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2017 ANNUAL REPORT

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“Federation is the American Jewish Community’s answer to the age-old Jewish search for the right organization form to meet the problems of its economic and socially needy, and promote and enhance Jewish group values. The Jewish component [is] the recognition of the need for each Jew to help every other Jew. The American contribution is a genius for organization and the emphasis on voluntary participation. The combination creates an indigenous instrument, capable of harmonizing and utilizing the energies and goodwill of even so sensitive, stubborn, individualistic and intelligent a group as we American Jews are.” HENRY L. ZUCKER EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, JEWISH COMMUNITY FEDERATION, 1946-1975

CONTENTS 4 Impact at a Glance

19 Our Beneficiaries

6 Care for Our Community

20 Total Grantmaking from the Jewish Federation of Cleveland

9 Build a More Vibrant Global Jewish Community

21 Thank You to Our Sponsors

12 Respond in Times of Crisis

22 2017 Board of Trustees

15 Build the Next Generation of Leaders

23 2017 Standing Committees

18 Giving to Our Campaign for Jewish Needs

24 2017 Volunteer Leadership Award Winners

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2017 ANNUAL REPORT


FEDERATION STAFF STEPHEN H. HOFFMAN, PRESIDENT ADMINISTRATION

Erika Rudin-Luria, Senior Vice President, CSO Tammy Rubin

Lisa Lebowitz Jill Pupa Barbara Wade

DEVELOPMENT TEAM

INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Hedy P. Milgrom, Senior Vice President, CDO Alan D. Gross, Vice President Abbie Levin, Vice President Shelley Milin Marcus, Assistant Vice President Ann Garson, Managing Director Carol Wolf, Managing Director Terry Amon Jessie Bruder R. Michael Cole Ellen Fishman Lisa Hacker Nancy Kaleal Matthew Kaliff Leora Lanzola Daniel Larson Lisa Lebovitz Joyce Lisiewski Leah Markowicz Linda McFarland Matthew Newman Caryn Schuster Jennifer Schwarz Christine Sebrasky Janet Schwartz Shapiro Reneé Tyler Francesca Parente Williams Debra Yasinow

DONOR SERVICE OPERATIONS CENTER Allison Levine, Managing Director Rosie Brown Caitlin Ford Jill Jacobson Diane Kopac Rima Melman

FISCAL

Daniel Strom, CIO, Managing Director Paul Gajowski Chris Jacobs Richard Henry Allen Roth Laura Steinberg Kavya Suram Michael Walton

INTERNATIONAL, COMMUNITY AND GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Oren Baratz, Senior Vice President Amy Kaplan, Assistant Vice President Jessica Cohen, Managing Director Ilanit Gerblich Kalir, Managing Director Mirit Balkan Joanne Davis Toby Holub Debbie Klein Sally Levine Jackie Reed Tal Rothstein Kelly Sperber Rubanenko

MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Robert Berick, Managing Director Nichole Avramovich Sean Benjamin Tracy Bergen Steve Chupnick Rebecca Golsky Aaron Heft Mike Kostechak Sylvia Owen Bryan Thomas William Pearce (Temp)

OPERATIONS

Barry Reis, Senior Vice President, CFO Annette Banks Kari Blumenthal Brett Cochran Heather Colbert-Eckert Debbie Duval Paul Feinberg Michelle Golan Estie Heifetz Nancy Hoffner Bonnie Huston Angela Kane Zulmarie Maldonado Faye Matitia Lori Miller Kellie Mirabile Sharon Newman Katie Palus Kathy Roeder Manya Smilovich Ariel Solowitch Irina Temkin Bruno Verbanac Howard Wolf Alan Wood

Grant Fish Ron Hale Judy Joffe Naomi Landis Laura Sue Mirabile John Mirabile

PLANNING, ALLOCATIONS & COMMUNITY SERVICE

Melanie Halvorson, Managing Director Rabbi Akiva Feinstein Shelley Fishbach Jayme Honigman Stephanie Kahn Leah Kasmenn Taylor Pat Keating Rabbi Alan Lettofsky Ellen Miller Anna Novik Aviva Roland Ali Schwartz Dana Scott Rabbi Edward Sukol Margot Tomer

HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MANDEL LEADERSHIP EXCELLENCE CENTER Tami Caplan, Vice President Naomi Fein Diane Fistek

2017 was a year of continued growth and meaningful community impact for the Jewish Federation of Cleveland. On the following pages, you’ll find just some of the stories and statistics from the past year that reflect the lifechanging results we can deliver together in Cleveland, Israel, and around the globe. As the excerpt from Henry Zucker’s retirement speech on the previous page explains, the collective and inclusive nature of the Federation provides Jewish Cleveland with the unique ability to create the scale necessary to drive meaningful societal change — and respond in times of crisis — in ways no individual could do alone. Similarly, as the only organization in Jewish Cleveland that takes responsibility for the long-term health and vitality of the entire community, Federation is the catalyst for innovative solutions and integrated services that exceed the capability of any one community resource. We are proud of and continue to build upon the impressive track record started more than 115 years ago as the most effective and efficient way for community members to make an immediate and sustainable impact. Together, with your continued support, we are able to build a stronger Jewish Cleveland and vibrant global community. Together, with the talent and energy of our beneficiary agencies, we are addressing the immediate needs of our people, while preparing for our future. Together, we can. Thank you for your continued support of Jewish Cleveland.

VOLUNTEER CENTER (PEI & JVN) Sydney Goldstein Susan Hyman Jessica Semel Jeanne Shatten

WITH SPECIAL THANKS TO JFC SECURITY, LLC James Hartnett, Director Jeff Robertson, Deputy Director James Abramowski

To our friends and neighbors,

Al Buckley Paul Mazzola David Moughan Brady Rieman

Scott Safenovitz John Senn Keith Weinbrenner

GARY L. GROSS

STEPHEN H. HOFFMAN

BOARD CHAIR

PRESIDENT

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IMPACT AT A GLANCE

$435,000 $0 2012

2017

Allocated to Security from the Campaign for Jewish Needs

2,249 Number of community volunteers with the Federation

772

Number of individuals in Cleveland enrolled in the Holocaust Survivors program as of December 31, 2017

Agencies coordinated to help community members in financial distress

34 13

2015

2017

$32,738,328

Total dollars raised during the 2018 Campaign for Jewish Needs

5x

51, 4

MEALS SERVED to local seniors in the Jewish community

4

1,037

2017

INCREASE in St. Petersburg’s Jewish community participation since 1998

666

2015

25%

INCREASE

of PJ Library enrollments from 2012 to 2017

2017 ANNUAL REPORT

Number of unique participants engaged in Young Leadership Division

2015 2017

77 254

Leadership positions available in Young Leadership Division


During this time of reflection for the Jewish people, the period between Rosh Hashanah (the Jewish New Year) and Yom Kippur (the Jewish Day of Atonement), we, the undersigned, want to share our vision for Greater Cleveland and our country that we are committed to upholding: A Cleveland and a nation where all live, work, worship, and play together in peace and tolerance.

20,308

2017

A Cleveland and a nation where hate and bigotry are condemned and denounced. A Cleveland and a nation where we build bridges of understanding and collaboration among all people. A Cleveland and a nation where we, together, sustain and defend the fundamental values upon which America was established.

18,772

2012

Number of Jews who have made Aliyah to Israel from countries like Russia, Ukraine, and France

$4, 23,727 Dollars raised during the 2018 Campaign for Jewish Needs by Jewish Cleveland women

1,517 1,131

Number of people* served by the Cleveland Chesed Center

2016

2017

746

Number of undergraduate Jewish students on Greater Cleveland campuses that have engaged with Hillel this year

*unduplicated

Families living in Cleveland’s sister community of Beit Shean and Valley of Springs who have benefited from Youth Futures

572 2012

Together we can ensure the world we live in is the one we want for all of us. Together we pledge to work towards this vision­— for ourselves, our families, our communities, our city, our region, and our nation.

Jewish Federation of Cleveland U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown

Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge

John R. Kasich, Governor

U.S. Senator Rob Portman

Congressman Dave Joyce

Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish

Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur

Mayor Frank G. Jackson, Cleveland

Congressman Jim Renacci Congressman Tim Ryan Clifford A. Rosenberger, Speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives Fred Strahorn, Minority Leader of the Ohio House of Representatives Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof

State Representative Nickie Antonio

Mayor Richard Bain, Pepper Pike

State Representative Janine Boyd

Mayor Ann Womer Benjamin, Aurora

State Representative Nicholas J. Celebrezze

Mayor Susan Drucker, Solon Mayor Merle S. Gorden, Beachwood

State Representative Kathleen Clyde

Ohio Senate Minority Leader Kenny Yuko

State Representative Dave Greenspan State Representative Stephanie Howse

State Senator Matt Dolan

State Representative Sarah LaTourette

State Senator John Eklund

State Representative Bill Patmon

State Senator Gayle Manning

State Representative Tom Patton

State Senator Sandra Williams

State Representative Dan Ramos State Representative John M. Rogers, Esq. State Representative Kent Smith

Mayor Susan Infeld, University Heights Mayor Earl Leiken, Shaker Heights Mayor Kathy Urdang Mulcahy, Orange Village Mayor Susan C. Renda, Village of Moreland Hills Mayor Cheryl L. Stephens, Cleveland Heights Mayor Georgene Welo, South Euclid

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Agudath Israel of America-Ohio Office AJC Cleveland Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple Anti-Defamation League Asian Services In Action B’nai Jeshurun Congregation Baldwin Wallace University Beachwood Kehilla Beth Israel – The West Temple Bethany Presbyterian Church Case Western Reserve University Christ Episcopal Church Christ Presbyterian Church, Chesterland Christ United Church, Olmsted Falls Christians United for Israel (CUFI) Church of the Covenant Church of the Redeemer UMC Church of the Saviour, United Methodist Church of the Western Reserve, Presbyterian Church USA Cleveland Council on World Affairs Cleveland Hillel Cleveland Neighborhood Progress Cleveland State University Congregation Shaarey Tikvah Cory United Methodist Church Cuyahoga Community College Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs, Diocese of Cleveland Elizabeth Baptist Church Esperanza, Inc. Federation of India Community Associations of N.E. Ohio First Presbyterian Church of Ashtabula First Presbyterian Church Willoughby First Unitarian Church of Cleveland (UU) – Shaker Heights Forest Hill Church, Presbyterian Garfield Church of the Nazarene Garfield Memorial Church GateWay Church, Aurora Global Cleveland

Grace Presbyterian Church, Lakewood Greater Love Missionary Full Gospel Baptist Church Green Road Synagogue Heights Christian Church Hillel at Kent State Hispanic Alliance, Inc. Hispanic Roundtable Independence Presbyterian Church, Independence Jewish National Fund JHub John Knox Presbyterian Church, North Olmsted Justice and Witness Ministries: United Church of Christ Kol HaLev:  Cleveland’s Reconstructionist Jewish Community Kol Israel Foundation Lakewood Presbyterian Church LGBT Community Center of Greater Cleveland Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry Lyndhurst Community Presbyterian Church Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage Mandel Jewish Community Center Masjid Bilal of Cleveland Mentor Presbyterian Church Mount Olive Baptist Church NAACP - Cleveland Branch #3176 National Council of Jewish Women NEO House Church Network, C&MA New Life Cathedral Baptist Church Noble Road Presbyterian Church North Coast District, The United Methodist Church Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) Notre Dame College Oheb Zedek-Cedar Sinai Synagogue Ohio Jewish Communities

ORT America Orwell North Presbyterian Church Philemon Community Baptist Church Presbytery of the Western Reserve River of Life Community Church Rocky River Presbyterian Church St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church Starlight Baptist Church Suburban Temple-Kol Ami Temple Emanu El The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints The City Club of Cleveland The Diversity Center of Northeast Ohio The Korean Central Presbyterian Church of Cleveland The Northeastern Ohio Synod Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) The Old Stone Church (First Presbyterian Church of Cleveland) The Park Synagogue The Shul The Temple-Tifereth Israel The Urban League of Greater Cleveland Trinity Cathedral Trinity Presbyterian Church Turkish American Society of Cleveland (TAS-C) Ukrainian Museum-Archives United Black Fund United Way of Greater Cleveland University Circle United Methodist Church Uqbah Mosque Foundation of Cleveland Ursuline College Westlake United Methodist Church Young Israel of Greater Cleveland YWCA Greater Cleveland Zion Hill Baptist Church

Number of signatories included on The Plain Dealer ad “We Stand Against Hate,” which ran in September 2017 WWW.JEWISHCLEVELAND.ORG PAID FOR BY FRIENDS OF THE JEWISH FEDERATION OF CLEVELAND

760 2017

2017 ANNUAL REPORT

168

Number of business, civic, and elected leaders who have traveled to Israel over the past three years as part of our effort to build strong support for Israel among the general community

5


...CARE FOR OUR

community Preserving Families in our Jewish Community

“Because of the Federation, families are able to receive the necessary care and overwhelming support they need.”

O

ur Jewish community is not immune to drug addiction, mental health issues, or unexpected death. The Jewish Federation of Cleveland brings together its beneficiary agencies to support children and families in which a relative or close family friend is caring for a child whose parents are unable to do so. For example, a suburban family of five in Jewish Cleveland was living with the challenge of opioid addiction. After a difficult delivery with their youngest child, the mother was left with back pain that required medication. This led to a dependency, which spiraled into heroin addiction. The mother was in and out of various outpatient facilities, but when she decided to seek inpatient treatment, the family began to struggle; the father could not maintain the household on his own and the children suffered from anxiety. The Cleveland Jewish community was there for them through

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2017 ANNUAL REPORT

Federation beneficiary agencies Bellefaire Jewish Children’s Bureau and Jewish Family Service Association (JFSA). Bellefaire immediately assumed care coordination for the entire family, mobilizing services and counseling, and coordinating community support. Professionals from Bellefaire and JFSA developed and executed a plan for the family, including counseling for all, mentors for the kids through Bellefaire’s Jewish Big Brother Big Sister program, financial assistance and self-sufficiency support through JFSA’s Forward Focus program, and support from other community organizations. “The Federation is able to help facilitate critical support for our community and across multiple agencies,” said Ira C. Kaplan, Chair of Federation’s Community Planning Committee. “Because of the Federation, families are able to receive the necessary care and overwhelming support they need.”


A Lifeline to Nourishment

F

or 99 year-old Ruth Goldstein, the Jewish Federation of Cleveland is a lifeline to nourishment, friendship, and independence. Ruth takes part in the Lunch Plus Program through the Mandel JCC, a Federation beneficiary agency. Along with free transportation to and from, the program serves hot kosher lunches six days a week in the Warrensville Community Apartments dining area. Lunch Plus also provides free activities and services that encourage seniors to maintain independent lifestyles through exercise and social opportunities.

“Many of our seniors have no family in town or they’ve outlived their loved ones; this program gives them a sense of self.”

“Coming here has kept me alive so long,” Ruth said. “The food is good, but more than that, it gives me something to do and keeps me on a regular routine. It makes me want to get up in the morning.” Ruth’s words bring a smile to the face of Lunch Plus Supervisor Yolanda Nixon. “Many of our seniors have no family in town or they’ve outlived their loved ones; this program gives them a sense of self.” Annually, the Lunch Plus program serves more than 12,000 nutritionally balanced, hot kosher meals to nearly 194 elderly adults ages 60 or older. Ruth says Lunch Plus provides her with so much more than a hot lunch. “It’s like coming home to family. You never feel alone.”

2017 ANNUAL REPORT

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CARE FOR OUR COMMUNITY

Ensuring a Safer, Stronger Community

S

afeguarding our community is at the core of our mission. Each year, the Jewish Federation of Cleveland invests significant time and resources to ensure people of all segments of Judaism feel comfortable living their Jewish lives. One recent example of this is contracting with JFC Security to provide the security team that patrols Jewish Cleveland. “The importance of the Federation’s role in securing our community cannot be overstated,” said Jordan Berkowitz, a day school parent. “We want to make sure that our community members feel safe wearing a kippah or Hebrew on their sweatshirt, or going to a Jewish Day School,” said Jerry Isaak-Shapiro, Head of School for Joseph and Florence Mandel Jewish Day School, a Federation beneficiary agency. “We should all be proud, enthusiastic, and

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excited about doing Jewish, being Jewish, and living Jewish.” In the spring of 2017, the Federation led a process with more than 20 agencies and other Jewish entities that secured more than $2.1 million of funding from the State of Ohio’s Emergency Management Agency Grants. This critical funding provides for security improvements in preventing, preparing for, and responding to acts of terrorism. “These grants enabled us to strengthen our ability to protect our community members,” said Howie Beigelman, Executive Director of Ohio Jewish Communities. “The support from the State of Ohio enabled us to accelerate many significant security improvement projects throughout Jewish Cleveland.”

2017 ANNUAL REPORT

“If one segment of our population is unsafe, then we’re all unsafe. We cannot take Jewish Cleveland for granted.”


... BUILD A MORE

VIBRANT GLOBAL

Jewish community Renewing Jewish Life in St. Petersburg, Russia

I

magine waking up one day to find you belong to a faith you have never heard of and knew nothing about. For many in Jewish communities throughout the former Soviet Union, they are slowly discovering their roots. This is part of the reason why the Jewish Federation of Cleveland partnered with the city of St. Petersburg, Russia more than two decades ago ­— to help these Jews reclaim their heritage. “In Cleveland, a significant portion of our Jewish community has deep roots in Russia. Therefore, it’s only natural that we invest our time and resources towards helping our brethren in St. Petersburg create and grow a self-sustaining Jewish community again,” said Barry Feldman, Chair of the Federation’s St. Petersburg Subcommittee. One key strategic initiative has been to focus on cultivating Jewish leaders in St. Petersburg. To that end, the Lehava Leadership Program was created to focus on producing young, active Jewish community leaders and the Capacity Building Program was initiated to help give tools and skills to professionals working in the Jewish community. Timofey Sherbakov credits Lehava with helping him become more invested in the Jewish community and active as a community leader. “Cleveland is one of the most successful Jewish communities in the world,” Timofey said. “The guidance we received from the young leaders in Cleveland has inspired all of the young leaders in St. Petersburg to develop our community and make it a better place.”

“The guidance we received from the young leaders in Cleveland has inspired all of the young leaders in St. Petersburg to develop our community and make it a better place.” Yana Ivanova, an alumna of Capacity Building, has been able to make a difference in the lives of families in her local community with our support. Yana directs the social and special needs programs at the Adain Lo Family Center in St. Petersburg, which has a large network of programs for children and families. “Thanks to the Federation, we now understand how we can best serve a child with special needs and provide him or her with the enrichment they need to live happily and Jewishly,” Yana said. “We have been inspired by what we’ve learned through the Federation’s support. Our future — ­ and those of the families we serve — are much brighter because of it.”

2017 ANNUAL REPORT

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BUILD A MORE VIBRANT GLOBAL JEWISH COMMUNITY

Instilling Pride in Beit Shean

I

n 1995, Jewish Cleveland selected the city of Beit Shean and the Valley of Springs region as its sister community in Israel. Over the years, the Federation has helped launch several high-impact programs in this multicultural periphery community to help spur demographic growth and improve quality of life for its residents. Such programs include Bridge to the Future (BTF), a neighborhood revitalization and community development program, and Youth Futures, a mentoring program for at-risk youth. Through BTF — and The Jewish Agency’s Partnership2Gether program — we recently developed a resource development course for volunteers in the community who wanted to start and grow non-profit initiatives. Moshe Huminer participated in the course and as a result, launched the Zvika Force Association in memory of his friend, Zvika Kaplan who was killed during the 2014 Israel-Gaza conflict. Zvika Force provides education and tourism experiences highlighting the beautiful natural scenery in Beit Shean for soldiers, families, and school groups. The resource development course is one example of dozens of initiatives building local capacity and pride in the region. “My friend, Zvika, loved this region and wanted everyone in Israel to love it as much as he did,” said Huminer. “Because of the support and encouragement from Jewish Cleveland, we have been given the tools and confidence to run our organization and support families in our region.”

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2017 ANNUAL REPORT


Youth Futures Brings Hope to Israeli Families

I

n an effort to counsel and support at-risk youth in Israel, the Jewish Federation of Cleveland and the Jewish Agency for Israel established the Youth Futures program. Mentors guide children and their families in different circles of intervention: personal, familial, social, and educational, with an emphasis on full parental partnership. Now in its 11th year, Youth Futures helps more than 5,000 at-risk children and their families across 36 cities in Israel’s geographic and socio-economic periphery. With the One such family is the Katz’s, who moved to Cleveland’s sister community of Beit Shean and the Valley of Springs from the southern part of Israel a few years ago. The stress of the move was particularly hard on son Udi, who quickly lost interest in school and sunk into a depression. “Udi was lost,” said Danielle, Udi’s mother. “He was chasing other children, throwing sticks and stones. When a teacher tried to stop him, he went after her as well.”

help of Youth Futures, Udi and the entire family got the support they needed to build a better life.

With the help of Youth Futures, Udi and the entire family got the support they needed to build a better life. “Udi’s mentor was a living bridge for understanding and solving conflicts. She was my hug to him when I wasn’t there,” said Danielle. “Over the last two years, Udi has gained self-confidence and better social skills. Thanks to Youth Futures, Udi embraces all the good the world has in store for him. My boy is happy and full of life! Youth Futures brings a better future to the children and the families of Israel.”

2017 ANNUAL REPORT

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... RESPOND IN

TIMES OF CRISIS

24 HOURS IN HOUSTON

I

n August 2017, Houston, Texas was devastated by Hurricane Harvey, a Category 4 storm, destroying nearly everything in its path. The town of Meyerland, a suburb of Houston, was one of the areas hardest hit. The majority of the Jewish community in Houston lives in and around Meyerland, and within two miles of the Houston Jewish Community Center. Jewish Clevelander Michelle Hirsch traveled to Houston shortly after Harvey subsided. As Co-Chair of National Young Leadership Cabinet, the Jewish Federations of North America’s premier leadership philanthropic program for young adults, Michelle led a cohort of Cabinet members to Houston to assist financially and with hands-on support. For example, the group spent time sorting through the rubble of the Jewish preschool on the JCC campus, which was completely destroyed, to determine what was salvageable. “I had no idea what to expect,” said Michelle. “Having two preschool-aged children of my own, every item in that classroom hit home. School was supposed to have started that Monday and the room was ready to go. A ‘meet your teacher’ open house had been held just two days before the storm. When we asked a teacher what she could possibly tell her students after such a traumatic experience,

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“Houston is powerfully resilient and the optimism is truly contagious. Houston defines the essence of community and what it means to stand up and move forward.” her response was ‘everyone is safe and we just have to pick up the pieces and we will get through it together.’” As she flew home to Cleveland, Michelle was struck by how a community can remain so positive after so much tragedy. “Houston is powerfully resilient and the optimism is truly contagious. Houston defines the essence of community and what it means to stand up and move forward.” Because of the strength of Jewish Cleveland and our Endowment Fund, we were one of the first communities to send significant relief to victims of Hurricane Harvey. The Jewish Federation of Greater Houston, with support from national partners like Cleveland, has raised $20 million of the estimated $30 million needed to help rebuild their Jewish community.

2017 ANNUAL REPORT


Supporting Victims of Hurricane Maria

W

hen Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, nearly 500 displaced families relocated to Cleveland. The Jewish Federation of Cleveland’s Endowment Fund provided support for these new Clevelanders through our partnership with the Spanish American Committee for a Better Community (SAC), fostered by our Community Relations Committee (CRC). These funds enabled SAC to hire a case manager that helped families access childcare services, financial literacy, education, housing, counseling, job-readiness training, employment placement services, and adult education opportunities.

$263,000 Total amount of relief dollars Jewish Cleveland sent to Houston, Florida, and Puerto Rico.

“The Federation’s CRC has a longstanding partnership with several organizations within the Latino community,” said Bradley J. Schlang, CRC Chair. “When Cuyahoga Community College convened a group of organizations committed to helping victims of the hurricane in Puerto Rico, the Federation stepped up to work with the Spanish American Committee to meet this important need.”

“Having a resource like the Federation was so important to us because we could not possibly provide everything that was needed.”

The case manager has been working with clients to develop plans so newcomers can overcome barriers and find success in our community. “Having a resource like the Federation was so important to us because we could not possibly provide everything that was needed to help our new residents with their immediate and future needs,” said Ramonita Vargas, SAC Executive Director. 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

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RESPOND IN TIMES OF CRISIS

Meet the Myakotkin Family A Displaced Ukrainian Jewish Family from Lugansk

W

hen crisis hits our Jewish family, we help — whether in Cleveland, Israel, or around the world. The Myakotkins were a typical middle class Jewish family from Lugansk, Ukraine. Roman, the father, owned a chauffeur service with a fleet of vehicles. Iryna, his wife, worked at a local plant, producing spare parts for trains. Together with their daughters, Dasha and Masha, they were a strong family unit. When pro-Russian forces bombed the warehouse where Roman’s fleet of vehicles was stored, his business and livelihood went up in flames in less than 15 minutes. They were forced to flee their home and leave behind everything they owned. With just two suitcases, they left for Odessa on a 12-hour journey to Hesed, a RussianJewish organization part of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC), a Federation beneficiary. The Myakotkins arrived at Hesed with just the clothes on their backs, having lost everything else when their car was destroyed by a bomb. They were immediately provided living accommodations, food, career assistance for Roman and Iryna, and schools for their children. They also had access to counseling to help one daughter cope with warrelated stress. Today, due in part to our continued support of the JDC and its Hesed network, the Myakotkins are rebuilding their lives. Roman explained that although they can never know what is around the corner, they are determined to create a new life in the city.

“They were immediately provided living accommodations, food, career assistance for Roman and Iryna, and schools for their children.”

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2017 ANNUAL REPORT


... BUILD THE NEXT GENERATION OF

LEADERS Fostering Future Support for Israel

T

o maintain a meaningful connection between the next generation of Jewish Cleveland and Israel, the Jewish Federation of Cleveland created a unique two-year program for high school sophomores and juniors. Israel.Cleveland.Next (icnext) focuses on the core issues of Israeli society and the ever-changing geopolitical landscape in the Middle East. In addition, icnext offers teens a chance to meet and get to know teens in Beit Shean and the Valley of Springs, Cleveland’s sister community in Israel. “The classes are taught differently than the way most of the kids have studied Israel in the past,” said Tina Keller, Associate Director of @akiva, a Federation beneficiary and site of the icnext program. “By utilizing a more hands-on approach to the lesson plans, including a 10-day mission to Israel, our students experience Israeli life and culture first-hand.” “This program not only changed the way I view Israel, it changed the way

I see myself as an advocate for the country,” said David Mack, a recent icnext student. “The program has made me feel more confident in my ability to combat anti-Israel bias.” To support students like David when they graduate high school, the Federation has trained young professionals in their 20s and 30s to be Israel Advocacy Fellows. Some of these young professionals serve as mentors to college students who want to become more vocal against the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement found on many campuses. “When I talk to students, I advise them to engage with our broader community — including other minorities and faith groups — to make sure the students fully understand why the BDS movement is wrong,” said Arkady Polinkovsky, a current program fellow. “We need to dispel misconceptions about Israel and broaden support for the country.” 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

“This program not only changed the way I view Israel, it changed the way I see myself as an advocate for the country.”

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BUILD THE NEXT GENERATION OF LEADERS

A Jewish Future on Campus “The support and friendship I received from Hillel quickly engaged me into Jewish Cleveland and strengthened my connection to Jewish life.”

T

he Cleveland Hillel Foundation, a beneficiary agency of the Federation, is engaging and empowering Jewish students through experiences that foster active Jewish life. Currently, the staff provides resources for undergraduate, graduate, and professional students throughout Northeast Ohio. “Our goal is to provide these students with a strong and inclusive Jewish community when they arrive on campus,” said Jared Isaacson, Executive Director of the Cleveland Hillel Foundation. “When they come here to Cleveland, and when they come here to Hillel, we want them to know that they are an important part of our community.” By engaging and empowering young Jewish adults through leadership

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2017 ANNUAL REPORT

opportunities and innovative programming, the Cleveland Hillel Foundation helps young adults navigate their Jewish college experience. Hannah Pomerantz braced for a culture shock when she left New York to attend Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. What she found — thanks to Hillel — was anything but that. “The support and friendship I received through Hillel quickly engaged me into Jewish Cleveland and strengthened my connection to Jewish life. Even though my family is hundreds of miles away, I know I have a family here in Jewish Cleveland. Without Hillel, I would not be the confident campus leader I have become.”


LEADing by Example

T

he Jewish Federation of Cleveland’s Young Leadership Division (YLD) is helping to prepare the next generation of Jewish Cleveland leadership through unique experiential professional and volunteer opportunities, as well as tailored educational programming, through its LEADS (Leadership Education and Development Series) program. “YLD’s focus on developing young leaders enables us to groom the future leaders of the Federation, and to develop young professionals into future leaders and board members of all of our community’s Jewish organizations,” said Natan Milgrom, 2018 YLD Board Chair. Through the LEADS program, these emerging community leaders learn effective communication skills, how to utilize individual strengths in group settings, and the history of the Cleveland Jewish community.

“Thanks to the leadership development I received through LEADS, I have become a better and stronger teacher, leader, speaker, programmer, and planner.”

2019 Campaign for Jewish Needs Chair Jeffrey J. Wild credits his personal and professional success in part to the knowledge he gained while his time in YLD leadership roles. “YLD provided me with the necessary skills to lead within my law firm, to run a Federation agency, and to run strategic planning processes at different philanthropic organizations — and they are skills that are with me to this day in much of what I do professionally and communally.” In the five years since Jennie Becker of Shaker Heights was a part of LEADS, she has become a member of the YLD Board, the YLD representative in Federation’s Allocations Committee, and an integral participant on Federation’s STEM Task Force. “Thanks to the leadership development I received through LEADS, I have become a better and stronger teacher, leader, speaker, programmer, and planner.”

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our FEDERATION

IS THE ONLY JEWISH ORGANIZATION IN CLEVELAND THAT CONSIDERS THE NEEDS OF OUR COMMUNITY AS A WHOLE AND PLANS FOR ITS FUTURE.

GIFT

YOUR

32

CAMPAIGN BENEFICIARIES

E JEWISH FUTU • ENSUR RE • H T U SPE O Y E AK T A UC

RIGHT • BRIDGE CULTU HAT’S RA L RW D IVID T FO OU

together

• CARE FOR THE EL DER LY •

ED

IN CLEVELAND, ISRAEL, AND 70 COUNTRIES AROUND THE GLOBE.

and MORE. ISRAE PORT SUP

L

• FEED TH E

HUN G R Y• 18

2017 ANNUAL REPORT

• ES

ICK THE S T R FO COM

WE CAN DO ALL THESE THINGS


our CAMPAIGN

IN CLEVELAND

@Akiva Program Bellefaire JCB Cleveland Hillel Foundation CWRU Siegal Jewish Lifelong Learning Program Fuchs Mizrachi School Gross Schechter Day School

ACROSS THE COUNTRY

American Jewish Committee Anti-Defamation League BBYO

Hadassah Hillel at Miami University Jewish Council for Public Affairs

Jewish War Veterans National Alliance* Ohio University Hillel *Funds nine agencies listed on page 20

AROUND THE GLOBE

IS THE ANNUAL FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN THAT ENSURES OUR COMMUNITY’S VITALITY AND VIBRANCY IN THE YEAR AHEAD.

American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI)

The Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA) Overseas Connections Committee, Jewish Federation of Cleveland

World ORT Ethiopian National Project

Hebrew Academy of Cleveland Hebrew Shelter Home Hillel at Kent State University Jewish Community Security Program Jewish Education Center of Cleveland Jewish Family Service Association

$32.7M 10K TOGETHER, WE RAISED A RECORD $32.7 MILLION TO CARE FOR OUR LOCAL AND GLOBAL JEWISH COMMUNITY.

APPROXIMATELY 10,000 DONORS MADE A GIFT TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN CLEVELAND, ISRAEL, AND 70 COUNTRIES AROUND THE GLOBE.

2017 ANNUAL REPORT

Joseph and Florence Mandel Jewish Day School Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage Mandel Jewish Community Center Menorah Park Montefiore

91c

91 CENTS OF EVERY DOLLAR GOES DIRECTLY TO THE COMMUNITY FOR PRIORITY PROGRAMS AND SERVICES.

19


TOTAL GRANTMAKING & PROGRAM EXPENSES: JEWISH FEDERATION OF CLEVELAND

TOTAL JFC SUPPORT

CAMPAIGN ALLOCATION1 from the 2017 Campaign for Jewish Needs for fiscal year 7/1/17 6/30/18

OTHER FEDERATION SUPPORT from donor advised and special purpose funds, supporting foundations, the Endowment Fund for fiscal year 7/1/16 - 6/30/17

180,451 1,308,090 389,438 782,352 298,319 1,074,357 814,176 2,873,791 125,636 321,214 382,306 595,292 5,753,869 4,869,803 1,462,848 934,972 339,350 2,129,402 703,996 588,354

180,451 1,113,855 628,722 533,041 452,634 1,274,519 83,711 207,914 -5 435,000 4,340,071 2,625,8155 1,462,848 543,425 220,000 1,919,302 428,235 351,567

194,235 389,438 153,630 298,319 541,3162,4 361,5422,4 1,599,2722,4 41,925 113,300 382,306 160,292 1,413,798 2,243,9882 391,5472,4 119,350 210,100 275,761 236,787

556,345

276,345

280,000

26,484,361

17,077,455

9,406,906

Supports Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA), Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI), the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC), the Ethiopian National Project (ENP) in addition to Cleveland’s Beit Shean/Valley of the Springs partnership and summer camps in the former Soviet Union and Hungary.

9,988,287

8,901,856

1,086,431

Supports Jewish Federation of Cleveland’s Overseas Programs, including: Parents and Children Together (PACT), IDF Education Corps Projects for at-risk young adults, I-Connect, Bridge to the Future (BTF), Jordan/Cross-Border Initiative, and community-building programs in St. Petersburg, Russia and Jewish identity programs in six towns in its periphery.

2,950,000

2,950,000

-

12,938,287

11,851,856

1,086,431

American Jewish Committee Anti-Defamation League BBYO Hadassah Jewish Council for Public Affairs Jewish War Veterans National Alliance: AJFCA (Association for Jewish Family & Children’s Agencies), AJWS (American Jewish World Service), BBYO, HIAS (Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society), Hillel Foundation for Jewish Life, JCCA (Jewish Community Centers Association), JCPA (Jewish Council for Public Affairs), JTA (Jewish Telegraphic Agency), NCSEJ (National Coalition Supporting Eurasian Jewry).

133,105 89,030 3,231,950 6,030 17,000 2,100

58,500 58,500 47,600 2,000 6,000 2,100

74,605 30,530 3,184,350 4,030 11,000 -

477,700

477,700

-

Ohio University Hillel and Hillel at Miami University

117,595 4,074,510

107,220 759,620

10,375 3,314,890

43,914,405

-

43,914,4054

43,914,405

-

43,914,405

21,524,419

-

21,524,4192

21,524,419

-

21,524,419

12,425,868

-

12,425,868

12,425,868

-

12,425,868

121,361,850

29,688,9313

91,672,919

LOCAL AGENCIES, SERVICES, AND PROGRAMS: @Akiva Program Bellefaire JCB Cleveland Chesed Center Cleveland Hillel Foundation Community Cemetery Support Fuchs Mizrachi School Gross Schechter Day School Hebrew Academy of Cleveland Hebrew Shelter Home Hillel at Kent State University Holocaust Survivor Initiative Jewish Community Security Program Jewish Education Center of Cleveland (includes Fund for the Jewish Future*) Jewish Family Service Association Jewish Federation of Cleveland Joseph and Florence Mandel Jewish Day School Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage Mandel Jewish Community Center Menorah Park Montefiore Laura and Alvin Siegal College of Judaic Studies Educational Foundation (including funding for CWRU Siegal Lifelong Learning Program) SUBTOTAL: OVERSEAS AGENCIES AND SERVICES:

SUBTOTAL: NATIONAL AGENCIES:

SUBTOTAL: OTHER GRANTS FOR JEWISH PURPOSES: Includes local synagogues, local and national Jewish organizations meeting educational and humanitarian needs, and international organizations that serve Jewish communities in need. SUBTOTAL: NORTHEASTERN OHIO CHARITABLE AND EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS SERVING THE GENERAL COMMUNITY SUBTOTAL: CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS OUTSIDE NORTHEASTERN OHIO SERVING THE GENERAL COMMUNITY SUBTOTAL: GRAND TOTAL:

1. Includes part of United Way of Greater Cleveland (UWGC) grant of $1,583,069. UWGC supports Bellefaire JCB, JFSA, Mandel JCC, Menorah Park, Montefiore and the Federation; 2. Includes Centennial Initiative grants; 3. From the annual Campaign after deducting fundraising cost of 8.7% percent, one of the lowest overhead costs of any charitable organization in Ohio; 4. Includes funding for school security; 5.JFSA allocation includes additional Holocaust survivor support. *The Fund for the Jewish Future is a partnership of communal agencies, synagogues, and schools that develop and implement programs to dramatically enhance our community’s Jewish educational system. The Fund is administered by the Jewish Education Center of Cleveland and received an allocation from the 2017 Campaign for Jewish Needs to support Jewish education throughout the community. The Fund also provides local synagogues with more than $1 million in educational programs and services.

20

2017 ANNUAL REPORT


OUR ENDOWMENT FUNDS, DONOR ADVISED FUNDS AND SUPPORTING FOUNDATIONS, COMBINED WITH THE ANNUAL CAMPAIGN FOR JEWISH NEEDS AND CENTENNIAL INITIATIVE FOR JEWISH CLEVELAND FUNDRAISING, MAKE THE FEDERATION ONE OF OHIO’S LARGEST GRANTMAKING ORGANIZATIONS — WITH MORE THAN $121 MILLION ALLOCATED FROM ALL SOURCES IN THE 2017 FISCAL YEAR. FEDERATION AND LOCAL BENEFICIARY AGENCIES AND SERVICES 21.82%

SUPPORTING FOUNDATIONS* 37.03%

OVERSEAS JEWISH AGENCIES AND SERVICES 10.66%

TOTAL GRANT MAKING BY CATEGORY

OTHER AGENCIES AND SERVICES FOR JEWISH PURPOSES 36.18% NORTHEAST OHIO CHARITABLE AND EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 17.74% CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS OUTSIDE NORTHEAST OHIO 10.24%

SOURCE OF GRANTS

ANNUAL CAMPAIGN ALLOCATIONS 24.46% DONOR ADVISED FUNDS* 33.37% ENDOWMENT FUNDS* 4.63% CENTENNIAL INITIATIVE FOR JEWISH CLEVELAND 0.51%

NATIONAL JEWISH AGENCIES 3.36%

*DOES NOT INCLUDE GRANTS TO THE CAMPAIGN FOR JEWISH NEEDS.

THANK YOU TO UNITED WAY

GOLD SPONSORS

BRONZE SPONSORS

SILVER SPONSORS

PLATINUM SPONSOR

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

2017 ANNUAL REPORT

21


2017 BOARD OF TRUSTEES EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

Board Chair: Gary L. Gross Vice Chairs: Bruce H. Goodman, Richard Horvitz, Randall J. Korach, Idelle K. Wolf, Sandra Wuliger Treasurer: Daniel N. Zelman • Associate Treasurer: Beth Wain Brandon • President: Stephen H. Hoffman

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE David F. Adler • Barnett N. Bookatz • Reneé Chelm* • Lynne M. Cohen • Leslie D. Dunn • Margaret Richards Frankel Robert Goldberg* • Henry J. Goodman* • Penny Greenberger • Harley I. Gross* • Barry J. Guttman • Michelle Hirsch Sara Hurand • Ira Kaplan • Jennifer L. Korach • Eliana LeVine • Keith Libman • Louis J. Malcmacher • Morton L. Mandel* Albert B. Ratner* • Charles A. Ratner* • Sharon Rosenbaum • Enid Rosenberg • Bradley J. Schlang • Mitchell C. Schneider Paula R. Schwartz • Michael D. Siegal* • Jeffrey Weiss • Sally H. Wertheim* • Jeffrey J. Wild • Timothy F. Wuliger*

TRUSTEES Hedy Adler

Larry P. Goldberg*

Milton Maltz*

Eliav Sharvit

Jules Belkin

Suri Goldman

Tamar Maltz*

Bradley A. Sherman

Eric E. Bell

Roe Green

Barbara A. Mandel*

Elisabeth Sherman

Ronald M. Berkman

Steven G. Greenberg

Gregory A. Marcus

Rabbi Joshua Skoff

Rabbi Binyamin Blau

Andrea Kanter Grodin

Kevin D. Margolis

Scott J. Spiegle

Myrna A. Bloch

Rochelle Gross

Peter Meisel

Erica G. Starrfield

Susan Borison

J. David Heller

Susan Y. Meisel

Carmie J. Stein

Alan Charnas

Rebecca C. Heller

David P. Miller

Rachel Weinberg

Jennifer E. Cohen

William H. Heller*

Jared S. Miller

Stephen J. Weinberg

Bruce Daskal

Kathryn Wertheim Hexter

Samuel H. Miller*

Judith Weiss*

Mindy Davidson

Robert A. Immerman

David M. Neumann

Morry Weiss*

Cheryl L. Davis

M. Orry Jacobs

Rabbi Robert Nosanchuk

Danielle J. Wild

Reuven D. Dessler

Edna Jaffa

Jeremy A. Paris

Mitch Wolf

Grant N. Dinner

Suellen Kadis

Keith Polster

Nancy Wolf

Fran Doris

Jeffrey M. Kahn

Loree E. Potash

Warren L. Wolfson

Cindy Duber

Ilana I. Katz

James A. Ratner

Elissa J. Wuliger

Barry S. Feldman

Terri Kline

Robert S. Reitman*

Jason A. Wuliger

Ronald A. Fisher

S. Lee Kohrman*

Michael A. Ritter

Alan E. Yanowitz

Amy Wain Garnitz

Jeffrey L. Korach

Brian D. Robbins

Donna Yanowitz*

victor gelb*

Harvey Kotler

Betty Rosskamm*

Andrew Zelman

Shelley Gimbel

Charlotte R. Kramer*

Peter Rzepka*

Sarah Zimmerman

Ira S. Goffman

Karen Krause

Evie Safran*

* Trustee for Life

Adrienne Goldberg

Andrew Lefkowitz

Kyla Epstein Schneider

Jordan A. Goldberg

Norma W. Lerner*

Gary S. Shamis

EMERITUS TRUSTEES Thomas W. Adler • George N. Aronoff • Richard Bogomolny • Leonard Fuchs • Peggy Garson • Lois K. Goodman • Robert D. Gries Marvin L. Lader • Barbara S. Rosenthal • Edwin M. Roth • Gordon H. Safran • Norman Wain • Philip Wasserstrom

22

2017 ANNUAL REPORT


COMMITTEES

2017

The Jewish Federation of Cleveland’s activities are conducted by committees of volunteers in partnership with professional staff. Committee and subcommittee chairs are listed below. Please contact them or the Federation for more information about participating in Federation activities or other volunteer opportunities at affiliated organizations. JEWISH FEDERATION OF CLEVELAND Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Building 25701 Science Park Drive, Cleveland, Ohio 44122 phone: 216-593-2900 toll-free: 888-467-1125 e-mail: info@jcfcleve.org fax: 216-593-2901 www.jewishcleveland.org

STANDING COMMITTEES (As of September 30, 2017) ALLOCATIONS COMMITTEE Distributes resources from the Campaign for Jewish Needs, balancing local, national, and overseas needs; helps to identify immediate and long-term issues which the community and/or individual agencies need to address; helps ensure that funds from the Campaign for Jewish Needs are used effectively and efficiently Jeffrey J. Wild, Chair Michal Soclof, Subcommittee on Overseas Chair Stephen A. Monto, Subcommittee on Education Agencies Chair Ronald S. Gross, Subcommittee on Human Services Chair Barry S. Feldman, National Agencies Liaison Team Chair COMMUNITY PLANNING COMMITTEE Studies and plans for community needs Ira Kaplan, Chair Susan S. Frankel, Facilities Planning Chair

OVERSEAS CONNECTIONS COMMITTEE Conceives and manages projects that connect Jews in Cleveland with Jews in Israel and around the world Lynne M. Cohen, Chair Barbara J. Leukart, Cleveland/Beit Shean Partnership Subcommittee Chair Barry S. Feldman, Cleveland/St. Petersburg Partnership Subcommittee Chair Lynne M. Cohen, Ethiopian-Israeli Integration Subcommittee Chair Susan Y. Meisel, IDF Education Corps Subcommittee Chair Lydia Frankel, Shmuel Shkop, ISR@CLE (Israelis in Cleveland) Subcommittee Co-Chairs Dan A. Polster, Jordan/Cross-Border Initiative Subcommittee Chair STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMITTEE Responsible for the creation, implementation, oversight, and revision of the Strategic Plan Randall J. Korach, Chair Bradley A. Sherman, Vice Chair

ADDITIONAL COMMITTEES

COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE Implements public affairs agenda Bradley J. Schlang, Chair Rubin Guttman, Michael H. Jacobson, Vice-Chairs

ADMINISTRATIVE Keith Libman, Chair

DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE Oversees all fundraising activities Daniel N. Zelman, Chair David F. Adler, 2018 Campaign for Jewish Needs General Chair Stephen J. Weinberg, Dara G. Yanowitz, Create Your Jewish Legacy Co-Chairs James Goldsmith, Professional Advisory Council Chair Jennifer L. Korach, Women’s Philanthropy Chair Barry J. Guttman, Young Leadership Division Chair ENDOWMENT FUND COMMITTEE Recommends funding for community programming and emergency needs Penny Greenberger, Chair Matthew F. Kadish, Donor Advised Fund Advisory Committee Chair Alan E. Yanowitz, Foundation Advisory Council Chair FINANCE AND INVESTMENT COMMITTEE Manages investment of endowment and capital funds William H. Heller, Chair

AUDIT Idelle K. Wolf, Chair CASH Larry A. Mack, Chair CHARLES EISENMAN AWARD Gary L. Gross, Chair COMMISSION ON CEMETERY PRESERVATION Ari H. Jaffe, President EXECUTIVE Gary L. Gross, Chair

RETIREMENT FUND Arthur Weisman, Chair RISK MANAGEMENT Dorothea M. Polster, Chair SECURITY Elie Weiss, Chair TECHNOLOGY Esther Potash, Chair YOUNG LEADERSHIP AWARDS Gary L. Gross, Chair

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Philip M. Cohen, Chair JEWISH COMMUNITY HOUSING Mark C. Siegel. President Mark H. Doris, Vice President

HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE Provides guidance and oversight of the recruitment, development, and placement of qualified professional and lay leadership Sharon Rosenbaum, Chair Jeanne Tobin, ALeRT (Agency Leadership Roundtable) Chair Gary S. Shamis, Gries Award Committee Chair Gregory A. Marcus and Dara G. Yanowitz, Mandel Symposium Co-Chairs MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE Establishes marketing agenda and oversees communications activities Jeffrey Weiss, Chair Ilana I. Katz, Vice Chair Carmie J. Stein, Todd Stein, Annual Meeting Co-Chairs

JEWISH VOLUNTEER NETWORK Joanie Berger, Chair NOMINATING Paula R. Schwartz, Chair (2016-2017) Suellen Kadis, Chair (2017-2018) PROPERTIES David B. Katz, Chair

2017 ANNUAL REPORT

23


Jewish Federation of Cleveland Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Building 25701 Science Park Drive Cleveland, Ohio 44122

NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID CLEVELAND, OHIO PERMIT NO. 581

mazel tov!

2017 VOLUNTEER LEADERSHIP AWARD WINNERS CHARLES EISENMAN AWARD: OUR HIGHEST CIVIC HONOR Michael Siegal Recognizing a leader in the community for their exceptional civic contributions, Michael Siegal is one of the most remarkable leaders in Jewish life today – on a local, national, and international scale. RUBY BASS AWARD Beth Wain Brandon Honoring a leader’s passion for the Jewish Federation of Cleveland and commitment to the Women’s Campaign, Beth Wain Brandon is an incredible mentor to all women and sets the tone for others around her. GRIES FAMILY AWARD Kim Meisel Pesses Recognizing exemplary individuals who, through top leadership positions, make a lasting impact on organizations within the Jewish and general communities, Kim Meisel Pesses has led the way for many prominent organizations that resonate with her passions.

IRENE ZEHMAN VOLUNTEER AWARD Gayle Horwitz Recognizing women whose efforts on behalf of the Cleveland Jewish community demonstrate the highest ideals of volunteer service, Gayle Horwitz’s volunteerism exemplifies the mitzvah of welcoming the stranger. BENNETT AND DONNA YANOWITZ YOUNG LEADERSHIP AWARD Kerry Kertesz Honoring outstanding young individuals who have demonstrated commitment, involvement, and leadership within Cleveland’s Jewish community, Kerry Kertesz does whatever she can to help the next generation and our community succeed. AMB. MILTON A. AND ROSLYN Z. WOLF YOUNG CAMPAIGNER OF THE YEAR AWARD Barry Guttman Recognizing young campaigners who have demonstrated exceptional leadership in Campaign activities and deep commitment to our community, Barry Guttman has a strong passion for Jewish Cleveland and helping to make our community the special place it is.

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