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Jobcentre Plus Services for Schools

V4 January 2014


Contents:

The Local Labour Market Job notifications How to look for work Where to look for work Jobs in Europe Apprenticeships Creating the perfect CV Covering letter Application process Interviews Self Employment Work Experience Volunteering Nottingham Jobs Fund (NJF) Top 10 tips for job hunting

DWP cannot guarantee the availability or accuracy of data and information in the following cases: 1 on any linked website: 2 We are not responsible for the results of you using the information or services on linked websites; 3 that the links to any linked websites will work all of the time;

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School Engagement

Department for Work and Pensions


The Local Labour Market: Key Sectors in Nottingham January 2014 Health/ Social Care – 210 vacancies • Care Assistant / Home Carer • Support Worker / Child Care • Community Care Call Centre/Customer Service – 127 vacancies • Inbound / Outbound • Contact Centre / Theatre Tickets • Centre Supervisor 3

Department for Work and Pensions


The Local Labour Market: Key Sectors in Nottingham January 2014 Sales - 716 vacancies: Sales Person / Sales Executive •Energy Sales Rep / Sales •Door to Door Sales Construction - 234 vacancies: •Track Worker / Plumber •Plasterer / Bricklayer •Welder

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Department for Work and Pensions


Job Notifications: • As at January 2014, there were 4,313 jobs advertised for the Nottingham area. • On average, 1,700 jobs are placed every week for this area including temporary, permanent, full and part time hours

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Department for Work and Pensions


Job Notifications: Key Recruiting Times

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March:

Retail jobs for Easter/Springtime Airport jobs in readiness for the summer season, Tourism / Leisure

July:

Graduate posts

Sept/Oct:

Retail / Hospitality for Christmas

Year Round :

University posts, Care posts Construction posts – dependant on existing projects

Jan / Apr / Sep:

Teaching Posts Department for Work and Pensions


How to look for work: It is worth remembering that: • 78% of recruitment companies advertise vacancies online • There are currently around 1000 online Job Boards in the UK • To make sure you keep up with the latest vacancies, you will need to: - find ways of having access to the internet - have your own e-mail address - know how to find vacancies; and - fill in the application online

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Department for Work and Pensions


How to look for work: Finding Internet Access If you have access to the internet visit: www.ukonlinecentres.com If not a few suggestions are: Use UK online centres which are based in your community. To find your nearest centre call 0800 77 1234 Your local library, Friends or relatives or some of our partners offer customers access to computers and the internet 8

Department for Work and Pensions


Where to look for work: There are various ways to look for work, internet sites, newspapers, shop windows, employment agencies, Jobcentre Plus, friends, family and speculative approaches to employers. Jobcentre Plus advertises thousands of jobs from employers across the UK and abroad. You can search for these jobs at: www.gov.uk/jobs-jobsearch There’s also a website for jobs across Europe, at: www.eures.europa.eu

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Department for Work and Pensions


Where to look for work: There are many websites that advertise jobs and offer employment information. Here are some of the most commonly used internet sites: www.gov.uk/jobs-jobsearch www.totaljobs.com www.jobsite.co.uk www.jobs.co.uk www.redgoldfish.co.uk www.graduate-jobs.com www.monster.co.uk www.fish4.co.uk www.jobsword.co.uk www.prospects.ac.uk www.tda.gov.uk 10

Department for Work and Pensions


Where to look for work: Company websites - many employers now advertise vacancies online and ask you to apply online. Local and national newspapers and trade journals find out what day your local newspaper advertises jobs. Employment agencies – many employers use Employment Agencies to recruit staff. You can look for agencies in the Yellow Pages, or use the website of the Recruitment and Employment Confederation: www.rec.uk.com

Digital channels - download job applications to your mobile and search on digital TV Word of mouth - ask family and friends 11

Department for Work and Pensions


Where to look for work: Approaching employers directly many jobs are never advertised. You could e-mail or write to an employer (and attach your CV) asking if they have jobs. Apprenticeships – offer both work and training combined. Find out what’s on offer at: www.apprenticeships.org.uk Self-employment – maybe you have thought about working for yourself? For more advice go to www.nationalenterprisenetwork.org or www.gov.uk/starting-up-a-business 12

Department for Work and Pensions


Where to look for work: Where else can you look for jobs? Internet Newspapers Trade magazines Employment Agencies Training Providers Jobcentre Plus website: www.gov.uk

Jobseeker Direct: 0845 606 0234

Jobcentre Plus Office 13

Department for Work and Pensions


Where to look for work: Social Media • Facebook is a social network connecting friends/contacts. • People can use Facebook to help with Jobsearching. • Join at www.facebook.com •Twitter Instantly connect to what's important to you. • Follow friends, experts, celebrities, and breaking news. • See www.twitter.com

Universal Jobmatch • A new vacancy website, launched 19th November 2012 • One of the largest job sites in Europe. • Jobseekers can upload their CV on it. • System will automatically search for suitable job matches

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Department for Work and Pensions


Where to look for work Universal Jobmatch You can use this service by visiting: www.gov.uk/jobsearch to make sure you can use all of the features you need to create an account in the following way: Get an email address if you don’t already have one (you cannot use an email address that you share with anyone else) Visit www.gov.uk/jobsearch Set up a Government Gateway Account if you don’t already have one (when you visit www.gov.uk/jobsearch, you can follow a link to set up this account) Keep a note of your Government Gateway user ID and password as you will need them every time you log in to Universal Jobmatch 15

Department for Work and Pensions


Where to look for work: Over 175 million professionals use LinkedIn to exchange information, ideas and opportunities • Stay informed about your contacts and industry • Find the people & knowledge you need to achieve your goals • Control your professional identity online • Join here: www.uk.linkedin.com 16

Department for Work and Pensions


Where to look for work: Points to consider in our digital age… • Employers now use social media to vet potential employees so you need to be very careful about what you put on Facebook, Twitter, Yammer etc. • If you are a party animal, think twice before posting photos or comments, no matter how much fun you had! • Once you are employed, a misplaced comment could lead to disciplinary action against you and possibly lead to you losing your job.

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Department for Work and Pensions


Jobs In Europe: Ever thought about working abroad? • The European Union’s principle of free movement of workers means that you can get a job in any country of the European Union, as well as in Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein (also known as the EEA countries) and Switzerland. • Only around 2% of European citizens live and work in a different Member State different to that of their country of origin. Yet, there are many benefits to working abroad. •The EURES website, www.eures.europa.eu is an easy way to find information on jobs and learning opportunities throughout Europe. 18

Department for Work and Pensions


Working In Europe: • The

purpose of the EURES website is to provide information, advice and recruitment / placement (jobmatching) services for the benefit of workers and employers wishing to benefit from the principle of the free movement of persons. • There are currently 1,004,836 jobseekers and 29,379 organizations registered! 19

Department for Work and Pensions


Working in Europe: • It contains job vacancies in 31 European countries, CVs from interested candidates, what you need to know about living and working abroad and much more brought to you by the EURES network. • You can register for free with "My EURES“, create your CV and make it available to both registered employers and to EURES Advisers matching employers to suitable candidates. 20

Department for Work and Pensions


Apprenticeships: What do you know about apprenticeships??? • Apprentices do real jobs for real employers. • Apprenticeships are aimed at people over 16 years old who are capable of achieving a Vocational Qualification. • There are over 100,000 employers offering Apprenticeships in more than 160,000 locations; there are more than 250 different types of Apprenticeships available offering over 1,400 job roles.

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Department for Work and Pensions


Apprenticeships: How old do you have to be? There is no upper age limit for people who wish to apply for Apprenticeship Vacancies, however funding is normally only available for ages 16-24.

Do I need qualifications? No, often employers require no previous qualifications or experience

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Department for Work and Pensions


Apprenticeships: Where can I do an apprenticeship? Apprenticeships are available in various trades including hairdressing, care, retail, admin, construction etc. How much will I earn? The current apprentice National Minimum Wage is £2.68 per hour. However, as skills develop, many employers tend to increase wages – in fact, research has found that apprentices earn an average of £170 net pay per week. 23

Department for Work and Pensions


Apprenticeships: How long will an apprenticeship last? Apprenticeships typically take between one and four years to complete, depending on the type of framework. There is no set time to complete an Apprenticeship as they vary widely in content and size. The length of time taken will depend on the ability of the individual apprentice and the employer's requirements.

Do I achieve a qualification? Apprentices work towards a work-based qualification such as a National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) and other nationally recognised qualifications. Get started by visiting: www.apprenticeships.org.uk 24

Department for Work and Pensions


World Skills UK: World Skills UK features national and international skills competitions: • Students from across the UK undertake competitions to progress through the heats. • The finals take place at the Skills Show NEC, winners may represent Team UK in the World Skills Competition. • There are over 55 skills competitions in 5 sectors. • The competition re-opens on 10th February 2014 • For more information see: http://worldskillsuk.apprenticeships.org.uk/ 25

Department for Work and Pensions


Creating the perfect CV! A Curriculum Vitae (or CV for short!) is a personal statement of your details, qualifications, experience, interests etc. It is often the first thing an employer will see so needs to be a good representation of you. • A good CV should be no more that 2 sides of A4 and only contain pertinent information about you. • Here are some things that don’t need to go on a CV…. Date of Birth Ethnicity Religion Photo 26

Nationality Marital Status Dependants

Department for Work and Pensions


Creating the perfect CV! Click on the links below to: Create a great CV: www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/jobkit-cv-writing.pdf

Top 5 CV tips: www.career-advice.monster.co.uk/cvs-applications/cv-advice/top-5cv-tips/article.aspx

CV Library: www.cv-library.co.uk

CV Templates: www.jobs.ac.uk/careers-advice/cv-templates

National Careers Service CV: www.nationalcareersservice.direct.gov.uk/tools/cv/Pages/default.aspx

Graduate CV Templates: www.prospects.ac.uk/example_cvs.htm 27

Department for Work and Pensions


Covering Letter: A covering letter usually accompanies a CV and acts as an introduction. Here are some points to consider… • Keep it to one side of A4. • Use plain white or cream paper and envelopes. • If replying to an advert, include the job title and reference. •Address the letter with the person’s name, if you know it, and end it ‘Yours sincerely’. • If you don’t know their name, address it ‘Dear Sir/Madam’ and end it ‘Yours faithfully’. 28

Department for Work and Pensions


Covering Letter: • It can be changed according to the job you are applying for e.g. if retail, you can emphasise any customer service skills you may have. • Showcase different skill sets. • Include additional points not previously mentioned on your CV e.g. why this particular type of work is of interest to you.

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Department for Work and Pensions


Application Process: Application Forms There tends to be 3 main types of application forms:- Online - Competency based - Basic / standard non-competency based However before you do anything be aware of the following‌

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Department for Work and Pensions


Application Process: Remember: • Make sure you read any instruction first e.g. what colour pen the form has to be completed in • If an application form is to be completed in writing, make sure you write clearly and in your own handwriting. • If possible get 2 forms in case you make a mistake or do a rough draft first. • Complete every section, an employer may think that you have missed it rather than you thinking it doesn’t apply. Use personal skills from hobbies and interests not just work related evidence. 31

Department for Work and Pensions


Application Process: Remember: • Read

through before submission to check for any errors e.g. spelling • Online applications may be timed so make sure you have allocated yourself enough time and won’t be disturbed. • Competency applications are about you so remember to use ‘I’ not ‘We’. It is ok to refer to an example of team working, but you must state what your role was within it. • For referees, use head teachers name if still at school or an employer if you are working. But get their permission first. 32

Department for Work and Pensions


Application Process: Telephone Application / Interview • Make sure you know the name of the person you need to speak to. • Speak clearly. • Have all the information to hand, including a couple of relevant questions. • Have a pen and paper to hand. • Make sure you are somewhere quiet (not on a bus) and make sure you have enough credit on your phone if dialling from a mobile. 33

Department for Work and Pensions


Interviews: There are different interview types: group, individual and telephone. Before any type of interview you need to be prepared…… • Research the company, try to have 2-3 points that you can quote. • Make sure you know where you need to be in advance. Do a trial run if possible. • Arrive approximately 10 minutes early to settle yourself. •Dress smartly. 34

Department for Work and Pensions


Interviews: • Know who to ask for on arrival. • Consider your body language, keep eye contact, offer a firm handshake and try not to fidget. • Take your CV, any relevant certificates etc. • Prepare a couple of questions as it is likely that you will be asked if you have any at the end. If your questions have been answered during the interview, just say so. • During a group interview you may all be asked to perform a task. Try to include all members and get involved as much as you can. It is to assess how you work as part of a team. 35

Department for Work and Pensions


Self Employment: • There is a lot of help available for all budding young entrepreneurs. • Anyone can become self-employed and become their own boss. • Self employed people are responsible for their own tax and national insurance contributions and requires selfmotivation and determination to succeed. • See www.gov.uk for more information. • If aged 18 – 30, you can also contact the Princes Trust on 0115 845 6495 or www.princes-trust.org.uk who can offer advice, guidance and funding 36

Department for Work and Pensions


Work Experience What is Work Experience?

• Work experience is an opportunity to introduce you to the reality of working life within a willing organisation, to help you secure and sustain employment • The aim is to provide learning and insight into working life by exposing you to a variety of tasks and experiences. • This will be for a limited period of time during which you will have an opportunity to learn directly about the working environment • You will not be paid for the duration of the placement 37

Department for Work and Pensions


Work Experience What are the benefits of work experience? The specific aims and objectives of work experience will vary according to your individual needs, but there are many common benefits: • It can help you relate the knowledge and skills you are

developing at school to the world of work; • Develop vocational skills; • Increase your understanding of economic and industrial issues, citizenship, environmental and health education; • Help you to develop increased maturity, self confidence, flexibility, self reliance and the ability to work with others. 38

Department for Work and Pensions


Work Experience Enable you to clarify your thoughts and make decisions about your future career choices. • Looks good on your CV • Work related reference / referee • See the skills and behaviours employers want from people • See how the skills you may already have can be adapted to the workplace 39

Department for Work and Pensions


Work Experience How can I find a placement? • Speak to your school, enquire if they have a list of local companies that can provide placements • Research local companies that you would like to do work experience with. If they have a website it may have details of whether they offer work experience, and how to apply. If not contact them by letter/email, attaching your CV, asking if they can offer you a placement • Ask family and friends if the company they work for is able to offer you a placement • If you are claiming Jobseekers Allowance your Jobcentre will have a Work Experience programme. It is voluntary, you are not paid by the employer/host, but retain all of your benefit entitlement and travel expenses are paid. Speak to your Jobcentre adviser for further details. 40

Department for Work and Pensions


Volunteering : • Volunteering is a great way to obtain the skills and experience required to enter the world of work. • Employers also appreciate the fact that applicants have given their time and energy to benefit others without being paid for it. • See www.ncvs.org.uk for a list of volunteering opportunities or arrange your own. • Volunteering can be done with any kind of organisation. 41

Department for Work and Pensions


Nottingham Jobs Fund: • These

jobs are open to unemployed City Residents aged 18+ on an out of work benefit. • The fund pays up to 50% of the wages for the 1st year and covers a wide range of jobs from IT Technicians to Warehouse Operatives. • Experience is not usually necessary. Ask your local Jobcentre for the latest jobs or visit: www.nottinghamjobs.com 42

Department for Work and Pensions


Top 10 Tips for job hunting! 1. Be prepared at all times 2. Have fresh, clean, ironed interview clothes ready 3. Be on top of personal grooming so you look the part 4. Have a bag prepared with CVs, pens, note paper etc 5. Have a professional email address 6. Be careful what you put about yourself on social media sites 7. Have a business like voicemail 8. Let all your contacts know you are seeking work 9. Always answer the phone politely‌it could be an employer! 10. Stay positive. 43

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Finally, good luck!

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Department for Work and Pensions

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