of September 2014: 71% of online adults use Facebook, 23% of online adults use Twitter, 26% of online adults use Instagram, and 28% of online adults use Pinterest. Use of these applications is prevalent across multiple demographic types. Also as of September 2014, 40% of cell phone owners use a social networking site on their phone (Social Media Fact Sheet | Pew Research Center) Because of the role that community plays in promoting park and recreation services, public perception of JCPRD services is paramount. Stakeholders and public feedback participants agreed that there is often confusion with identification of JCPRD parks, trails, facilities, and services, and the ability to distinguish JCPRD spaces from municipal and private providers. There is not always a clear recognition of JCPRD by the public.

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Mail Survey Q7 Organizations that respondent households used the most often during the past year

JCPRD Recent History As municipal and private providers have continued to grow, successful partnerships have been built with JCPRD. These partnerships, including shared programming spaces in municipal community centers and private facilities and trail development, have continued to blur the differentiation between providers. While the overall goal of providing quality parks and recreation services within Johnson County is the intent of all JCPRD partners, JCPRD is in a unique position. Dependent upon enterprise revenue and county-wide tax based funding for over 95% of their annual budget, it is important that the community understand the benefits they receive from JCPRD. Brand identity and accessibility to patrons is important to differentiate JCPRD resources through out Johnson County.

JCPRD Future JCPRD anticipates providing offerings that evolve to meet community needs, and strengthen partnerships. The district has identified real time active outreach to the public as a component of this plan. There is an opportunity for JCPRD to distinguish itself from municipal and private providers by offering programs and services at a county-wide level that expand patron recognition of JCPRD, provide acknowledgment of patrons and their role in the success of JCPRD, and encourage expanded partnerships at the municipal and private level. JCPRD’s position as a regional parks and recreation leader and innovator is a platform from which to elevate public awareness of the district, and JCRPD’s role in expanding and unifying parks and recreation throughout Johnson County.

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Actions + Recommendations

Identity describes the outward expression of JCPRD to the community, and the means for interacting with Johnson County residents and visitors. This legacy element sets the groundwork for continued relationship building with the public to ensure a secure future for JCPRD. Along with enterprise funded recreation services, the district is dependent upon county taxes as the primary source of financial support. Residents are more likely to vote to approve funding for an agency that has a clear impact on their daily lives, provides consistent services, and is responsive to their needs. The recommended course of action seeks to unify the public outreach efforts as one constant presence with the means to accept public feedback. This effort will continue to shape JCPRD into a district in which all of Johnson County feels a sense of ownership, and that it is “their� parks and recreation system. Identity action items are:

6.1. Action: Increase Emphasis on Social Media

6.2. Action: Emphasize Patron Recognition

6.3 Action: Enhance Primary Public Outreach Methods

6.4 Action: Embrace Role within Larger Parks and Recreation Network

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6.1. Action: Increase Emphasis on Social Media Mobile technology has become a key source of public information gathering and decision making in recent years, and social media is the primary means by which this information is distributed and received. According to CNN, in January 2014, Americans used smart phones and tablet apps more than PCs to access the internet. This makes the platform a critical way for an organization such as JCPRD to engage with its users. Social media has the potential to play an expanded role in future public outreach efforts, due to its reach and continued growth across all demographic categories. There are many means to social media outreach including regular, automated schedules of announcements and more spontaneous posting which provides a venue for real time communication with “friends” and “followers.” JCPRD can enhance its presence on social media platforms to share important information and alert patrons of events occurring in the moment. Because information shared through social media has the potential to reach such a wide range of viewers, it is important the content and tone continue to be regulated by a set of guidelines to present a consistent and appropriate JCPRD voice that residents and visitors can depend upon for high-level park and recreation experiences. Recommendations are: 6.1.1. Establish a Social Media Coordinator Position 6.1.2. Evaluate Existing Social Media Guidelines

6.1.1. Establish a Social Media Coordinator Position In light of the relevance of social media and its potential to enhance the accessibility of information and the responsive nature of JCPRD’s relationship with the community, a dedicated position within the JCPRD staff to manage the district’s social media presence is recommended. 6.1.1.1. Value of the Position to JCPRD •

Oversight by the social media coordinator position will provide JCPRD with a resource for understanding trends in social media and ensuring JCPRD is connecting with the Johnson County community on the most popular social media formats.

Guidance provided by this position will present the community with a singular voice and consistent information.

6.1.1.2. Roles and Responsibilities •

The social media coordinator will streamline social media presence for JCPRD and manage the timeline for scheduled postings.

Knowing the importance placed on word of mouth from neighbors and friends from the survey, the social media coordinator will work with JCPRD staff to manage and encourage sharing of what they do well. They will obtain testimonials and sound bites from staff and patrons and establish a program of posting this feedback through social media.

The social media coordinator will lead an effort to revise the existing JCPRD social media guidelines as detailed in recommendation (6.1.2)

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Social Media Strategy Funnel Organizational Mission Organization Goals

start here

Department Goals Social Media Goals not here

Social Media Tactics Social Media Metrics

The social media coordinator and Social Media Advisory Group will update guidelines to enact a social media strategy. (Diagram adapted from a graphic created by Angie Schottmuller)

6.1.2. Evaluate Existing Social Media Guidelines JCPRD has a social media presence on Facebook and Twitter with a primary district account on each and approximately 12-14 individual program and facility accounts providing specific information to their users. The social media coordinator and JCPRD Social Media Advisory Group will review and refine the existing framework for social media accounts within JCPRD, develop a “One JCPRD� social media strategy, and identify managers for each account. The resulting strategy should be rooted in the organization’s mission and speak to one or more organization goals to truly enhance the relationship between JCPRD and the community. The advisory group will provide the necessary guidance to shape the strategy. Social media account managers will work with the social media coordinator to develop scheduled content, identify programs, events, and opportunities where real time posting will enhance awareness and generate additional interest or participation in events. This program can be expanded to explore cross-promotion opportunities among JCPRD accounts or with municipal and private partners to share through JCPRD social media.

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6.2. Action: Emphasize Patron Recognition To improve public awareness and recognition of JCPRD by patrons and the community, it is important to explore programs and activities that show appreciation of patrons and encourage continued participation and visitation of other JCPRD parks and facilities. Through the types of programs described below, JCPRD will continue to prioritize one of the most meaningful impacts the district has on patrons: providing memorable experiences. Recommendations are: 6.2.1. Expand Park Patron Programs 6.2.2. Implement District-wide Events 6.2.3. Expand Internal Cross-promotion 6.2.1. Expand Park Patron Programs JCPRD should focus on expanded park patron programs. These programs acknowledge participation, provide incentives for continued or expanded use of JCPRD services, and spur growth in participation by encouraging new users. Examples include: 6.2.1.1. Seasonal Scavenger Hunt / Rewards Program Seasonal scavenger hunt or rewards programs where patrons can collect prizes and redeem rewards by visiting multiple parks and facilities or participating in multiple programs and activities. 6.2.1.2. Park Ambassador Program This program may be modeled off of America’s State Parks Ambassador program. JCPRD park patrons may be selected to serve as “Park Ambassadors.” These individuals will participate with JCPRD through a variety of means that may include a hike, participation in an event or league, or a native restoration service project. The ambassador will capture their experiences in an article, set of photos, drawings or other creative means. The work of these ambassadors will be highlighted by sharing and linking to the material on the JCPRD website and social media platforms. These experiences can also be shared as an annual exhibit within the Johnson County Museum. 6.2.1.3. Patron Appreciation Concert / Show Establish a free or discounted concert or entertainment event to kick-off the summer concert or theatre season. Tickets may be limited to ensure an intimate and personal experience. Multiple events may be held to accommodate patrons. 6.2.2. Implement District-wide Events Events that incorporate more than one JCPRD park or facility invite patron visitation to locations outside of their typical patterns of use. These events may be one-time activities or regular events occurring annually or seasonally. The events may be hosted by JCPRD, or in coordination with JCPRD partners. Examples include:

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6.2.2.1. Art in the Park An art in the park program can provide opportunities for collaboration with local artists or schools providing art for display across the JCPRD system. These events raise awareness of the parks and facilities within the JCPRD system, and promote the local art community. •

Conduct the annual event with works on temporary loan or pieces commissioned for recurring display.

Engage the Park and Recreation Foundation of Johnson County to commission art or establish an endowment for an annual program.

Utilize the Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center to add to the success of this undertaking.

Provide informal opportunities for visitors to spend time in parks and facilities, as well as organized programming for tours, walks, and events throughout the year.

Produce themed events to reflect relevant and timely JCPRD milestones.

6.2.2.2. Seasonal Park Experience Walks Self guided or programmed walks can be created to celebrate the unique natural features and seasonal attractions within selected parks and along streamway trails. The walks may emphasize the unique characteristics of individual locations, and encourage visitors to the wide range of JCPRD experiences.

6.2.2.3. Facility-focused System-wide Event Open house events at JCPRD facilities can showcase program and activity offerings at a specific location and provide a sampling of system-wide offerings for cross-promotion. These events can include mini-classes and open gyms, along with information, registration opportunities, and special promotions available that day only. These open houses provide partnership opportunities for contract instructors and outside program location partners to visit with current and potential clients. Offering these at each recreation program location at different times throughout the year will encourage visitors to all locations.

6.2.3. Expand Internal Cross-promotion Effort to build on cross-promotion and registration opportunities can encourage participation and increase accessibility to patrons. •

Recent enhancements to allow for program registration at multiple facilities encourages patrons to enroll in programming while on-site through ease of access and assistance from facility staff.

Provide opportunities to increase awareness of other locations, or programs and classes offered within JCPRD facilities that may be of interest to patrons.

Personal interaction with patrons encourages feedback regarding programming and activities to assist JCPRD to better meet the needs of participants, and solicit feedback and sound bites.

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6.3. Action: Enhance Primary Public Outreach Methods An approach to building awareness that will focus on enhancing the four most popular methods by which patrons learn about JCPRD offerings and services. As identified in the statistically valid survey, the top four methods are: •

JCPRD Activities catalog (62%)

From Friends and Neighbors (57%)

JCPRD Website (41%)

Park Signage (41%)

Enhancing these methods of outreach will allow JCPRD staff to have a large, but efficient, focus in areas where it will be the most beneficial to residents of Johnson County. An improvement to the level of awareness and accessibility of information is intended to increase users and visitations. Access to information will also assist in building public support for the continued investment in existing parks, trails, facilities, opening of undeveloped parkland, and innovative recreation programs. Recommendations are: 6.3.1. Continue Activities Catalog and Direct Mail 6.3.2. Capitalize on Word of Mouth / Testimonials 6.3.3. Expand Role of Website 6.3.4. Expand Role of Park Signage 6.3.5. Develop a JCPRD Mobile App

6.3.1. Continue Activities Catalog and Direct Mail The Activities catalog is the number one resource used by residents of Johnson County to learn about JCPRD offerings. In the survey results, over 50% of respondents in all age groups included the Activities catalog when asked about the ways they learn of JCPRD programs and activities. Even within the technically savvy 25-34 age demographic, 56% of respondents identified the Activities catalog as a source for JCPRD offerings. This was the number one response for this age demographic. The Activities catalog provides more than just program registration information, and it is currently the most organized and convenient location for people to find information regarding JCPRD activities and programs. The survey results also show that, across the board, residents of Johnson County recognize and use this JCPRD publication. The Activities catalog should remain a priority for JCPRD. As website and mobile improvements are implemented, JCPRD should track usage and conduct additional research to determined if, and when, and prioritization of communication efforts is warranted. This may lead to an eventual simplification of the catalog or complete phase out of the printed document. 6.3.2. Capitalize on Word of Mouth / Testimonials In terms of learning about JCPRD offerings, the role of “word of mouth” has increased since the previous survey for the MAP 2020 study. This method of information gathering is highly regarded across all demographic categories. Its popularity shows the community based nature of users. It underscores the importance of engaging all of Johnson County, especially as the demographics continue to evolve and make Johnson County a much more diverse community. For example, the number of Johnson County residents who speak English as a second language will continue to grow within the life of this Legacy Plan, and JCPRD needs to adapt a strategy to target these households.

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It is important to recognize the value placed by the community on others’ experiences, and identify ways to engage patrons for testimonial feedback. The following examples identify opportunities for JCPRD to support a network of peer-to-peer referrals.

6.3.2.1. Digital Word of Mouth The rise of “word of mouth” referrals coincides with a rise in social media use. Even when digital sharing is not the means of distribution, patrons often verbally direct their friends to online material or provide an overview of a program which can then be further investigated using online resources. •

Provide the material that can be easily shared or accessed over social media and is mobile friendly. JCPRD may produce regular scheduled online content and reminders that are pushed out for digital distribution.

As identified in the social media coordinator section (6.1.1.), a focused effort to collect and share testimonials via the website and social media may provide an online venue for learning about JCPRD programs from JCPRD users, instructors, and staff.

6.3.2.2. Add Multi-Lingual Services Johnson County is a growing and diversifying community. To meet the needs of these residents and increase awareness of opportunities and accessibility of resources, JCPRD should add multi-lingual services in print and in-person registration services. •

Expanded online tools will provide a cost effective resource for multi-lingual documentation.

The Activities catalog can provide direction to services in multiple languages. If popularity of the catalog remains high, JCPRD may consider producing print material in most commonly requested languages.

6.3.2.3. JCPRD Presence at Local Public Events JCPRD may expand its presence at public events and organizational gatherings to engage with existing and potential patrons, increase awareness of JCPRD parks and facilities, and obtain and share testimonials. •

Engage a greater mix of the community, or select user groups as appropriate. The key is to engage, share, and listen.

These events and gatherings provide opportunities to obtain testimonials and feedback regarding public opinion, and perspective on needs, innovation, and public perception of JCPRD.

6.3.2.4. Referral and Sampling Programs JCPRD may provide opportunities to take word of mouth a step further by offering “bring a friend to class” and similar programs for potential patrons to experience activities with friends and neighbors. Formalize a program allowing potential patrons to sample a class prior to registration. •

JCPRD program participants may be rewarded with registration credits for each new user who signs up for a program based upon their referral. Credits awarded could be redeemed towards future program registrations.

If new users notify instructors or program hosts ahead of class time, they may be eligible to participate in one session before committing to class registration or payment of fee.

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6.3.3. Expand Role of the Website A reduced number of Johnson County residents report using the website to obtain information about JCPRD parks, facilities, and programs than in the MAP 2020 survey. While this trend may be partly attributed to the other forms of digital outreach, including social media and the @JCPRD e-newsletter, the decline in website-based responses may be tied to the current website format. The existing website is difficult to navigate and complicated to use for registration and obtaining information on programs and activities. Currently, efforts are underway to update the website. Recommendations for the new website include: •

Provide a more interactive and intuitive interface and navigation.

Include expanded visitor tools for reviewing and registering for programs and activities.

Allow for content management at facility and program levels and locations. This will streamline the process for updating content to provide site users with the best information available.

Create a website that is mobile friendly to enable smart phone and tablet use of the site.

Streamline program and activity interface to provide overview of similar classes and programs.

Simplify registration process to increase use.

Message board at Nuuksio National Park in Finland

6.3.4. Expand Role of Park Signage At 40%, the percentage of Johnson County households who report park signage as a source of information in the survey, has nearly doubled since MAP 2020. This response supports the current efforts by JCPRD to provide kiosks and sign boards in parks and at facilities. Knowing the importance of signage within parks, it is recommended that in addition to kiosks and sign boards, larger message boards should be located near park entries or at key locations within parks. Message boards at high traffic areas in parks and facilities will provide an opportunity to display key JCPRD information for individual park and district announcements. Recommendations for park signage improvements are: •

Message boards should be designed to match JCPRD’s sign system.

Explore options to incorporate digital messaging capabilities and technologies within parks and facilities.

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6.3.5. Develop a JCPRD Mobile Application (App) A recommendation that blends the expanded website and message board elements is a JCPRD mobile application for use on smartphones and tablets. Mobile apps can give users the ability to opt in to the information most relevant to them. In this way, park patrons can customize their relationship with JCPRD resources. Although a mobile app has the potential for endless options, a gradual roll out of functions is recommended to ensure quality remains high and capabilities are prioritized in response to community desires. Potential capabilities of a JCPRD mobile app include: 6.3.5.1. Information Resource The mobile app can provide park and facility visitors with a wide variety of information and resources including, but not limited to, a directory of JCPRD trails, parks and facilities. For each location the following information can be provided: • • • • •

List of amenities. Photo gallery (may include video clips and drone footage). Hours of operation. Contact information. Schedules of upcoming events.

6.3.5.2. Registration A registration feature on the mobile app will allow patrons to learn about and conveniently register for programs and events as they learn about them on or off-site of JCPRD facilities. 6.3.5.3. Condition Assessment This feature can display up-to-date information regarding the status (open vs. closed), and condition of fields, pools, trails, beaches, off-leash areas, and flood prone areas of parks. The availability of this information on a mobile device will help patrons plan their visit to JCPRD parks and facilities. 6.3.5.4. Event and Program Notification JCPRD park patrons may sign up to receive specific sets of notifications in the form of emails or “push notifications.” Notifications, reminders and updates related to upcoming events and programs, as well as present conditions of JCPRD amenities (6.3.5.3.), can appear on the mobile app’s landing page, and be customizable for each user. 6.3.5.5. User Feedback The ability to collect user feedback and reports can inform staff of pressing issues or patron concerns. The mobile app may also provide the ability to allow direct user feedback including completing the JCPRD park user survey. Opportunities may also be provided for capturing participation data related to JCPRD programs such as biodiversity mapping and health and wellness initiatives including JCPRD U.

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6.4. Action: Embrace Role within Larger Parks and Recreation Network An intent of the Legacy Plan is to equip JCPRD with flexible strategies and capital improvement implementation plans that can be used to inform an adaptive management strategy. Adaptive management is a process by which an organization’s approach is refined and improved over time as best practices or recommendations are tested, monitored, reviewed and adjusted. This practice will draw on JCPRD’s experience, but the district’s direction can also take cues from a larger network of park and recreation practitioners, including national organizations like NRPA which are actively conducting research and compiling data. Through this network the Johnson County Park & Recreation District will have access to resources to better serve its patrons and manage its resources. By embracing a leadership role among local municipalities and organizations, JCPRD can pass along lessons learned to benefit smaller parks and recreation agencies. One consistent theme within the feedback provided by municipal parks and recreation partners, as well as several private and regional planning partners, was the desire for JCPRD to act as a central agency to coordinate the collective sharing of information and efforts related to areas of practice such as recreation programming, cultural services, and trail development. This role for JCPRD could align related partner efforts to provide the biggest benefit to the residents and visitors of Johnson County. Recommendations include: 6.4.1. Organize Communities of Practice 6.4.2. Establish and Maintain Relationships with Benchmark Counties 6.4.3. Participate in NRPA’s PRORAGIS System 6.4.1. Organize Communities of Practice A community of practice is a collection of individuals who share a craft, profession or function. Through the sharing of information and experiences, group members learn from one another. As a way of structuring partnership engagement, managers and leaders within JCPRD may coordinate communities of practices that bring together appropriate representatives from partner organizations who share common functions. Communities of practice can develop shared resources to monitor the performance of their individual organization’s work and share lessons learned. Members may also identify and plan opportunities for mutually beneficial collaboration. 6.4.2. Establish and Maintain Relationships with Benchmark Counties MAP 2020 highlighted several benchmark counties with demographics, funding, and goals similar to Johnson County. Within the Legacy Plan strategic effort, JCPRD leadership has identified several key benchmark counties whose current offerings and future trajectory share similarities with the JCPRD of 2015. Because each benchmark county is so unique, there are particular areas of strength that JCPRD can look to the counties as an example of successful implementation. The overview and precedent programs operated by these benchmark counties is attached in the appendix to this document. By conducting outreach to develop a relationship with counties that hold common values and objectives, JCPRD can position itself to learn from and contribute to other’s success, adding to the strength of the national parks and recreation landscape as a whole. 6.4.2. Participate in NRPA’s PRORAGIS System The National Recreation and Park Association(NRPA) developed the Parks and Recreation Operating Ratio and GIS (PRORAGIS) system as a resource for comparative benchmarking. JCPRD is recommended to continue to participate in PRORAGIS by sharing its own data and to utilize the reports NRPA publishes to inform operational decision-making.

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3

.07

Teamwork


Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center Outdoor Discovery Campers

“The world doesn’t change one person at a time. It changes as networks of relationships form among people who discover they share a common cause and vision of what’s possible.” Margaret Wheatley and Deborah Frieze “Using Emergence to Take Social Innovations to Scale”


Snapshot Teamwork

One JCPRD Within the JCPRD ecosystem, Teamwork is the root structure holding the ground in place. As JCPRD grows, it is the complex network of the Johnson County Park & Recreation District staff, partners and advisors that secures its position within the context of an evolving Johnson County.

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Legacy Framework Goal: We will promote a legacy of Teamwork through a focused effort to engage staff, support one another, and cultivate partnerships.

7.1 7.2 7.3

Action: Evaluate Staffing Needs Outcomes: The evaluation of staffing needs identifies the roles for new and expanded positions, and supports proactive succession planning. Action: Enhance Internal Coordination / Recognition Outcomes: Improve internal coordination and recognition of team members through technology and employee focused communication. Action: Expand Partnerships Outcomes: Through practicing the “One JCPRD” philosophy, team members will coordinate across departments to collaborate and share knowledge on related efforts. A culture of cooperation will enhance partnerships.

Case Study Jonathan Jarvis, the Director of the National Park Service (NPS), notes that as the NPS enters its second century, its focus is expanding, from bringing “people to the parks” to “bringing parks to the people.” To guide the implementation of a wide set of programs that will move the parks service closer to this goal, the organization published “The Call to Action,” a report which calls for the establishment of several initiatives. One of these initiates, the “Urban Matters” initiative, is being implemented through the “Urban Agenda” report and fellowship program. In support of this program, the NPS Stewardship Institute has hosted webinar conferences with several communities of practice. These are groups of park managers, directors, staff, and urban strategists, who meet to discuss “nuts and bolts” issues in which they share goals and can learn from one another’s experiences.

Operational Investment Priorities The primary cost associated with this Legacy Element is the Deputy Director position, which is included in the 2015 JCPRD budget. The funding for additional planning and development staff is captured as a district-wide operations cost within the regional parks section of the capital investment plan.

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Supporting Analysis

Teamwork is practiced by JCPRD within its own organization and through ongoing partnerships. JCPRD team members identified opportunities for increased efficiencies and internal coordination, and stakeholders expressed a desire to expand collaboration.

Mail Survey Q19 How respondent households qualify their level of satisfaction with the overall value their household receives from the Johnson County Park & Recreation District

JCPRD Now Stakeholders recognize JCPRD staff as highly skilled and knowledgeable. JCPRD advisory groups and internal staff identified gaps within staffing including plumbing and electrical work, overall volunteer management, and grant writing. Public satisfaction in the survey showed that over 80% of households are somewhat satisfied or very satisfied with the overall value received from the Johnson County Park & Recreation District (Q19). Johnson County governmental stakeholders and JCPRD staff agree that existing relationships can be strengthened. Efforts to build these relationships are ongoing, with the goal of increased efficiencies and better service to Johnson County residents. The partnership between Johnson County Department of Health and Environment and JCPRD in the execution of the Community Health Assessment is an example of this strengthening relationship.

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Mail Survey Q5b Respondent household rating of the overall quality of programs they have participated in

JCPRD Recent History Growth in JCPRD parks, trails and facilities over the past 15 years has led to dispersal of staff throughout the county to support the expansion of offerings and facilities. This has created situations which complicate internal team coordination. JCPRD staff report that efficient coordination is impacted at times by the separation of parks and recreation administration staff within the district. Limited funding and availability of qualified labor have presented challenges with JCPRD staffing. Park police, in particular, require lead time for hiring and training, and experience high turnover within the first few years of hire. JCPRD staff identified the importance of additional officers for future parks. Staffing needs should be considered when planning new development so officers may be hired and trained in time for the opening of additional parkland.

JCPRD Future JCPRD team members look forward to contributing to the future of JCPRD. Improved technology may enhance coordination for management of resources and services. The addition of a deputy director will add a level of leadership to oversee internal organization and coordination. JCPRD internal staff anticipate upcoming issues with staffing and service to the community. Team members identified the importance of succession planning as the district will lose many skilled workers to retirement in coming years. It was also noted that a variety of programs area at capacity and additional staff and facilities area needed to meet that demand. Multiple stakeholder groups report future opportunities exist for expanded JCPRD partnerships with the private sector, schools, municipalities, and Johnson County Government. In addition, Johnson County advisory groups and internal staff express a need and desire for more diversity on the JCPRD board and staff.

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Actions + Recommendations

Teamwork is a focus on celebrating the strengths of JCPRD with the team members and partners who are responsible for 60 years of service and leadership in parks and recreation. It also takes a look forward to identify opportunities for growth. The day-to-day operations of any organization can become focused on the detail and lose site of the big picture. To define an approach for JCPRD’s legacy of teamwork, this plan takes a look at the big picture and identifies the following teamwork action items. Teamwork action items are:

7.1 Action: Evaluate Staffing Needs

7.2 Action: Enhance Internal Coordination / Recognition

7.3 Action: Expand Partnerships

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7.1. Action: Evaluate Staffing Needs Planned growth for JCPRD over the next 15 years includes opening five new parks, development of streamway trails, continued investment in existing parks and facilities, and opening two new facilities. With this growth it is important to look at organizational staffing to prepare for the development and operations of these amenities. Recommendations for staffing needs and organizational alignment are: 7.1.1. Addition of a Deputy Director of Parks and Recreation 7.1.2. Additional Planning and Development Staff 7.1.3. Proactive Succession Planning 7.1.4. Relocation of Superintendent of Recreation and Registration Manager 7.1.1. Addition of a Deputy Director of Parks and Recreation The addition of a Deputy Director is recommended to support the Executive Director and strengthen the JCPRD administrative services management team. This is a typical position in park and recreation as an organizational leader and complement to the Executive Director. The Executive Director’s responsibilities should be focused on leadership and representation of JCPRD at the national, regional, state, and county levels. The Executive Director is an advocate and representative for JCPRD to other county entities and stakeholders, as well as to the Board of County Commissioners and the Park and Recreation Board of Commissioners. Engagement with JCPRD leadership and staff is important to this position, but day-to-day management and coordination should be the responsibility of a Deputy Director. 7.1.1.1. Value of the Position to JCPRD •

The Deputy Director role will be0 to provide internal leadership for the Administrative Services Division management team, and with JCPRD staff. This position will manage the day-t0-day operations of JCPRD and coordinate with the Executive Director on matters as appropriate.

For years, JCPRD Executive Directors have served both roles. With the continued growth of Johnson County and planned growth of JCPRD, now is the time to add this leadership position. The addition of a Deputy Director is important for the implementation of this Legacy Plan and the long-term success of JCPRD.

7.1.1.2. Roles and Responsibilities •

Provide day-to-day leadership for JCPRD in the absence of the Executive Director.

Report to the Executive Director.

Possess a skill set to complement the Executive Director and present a solid leadership presence for JCPRD.

Manage the implementation of this Legacy Plan.

Focus on expanding internal communication and coordination to strengthen JCPRD.

7.1.2. Additional Planning and Development Staff With the significant amount of park and trail development and existing park improvements anticipated,

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it is recommended that an additional project manager be added to the Planning and Development Department staff. Additional staff may be needed based on project load and implementation timelines, but one additional team member is recommended at this time. 7.1.2.1. Value of the Position to JCPRD Without an additional team member, it will be very difficult for JCPRD to maintain the proposed investment schedule with the level of quality control and oversight expected of the Planning and Development Department. 7.1.2.2. Roles and Responsibilities This position will assist the existing staff in planning, design, and project management related to capital investment in parks, trails, and facilities. 7.1.3. Proactive Succession Planning It is important in this document to acknowledge the strength of JCPRD in all divisions and positions. With the focus of this plan on defining legacy roles for JCPRD going forward, we must look at current and past employees to celebrate the legacy of JCPRD over the past 60 years. In recent years these team members have taken on the challenges associated with the economic downturn and its impact on JCPRD funding. Yet, they have continued to provide Johnson County with a regional park and recreation district that in 2014, once again, received accreditation from the Commission for Accreditation of Park and Recreation Agencies (CAPRA) with a perfect evaluation score. This evaluation encompasses all areas of a parks and recreation district, and is truly a recognition of the entire JCPRD team. Looking forward, it is important for JCPRD to prepare for the transition of the long-time employees who have accumulated significant institutional knowledge. In addition to the knowledge of these individuals, there is the functional element that many JCPRD employees perform roles and provide service in their positions that go beyond the job description. Succession planning for transitioning team members should be a focus of JCPRD leadership. This should include preparing individuals to fill these positions, and documenting job descriptions and responsibilities to ensure all roles and tasks currently being performed are accounted for going forward. Replacement of one individual may require multiple positions or reassignment of responsibilities to multiple positions. Transition is never easy, and with the dedicated and long-time staff of JCPRD, it can be even more difficult. Recognizing this, and taking proactive measures to address succession planning, can help smooth these transitions and the continuation of the JCPRD legacy. 7.1.4. Relocation of Superintendent of Recreation and Registration Manager The JCPRD Administration Building at 7904 Renner Road in Shawnee Mission Park is home to the Executive Director and all divisional leadership with the exception of the Recreation Division. The Superintendent of Recreation and the Registration Manager, along with support staff, are still located in Antioch Park, the traditional home of the Recreation Division. Today, the recreation staff is spread throughout the system from Mid-America West to New Century Fieldhouse to Roeland Park, and numerous other locations for JCPRD recreation programming. Additionally, with Meadowbrook and the Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center coming on-line, staff will be spread out even futher. It is recommended that the Superintendent of Recreation and Registration Manager, along with several support staff, be relocated to Shawnee Mission Park to increase efficiencies of leadership and allow for more interaction of the full administration leadership team. While the Superintendent of Recreation will still be on the road meeting with staff and visiting facilities, they will be more readily accessible to other leadership team members including the Executive Director and Deputy Director. The ideal office space would be a wing suite in the Administration Building similar to Planning and Development and Community Relations. This space does not currently exist at the administration building, so an expansion would be required to integrate the Recreation Division leadership. Another option would be if office space were available in the soon to be constructed park police headquarters and visitors center. This location will still provide the proximity to the other JCPRD administrative team members that is the ultimate goal of this proposed relocation. With this relocation, remaining recreation managers at Antioch Park should be relocated from Building A, and the future of this building should be assessed at that time.

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7.2. Action: Enhance Internal Coordination / Recognition Continuing to build on existing procedures and technological advances to improve communication and coordination, and taking the time to recognize successes with all of JCPRD are the goals of this action item. This includes looking at ways to fully engage technology to improve internal coordination, and engage the JCPRD team to share accomplishments. This action includes exploring ways to expand roles for the mutual benefit of each JCPRD team member and for patrons. A Deputy Director will lead the efforts in this action item. Recommendations include: 7.2.1. Expand Reservation Notification 7.2.2. Emphasize Employee Notification 7.2.3. Coordinate Programming and Activity Resources 7.2.1. Reservation Notification An upgraded recreation management software system should explore providing real-time digital notification of the park police and park maintenance for special event scheduling or shelter reservations. This will streamline the notification process and allow for scheduling and preparation. 7.2.2. Emphasize Employee Communication / Recognition Identify opportunities to increase communication to the entire JCPRD team. •

Provide communication to staff for special events and volunteer opportunities. Explore options to share this information, and encourage participation. Integration of reminders and event follow-ups into existing newsletters or other regularly scheduled correspondence is an option. A district-wide annual calendar of events would provide a location for individuals to understand all JCPRD has going over a year, and a location to check on events and plan in advance.

Celebrate successes when they happen and with all. These successes are what makes JCPRD special. Celebrations will allow everyone to share in the success and recognize their roll in the success. Team members will take pride in these successes and become advocates for JCPRD as they share these stories with family and friends.

Prepare annual (or more often) success updates for divisions or departments. Building on the concept of the divisional updates in the annual report, these documents will provide team members the opportunity to reflect back on the year and think about all they have accomplished and what stands out. Natural resource management staff prepared a very good example in their 2014 Natural Resource Report. This combination of facts and images was a great success story to share with the JCPRD team and the community.

7.2.3. Coordinate Programming and Activity Resources Encourage and identify internal partnership opportunities to expand and enrich curriculum and activities. Cooperative programs will strengthen the JCPRD brand and enhance program value. Examples include: •

Safety and outdoor education and natural resource management staff should partner with Natureplay Preschool for enrich curriculum.

Wellness coordinator should partner with concessions staff in the offering of health food choices.

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7.3. Action: Expand Partnerships Partnerships have helped drive JCPRD’s success over the past 60 years. From the Sertoma Club of Johnson County’s support of the first Theatre in the Park to the work organizations such as KC Flying Disc Club and Urban Trail Co. are doing with disc golf and singletrack trails. Continued collaboration will be critical to carrying JCPRD’s legacy of high level services into the county’s future. Recently, JCPRD has expanded its opportunities for partnerships with other governmental agencies with the partnerships at the Meadowbrook Golf Course and County Club property and the Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center. As JCPRD looks to move these, and other, future partnership efforts forward, it is recommended to think beyond one-on-one partnerships and, whenever possible, create teams or communities of practice. Recommendations for the expansion of partnerships include: 7.3.1. Build Partnerships from the Inside Out 7.3.2. Strengthen Johnson County Partnerships 7.3.3. Create Communities of Practice to Guide Current Focus Areas

An early partnership, the Sertoma Club of Johnson County and JCPRD collaborated to develop the first Theatre in the Park

7.3.1. Build Partnerships from the Inside Out A strong base of engaged staff within JCPRD is needed to effectively manage and grow partnerships with Johnson County Government, municipalities, local non-profits, and private recreation service organizations. Involving JCPRD team members from a cross section of perspectives will encourage teamwork, foster ownership and confidence, and provide for varied perspectives and opinions on individual topics. When diverse team members are engaged, these individuals are equipped to manage partnership coordination and advocate for newly developed initiatives at multiple levels within JCPRD. This approach will increase organizational efficiency by managing communications among the individuals who will be primarily responsible for taking direct action. As communities of practice are established consideration should be given as to the appropriate department or staff member to lead the effort. Examples of potentially effective internal communities of practice include the evaluation of land acquisition opportunities, volunteer management, and event planning. 7.3.1.1. Evaluation of Land Acquisition Opportunities As JCPRD evaluates properties for acquisition, representatives from planning and development, park maintenance, natural resource management, park police, recreation programming and financial management

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can contribute varied perspectives. Their input can focus on anticipated costing and initial phases of development and management, necessary staffing levels and safety concerns, the potential to serve or host JCPRD core recreational services, and the long term economic viability of a purchase and/or financial commitment to site management. 7.3.1.2. Volunteer Management Planning for the engagement and management of a volunteer base to support the JCPRD can benefit from the shared insight of recreation program managers and staff, park maintenance employees, natural resource management and nature educators, as well as representatives from community relations staff. 7.3.1.3. Event Planning Previous sections include recommendations related to the coordination of scheduled events across departments within JCPRD. In addition to these improvements in coordination, a diverse focus group of JCPRD team members may contribute valuable perspectives as new events are initially planned. A regular process of incorporating feedback from park police, park managers, and maintenance staff can identify public safety concerns, capacity limits, maintenance efforts associated with clean up, and the total cost of an event. 7.3.2. Strengthen Johnson County Partnerships Aligned services provide opportunities for shared funding, joint programming, grant writing, and funding eligibility that are enhanced through partnership. A unified presence of county resources to the public could simplify the user process of identifying and locating appropriate county-wide offerings. JCPRD is working closely with Johnson County to operate the former King Louie building as the Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center, an effort that will also incorporate the Johnson County Museum. Based upon stakeholder engagement feedback from members of these groups, partnerships with several Johnson County departments may align with JCPRD’s immediate focus areas. •

JCPRD U, Natureplay Preschool, Children’s Services, 50 Plus, and Special Population programming aim to support healthy, engaged residents across all ages and abilities. These departments may benefit from collaboration with Johnson County Health and Environment, Human Services, and Developmental Supports.

JCPRD’s Planning and Development staff provides a valuable complement to Johnson County’s Facilities Management department which could positively impact the planning, design, construction and management projects for each agency and throughout the county.

A partnership with Johnson County Transit could result in initiatives capable of supplementing JCPRD trail and streamway development to provide a network of transportation facilities that decrease the county’s reliance on personal vehicles.

The county and JCPRD may be able to collaborate on the creation and management of a countywide innovation fund, a concept modeled by several cities including Boston, Detroit, and Austin to fund pilot projects such as green infrastructure, farmer’s markets, and wellness programming.

7.3.3. Create Communities of Practice to Guide Current Focus Areas The recommended approach to outside partnerships is to build teams around goals. The execution of initiatives should result in a mutual benefit to JCPRD and participating organizations through the provision of public services which further the missions of all participating stakeholders. A wide range of stakeholder types should be considered for their participation in JCPRD facilitated communities of practice, including: municipalities, the State of Kansas, Johnson County Government,

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schools, private recreation providers, and local social services. As these stakeholders collaborate with JCPRD they will bring with them expertise and influence related to such program elements as: funding, policy, management, and education. Incorporating the following partners into the example communities of practice listed below could advance the actions recommended within this Legacy Plan. The list below is not a complete collection of all appropriate partnerships and should continue to be amended to include key stakeholders and relationships that JCPRD deems appropriate. These communities are intentionally flexible in nature and expected to fluctuate in members and level of importance over time. 7.3.3.1. Natural Resources •

Johnson County Public Works

KC Wildlands

School Districts

Johnson County Planning and Codes

JCPRD Children’s Services

JCPRD Safety and Outdoor Education

State of Kansas (KDWPT)

JCPRD Natural Resource Management

7.3.3.2. Park Design, Construction, and Management •

Johnson County Public Works

Johnson County Facilities Management

KC Wildlands

Community Recreation and Athletic Providers

Parks and Recreation Foundation of Johnson County

JCPRD Planning and Development / Parks and Golf Courses

7.3.3.3. Streamway Trail System Development •

Mid-America Regional Council (MARC)

Johnson County Transit

Johnson County Health and Environment

Municipal Park and Recreation Departments

JCPRD Planning and Development / Parks and Golf Course

7.3.3.4. Social and Community Services •

Johnson County Human Services

United Community Services (UCS)

Chambers of Commerce

JCPRD Recreation Division

Healthcare Providers

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04

Capital Investment Plan

Defined objectives provide the framework for future growth


Capital Investment Plan

178-183

Legacy CIP Summary

184-195

Implementation

196-199


Capital Investment Plan

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4.01. Funding the Legacy The Legacy Plan identifies a framework of seven legacy elements to define the roles of JCPRD as a provider of parks and recreation services in Johnson County. Each legacy element contains a series of action items and recommendations to guide and strengthen these roles over the 15-year vision of this plan. The capital investment approach for 2016-2030 identified in this plan is focused on maintaining and protecting existing JCPRD resources, investing in new parks, trails, and recreation services, and establishing the operational investment necessary to support the district vision. This approach will allow JCPRD to move forward with a clear direction as a regional parks and recreation leader and innovator, and a stronger partner to Johnson County municipalities, stakeholders, and residents. Establishing this legacy for JCPRD, as detailed in the previous sections, will require additional funding support. While outside funding sources including grants, donations, and partnerships will provide opportunities to accelerate implementation timelines, the investment identified in this plan requires a steady and dedicated funding source for success. The level of additional funding received, along with outside funding and partnerships, will dictate the final timeline for the plan implementation. The following pages outline the anticipated costs of the Legacy Plan recommendations and a prioritized implementation approach to the Legacy Plan over the next 15 years. Capital Investment Approach Previous planning for JCPRD focused on growth and land acquisition as priorities for the district. This plan is focused more internally, with priorities to improve and enhance existing amenities and natural resources, establish strategies for long-term management and maintenance success, and continue development of streamway trails and previously acquired parkland. The estimated investment identified in this plan is $219.9 million in 2015 costs. It is recommended this investment be made to set JCPRD on solid ground for long-term, sustainable success in filling the regional parks and recreation roles identified in this document. The capital investment plan outlined on the following pages is based on a commitment to the stewardship of both existing and future parks, trails, and facilities.

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4.02. Investment Summary Overall Investment Summary Below are summaries of the overall capital investment organized by Legacy Element and by Cost Type. These summaries show the total and annual investment requirements for full implementation of the recommendations over the 15-year life of this plan. The Legacy Element summary breaks down the funding by the five significant capital elements, shows the annual investment for each, and outlines how they vary over the 15 years of this plan. Stewardship has been front-loaded to address deferred maintenance, while parks and trail development is more focused initially and increases as maintenance investment levels out. This distribution is more noticeable in the Cost Type summary where the Legacy Elements are combined into four cost type categories: New Development, Maintenance and Replacement, Operations, and Reinvestment in existing parks and facilities. This organizational alignment shows a steady investment through 2030 and reinforces the JCPRD focus on maintaining existing resources, and investing in parks, trails, and facilities for the future. The capital costs associated with the Identity and Teamwork elements are accounted for within the other five element summaries. For example, additional planning and development staff are accounted for within the summary of new parks funding, as their primary role is supporting these implementation recommendations.

Summary of Annual Investment by Legacy Element Total Capital Investments (2015 dollars)

Legacy Element

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

Regional Parks

$

81,529,620 $

8,439,159 $

5,767,239 $

3,029,489 $

3,773,239 $

2,956,989 $

4,192,239

Trails and Connectivity

$

57,783,620 $

1,369,150 $

1,934,250 $

3,834,470 $

1,260,000 $

3,364,750 $

3,453,000

Recreation

$

20,678,015 $

1,298,480 $

996,960 $

1,750,000 $

2,550,000 $

- $

1,500,000

Connection with Nature Stewardship

$

8,620,000 $

80,000 $

50,000 $

226,000 $

53,500 $

53,500 $

458,500

$ Budget Totals $

51,323,008 $ 3,419,730 $ 3,423,829 $ 3,213,890 $ 4,784,297 $ 6,373,530 $ 3,201,500 219,934,263 $ 14,606,519 $ 12,172,278 $ 12,053,849 $ 12,421,036 $ 12,748,769 $ 12,805,239

Summary of Annual Investment by Cost Type Total Capital Investments (2015 dollars)

Cost Type New Development

$

Percent of Capital Investment Total Maintenance and Replacement

Percent of Capital Investment Total

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2018

2019

2020

2021

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

103,382,370 $

$

60,589,298 $

$

17,768,500 $

$

38,194,095 $

28%

Percent of Capital Investment Total Reinvestment

2017 (2015 dollars)

47%

Percent of Capital Investment Total Operations

2016 (2015 dollars)

8% 17%

8,704,150 $ 60% 4,579,139 $ 31% 235,500 $ 2% 1,087,730 $ 7%

5,688,750 $ 47% 4,785,778 $ 39% 552,750 $ 5% 1,145,000 $ 9%

6,293,970 $ 52% 3,768,379 $ 31% 1,356,000 $ 11% 635,500 $ 5%

6,457,000 $ 52% 5,021,286 $ 40% 942,750 $ 8% - $ 0%

4,861,750 $ 38% 6,585,519 $ 52% 1,261,500 $ 10% 40,000 $ 0%

4,125,000 32% 4,048,489 32% 1,076,750 8% 3,555,000 28%


Investment Summary by Legacy Element The following pages provide an overview of the Legacy Plan capital investment organized by legacy element. Each element summary contains an overview of associated investment costs and identified priorities. Additional detail regarding distribution of costs within the element is provided to better convey the proposed implementation priorities. The summaries for each legacy element highlight key spending areas and describe investments according to four cost types. •

New Development - These costs include investments associated with the purchase, planning, and development of park and recreation assets within currently unopened properties.

Reinvestment - These costs refer to significantly improved assets within existing properties.

Maintenance and Replacement - These costs are related to addressing the backlog of deferred maintenance, adequately funding regular maintenance needs, and replacing aging park and facility features.

Operations - These costs describe areas such as staffing, equipment, and administrative functions. The operations costs shown represent an increased level of care, function or operational assets required to meet existing and proposed needs. These include vehicles, equipment, ADA improvements, etc.

summary by element

All capital investment costing included in this legacy element overview are shown in 2015 dollars.

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

$

2,787,739 $

4,432,239 $

6,143,239 $

4,158,239 $

7,158,239 $

9,192,989 $

8,403,239 $

6,443,604 $

4,651,739

$

2,108,000 $

4,963,500 $

4,526,000 $

5,286,000 $

6,383,500 $

2,657,000 $

3,651,000 $

4,600,000 $

8,393,000

$

2,900,000 $

- $

365,000 $

4,000,000 $

255,000 $

1,906,075 $

1,506,500 $

1,650,000 $

-

$

528,500 $

2,482,000 $

1,857,000 $

107,000 $

107,000 $

107,000 $

160,500 $

1,285,500 $

1,064,000

$ 4,733,232 $ 2,763,500 $ 2,798,500 $ 2,763,500 $ 2,783,500 $ 2,748,500 $ 2,783,500 $ 2,748,500 $ 2,783,500 $ 13,057,471 $ 14,641,239 $ 15,689,739 $ 16,314,739 $ 16,687,239 $ 16,611,564 $ 16,504,739 $ 16,727,604 $ 16,892,239

summary by cost type

The funding scenario depicted in the tables above and below represents full funding of the Legacy Plan capital investment recommendations.

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

$

2,405,000 $ 18%

$

5,420,721 $

$

1,076,750 $

$

4,155,000 $

42% 8% 32%

8,920,000 $ 61% 3,000,489 $ 20% 1,285,750 $ 9% 1,435,000 $ 10%

6,672,500 $ 43% 3,035,489 $ 19% 1,236,750 $ 8% 4,745,000 $ 30%

8,267,500 $ 51% 3,000,489 $ 18% 1,236,750 $ 8% 3,810,000 $ 23%

7,015,000 $ 42% 3,075,489 $ 18% 1,316,750 $ 8% 5,280,000 $ 32%

9,980,750 $ 60% 4,691,564 $ 28% 1,379,250 $ 8% 560,000 $ 3%

6,960,000 $ 42% 3,020,489 $ 18% 1,362,750 $ 8% 5,161,500 $ 31%

6,529,000 $ 10,502,000 39% 3,535,489 $ 21% 1,508,750 $ 9% 5,154,365 $ 31%

62% 3,020,489 18% 1,939,750 11% 1,430,000 8%

Capital investment priorities shift from an early focus on new development and deferred maintenance to an increase in reinvestment over the 15-year timeline of the Legacy Plan. Maintenance and replacement investments remain relatively consistent along with operations costs.

legacy plan | 183


Legacy Element

S U M M A RY

Regional Parks Undeveloped Parkland $ 54, 418, 000

total 15-year capital investment

$ 1,760, 000

spending area: master plans spending area: phase I development

$ 22, 035, 000

spending area: future phases

$ 14, 509, 750

spending area: acquisitions and operations

$ 16, 113, 250

spending by location

General Information A quarter of the capital investment budget is directed toward undeveloped parkland, which will provide new regional parks for the growing county along with the maintenance and park police to operate the parks. JCPRD currently owns 3,590 acres of undeveloped parkland located within the four proposed future park sites (4,358 total acres of proposed parkland), in addition to the approximately 80 acres at the Meadowbrook future park property. The 2,000 acre Sunflower Ordnance Works property is not currently owned by the Johnson County Park & Recreation District. Legacy Element Priorities An initial master plan is the highest priority for the future Big Bull Creek, Camp Branch, and Meadowbrook parks, as master plans currently exist for the Rieke Lake and Cedar Niles future park properties. Following this, the intent is to open each of the five currently owned properties to the public with a first phase of development, likely focused on trails and passive recreation amenities. The initial phase of development on each park site should meet the minimum development legacy standards identified in section 3.03. Once these assets are in place, future phases may establish additional features and amenities within these parks, as appropriate. The opening of each new park requires additional park maintenance staff and park police officers included in the operations costs. A secondary spending area is targeted land acquisition. This investment cost is anticipated to be occur after the five future park sites are opened to the public. Spending by 5-Year Period The relative percent of Undeveloped Parkland investment accomplished within each 5-year period is shown below. Future Big Bull Creek Park Future Camp Branch Park Cedar Niles Future Park Property Meadowbrook Future Park Rieke Lake Future Park Property Sunflower Ordnance Works 2021-2025

2016-2020

2026-2030

Capital Spending by Location Annual capital costs per location are color coded by primary spending area to show prioritization of undeveloped park investments. Total Capital Investments

Regional Parks Undeveloped Parkland Future Big Bull Creek Park Future Camp Branch Park Cedar Niles Future Park Property Meadowbrook Future Park Property Rieke Lake Future Park Property Sunflower Ordnance Works Parkland Acquisitions Parkland Operations Undeveloped Parkland SUBTOTAL Percent of CIP Total

184 | capital investment plan

(2015 dollars)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

8,845,000 5,920,000 8,759,750 5,450,000 6,210,000 1,920,000 3,000,000 14,313,250 54,418,000 25%

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

120,000 4,950,000 1,500,000 315,750 6,885,750 3%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,250,000 120,000 1,260,000 532,500 4,162,500 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,250,000 933,750 2,183,750 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,725,000 838,000 3,563,000 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,575,000 1,131,750 2,706,750 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

750,000 972,000 1,722,000 1%


Percent of Total Plan Cost

By Cost Type

By 5-Year Period

2016-2020 2021-2025 2026-2030

25%

40%

24%

36% 74% 24%

Undeveloped Parkland Investment

New Development Maintenance and Replacement

Operations Reinvestment

$8,283 average per acre investment in the four undeveloped parks

4,446 new acres of total parkland to be opened by 2030 (incl. 80 ac. Meadowbrook future park)

82% increase in open JCPRD parkland acreage by 2030 (incl. 80 ac. Meadowbrook future park)

summary by location

Green Heron and Turtle at Antioch Park - photo by MGE

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

972,000 972,000 0%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,535,000 1,450,000 1,052,000 4,037,000 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

500,000 1,265,000 500,000 1,038,000 3,303,000 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,100,000 1,038,000 3,138,000 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

750,000 1,118,000 1,868,000 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,000,000 750,000 1,834,750 2,000,000 2,000,000 1,038,000 8,622,750 4%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,000,000 1,000,000 500,000 1,000,000 1,038,000 4,538,000 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,500,000 500,000 120,000 1,184,000 3,304,000 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

500,000 1,800,000 1,111,500 3,411,500 2%

legacy plan | 185


Legacy Element

S U M M A RY

Regional Parks Existing Parks total 15-year capital investment

$ 27, 111, 620

spending area: existing master plan items

$ 15, 647, 535

spending area: legacy improvements

$ 6, 685, 500

spending area: planning,operations, and debt

$ 4, 778, 585

spending by location

General Information An investment into currently opened JCPRD parks and golf courses will assure these existing and well-visited amenities are kept in a high-quality condition, and patrons can enjoy new and improved features. There are reinvestment needs within JCPRD’s eight parks and two golf courses which must be addressed before these items begin to detract from the visitor experience. Delaying reinvestment will also add to the backlog of deferred maintenance items included in the Stewardship capital costs. The majority of the capital costs associated with existing JCPRD parks and golf courses is allocated to fund these reinvestment projects. These improvements will add to the amenities that existing parks with established and regular patronage can offer to visitors. Legacy Element Priorities According to the legacy standards, a current master plan is required for all parkland before significant development, including reinvestment, can occur. A district-wide priority for development within existing parks is updating the parks to include the legacy standards identified in the regional parks section of this plan (3.o1). In several parks this includes the construction of a large destination pavilion and the designation, or establishment, of natural areas as appropriate to site use. Individual park priorities include the continued implementation of existing master plans for Shawnee Mission Park, Heritage Park, and Antioch Park. Spending by 5-Year Period The relative allocation of existing park investments accomplished within each 5-year period is shown below. Antioch Park Golf Courses Heritage Park Kill Creek Park Mildale Farm Shawnee Mission Park Thomas S. Stoll Memorial Park Sunflower Nature Park 2021-2025

2016-2020

2026-2030

Capital Spending by Location Annual capital costs per location are color coded by primary spending area to show prioritization of existing park investments. Total Capital Investments

Regional Parks Existing Parks + Golf Courses Antioch Park Golf Courses Heritage Park Kill Creek Park Mildale Farm Shawnee Mission Park Thomas S. Stoll Memorial Park Sunflower Nature Park Planning, Operations, and Debt Exist. Parks + Golf Courses SUBTOTAL Percent of CIP Total

186 | capital investment plan

(2015 dollars)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

165,000 5,274,365 3,427,670 3,567,000 150,000 8,834,000 1,350,000 175,000 4,168,585 27,111,620 12%

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

437,170 72,000 769,000 275,239 1,553,409 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,000,000 299,500 305,239 1,604,739 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

490,500 80,000 275,239 845,739 0%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

210,239 210,239 0%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

250,239 250,239 0%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

40,000 750,000 165,000 150,000 1,050,000 315,239 2,470,239 1%


Percent of Total Plan Cost

By Cost Type

By 5-Year Period

2016-2020 2021-2025 2026-2030

16%

19% 52%

12%

32%

80%

Existing Parks Investment

New Development Maintenance and Replacement

Operations Reinvestment

5,422 acres currently developed parkland JCPRD will continue to manage

$4,028 average reinvestment per existing park acre (not including golf course acreage)

58% percent of funding identified for implementation of existing master plans

summary by location

Beach at Shawnee Mission Park

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

75,000 1,100,000 350,500 290,239 1,815,739 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

40,000 80,000 275,239 395,239 0%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

400,000 2,150,000 290,239 2,840,239 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

750,000 270,239 1,020,239 0%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

4,000,000 1,000,000 290,239 5,290,239 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

300,000 270,239 570,239 0%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

650,000 2,750,000 175,000 290,239 3,865,239 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

50,000 834,365 1,000,000 985,000 270,239 3,139,604 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

500,000 450,000 290,239 1,240,239 1%

legacy plan | 187


Legacy Element

S U M M A RY

Trails and Connectivity total 15-year capital investment

$ 57, 792, 620

s p e n d i n g a r e a : land acquisition by JCPRD

$ 18, 773, 000

s p e n d i n g a r e a : trailheads and connections

$ 2, 338, 980

s p e n d i n g a r e a : system growth through partnerships

$ 8, 600, 000 $ 28, 071, 640

s p e n d i n g a r e a : trail construction and operations

General Information A quarter of the total recommended capital investment plan costs are dedicated to meeting resident and partner interests in regional connectivity. These investments include acquisition and development of streamway trails and community connections to JCPRD parks and facilities.

spending by location

Legacy Element Priorities As trails are developed along streamways, the standards set in the MAP2020 comprehensive plan, including a 400 feet wide minimum corridor, are to be followed wherever possible. This development will allow for JCPRD protection and management of valuable habitat corridors, and provide an attractive and safe amenity to trail users. JCPRD will continue to pursue partnerships to develop these and other trails. The development of streamway segments within new parks, as a part of the first phase of development, will serve a dual function of opening undeveloped parkland and providing residents with highly-desired miles of trails and connectivity. Miles of Trails to be Developed in 15-Year Legacy Plan Time frame The total miles of trail to be developed within each streamway corridor during the 15-year window are shown below: 8 miles total 4.5 miles in future Big Bull Creek Park 6.2 miles total Camp Branch Streamway 2 miles in future Camp Branch Park Cedar Creek Streamway 4 miles in Cedar Niles future park property

Big Bull Creek Streamway

6.2 miles total 16.2 miles

Coffee Creek/ Blue River Streamway Kill Creek Streamway Little Bull Creek Streamway Rock Creek Streamway Turkey Creek Streamway

9.4 miles 12.9 miles 3 miles 3 miles

Capital Spending by Location Annual capital costs per location are color coded by primary spending area to show prioritization of connectivity investments. Total Capital Investments (2015 dollars)

Trails and Connectivity Big Bull Creek Streamway Camp Branch Future Park Streamway Cedar Creek Streamway Coffee Creek / Blue River Streamway Kill Creek Streamway Little Bull Creek Streamway Rock Creek Streamway Turkey Creek Streamway Connections Trail Operations Trails and Connectivity SUBTOTAL Percent of CIP Total

188 | capital investment plan

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

6,840,000 3,432,920 9,546,000 13,177,750 4,113,970 15,243,000 540,000 780,000 2,338,980 1,771,000 57,783,620 26%

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

297,150 582,000 330,000 160,000 1,369,150 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

789,770 65,000 275,000 100,000 628,980 75,500 1,934,250 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,335,000 225,000 1,233,970 40,500 3,834,470 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,182,000 78,000 1,260,000 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

426,000 450,000 418,750 1,512,000 180,000 300,000 78,000 3,364,750 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,164,000 1,041,000 540,000 600,000 30,000 78,000 3,453,000 2%


Percent of Total Plan Cost

By Cost Type

By 5-Year Period

2016-2020 2021-2025 2026-2030

20% 44%

97%

35%

26%

Trails and Connectivity Investment

New Development Maintenance and Replacement

Operations Reinvestment

79.8 new miles of streamway trail to be developed by 2030

$3,852,841 average annual investment in streamway system growth

2,676 acres estimated acres of streamway corridor habitat to be protected through streamway corridor acquisition summary by location

Fall Walk in Shawnee Mission Park - photo by MGE

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,050,000 950,000 30,000 78,000 2,108,000 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,126,000 600,000 3,084,000 153,500 4,963,500 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,367,500 2,040,000 118,500 4,526,000 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,282,500 525,000 500,000 2,800,000 60,000 118,500 5,286,000 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

900,000 825,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 2,480,000 60,000 118,500 6,383,500 3%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,746,000 650,000 261,000 2,657,000 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,460,000 1,000,000 191,000 3,651,000 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,800,000 822,000 1,427,000 360,000 191,000 4,600,000 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,920,000 1,800,000 3,522,000 900,000 60,000 191,000 8,393,000 4%

legacy plan | 189


Legacy Element

S U M M A RY

Recreation and Cultural Resources $ 20, 678, 015

total 15-year capital investment

$ 5, 965, 000

spending area: community space

$ 13, 157, 575

spending area: athletic facility

$ 1, 555, 440

s p e n d i n g a r e a : s a f e t y, a c c e s s , a n d o p e r a t i o n s

General Information JCPRD currently operates six indoor recreation facilities. Three of these have been added to the district since the last strategic planning effort in 2001. Two additional facilities are planned to be added in the next two years at the Meadowbrook property and the Johnson County Art and Heritage Center. The primary recreation and cultural resource capital needs include capital facility improvements, upgrading existing sports complexes, and investing in the Meadowbrook community center. This facility, along with the Johnson County Arts and Heritage Center, will fill a service gap in northeast Johnson County.

spending by location

Legacy Element Priorities The capital investment plan priorities include a focus on the Meadowbrook community center and reinvestment projects at Okun Fieldhouse, Mid-America Sports Complex, and Mid-America West Sports Complex. Spending by 5-Year Period The relative allocation of Recreation and Cultural Resource investments accomplished within each 5-year period is shown below.

Heritage Park (Sports Complexes) Meadowbrook Community Center Mid-America Sports Complex Mid-America West Sports Complex Okun Fieldhouse

2021-2025

2016-2020

2026-2030

Capital Spending by Location Annual capital costs per location are color coded by primary spending area to show prioritization of recreation investments. Total Capital Investments (2015 dollars)

Recreation + Cultural Resources Heritage Park Sports Complex Meadowbrook Community Center Mid-America Sports Complex Mid-America West Sports Complex Okun Fieldhouse Rec. + Cultural Resources SUBTOTAL Percent of CIP Total

190 | capital investment plan

$ $ $ $ $ $

5,400,000 5,765,000 4,117,575 4,561,960 833,480 20,678,015 9%

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

$ $ $ $ $ $

765,000 200,000 333,480 1,298,480 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $

200,000 796,960 996,960 0%

$ $ $ $ $ $

500,000 1,250,000 1,750,000 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $

2,550,000 2,550,000 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $

0%

$ $ $ $ $ $

1,500,000 1,500,000 1%


Percent of Total Plan Cost

By Cost Type

By 5-Year Period

2016-2020 2021-2025 2026-2030

28%

26%

32%

55%

9%

17% 42%

Recreation and Cultural Resources Investment

New Development Maintenance and Replacement

Operations Reinvestment

55 # of improved athletic fields

106,000 sf. estimated additional recreation and cultural resource programming space

94% percent of $14.3 million 2014 recreation division revenue was generated through the enterprise fund

summary by location

Summer Camp Swimmers

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

$ $ $ $ $ $

2,900,000 2,900,000 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $

0%

$ $ $ $ $ $

365,000 365,000 0%

$ $ $ $ $ $

1,000,000 3,000,000 4,000,000 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $

55,000 200,000 255,000 0%

$ $ $ $ $ $

1,406,075 500,000 1,906,075 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $

1,506,500 1,506,500 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $

500,000 1,150,000 1,650,000 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $

0%

legacy plan | 191


Legacy Element

S U M M A RY

Connecting with Nature total 15-year capital investment

$ 8, 620, 000

spending area: outdoor education space

$ 4, 405, 000

s p e n d i n g a r e a : vehicular + facility improvements

$ 2, 575, 000

spending area: planning and operations

$ 1, 640, 000

General Information

spending by location

While the Connecting with Nature capital costs make up a relatively small percentage of the legacy budget, this Legacy Element is a priority for JCPRD. The implementation of the proposed investments will support larger capital costs such as regional park and streamway trail development and operations. Appropriate management of natural areas will maximize ecosystem returns associated with the parks’ ability to manage stormwater, improve air quality, and increase county property values. Connecting with Nature capital costs include funding for natural resource management staff and reinvestment in existing environmental education facilities. Capital costs associated with this element include the additional phases of improvements at Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center and TimberRidge Adventure Center, the development of Oakridge Farm and a destination nature playground. This playground is included in this Legacy Plan as a district-wide cost, to be constructed in a JCPRD park within the next 1o years. Legacy Element Priorities An updated natural resource management plan and an additional resource management staff position are the early priorities for capital spending within this element. Following this, investments are recommended to enhance native landscape areas and outdoor education spaces as well as improved indoor facility spaces necessary to accommodate visitors and animal holding. Within the plan additional natural resource management staff are planned every four years, and placement of these staff will align with regional maintenance facilities and the opening of undeveloped parkland. Spending by 5-Year Period The relative allocation of Connecting with Nature investments accomplished within each 5-year period is shown below. Ernie Miller Park and Nature Center Oakridge Farm TimberRidge Adventure Center 2016-2020

2021-2025

2026-2030

Capital Spending by Location Annual capital costs per location are color coded by primary spending area to show prioritization of nature connection investments. Total Capital  Investments  Connecting with Nature Ernie Miller Park + Nature Center Oakridge Farm TimberRidge Adventure Center Destination Playground/ Facility Planning and Operations Connection with Nature SUBTOTAL Percent of CIP Total

192 | capital investment plan

(2015 dollars)

$                      925,000 $                  1,500,000 $                  2,185,000 $                  2,500,000 $                  1,510,000 $                  8,620,000 4%

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

$                       ‐ $                       ‐ $            80,000 $                       ‐ $                       ‐ $            80,000 0%

$            50,000 $                       ‐ $                       ‐ $                       ‐ $                       ‐ $            50,000 0%

$                       ‐ $                       ‐ $                       ‐ $                       ‐ $          226,000 $          226,000 0%

$                       ‐ $                       ‐ $                       ‐ $                       ‐ $            53,500 $            53,500 0%

$                       ‐ $                       ‐ $                       ‐ $                       ‐ $            53,500 $            53,500 0%

$          275,000 $                       ‐ $          130,000 $                       ‐ $            53,500 $          458,500 0%


Percent of Total Plan Cost

By Cost Type

By 5-Year Period

2016-2020 2021-2025

5%

17% 6%

2026-2030

32%

4% 18%

59%

Connecting with Nature Investment

63%

New Development Maintenance and Replacement

Operations Reinvestment

2009 most recent resource management plan published

$8.94M annual stormwater management value of JCPRD parks (The Trust for Public Land)

6 FTE total natural resource dedicated staff by 2030

summary by location

TimberRidge Adventure Center

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

$          100,000 $          375,000 $                        ‐ $                        ‐ $            53,500 $          528,500 0%

$                        ‐ $       1,125,000 $                        ‐ $       1,250,000 $          107,000 $       2,482,000 1%

$                        ‐ $                        ‐ $          500,000 $       1,250,000 $          107,000 $       1,857,000 1%

$                        ‐ $                        ‐ $                        ‐ $                        ‐ $          107,000 $          107,000 0%

$                        ‐ $                        ‐ $                        ‐ $                        ‐ $          107,000 $          107,000 0%

$                        ‐ $                        ‐ $                        ‐ $                        ‐ $          107,000 $          107,000 0%

$                        ‐ $                        ‐ $                        ‐ $                        ‐ $          160,500 $          160,500 0%

$                        ‐ $                        ‐ $       1,125,000 $                        ‐ $          160,500 $       1,285,500 1%

$          500,000 $                        ‐ $          350,000 $                        ‐ $          214,000 $       1,064,000 0%

legacy plan | 193


Legacy Element

S U M M A RY

Stewardship total 15-year capital investment

$ 51, 323, 008

spending area: site maintenance

$ 11, 624, 762

spending area: shelter and facility maintenance

$ 10, 071, 280

spending area: roads, trails, and infrastructure

$ 25, 392, 966 $ 4,234, 000

spending area: planning, operations, equipment

General Information A combination of high visitation and limited funding has resulted in a backlog of deferred maintenance and capital replacement items throughout the district. The Stewardship capital investments focus on taking care of existing JCPRD assets and establishing a foundation for long-term maintenance. These investments provide a critical balance to the new development projects included in the other legacy elements. District-wide programs such as pavement repair, shelter replacement, and ADA improvements will contribute to the set of standards for care of JCPRD parks, trails, and facilities.

spending by location

Legacy Element Priorities The focus of stewardship capital investment is to address deferred maintenance items within the first five to seven years of the Legacy Plan. District-wide priorities include drives and parking lots, walks and trails, off-leash areas, shelters, playgrounds, and lake improvements. The site, amenities, and infrastructure maintenance spending areas summarized above, and keyed into the table below, represent deferred maintenance capital costs. The development of a maintenance and management plan for this district is a priority in this 15-year plan. Spending by 5-Year Period The percent allocation of individual and district-wide park investments accomplished within each 5-year period is shown below. Regional Parks Golf Courses Streamway Trails Indoor Facilities

2021-2025

2016-2020

Capital Spending by Location

2026-2030

Annual capital costs per location are color coded by primary spending area to show prioritization of stewardship investments. Total Capital Investments (2015 dollars)

Stewardship Antioch Park Ernie Miller Park + Nature Center Golf Courses Heritage Park Kill Creek Park Shawnee Mission Park Thomas S. Stoll Memorial Park Mill Creek Streamway Mid America West Sports Complex Mildale Farm Mill Creek Activity Center New Century Fieldhouse Okun Fieldhouse Planning, Operations, and Equipment Stewardship SUBTOTAL Percent of CIP Total

194 | capital investment plan

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

128,000 242,500 1,737,450 4,010,160 86,000 2,305,232 360,000 169,500 865,550 417,300 530,585 220,000 1,023,375 39,227,356 51,323,008 23%

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

98,000 235,000 330,000 236,800 179,825 2,340,105 3,419,730 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

7,500 330,650 655,560 30,000 134,750 2,265,369 3,423,829 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

30,000 95,500 266,000 381,775 60,000 2,380,615 3,213,890 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,028,500 675,300 75,000 381,775 357,300 90,000 2,176,422 4,784,297 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

445,000 1,800,000 86,000 146,800 42,000 169,500 216,010 220,000 933,375 2,314,845 6,373,530 3%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

210,000 213,000 2,778,500 3,201,500 1%


Percent of Total Plan Cost

By Cost Type

By 5-Year Period

2016-2020 2021-2025 2026-2030

27%

23%

41%

98% 32%

Stewardship Investment

New Development Maintenance and Replacement

Operations Reinvestment

30-year shelter replacement schedule; assumes 2 shelters per yr.

48-year pavement renovation cycle; includes overlay every 16 yrs. and sealing every 4 years.

5 new maintenance regions

summary by location

Buttonbush and Bumblebee - photo by MGE

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

(2015 dollars)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

631,800 876,160 324,772 102,000 2,798,500 4,733,232 2%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,763,500 2,763,500 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,798,500 2,798,500 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,763,500 2,763,500 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,783,500 2,783,500 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,748,500 2,748,500 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,783,500 2,783,500 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,748,500 2,748,500 1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,783,500 2,783,500 1%

legacy plan | 195


4.03. Implementation

Archery Programming at TimberRidge Adventure Center

Staying on Target Many factors, both inside and outside JCPRD’s control, will define the implementation of this vision. The realization of the framework action items will address needs and desires of the Johnson County community and establish a solid foundation for long-term JCPRD success. To accomplish this measured implementation, it is important that JCPRD maintain a focus on overall need-based priorities. These priorities are: •

Deferred Maintenance - Focus on addressing deferred and recurring maintenance items not currently included in existing capital funding.

Operational Support - Provide the staffing and resources needed to manage existing and future resources.

New Development - Implement a first phase of the master plans for the undeveloped parklands, continue acquisition and development of streamway trails, and reinvestment into existing parks, trails, and facilities.

Capital funding is the driving factor in overall implementation and the ability to balance each of these priority areas over 15 years and beyond. While annual funding levels can only be estimated, balanced allocation of resources according to the priorities identified above will best equip JCPRD to build the foundation for subsequent years and realize the Legacy Plan.

196 | capital investment plan


Funding Implementation of the proposed Legacy Plan is estimated to require $340 - $365 million in capital funding over 15 years based on an anticipated 5% CPI annual escalation of the $219.9 cost in 2015 dollars, and annual funding available for implementation. Current funding sources for implementing the Legacy Plan total approximately $109 million in escalated value. These include the existing mill levy funding allocation for capital projects, scheduled debt payoff starting in 2019, a gift to be invested in Kill Creek Park, and the TIF investment from Prairie Village towards the development of the Meadowbrook future park property. On August 13, 2015 the Johnson County Board of County Commissioners approved a 0.75 mill levy increase for JPCRD in the 2016 county budget. This increase has the potential to provide an additional $136 million in escalated funding for the district over the 15 years of this plan. Table 4.01 below provides a summary of anticipated funding available to JPCRD for implementation of the Legacy Plan for the next 15 years. This anticipated funding total of $245.1 million will meet the need of approximately 67% of the funding required to implement the full Legacy Plan by 2030. The remaining plan improvements will require an extended timeline and/ or additional funding sources to complete. Table 4.01 - Funding Summary

Anticipated 15-Year Capital Investment Funding Funding Analysis Escalated at 5% CPI Growth 15 Year Plan 2016-2030

Anticipated Funding Source

Estimated Funding and Costs

CIP Portion of Existing Mill Levy $ 65,092,436 Funding from Mill Levy Increase $ 136,252,348 Scheduled Debt Payoff $ 36,783,400 Kill Creek Park Donor Gift $ 1,000,000 Meadowbrook Park TIF Funding $ 6,000,000 Total Funding $ 245,128,184 Capital Program Total* $ 365,844,073 Percent of Program Funded 67 % Unfunded Capital Program within $ 120,715,889 15-Year Capital Plan * Total based on 15-year anticipated annual available funding with unfunded capital program costs escalated at same rate as year 2030.

Additional Funding Approach Debt financing is an additional tool that may allow for accelerated implementation of certain plan elements. Preliminary study of debt funding scenarios indicates there is an opportunity to fund more investment earlier in the 15-year window, but the debt service significantly reduces available funding over the second half of the plan’s life. It is recommended that opportunities for debt funding be explored further.

legacy plan | 197


Implementation Priorities Table 4.02 shows how the need-based priorities guide the recommended funding investment over the 15 years of this plan. A focus on addressing maintenance needs and investing in existing JCPRD parks and facilities is reflected in the recommendations for these cost types. Recommendations for new parks and trails are prioritized based on need and providing public access to these amenities. Future phases of park development along with a significant percentage of the streamway corridor acquisition and trail development fall outside the available funding within the 15-year window of this plan. The following pages contain funding summaries showing more detailed priorities and recommendations for capital investment for each of the Legacy Elements. As noted in the need-based priority discussion, many factors will define the final implementation of this plan, and annual priories should be identified and reviewed by JCPRD through the CIP process. The following pages are an attempt to identify a balanced approach to meeting the priority needs and goals of the Legacy Plan within the anticipated annual capital funding available to JCPRD over the 15-year period from 2016-2030. Full implementation worksheets for each Legacy Element are included in the plan appendix.

Table 4.02 - Funding Priorities

Capital Investment Funding Priorities 15 Year Funding

Funding by Cost Type 15 Year Plan 2016-2030

Percent of

Percent of

Total Costs

Total Investment

Plan Total *

total funding **

$ 76,906,082

21%

$ 37,757,584

49%

15%

New Streamway Trails

$106,914,564

29%

$ 37,804,755

35%

15%

New Operations

$ 28,291,707

8%

$ 27,244,967

96%

11%

Reinvestment

$ 66,235,340

18%

$ 54,821,498

83%

23%

Maintenance

$ 87,499,380

24%

$ 87,499,380

100%

36%

Legacy Plan Subtotal

$ 365,844,073

100%

$ 245,128,184

72%

100%

Total Plan

Percent of

Escalated Costs

Opening New Parks

*of $365M

198 | capital investment plan

**of $245M


Year # Escalation Rate

1 5%

2 5%

3 5%

4 5%

5 5%

6 5%

7 5%

Summary of Annual Investment by Legacy Element Summary by Legacy Element

Legacy  Element

Total Capital  Investments 

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

Regional Parks 

$           115,988,557 $           8,603,068 $           3,610,900 $           1,038,520 $               568,813 $           1,046,203 $           4,712,960 $           1,343,658 $           5,351,

Trails and Connectivity

$           104,724,764 $           1,437,608 $           1,674,422 $           2,784,088 $               642,966 $           1,078,139 $           1,435,242 $           2,856,414 $                 96,0

Recreation

$              32,482,270 $           1,363,404 $           1,099,148 $           1,447,031 $           3,099,541 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               184,

Connection with Nature Stewardship

$              14,049,289 $                 84,000 $              98,599,193 $           3,838,254 Budget Totals $           365,844,073 $         15,326,333 Year # 1 Escalation Rate 5% Anticipated Funding Totals $           238,128,184 $           9,330,778 6 7 9 $          (5,995,555) 10 difference 8$          (127,715,889) 5% 5% 5% 5% 5%

Summary by Legacy Element Meadowbrook Funding

$                6,000,000 $           6,000,000 Kill Creek Park Gift $                1,000,000 ($120,715,889) $4,445

2021

2022 Regional Parks 

summary by element

Summary by Cost Type  Legacy  Element 2023

(Escalated)

$                 65,030 $           6,831,506 $         11,207,856 4 5% $         11,208,742 13 $                      885 5%

$                 68,281 $           9,576,298 $         11,768,921 5 5% $         11,769,179 14 $                      258 5%

$               614,434 $           5,590,209 $         12,352,846 6 5% $         12,357,638 15 $                   4,792 5%

$               743,653 $           8,025,020 $         12,968,745 7 5% $         12,975,520 15 $                   6,775 5%

$           3,667, $           5,745, $         15,045,3

$         15,051,4 $                   6,0

$1,000,000 $830

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 Unfunded $           115,988,557 $            8,603,068 $            3,610,900 $            1,038,520 $                568,813 $            1,046,203 $            4,712,960 $            1,343,658 $           5,351,7

(Escalated)

Summary of Annual Investment by Cost Type

2021

$               261,623 $           4,755,686 $         10,286,948 3 5% $         10,287,183 12 $                      235 5%

Total Capital  Investments 

Total Capital  (Escalated) (Escalated) $            104,724,764 $            1,437,608 Investments  $           4,712,960 $           1,343,658 $           5,351,784$               $            2,420,882 $           2016 2,132,335 Recreation 32,482,270 1,363,404 (Escalated) (Escalated) Cost Type $           1,435,242 $           2,856,414 $                 96,035$               $            2,691,554 $                  $           1,767,351 Connection with Nature 14,049,289 84,000 New Development $           183,817,646 $           9,139,358 $                             ‐ $                            ‐ $               184,682$               $            3,839,537 $           3,838,254 8,413,241 Stewardship 98,599,193 50% 60% Percent of Capital Investment Total Budget Totals 365,844,073 $          15,326,333 $               614,434 $               743,653 $            3,667,044$            $            2,880,816 $                174,292 $               87,499,380 $            4,797,584 Maintenance and Replacement 24% $           6,254,955 31% $           5,590,209 Percent of Capital Investment Total $           8,025,020 $           5,745,824 $           6,011,397 Operations $               28,291,707 $          $                247,275 Anticipated Funding Totals 238,128,184 $            9,330,778 $         12,352,846 $         12,968,745 $         15,045,369$            $          17,844,187 18,742,173 difference $          (127,715,889) 8% $          (5,995,555) 2% Percent of Capital Investment Total Reinvestment 66,235,3409 $          $            1,142,117 6 $         12,975,5207 $         15,051,4218$               10 $         12,357,638 $         17,851,911 18,744,506 18% 7% 6,000,000 6,000,000 5% Percent of Capital Investment Total 5% $                   6,052 5%$                 5% $            5% $                   4,792 $                   Meadowbrook Funding 6,775 $                    7,724 $                    2,333 Kill Creek Park Gift $                1,000,000 ($120,715,889) $4,445 Anticipated Funding Totals $            238,128,184 $           9,330,778 Budget Totals $           365,844,073 $         15,326,333 Difference $          (127,715,889) $          (5,995,555) Summary by Cost Type  (Escalated) Trails and Connectivity (Escalated)

$                 55,125 $           4,356,891 $         10,796,487 2 5% $           9,797,317 11 $             (999,170) 5%

(Escalated) (Escalated) $            1,674,422 $            2,784,088 2017 6,957,528 $           2018 7,285,913 $           1,099,148 1,447,031 (Escalated) (Escalated) $           5,361,914 $           2,635,419 $                  55,125 $                261,623 $           3,669,947 $           4,231,119 $                436,137 $           4,755,686 3,423,037 $            4,356,891 34% 41% $          10,796,487 $          10,286,948 $                183,006 $                192,157 $            5,254,771 $            3,750,418 49% $           7,125,060 36% $           6,738,737 $                609,407 $          $            1,569,740 $            9,797,317 $          10,287,183 $          19,677,322 20,661,586 $             (999,170) 6% $                      235 15% $            1,262,363 $                735,671 11 $          12 $          19,681,732 20,665,818 12% 7% 5% $                   4,233 5% $                   4,410 $1,000,000 $830 $         10,287,183 $           9,797,317 $         10,796,487 $         10,286,948 $             (999,170) $                      235

Meadowbrook Funding $                6,000,000 $           6,000,000 Total Capital  Kill Creek Park Gift $                 1,000,000 $            1,000,000 2023 2024 2025 2026 2016$4,445 2017 Investments  ($120,715,889) (Escalated) (Escalated) (Escalated) (Escalated) (Escalated)$830

2022

Cost Type

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

$           4,712,960 $           1,343,658 $           5,351,784$            $            2,420,882 $            $           9,139,358 2,132,335 183,817,646 2021 New Development 2022 2023 2024 2025 $            1,435,242 Percent of Capital Investment Total $            2,856,414 $                  96,035 $            2,691,554 1,767,351 50% $            60% (Escalated) (Escalated) (Escalated) (Escalated) (Escalated) Maintenance and Replacement 87,499,380 $                             $                             $                184,682$               $            3,839,537 $            $           4,797,584 8,413,241 $            2,802,140‐ $            3,693,639‐ $            5,917,209 $            4,653,985 $            3,461,401 Percent of Capital Investment Total 24% 31% $               614,434 23% $               743,653 28% $           3,667,044 39% $           2,880,816 26% $               174,292 18% Operations 7,541,910 $           4,332,709$               28,291,707 $                247,275 $            $           5,353,861 5,590,209 $            $           8,025,020 $           5,745,824 $            $           4,593,129 6,011,397 $            $           4,755,262 6,254,955 Percent of Capital Investment Total 8% 2% 43% $         12,968,745 58% $         15,045,369 29% $         17,844,187 26% $         18,742,173 25% $         12,352,846 Reinvestment 66,235,340 $           1,442,948 $           1,515,095 $           1,899,638$               $            1,918,605 $            $           1,142,117 2,014,535 18% 7% 12% Percent of Capital Investment Total 12% 13% 11% 11% $         12,357,638 $         12,975,520 $         15,051,421 $         17,851,911 $         18,744,506 $           2,753,897 $               218,101 $           2,895,813 $           6,678,468 $           8,510,974 $                   4,792 $                    6,775 $                    6,052 $                    7,724 $                    2,333 Anticipated Funding Totals 22% 2% 19%$           238,128,184 37% $           9,330,778 45% Budget Totals $           365,844,073 $         15,326,333 Difference (127,715,889) (5,995,555) $         12,357,638 $         12,975,520 $          15,051,421$           $          17,851,911 $           $         18,744,506

(Escalated)

$           3,669,947 6,957,528 $            2026 $            5,361,914 34% (Escalated) $            5,254,771 $                436,137 $            7,559,700 49% $               183,006 38% $                609,407 $            $           5,110,789 6,738,737 6% 26% $         19,677,322 $            $           1,262,363 2,252,089 12% 11% $         19,681,732 $           4,754,743 $                    4,410 $           9,797,317 24% $         10,796,487 $              (999,170) $         19,681,732

2027 2018

(Escalated) (Escalated)

$           4,231,119 7,285,913 $            2027 $            2,635,419 41% (Escalated) $            $           3,750,418 3,423,037 $            6,227,132 36% $               192,157 30% $            1,569,740 $            $           8,258,055 7,125,060 15% 40% $         20,661,586 $                735,671 $           2,476,935 7% 12% $         20,665,818 $           3,699,464 $                    4,233 $         10,287,183 18% $         10,286,948 $                       235 $         20,665,818

(Escalated) (Escalated) $                642,966 $            1,078,139 2019 8,714,517 $                             $           2020 6,713,057‐ $           3,099,541 (Escalated) (Escalated) $           2,418,345 $           1,251,317 $                  65,030 $                  68,281 $           4,003,841 $           1,760,949 $           6,831,506 2,840,730 $           9,576,298 4,256,853 36% 15% $          11,207,856 $          11,768,921 $                302,647 $            2,545,202 $            6,058,097 $            8,346,891 54% $           8,005,853 71% $           7,415,315 $            1,145,919 $          $            1,610,029 $          11,208,742 $          11,769,179 $          21,691,554 22,772,282 $                      885 10% $                      258 14% $                             $                  51,051 13‐ $          14 $          21,699,109 22,784,064 0% $                 11,782 0% 5% 5% $                   7,555

(Escalated) (Escalated) $            1,435,242 $            2,856,414 2022 $           2021 6,000,054‐ $                             $         49,488,366 $                             ‐ (Escalated) (Escalated) $           7,484,141 $         69,109,809 $                614,434 $                743,653 $           2,802,140 $           3,693,639 $                             ‐ $           8,025,020 2,078,928 $            5,590,209 23% 28% $          12,352,846 $          12,968,745 $            2,100,757 111,223 $            5,353,861 $                $            7,541,910 43% $                             58% $           8,328,186 ‐ $            1,442,948 $        $            1,515,095 $          12,357,638 $          12,975,520 $          23,913,139 120,788,326 $                   4,792 12% $                   6,775 12% $            2,753,897 15 $               218,101 15 $          23,923,268 22% 2% 5% $      (120,788,326) 5% $                 10,129

$                 96,0

2023

$               184,6

(Escalated)

$           3,667,0 $           5,917, $           5,745,8 $          15,045,3 $            4,332,

$            1,899, 15,051,4 $          $                   6,0 $           2,895,

$         11,208,742 $         11,769,179 $         12,357,638 $         12,975,520 $         15,051,4 $         11,207,856 $         11,768,921 $         12,352,846 $         12,968,745 $         15,045, $                      885 $                      258 $                   4,792 $                   6,775 $                   6,

2028 2019

(Escalated) (Escalated)

$           4,003,841 8,714,517 $            2028 $            2,418,345 36% (Escalated) $            $           6,058,097 2,840,730 $            6,095,361 54% $               302,647 28% $            1,145,919 $            $           5,509,385 7,415,315 10% 25% $         21,691,554 $                             $           2,569,668‐ 0% 12% $         21,699,109 $           7,517,140 $                    7,555 $         11,208,742 35% $         11,207,856 $                       885 $         21,699,109

2029 2020

(Escalated) (Escalated)

$           1,760,949 6,713,057 $            2029 $            1,251,317 15% (Escalated) $            $           8,346,891 4,256,853 $            1,795,798 71% $           2,545,202 8% $            1,610,029 $            $           7,783,972 8,005,853 14% 34% $         22,772,282 $                  51,051 $           2,987,222 0% 13% $         22,784,064 $         10,205,290 $                  11,782 $         11,769,179 45% $         11,768,921 $                       258 $         22,784,064

2030 2021

(Escalated) (Escalated)

$           2,802,140 6,000,054 $            2030 $            7,484,141 23% (Escalated) $            5,353,861 $                             $          10,550,561‐ 43% $           2,100,757 44% $            1,442,948 $            $           6,052,547 8,328,186 12% 25% $         23,913,139 $            $           2,753,897 2,985,861 22% 12% $         23,923,268 $           4,324,171 $                  10,129 $         12,357,638 18% $         12,352,846 $                    4,792 $         23,923,268

Unfunded 2022 (Escalated)

2023

(Escalated)

$         49,488,366 $            3,693,639 Unfunded $          69,109,809 28% (Escalated) $            7,541,910 $            2,078,928 $        108,255,507 58% $               111,223 90% $            1,515,095 $                             $                            ‐‐ 12% 0% $       120,788,326 $                218,101 $           1,046,740 2% 1%

(Escalated)

$           5,917,2 3 $           4,332,7 2 $           1,899,6 1 $           2,895,8 1

$         11,486,078 $      (120,788,326) $          12,975,520 10% $         15,051,4 $         12,968,745 $         15,045,3 $                   6,775 $                   6,0

$         12,352,846 $         12,968,745 $         15,045,369 $         17,844,187 $         18,742,173 $         19,677,322 $         20,661,586 $         21,691,554 $         22,772,282 $         23,913,139 $       120,788,326 6,000,000 6,000,000 $                   4,792 $                   Meadowbrook Funding 6,775 $                   6,052$                 $                    7,724 $            $                    2,333 $                   4,410 $                   4,233 $                   7,555 $                 11,782 $                 10,129 $      (120,788,326) Kill Creek Park Gift $                1,000,000 $           1,000,000 ($120,715,889) $4,445 $830

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

$           2,802,140 23% $           5,353,861 43% $           1,442,948 12% $           2,753,897 22%

$           3,693,639 28% $           7,541,910 58% $           1,515,095 12% $               218,101 2%

$           5,917,209 39% $           4,332,709 29% $           1,899,638 13% $           2,895,813 19%

$           4,653,985 26% $           4,593,129 26% $           1,918,605 11% $           6,678,468 37%

$           3,461,401 18% $           4,755,262 25% $           2,014,535 11% $           8,510,974 45%

$           7,559,700 38% $           5,110,789 26% $           2,252,089 11% $           4,754,743 24%

$           6,227,132 30% $           8,258,055 40% $           2,476,935 12% $           3,699,464 18%

$           6,095,361 28% $           5,509,385 25% $           2,569,668 12% $           7,517,140 35%

$           1,795,798 8% $           7,783,972 34% $           2,987,222 13% $         10,205,290 45%

$         10,550,561 44% $           6,052,547 25% $           2,985,861 12% $           4,324,171 18%

$       108,255,507 90% $                            ‐ 0% $           1,046,740 1% $         11,486,078 10%

summary by cost type

2021 (Escalated)

Unfunded

$         12,357,638 $         12,975,520 $         15,051,421 $         17,851,911 $         18,744,506 $         19,681,732 $         20,665,818 $         21,699,109 $         22,784,064 $         23,923,268 $         12,352,846 $         12,968,745 $         15,045,369 $         17,844,187 $         18,742,173 $         19,677,322 $         20,661,586 $         21,691,554 $         22,772,282 $         23,913,139 $       120,788,326 $                   4,792 $                   6,775 $                   6,052 $                   7,724 $                   2,333 $                   4,410 $                   4,233 $                   7,555 $                 11,782 $                 10,129 $      (120,788,326)

legacy plan | 199


Summary of Annual Investment by Location

Undeveloped Parkland  Future Big Bull Creek Park Future Camp Branch Park Cedar Niles Future Park Property Meadowbrook Fututre Park Property Rieke Lake Future Park Property Sunflower Ordnance Works Undeveloped Parkland SUBTOTAL Percent of CIP Total

Streamway Trails Big Bull Creek Streamway Camp Branch Streamway Cedar Creek Streamway Coffee Creek Streamway Connections Kill Creek Streamway Little Bull Creek Streamway Mill Creek Streamway Rock Creek Streamway Turkey Creek Streamway Percent of CIP Total Streamway Trails SUBTOTAL Percent of CIP Total

Existing Parks and Golf Courses Antioch Park Golf Courses Heritage Park Kill Creek Park Mid‐America Sports Complex Mid‐America West Sports Complex Shawnee Mission Park Thomas S. Stoll Memorial Park Sunflower Nature Park Percent of CIP Total ting Parks and Golf Courses SUBTOTAL Percent of CIP Total

Indoor Facility Ernie Miller Park + Nature Center Meadowbrook Community Center Mildale Farm Mill Creek Activity Center New Century Fieldhouse Okun Fieldhouse Timber Ridge Activity Center TimberRidge Adventure Center Indoor Facility SUBTOTAL Percent of CIP Total

Johnson County Park & Recreation  District District‐Wide

Total Capital  Investments 

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated

$              15,511,374 $              10,599,409 $              17,241,996 $              13,886,214 $              10,195,185 $                3,991,542 $             71,425,720 20%

$               126,000 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           6,000,750 $           1,575,000 $                            ‐ $           7,701,750 50%

$           1,378,125 $               132,300 $                            ‐ $               220,500 $               264,600 $                            ‐ $           1,995,525 18%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,447,031 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,447,031 14%

$               261,334 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           3,099,541 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           3,360,875 30%

$               682,811 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               682,811 6%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,366,898 $                            ‐ $           1,366,898 11%

$               309,562 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               309,562 2%

$           1,891 $           2,267 $                     $                     $                     $                     $           4,159

Total Capital  Investments 

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated

$              13,549,355 $                5,717,967 $              17,561,610 $              23,941,181 $                3,901,491 $                5,764,351 $              31,689,102 $                   216,330 $                1,122,621 $                1,477,088 0% $           104,941,094 29%

$                            ‐ $               312,008 $                            ‐ $               611,100 $               168,000 $               346,500 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           1,437,608 9%

$                            ‐ $               870,721 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               693,450 $               110,250 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           1,674,422 16%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,389,150 $               318,347 $                            ‐ $           1,076,591 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           2,784,088 27%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               273,489 $                            ‐ $               369,477 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $               642,966 6%

$                            ‐ $               543,696 $                            ‐ $               304,712 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               216,330 $                            ‐ $               229,731 2% $           1,294,469 11%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,395,040 $                 40,203 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           1,435,242 12%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,477,455 $                 42,213 $           1,336,745 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           2,856,414 22%

$                     $                     $                 96 $                     $                     $                     $                     $                     $                     $                    

$                 96

Total Capital  Investments 

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated

$                   395,762 $              11,439,692 $              19,690,389 $                6,180,178 $                7,736,829 $                7,923,927 $              24,650,107 $                2,409,139 $                   363,812 0% $             80,789,835 22%

$               102,900 $               346,500 $               459,029 $                 75,600 $                            ‐ $               210,000 $           1,266,329 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           2,460,358 16%

$                            ‐ $               364,542 $                            ‐ $           1,102,500 $                            ‐ $               878,648 $           1,263,193 $                 33,075 $                            ‐ 0% $           3,641,958 34%

$                 34,729 $                            ‐ $               678,368 $                 92,610 $                            ‐ $               441,952 $               518,167 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           1,765,827 17%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,250,148 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               464,050 $           1,031,070 $                 91,163 $                            ‐ 0% $           2,836,431 25%

$                            ‐ $               567,945 $           2,297,307 $               109,760 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               397,597 $                 53,604 $                            ‐ 0% $           3,426,213 29%

$                 53,604 $                            ‐ $           1,286,492 $               221,116 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               210,239 $           1,692,541 $                            ‐ 0% $           3,463,991 28%

$               105,533 $               889,006 $           1,232,845 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               143,524 $           1,688,077 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           4,058,985 31%

$                     $               650 $                     $                     $                     $               184 $           1,990 $                     $                    

$           2,825

Total Capital  Investments 

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated

$                1,858,844 $                                ‐ $                   704,772 $                   613,068 $                   280,782 $                2,548,727 $                3,988,924 $                                ‐ $                9,995,118 3%

$               246,750 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               188,816 $                            ‐ $               350,154 $                 84,000 $                            ‐ $               869,720 6%

$                 63,394 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               148,562 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               211,956 2%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                 69,458 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                 69,458 1%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               434,300 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               109,396 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               543,696 5%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               275,690 $               280,782 $           1,191,249 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,747,721 15%

$               368,526 $                            ‐ $               201,014 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               174,212 $                            ‐ $               743,753 6%

$               140,710 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               140,710 1%

$                     $                     $                     $                     $                     $                     $                     $                     $                    

Total Capital  Investments 

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated

$              98,692,306 $           2,856,898 $           3,272,627 $           4,220,544 $           3,823,888 $           4,617,708 $           5,342,961 $           5,603,074 $           7,964 District‐Wide SUBTOTAL $             98,692,306 $           2,856,898 $           3,272,627 $           4,220,544 $           3,823,888 $           4,617,708 $           5,342,961 $           5,603,074 $           7,964 Percent of CIP Total 27% 19% 30% 41% 34% 39% 43% 43%

legacy plan | 200


‐       ‐        ‐ ,040 ,203        ‐        ‐        ‐        ‐        ‐ 0% ,242 12%

)

,604       ‐ ,492 ,116        ‐        ‐ ,239 ,541        ‐ 0% ,991 28%

)

,526       ‐ ,014        ‐        ‐        ‐ ,212        ‐ ,753 6%

)

summary by location

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

$               309,562 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               309,562 2%

$           1,891,143 $           2,267,894 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           4,159,037 28%

$                            ‐ $           1,962,430 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,962,430 11%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,694,050 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,694,050 9%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           2,197,786 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           2,197,786 11%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,791,367 $                            ‐ $           1,791,367 8%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               544,481 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               544,481 2%

$           1,507,223 $                            ‐ $           1,559,196 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           3,066,419 13%

$           9,355,177 $           6,236,785 $         11,246,482 $           3,118,392 $           5,197,320 $           3,991,542 $         39,145,698 32%

Unfunded

Unfunded

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,477,455 $                 42,213 $           1,336,745 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           2,856,414 22%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                 96,035 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $                 96,035 1%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,760,758 $               930,797 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           2,691,554 15%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               855,170 $                            ‐ $                 97,734 $               814,447 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           1,767,351 9%

$               427,585 $                            ‐ $           1,411,030 $           1,710,339 $               102,620 $           1,710,339 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           5,361,914 27%

$           2,096,662 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               538,757 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           2,635,419 13%

$           2,418,345 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           2,418,345 11%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,132,521 $               118,796 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           1,251,317 5%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           3,742,071 $           3,742,071 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           7,484,141 31%

$           8,606,763 $           3,991,542 $           8,307,397 $         12,045,310 $           2,099,717 $                            ‐ $         31,689,102 $                            ‐ $           1,122,621 $           1,247,357 1% $         69,109,809 57%

Unfunded

summary by location

)

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

(Escalated)

2022

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

$               105,533 $               889,006 $           1,232,845 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               143,524 $           1,688,077 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           4,058,985 31%

$                            ‐ $               650,080 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               184,682 $           1,990,573 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           2,825,335 19%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           3,467,219 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               372,319 $               210,239 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           4,049,776 23%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           3,526,557 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           4,886,684 $               210,239 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           8,623,480 46%

$                            ‐ $           4,275,848 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                 94,069 $               342,068 $               210,239 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           4,922,224 25%

$                            ‐ $           2,693,784 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           2,525,109 $                            ‐ $               210,239 $               538,757 $                            ‐ 0% $           5,967,889 29%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,225,672 $                            ‐ $           2,840,730 $                            ‐ $           3,510,125 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           7,576,527 35%

$                 98,997 $           1,651,986 $           1,979,932 $           1,979,932 $           2,276,921 $                            ‐ $           2,160,472 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $         10,148,238 45%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,039,464 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           1,561,542 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0% $           2,601,006 11%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           2,286,821 $           1,559,196 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           8,211,766 $                            ‐ $               363,812 0% $         12,421,596 10%

Unfunded

2022

summary by location

      ‐        ‐        ‐        ‐ ,898        ‐ ,898 11%

2023

(Escalated)

summary by location

)

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

$               140,710 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               140,710 1%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               775,664 $                            ‐ $               775,664 4%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               897,928 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               897,928 4%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $           2,227,423 $                            ‐ $           2,227,423 10%

$           1,039,464 $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $               727,625 $                            ‐ $           1,767,089 7%

$                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ $                            ‐ 0%

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

Unfunded

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

(Escalated)

,961 $           5,603,074 $           7,964,962 $           8,364,762 $           6,657,292 $           7,195,398 $         11,160,349 $           9,905,315 $           8,600,823 $           8,994,483 $               111,223 ,961 $           5,603,074 $           7,964,962 $           8,364,762 $           6,657,292 $           7,195,398 $         11,160,349 $           9,905,315 $           8,600,823 $           8,994,483 $               111,223 43% 43% 53% 47% 36% 37% 54% 46% 38% 38% 0%

legacy plan | 201

JCPRD Legacy Plan  

A comprehensive framework for achieving the Johnson County Park & Recreation District’s mission to enhance the quality of life in Johnson Co...

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