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Careers Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Report Code: KIMEBABA

11th May 2013

Career Analysts

Contents The report

Page

1

Introduction

Page

2

Profile results

Page

3

The test report

Page

4

The questionnaire report

Page

9

The next step

Page

15

Career suggestions

Page

16

Further Information

Page

21

Prepared by: Career Analysts PO Box 2022 Belgrave Victoria 3160 Tel/Fax (03) 9752 6350 Mobile: 0405 812 113 info@careeranalysts.com.au www.careeranalysts.com.au


Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

This report This report has been prepared by computer. It looks at your abilities and interests, and makes some suggestions about your career choices. It reflects your current interests and your performance during the tests. There are many other specific factors which will affect your career choice but which cannot be included in this analysis. These need to be discussed with your adviser when you talk over this report.

Your Future Options you could consider include: Continuing your education at University A VET (Vocational) course at school or TAFE Vocational training or apprenticeship while in work Whichever route you choose, you need to ensure that it matches your abilities and intentions. Your Career Adviser will be able to provide you with information and advice to help you make your decision.

This Report

1

Your Future


Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Introduction This report should help you think about the sort of career that would suit you best. When you choose a career, you need to know what you can do, what you would like to do, and which way of working suits you. The Morrisby Profile (MP) and Morrisby Careers Questionnaire (MCQ) work together to show what you do well, how you prefer to work, how you approach learning and what you are likely to enjoy most. The Morrisby Profile reflects your abilities and the MCQ shows what you are interested in now and what you would like from a job. The MP and the MCQ may not say exactly the same things. Sometimes people find that they would be very good at something they have never thought of before. It is helpful to look at both parts of this report before deciding on a range of suitable career options. The results can give you an idea of why you prefer doing certain things, and how to make the most of what you do best. They can also show that you might be very good at some things that you cannot do at school, but could pursue afterwards through training or study. It is very important to know as much as possible about yourself, your strengths and interests, and about the careers you might choose, before making up your mind. You must also research the entry routes to jobs and careers and what they require in terms of qualifications and training. Appropriate courses may not always be available locally and you will need to explore your options. There is a list of websites that you may find useful at the end of this report. This report should help you to make the important decisions that lie ahead. Read it carefully and talk it over with your advisers and your family.

Scores Test scores are grouped in the following way. These groups give you an idea of how your scores compare with others your own age. If you get an average score, your test result is in the middle 40% of people your own age (the most usual result). Although it is quite useful to know how you did when compared with other people, it is much more important to compare your own scores with one another, to see what you do best and what you find most difficult. Group

You are in the ...

Very High - Upper High - Next Average

Middle

10% 20% 40%

Fair - Next

20%

Low - Lower

10%

All through the report the level of your scores is given in comparison with a wide range of other people your own age.

Introduction

2

Scores


Test Report

Test Results

Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

This section shows how you did in the Morrisby Profile. It goes through your results in detail and what they suggest about your career choices.

This chart shows how you did in each of the measures and compares your performance with that of others. It is the pattern of your scores that matters more than individual results viewed in isolation.

The table shows how your scores compare with those of others your own age and also how your scores compare with each other. Although the comparison with others is quite useful, it is much more important to compare your own scores with one another, to see what you do best and what you find most difficult.

Test Results

3

Test Results


Test Report

Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Reasoning This tested how well you understand new, difficult ideas and solve problems you have not met before. Even if people do very well on this test, they may not always be good at passing exams, as it does not test how well they remember things. You do not need a high score to do most jobs once you have been trained, but some types of study and training are easier for people with high scores. Some people with very high scores get bored easily and can feel frustrated as they do not do as well as they feel they should. Your score shows that you understand new ideas quickly, even when they are highly complex, and would enjoy thinking up different ways of doing things. This very high score means that you are likely to find routine or repetitive work particularly dull. You would prefer a career which provides you with an intellectual challenge rather than one where you mostly had to follow standard procedures or be told how to go about your work.

General abilities

These tests looked at whether you prefer to work with words, numbers, pictures and diagrams, or a mixture of these. Some people understand things best when they are explained in words. Some people find it easier to look at a chart or table of numbers; others like plans, diagrams and pictures. Please remember that the career suggestions at the end of this report also take your interests and qualifications into account. Your very high perceptual and numerical results, when compared with the less strong verbal, suggests that you would be good at working with real things, diagrams and plans, as well as dealing with numbers, rather than just words. You may prefer learning from charts, models or videos, rather than from books or lectures. Although these tests cannot measure how good you are at art, people who have this pattern of scores are often good at art or design. You should look at the types of career which match this, such as many types of scientific work, technical design, working with computers, surveying, engineering and other technological areas. Many commercial careers, such as finance, banking, insurance, might also be suited. Please remember that the career suggestions at the end of the report also take your interests into account.

Reasoning

4

General abilities


Test Report

Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Practical ability

Both these tests are about being practical, but they are looking at different ways of being practical. The spatial test asked you to visualise drawings from different angles. This is important in engineering, architecture and design work. The mechanical test was about knowing how things work and are put together. Your results show a high level of general practical ability. You are obviously very good at coping with down-to-earth, practical problems. Even though the level is high, your other abilities are even stronger and because of this it is probable that you would be bored by work which was predominantly hands-on and practical. When considering careers, it is important that they are in line with your General Abilities as described previously.

Planning Style

Some people are very good at coping with problems as they arise but not so good at planning ahead. Others are good at planning, but do not always notice the details. Some people can do both these things. It is helpful to know whether you are better at seeing the details or the overall picture. Your results suggest that you can deal with both the details of a situation and the whole picture equally effectively. This ability to work in either way is very useful, as you are able to plan what you want to do first, and then work through the steps to reach your goal.

Working with your hands

The two manual dexterity tests show how quickly and accurately you can work with your hands. Your scores on these dexterity measures show that you work at a slightly above average speed with your hands and are quite neat and careful.

Practical abilities

5

Manual dexterity


Test Report

Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Problem Solving

By looking at groups of your scores on the first six aptitude tests, it is possible to see how you like to solve problems. Some people like to work out a solution to a problem from scratch, by thinking it out for themselves. Others like to look for the solution in books, or to be taught how to find a solution. Some like to ask other people, or to rely on past experience, or try out different ways in a trial and error approach. All these are good ways of solving problems, but some are better for some jobs than others. It is also quite useful if you are thinking about further or higher education to know how you like to deal with problems, because there are many different types of teaching and training, and not all methods suit everybody. Your approach to work and to solving problems is characterised by the very high level of your general abilities and reasoning. However, the practical abilities are lower. This probably means that you are better at dealing with ideas and thinking through problems carefully rather than dealing with the practicalities of solving them. You prefer to work things out in advance rather than attempting to find the answer by trial and error. The very high level of reasoning shows that you can think out original ways of doing things, rather than relying on what you have read or been told. You would probably find working with ideas and theories, better suited than trying things out in practice. You will probably do better working in a more academic, theoretical or analytical career, than in one where you are expected to be very practical in your approach.

This way of working, especially when it goes with your pattern of abilities, can be very useful in a technical, office-based job, although you probably would not enjoy being directly involved in producing things. A number of careers working with computers might appeal to you.

Problem Solving

6

Problem Solving


Test Report

Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Learning Styles There are many different ways of learning and studying, and we all prefer some ways to others. For example, many people prefer to work from books and to study in an academic manner; others like to work things out by themselves and develop practical skills. Your style of learning also includes things like where you prefer to work, the time of day you feel you learn best, and whether you prefer to learn on your own or in a group. You might also want to consider how active you like to be, or if you prefer to watch a demonstration or listen to/read an explanation. The diagrams below tell you some of the preferences you have, but you should also consider the results of your interest questionnaire before deciding on a course or training method.

Preferred Learning Style

On balance, you seem equally at home learning through observation, experiments and diagrams, as you are learning through more traditional methods. You may enjoy courses which involve a variety of ways of learning; book-based as well as demonstrations, experiments and interactive learning. You seem to be the sort of person who likes to use both your acquired knowledge and understanding to help you solve new problems. A more formal sort of learning situation may suit you better than learning on the job or working to solve a problem in a hands-on manner. This type of more formal situation would give you the chance to acquire and develop the knowledge necessary to solve the problems which you are likely to come across in a career. You would prefer not to just memorise the content, but would enjoy being able to develop your understanding of the subject matter.

Learning styles

7

Learning styles


Test Report

Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Personality It is important to understand the way in which people prefer to apply their abilities to the problems and situations they face everyday. Although people change and develop, there are some things which do not change very much and which are useful to know about. For instance, some people like to stick at one thing until it is finished, while other people like having a lot of things to do at once, and do not mind if they cannot finish them all. Some are very confident about expressing their ideas, while others might be quite sure what they think, but a little unsure when it comes to putting it across to others. Some people are very aware of what goes on around them, and very sensitive to how other people are feeling, while others are quite tough and take less notice of what is going on. Your high scores on awareness and flexibility suggest that you are able to adapt to new situations and challenges quite easily. You prefer variety in your work and can cope well with interruptions but you would not enjoy highly repetitive tasks. The scores suggest that you have plenty of decisiveness, and seem willing to express your ideas. You could take the lead as well as being a good team member, and seem able to work well in a front line position. Where possible you like to do things well and complete tasks to a high standard. You appear confident in yourself which means that you know your own mind and appear self assured. You seem quite independent, and like to think for yourself rather than just follow instructions. You show the confidence to be able to make your own decisions and take responsibility for how they turn out.

Abilities and personality

Your abilities and your personality are both very important when it comes to choosing a career, but you may need to take one into account even more than the other. Some people prefer a job that matches their personality, and do not mind if it does not fit their abilities too well. Others want a job which matches their abilities most. Whilst your personality is obviously a very important consideration in deciding your career direction, the level of your abilities suggests that you must also pay particular attention to this aspect of your make-up. Try to ensure that your future development gives you the opportunity to use your abilities fully.

Personality

8

Personality


Questionnaire Report

Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Questionnaire Report

On the following five pages are your results from the Interest Questionnaire which you completed. The results reflect your present preferences regarding a career and NOT your test results. If there are differences between what you prefer (the Questionnaire Report) and what you seem good at (the Test Results), you should think about the reasons for your preferences.

Questionnaire Report

9

Introduction


Questionnaire Report

Interests

Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Your answers to the questionnaire have been analysed to find out what matters most to you when choosing a career. The first part of this report looks at what interests you, the second part looks at the types of work setting you would prefer.

1 What interests you most - People, Things or Information? Most jobs involve a mixture of these. For example, a police officer may spend much of the time dealing with people, but also has to keep records and be familiar with computer systems. An engineer may spend much of the time designing structures or systems, but also needs to use mathematics and to work with clients and colleagues. You can see your preferences in this pie-chart. It is divided into three slices; one for people, one for things and one for information. The size of the slice shows how important that area is for you.

The results show that you are equally interested in working with people and things (machines, tools, nature, and real objects). You are not interested in a job revolving around facts and figures.

2 What matters most to you - Where, how or with whom you work? Some people need to work by themselves, or with close friends, or with a larger group of people. Other people don't really mind. Some people mind very much where they work, others may not mind whether they work in an office, outdoors or in a manufacturing environment. Some people can switch from being practical to being imaginative or systematic when they need to; others want to work in one way all the time.

Who you work with matters most to you. You don't seem to be too bothered about your surroundings or how you go about your work.

This is explained more fully on the next three pages.

Results in outline

10

Results in outline


Questionnaire Report

Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

You are interested in a job dealing with other people. You would enjoy a job which involved helping people cope with their personal or emotional problems. You would also like to look after young children, or people who are sick or unhappy. You may enjoy a career which involves giving advice to others. Of the four areas, bringing people round persuasively to your point of view interests you the least.

You are equally interested in working with things. You are interested in scientific theories and methods, and might enjoy research. You are equally interested in the working of machines, and might enjoy a career in engineering. Of the three areas, working in a field in which you had to build or make things with your own hands appeal to you the least.

You are not so interested in working with information. Although working with information as a full time job would not be your first choice, you wouldn't mind evaluating facts and information to work out what it really means, summarising it and maybe writing reports. Nor would you mind using maths and statistics to analyse facts and figures to find out what they indicate. You are not interested in spending most of your time sorting through information systematically.

What interests you most?

11

What interests you most?


Questionnaire Report

Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Who you work with is important to you. You really need to feel comfortable with the other people working with you, but do not want to work with the same people all the time. Some of the time you would like to work without interference and some of the time to deal with members of the public. When you need it, you would also like to have the support of work colleagues you know and trust.

How you go about your work is less important to you. All other things being equal, you would prefer to work to produce a practical result, something which is real and long lasting. You are not particularly bothered about a job in which you have to rely on your creativity rather than your other skills. You don't seem interested in following a set routine, or having to pay great attention to getting all the small details right.

Where you work is also fairly important to you. You would prefer working outdoors with the natural environment, landscapes, plants and animals. Your answers show that you would probably put up with working in an industrial area - if other aspects of the job were right for you. The idea of working within an organisation interests you least.

Who, where and how?

12

Who, where and how?


Questionnaire Report

Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

How you prefer to use your imagination You would like to have the chance to work in the visual arts, which might mean art and design or art appreciation. Being able to work in the performing arts is not so important to you. You are not very interested in writing creatively or critically.

Your specific feelings towards working Outdoors Ideally, you would like to work with the natural environment, landscapes, plants and animals, in areas such as farming, forestry and environmental work. While still important, your wish to have some contact with sport and physical fitness is not as strong. You do not seem interested in having the chance to work with the built environment (e.g. architecture, town planning, transport infrastructure).

Do you prefer to take the lead or be supervised? You would prefer to be able to take the lead at work and would quite enjoy the challenge of advising others how to do their work. You would like to be able to decide how you go about your work and you would appreciate having colleagues with whom you could discuss problems. However, you would not enjoy being told what to do and how to do it. How much study are you prepared to do? All other things being equal, you would prefer a career which requires a lengthy period of full time study, probably at university. You might be willing to pursue a career which requires job-related study and specific training probably in the workplace providing it leads to something you really want to do. You are not interested in a job which needs few formal qualifications.

Other Features

13

Other Features


Police & Security

Tourism & Hospitality

Education

Management

Financial / Legal Advice

Cultural / libry-musm

Business / Finance

Economics / Analysis

Accounts Audit

Maths / Statistics

Physics

Science

Remember; this does not take your abilities into account.

Things

Fine Art

Photography Digital Arts

Graphics / Animation

3D design

Agriculture Land-based

Art & Design

Building / Mining

Transport / Logistics

Architecture Landscape

Mechanical / Aerospace

Civil / Construction

Practical

Maintenance

Manufacturing

Technology

Chemical / Food

Biological

Energy / Power

Electrical / Electronic

Chemistry

Environment Sciences

Questionnaire Results Starting from the top, follow the darkened lines through 'People', 'Information' or 'Things' to the areas that interest you most. Your interest in each area is indicated by the thickness of the line.

Media / Writing

Numerical

Visual media

Software Development

Web / Internet

Data Management

Digital / Visual

Information

The World of Work

Verbal

Policy / Govt.

Law & Order

Business Operations

Sales / Marketing

Persuade

Political

Training / Employment

Advise & Help

Healthcare

Personal Well-being

Medicine

Music

Sport / Leisure

Health & Safety

Social Welfare

Care & Protect

Moving Image

Stage / Studio

Entertain / Hospitality

People

Elizabeth Barraclough


Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

The next step After reading this report and perhaps talking it over with your family and your adviser, you are probably ready to consider where your greatest strengths lie, and how they fit in with your interests. Maybe there is a perfect match between what you want to do and what you are best at doing. However, you may find that you could be good at things that you have never really thought about before. If so, it might be helpful to try to find out why you are not so interested in these areas and, maybe, to reconsider how you feel about them. In the 'World of work' chart, on the previous page and in the 'Career suggestions' section, are some job and career ideas for you to think about. More information on all of these careers can be found in your careers library and books such as the Job Guide. The Job Guide plus a range of other resources are available on-line and Page 20 lists a number of websites that you might find useful. Choosing a career will also depend on the sort of qualifications you will have. Your careers library should have plenty of information about careers, training, further study and the entry qualifications required. Your adviser will talk the report over with you and help to plan the next stages. If you are interested in a higher education course, try to go to the various open days offered by the universities, and read the prospectuses which describe the courses they offer and the sort of life you are likely to lead there. Deciding on a career is one of the most important decisions you will ever have to make, so you need to know as much as possible about yourself, about possible careers and how to go about entering them. This report should have helped you to think about your strengths and your preferences, and may be something you will want to keep as a useful guide in deciding your future.

The next step

15

The next step


Career Suggestions

Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Career Suggestions

The career suggestions listed on the following pages have been selected from a list of over 500 occupations. They match your particular abilities and interests. These suggestions do not take into account the subjects you are studying. Many tertiary courses require applicants to have specific subjects and/or knowledge, known as prerequirsites. Be sure to research any such requirements as part of your decision making process. These are not the only jobs for you to think about. You may have other career ideas to add to these, and you may have talents and abilities - such as sport or music which cannot be measured by paper and pencil tests.

Career Suggestions

16

Introduction


Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Career suggestions These career suggestions are made on the basis of your results. They do not form a definitive list of everything that is suitable and your research may well lead you in slightly different directions.

Environmental scientist

Associated Areas:

Environmental scientists study the environment and the impact that humans have made on it. Their work is to do with improving the environment; they produce solutions to problems that are socially acceptable and economically affordable. They use their scientific knowledge to look at problems, carry out research and test their ideas. The data is then analysed and reports are produced with suggested solutions. Environmental scientists can work in areas such as conservation, energy, waste management, flood defence and water quality. People who do this work are methodical and analytical with an enquiring mind; they have good problem solving skills.

Marine biologist Biologist Materials scientist Meteorologist Mechanical engineer Hydrographic surveyor Further Information

Meteorologist

Associated Areas:

Meteorologists observe the weather, using ground based and airborne systems and satellites, and interpret these observations with the help of computers to produce weather forecasts. These forecasts can be designed to help different groups such as pilots, shipping, armed forces, farmers and the emergency services. Another aspect of their work is to develop computer models that help them to forecast future climate. Meteorologists use computers and a variety of high-tech equipment to collect and analyse information. People in this career are observant, accurate, pay attention to detail and are able to understand and evaluate complex information.

Geologist / geophysicist Oceanographer Physicist Materials scientist Chemist Mathematician/ statistician Further Information

Veterinary surgeon / scientist

Associated Areas:

Veterinary surgeons diagnose and treat all types of animals, including family pets, farm and zoo animals. They discuss treatment for the animals with their owners, which may involve medication or surgery; other work can be illness prevention and vaccinations. Many vets work in general practice and others specialise, for example, in equine, farm or exotics; some work for the government. Veterinary scientists study animal diseases, looking at ways to combat and prevent them. They work in laboratories where they design and carry out experiments and record the results; they may be asked to check for certain diseases and ways in which they can be contained. They can work for the government, for pharmaceutical companies or in research.

Hospital doctor/ surgeon Animal physiotherapist Veterinary nurse Zoo keeper Dentist Meteorologist Further Information

Career Suggestions

17

Career Suggestions


Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Career suggestions

Marine biologist / ecologist

Associated Areas:

Marine biologists and ecologists study the ocean’s plant and animal life and how they relate to one another. This knowledge is used to understand how they are affected by a number of external factors; these include global warming and climate change, overfishing, pollution - from ships, industry, dumping of waste - coastal defences and tourism. The marine biologist collects information and samples from an area of interest. They test samples and record the results onto computer. This information is then used to produce reports and to make recommendations. People who do this work are observant, methodical and accurate in their work.

Oceanographer Biologist Environmental scientist Biochemist / biotechnologist Geneticist Forensic scientist Further Information

Materials scientist / engineer

Associated Areas:

Materials scientists study the properties of a wide range of materials, including glass, metals, ceramics and polymers. They study the production of the materials and their uses, examine why materials behave the way they do and what effect changes in such things as temperature, pressure and stress may have on them. This knowledge is then used to improve existing materials, look at ways of recycling materials and also to develop new ones. These materials can be used in transport, sport, aerospace, the medical industry and many others. In addition, some materials scientists work in accident investigation, if there is a suspicion that material failure may be a cause. People who do this work are enquiring, logical, methodical and have an eye for detail. They have good problem solving and IT skills.

Chemist Metallurgist Biochemist / biotechnologist Physicist Microbiologist Nanoscientist Further Information

Physicist

Associated Areas:

Physicists study the world around us in terms of matter, force and energy; they use this information to assist with a variety of developments. They can specialise in one of a number of areas, including space, aerospace, meteorology, energy, defence and medical physics. What they actually do depends on the area that they work in. In general, they use computer software systems to model complex processes, carry out and control experiments, then record their observations and results. They then analyse the information and use this to develop new products or improve existing ones; or they continue with further research. Physicists have high level IT and mathematical skills; they are logical, observant and accurate.

Materials scientist Electrical / electronic eng. Nanoscientist Chemist Mathematician/ statistician Meteorologist Further Information

Career Suggestions

18

Career Suggestions


Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Career suggestions

Chemist

Associated Areas:

Chemists study the makeup of various materials and chemicals; they may use this to create new products or to improve existing ones. Chemists can also use their research to develop testing systems for products and systems. They start by designing and conducting experiments, then they observe the process, record the results and analyse the data in order to produce reports. They work in many areas including manufacturing, forensics, hospital, pharmaceuticals, environmental areas and in public protection. Some work in research; others in sales and technical support. Chemists are observant, logical, methodical and accurate in their work.

Materials scientist Biochemist / biotechnologist Nanoscientist Physicist Metallurgist Government Scientist Further Information

Microbiologist

Associated Areas:

Microbiologists study microbes; where they are found, how they affect us and how they may be exploited. This could be in the treatment and prevention of disease, ensuring the safety of food or in the development of green technologies. Microbiology is also at the heart of the study of and the work carried out in genetics. Generally, microbiologists investigate specific microbes; they set up experiments, observe what happens and record the results. These results are then used to decide on the way further research will go or action to be taken. The major industries that employ microbiologists are food and drink, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, environmental and the health industry. The actual work done depends on the industry they work in. People who do this work are organised, methodical and observant.

Biochemist / biotechnologist Nanoscientist Materials scientist Chemist Biologist Physicist Further Information

Medical physicist

Associated Areas:

Medical physicists design, construct and develop equipment that is used in the treatment of patients. They develop equipment that uses x-rays, ultrasound scanning or nuclear medicine to examine what is happening in a patient’s body. Others use their knowledge to develop systems to protect people who come into contact with various types of machinery, such as x-ray machines. Some supervise the dosage of radiation that is used to treat tumours. Medical physicists are logical and methodical and have ability in maths and physics combined with an interest in biology.

Materials scientist Environmental scientist Chemist Biochemist / biotechnologist Meteorologist Biologist Further Information

Career Suggestions

19

Career Suggestions


Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Career suggestions

Doctor: hospital / surgery

Associated Areas:

Hospital doctors and surgeons specialise in one of many branches of medicine. Their first introduction to a patient is usually as the result of a referral from a general practitioner (GP); sometimes the patient may be admitted direct to the hospital. They meet the patient, discuss their symptoms and carry out an examination and further tests; this helps them to arrive at a diagnosis. Doctors work in teams with other healthcare professionals to decide on the best treatment to offer patients and monitor their progress; this may include medication and/or surgery. Doctors need to keep themselves up-to-date with changes in treatments, new technology and ways that they can work. They are caring, compassionate, patient and able to work under pressure.

Doctor: Community Veterinary surgeon Dentist Chemical engineer Clinical engineer Pharmacy Further Information

Geologist / geophysicist

Associated Areas:

Geologists and geophysicists can be employed by oil and gas companies and also water, mining and engineering companies. They study the structure and physical properties of the earth and its resources. This information is used to plan programmes of exploration of potentially useful sites that contain resources such as water, gas, oil and minerals. They carry out surveys, tests and mapping exercises and work out the size of any potential resources. These results are written up and they make suggestions on ways to carry out the exploration. This work combines a mix of laboratory and field work. People who do this work are organised, analytical and pay attention to detail.

Meteorologist Oceanographer Environmental scientist Veterinary surgeon Materials scientist Biochemist / biotechnologist Further Information

Nanoscientist / technologist

Associated Areas:

Nanoscientists and technologists work on the application of tiny (nano) particles in industry. This is a growing industry and new areas for the use of nanoscience are always being found. Currently, their work can be found in the sports industry, to develop better equipment; in stain and water repellent clothing; in the development of better implants used in medicine and for more accurate targeting of drugs in order to reduce side-effects. Other industries that use nanotechnology include environmental related areas, computing and manufacturing. Some work in research, where they find out what nanoparticles can do and how they can be adapted for use. Nanoscientists use specialist equipment such as electron and atomic-force microscopes; they tend to work with other scientists and engineers. People who do this work are questioning and work with a great deal of accuracy.

Materials scientist Biochemist / biotechnologist Metallurgist Chemist Chemical engineer Mechanical engineer Further Information

Career Suggestions

20

Career Suggestions


Morrisby Guidance Report

Elizabeth Barraclough

Further information There is no shortage of information available about careers, education and training. Some useful websites and titles are listed below. The Careers Library at school may have many other useful information sources. Morrisby Report on-line - One place to start your exploration is the website for the Morrisby Report. From www.morrisby.com register according to the instructions on the site. Your password protected space gives access to an electronic version of this Report and further resources including the Careers page. Within the Careers page you can browse information on all the careers suggested in this report and follow links to the Job Guide and myfuture. Each career lists 20 similar areas allowing you to broaden your search for the right career for you. www.jobguide.deewr.gov.au - An on-line version of “The Job Guide”. Designed as a primary source of information for Year 10 students. www.myfuture.edu.au - A site to help with career planning and for researching careers information - for all ages. www.jobjuice.gov.au - A website aimed at young people. It offers information on choosing career directions, job seeking tips, apprenticeships etc. www.itsyourfuture.com.au - This features careers in many areas of the Manufacturing sector. An overview of each sector is provided, with profiles of workers and links to further relevant sites. www.careergov.com.au - Covering careers in Government sectors. Short videos for each sector provide further insight into various careers. www.youthcentral.vic.gov.au - A diverse site focusing on areas of interest to young people. A broad range of “Career Profiles” provides personalised information about jobs through the responses of workers themselves. They speak about what they do, the pros and cons of their jobs and the training they have taken to get into their occupations. www.abc.net.au/acedayjobs - A series of profiles and videos, featuring people in cutting edge jobs. www.bigplans.com.au - This site provides information on a wide range of professional and trade careers through profiling people involved in the building industry. www.GradsOnLine.com.au - A site that focuses on graduate destinations. Their activities, salaries and jobs. Recommended Reading Career FAQs – A series of up-to-date, Australian vocational guidance books, with separate titles across a wide range of careers. Refer to www.iSubscribe.com.au for details. Cambridge Student Career Guides - Two or three page entries cover Career Facts, Training, related Jobs and Personal Skills and Qualities. Then each presents a profile of a person in the job, together with a diary type entry for a "Typical Day" as well as what they both like and dislike about the job. See: www.cambridge.edu.au Tertiary Course and Application Information Good Universities Guide (www.thegoodguides.com.au) - Compares universities across Australia on the basis of their performance rating, with additional information on institutions, courses, careers and scholarships. www.goingtouni.gov.au - Through “Coursefinder” this site provides details on all courses offered by Universities and Higher Education Providers throughout Australia, allowing users to compare courses in terms of content, duration, location and costs. Also includes information on fees, loans, scholarships and student support services. Tertiary Entrance Information - Each state produces a guide to tertiary courses - listing tertiary courses available to students at the end of Year 12, depending upon their final results. They are called by various names eg VTAC Guide (Victoria) - www.vtac.edu.au/publications /guide.html, UAC Guide (NSW) www.uac.edu.au, SATAC Guide (South Australia), QTAC Guide(Queensland).

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Morrisby Report sample

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Morrisby Report sample

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