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Fall 2008 • Volume 5 Issue 1

A publication of Jackson Community College

Questions about the JCC programs and services described in this publication should be directed to Student Services at 517.796.8425. Comments or questions about the publication itself can be directed to the Marketing Department at 517.796.8416. Publisher: Editor: Writer: Creative Director/Design: Photography:

Bang up jobs: Automotive programs expand to include collision repair

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Cynthia S. Allen Dotty Karkheck Marilynn Fryer Lisa Drake Lisa Drake Ashley Fauser Marilynn Fryer

JCC Board of Trustees:

Dennis DaPra Chairman

Philip E. Hoffman Treasurer

Dr. Edward A. Mathein Vice Chairman

John M. Crist Trustee

Christina L. Medlar Secretary

Sheila A. Patterson Trustee

University connections: JCC’s four-year partners ease transfer for students

Do’s and don’ts for job seekers

Stand out from the crowd with a few simple job search tips

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Careers in criminal justice, corrections

not always what you see on T.V.

Top 10 jobs for the area

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Dr. Daniel J. Phelan President/CEO

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Career Choices is published twice a year. All rights reserved. No part of the material may be reproduced or used in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage retrieval system without the permission of the publisher.

To the rescue:

EMS workers irreplaceable in an emergency

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Video games and beyond... 3D design useful in a variety of fields

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College briefs

Executive Officers: Dr. Daniel J. Phelan, President/CEO William Strohaver, Executive Vice President for Educational and Student Services Tom Vainner, Vice President Administrative Services

It is the policy of Jackson Community College that no person shall be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin or ancestry, age, sex, marital status, or handicap, excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to, discrimination in any program or activity for which it is responsible for or for which it receives financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Education. Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400 Chicago, IL 60602-2504 (312) 236-0456 www.ncacihe.org

Jackson Community College 2111 Emmons Road Jackson, MI 49201 www.jccmi.edu


by Marilynn Fryer


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aking what’s been broken look new again is the task of automotive collision repair specialists.

curriculum to ensure that students learn what is needed in today’s workplace, suggested collision repair as a possible program. Collision repair is a different specialty than Starting this Fall, JCC will partner with automotive technology, and because the Jackson Area Career Center and JCC doesn’t have the facilities for it the LISD TECH Center in Adrian to while local career centers do, the offer classes in automotive collision College will begin by partnering with repair services. JACC and LISD TECH Center. Automotive body repairers, often called collision repair technicians, straighten bent bodies, remove dents, and replace crumpled parts that cannot be fixed. They draw on a broad knowledge of automotive construction and repair techniques to decide how to handle each job based on what the vehicle is made of and what needs to be fixed. “There are excellent opportunities in the field. Every car that gets into an accident will need to be worked on by a collision specialist. This will give students employability skills that industry looks for,” said Les Coxon, automotive instructor.

Classes will focus on the five major body repair groups: • Collision repair fundamentals; • Non-structural analysis and damage repair; • Structural analysis and damage repair; • Painting and refinishing; • Mechanical and electrical components repair.

Collision repair is a good career field for anyone who loves cars and who enjoys fixing something that is broken to make it look like new again. Job opportunities should increase in the coming years as more Classes follow the Inter-Industry technicians are needed and a large Conference on Auto Collision Repair number of current repair specialists (I-CAR) Enhanced Delivery Curriculum, retire. Earnings range from $10.10 a nationally recognized standard in to $28.71 per hour, according to the automotive collision repair education. Bureau of Labor Statistics. “I-CAR is the industry standard “I’ve always been fascinated with for insurance and collision repair cars, and I’m not scared of hard specialists,” Coxon said. work,” said Andy Hammond, HanoverJCC’s automotive advisory committee, Horton senior enrolled in the collision repair program at the JACC. “You get a group of local automotive industry personnel who make suggestions on to learn a lot of new things all the

time. I enjoy custom work, bringing a vehicle back to its former condition.”

Automotive technology improvements Keeping your car running smoothly is more important than ever today as gas prices continue to rise. Having well-trained automotive technicians is important, and Jackson Community College has a top-quality automotive technology program that can put students on the road to a great career. JCC offers a full range of automotive service technology programs to prepare students to become automotive technicians. Students may complete an associate degree, certificate, specialize in either Toyota or Ford vehicles through two partnership programs with those manufacturers, or complete certificates or skill set credentials that can be used to go to work right away, and then used as building blocks if students want to continue their education. Manufacturers are constantly improving vehicles, and today’s automotive technician must possess a great deal of knowledge, be computer literate and have a high level of reading comprehension to read and understand repair manuals and online information. Technicians have developed into diagnostic, hightech problem solvers. continued on next page

Looking for more information? careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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Student Profile:

Perry Weaver

After several years of 65-hour work weeks and dealing with the hustle and bustle of automotive engineering, Perry Weaver lost his job when his plant’s work was outsourced to Mexico. With a lifelong love and hobby of working with and restoring automobiles, Weaver used benefits from the North American Free Trade Agreement – Trade Readjustment Act to go back to JCC and get an associate degree in automotive technology. He has recently opened his own shop in Concord, Weaver’s Pro Tech.

“For our program, just like any other college program, you need to be a quality student,” Coxon said. Will Aponte was looking for a career change when he enrolled in JCC’s automotive program three years ago. He is finishing up his Associate in Applied Science degree in automotive technology and has been working for the past year as a technician at Royal Chevrolet in Coldwater. “I would absolutely recommend the program. Make sure it’s something you want to get into, because it’s not easy. You have to really want to do it and enjoy doing it.” In recent years, JCC’s automotive program has added classes introducing

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hybrid automobiles, alternate fuels, diesel technology and undercar repair that includes basic shop procedures such as welding and pipe bending. “These are all areas that today’s technicians need to know about,” Coxon said. Students with an automotive technology degree have a variety of job opportunities available to them, including parts representatives, parts designers, shop owners, service writers and advisors and telephone technical assistance specialists. Employment for auto mechanics is expected to increase in the coming years, and earnings generally range from $33,900 to $52,300 per year.

Fall 2008 • Career Choices • 517.796.8467

Perry Weaver

“I had the option to transfer and relocate, but my wife and I decided that’s not what we wanted to do,” Weaver said. “This was going to be something I did after retiring, but I decided to do it now. I like a small, personal business.” Weaver’s Pro Tech Shop began in a hobby shop where he maintains his classic Chevelle Malibu sport coupe that he’s owned for 31 years, a prize winner at many area car shows. Weaver is now state certified and will do all car repairs as well as classic car, muscle car and street rod repair, restoration and custom work. “We’ll do anything you want on a car, repair work, tune-up, oil change. We also hope to get more into restoration work,” Weaver said. He and his wife take the Malibu to several local area car shows throughout the summer. “We want to be a part of the local community and to support the local community,” he said. His experience at JCC was very good, he said, and he uses every class he took in his daily business. He also enjoyed the friendliness and camaraderie the instructors promoted with the automotive students. “It’s nice to have our own business, and JCC’s program helped prepare me for it,” Weaver said.


Looking for more information? careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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by Marilynn Fryer

Jackson Community College partners with a number of colleges and universities to help students who want to transfer. Three institutions have offices on the Jackson campus: Siena Heights University, Spring Arbor University and Eastern Michigan University. They are located on the first floor of McDivitt Hall, a “university transfer center” area.

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Eastern Michigan University Eastern Michigan University has been offering classes in Jackson on the Jackson campus for several years. The office is staffed by on-site personnel who can assist students in registering for classes, becoming admitted to Karen Peacock the university, scheduling advising appointments and more. Programs offered on the Jackson campus include: master’s degree in curriculum and instruction, master’s degree in educational leadership, bachelor’s degree in cross-disciplinary studies,

Fall 2008 • Career Choices • 517.796.8467

and nursing – Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing completion. EMU’s main campus is located in Ypsilanti, but students may also take credit and non-credit classes at its continuing education centers throughout the state, including JCC. Karen Peacock, EMU representative at JCC, said EMU’s graduate programs are designed primarily for teachers returning to school, and many current registered nurses return for the R.N. to B.S.N. program. To learn more about EMU offerings at JCC, contact Karen Peacock at 787.7265. EMU’s office is also located on the first floor of McDivitt Hall just off the McDivitt Commons area.


Siena Heights University Siena Heights University at JCC has been providing bachelor degree completion programs to adult students since 1998. Prospective students may stop by and find out more about Siena Heights’ offerings Monday through Friday. Students interested in transferring should stop by the Siena Heights office early in their studies at JCC to be sure they take the best classes for transfer. “Students can complete their bachelor’s degree right on the JCC campus,” said SHU representative Lesley Weidner. “We’re here Lesley Weidner to answer questions and help keep students on track, to help them maximize their credits and take the right classes.” Classes are offered on the JCC campus, and there are evening, weekend and online offerings. Students can transfer in 90 credit hours toward a 120-credit hour bachelor’s degree, representing a cost savings. Jackson area bachelor degrees include: accounting; applied science; business

administration; criminal justice; and multidisciplinary studies. Siena Heights’ main campus is located in Adrian, Mich, and enrolls about 1,200 students in associate, bachelor’s and master’s degree programs. In addition, SHU has degree completion centers in eight cities across Michigan, as well as online. The Siena Heights office is located just off the McDivitt Commons area on the first floor. Stop in and see Lesley Weidner to learn more about SHU.

Spring Arbor University Spring Arbor University has an office in McDivitt Hall where students can learn more about the transfer process from JCC. SAU’s Professor of Education, Miriam Sailers, keeps regular office hours on Monday, Gary Mason and Erin May, from the SAU Admissions Office are there on Tuesday and Glenn Yamakwa, a representative from SAU’s School of Adult Studies program, is available on Wednesdays. Sailers advises students who may be interested in transfer to Spring Arbor to meet with an advisor right away to work out a plan for which classes they will take at JCC and how to make the transfer process user-friendly. Students can transfer to Spring

Arbor’s traditional programs, located on its main campus west of Jackson. Spring Arbor’s Adult Studies program, located in downtown Jackson and in various locations across the state, allows students to complete a bachelor’s degree in business, family Miriam Sailers life education, nursing, organizational development, social work and education. JCC and SAU have an established partnership in teacher education which began in 2000 and has yielded numerous positive results. A JCC student can transfer up to 80 semester hours to SAU, representing a substantial savings in cost. General education courses and major/ minor courses are continuously being aligned to provide equivalent course work. Students also benefit from joint programs between the two schools such as the Future Teachers Conference, Education Forums, Epsilon Chi (Education Connection) Student Organization events which provide an integrated and “seamless” college experience over all four years. Call the SAU office, also located just off the McDivitt Commons, at 796.8534 or Dr. Sailers at 517.474.6674.

Looking for more information? careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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by Marilynn Fryer


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n today’s competitive job market, landing and being successful in the interview is vital to finding a job. Local employment advisors offer the following do’s and don’ts for job seekers.

Do: Choose the right résumé format.

When it comes to résumés, one size does not fit all! Two primary types of résumés are chronological and functional. “Chronological résumés are better if you have a steady tenure of employment without breaks,” said Anthony Rana, director of employment services for South Central Michigan Works. “If you do have breaks in your employment, a functional résumé that focuses on

your skills would probably serve you better.”

Don’t: Include too much information on your résumé. Whether you’re a new graduate just entering the work world or a career veteran looking for their next step, employment specialists urge job seekers to keep their résumé short, preferably to one page.

“Make sure that your résumé works for the particular job you are seeking,” said Manuel Salazar, employment services manager with South Central Michigan Works! Lenawee County office. “Show what your skills are and make it short and sweet. Employers don’t have a lot of time when they are sitting and reading 30 or 40 résumés.”

To keep your résumé short, don’t volunteer unsolicited information that isn’t necessary to the job. “We have always had issues with people putting too much personal information on résumés,” said Terry Ogg, area manager for Manpower. “You should make sure there is nothing on there that can be used against you; for example, when you graduated from high school, hobbies, or your Social Security number. Focus on your skills, education and abilities.” Rana adds: “I like the old adage, ‘You want to sell the sizzle, not the steak.’ The whole goal of your résumé should be to whet an employer’s appetite. You want to make a potential employer curious enough to call you in for an interview. If a continued on next page

Looking for more information? careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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résumé does this, it is working for you! If you give too much information, you can potentially eliminate yourself from consideration.”

Do: Carefully check your résumé.

Fall 2008 • Career Choices • 517.796.8467

Any résumé and cover letter should be professional-looking and free of typos and grammatical mistakes. “Have somebody proof it and see what they would think if they were an employer. It’s good to have someone else’s opinion,” Salazar said. A clear, concise objective statement is important, he adds.

Don’t: Project an unprofessional image. When you do go in for an interview, you may be saying a lot before you even open your mouth to speak. “An employer will make an initial judgment of you based on dress and appearance within the first eight seconds or so,” Salazar said. “Put your best foot forward by dressing professionally, being clean and neat, and covering up any tattoos or body piercings that may be a distraction.” Projecting a positive, professional image today also extends beyond your résumé, appearance and experience. When applying for a position, make sure that your e-mail address is appropriate, and if a potential employer gets your answering machine or voice mail, make sure your outgoing message projects a positive image. For those with social networking pages on Internet sites like Facebook or MySpace.com, use discretion on how much personal information is available online to the general public,


“ because employers may search for potential candidates. “Though it’s not a company practice (to check web sites), I do speak to our interns about being professional with things like MySpace and voice mail messages on cell phones when they go out to look for jobs,” said Bryan Friedrich, human resources consultant with Consumers Energy. “It’s ultimately up to the individual how much they want to reveal. If you’re looking for a professional position, you need to take that into account.”

Do: Research your potential employer. Ultimately an employer would like to know what you as a potential employee can bring to their business. A first step for any job seeker going into an interview should be learning

a little about what kind of business or organization they are applying to, what their operation is, who they serve, and so on. “Know something about the employer you are going to see,” Salazar said. “Two or three days before, do some research on that employer, know something about what kind of business they run. That will present some conversation for you during the interview and show the potential employer that you are interested.”

Don’t: Be negative about previous employers or work situations. “Don’t talk about past employers in a negative way. You don’t want to bad mouth an employer. Always try to keep it positive,” Salazar said. A potential employer may assume that

you will bad mouth their operation in the future.

Do: Project confidence and self-esteem and be polite. A job interview isn’t the time to be shy; you want to let the potential employer know what skills and traits you have to offer them. It is a time to let the employer know why you think you would be a good fit for the position. “Do show some selfconfidence, but don’t overdo it either. Make sure what you are talking about is something you have learned about that employer, and what you can offer,” Salazar said. Politeness is important also. Have a firm handshake, do not interrupt when someone else is speaking, and after the interview, send a letter of thanks for the opportunity.

Looking for more information? careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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Careers in criminal justice, corrections not always like what you see on TV

by Marilynn Fryer

hile TV shows like “Law and Order” and “CSI” interest many in the different areas of criminal justice and corrections work, the jobs aren’t always like what one sees on TV.

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“You definitely need to have compassion and respect for others,” Kennedy said. “You are working with people all the time, working with diverse populations. You will be communicating with people of all backgrounds and levels of economic status.”

officer, firefighter and medical first responder. “We respond to many kinds of calls, and you have to deal with people and their problems and be able to help them,” Pohl said. “It’s a great feeling to know you are helping someone. You know you’ve done your job.”

“Everyday is something different,” said Mary Jo Kennedy, criminal justice coordinator at JCC and a police officer with the Jackson City Police for 30 years. “A lot of people go into law enforcement thinking it’s all arrests and investigation.”

“Police work is good for someone who enjoys working with people,” said Officer OnDreana Campbell of the Jackson City Police Department, an alumna of JCC. “It’s good for someone with a positive attitude. You have to enjoy doing it.”

It’s all about people

Officer Chris Pohl of the Blackman Township Department of Public Safety is trained as a police

Corrections officers oversee individuals who have been arrested and are awaiting trial or are sentenced to serve time in a jail or prison. Kevin Lindsey is currently an inspector for the Department of Corrections and over his 21-year career has served as a corrections officer, sergeant, lieutenant, captain, acting assistant deputy warden and acting assistant resident supervisor.

Criminal justice and corrections both center on working with people.

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Fall 2008 • Career Choices • 517.796.8467


“My work is interesting because there is always an opportunity to learn something,” Lindsey said. “Whenever I’m investigating some kind of misconduct, there’s always a new way for someone to beat you and I enjoy trying to play the game and catch them doing what they’re not supposed to do.”

There will be paperwork In addition to what many typically picture a police officer doing – patrolling the streets, responding to calls for service – there is also paper work and administrative duties. Every call and incident must be logged and have a report written on it, which takes a fair amount of an officer’s time. Police officers also participate in service projects and community education, such as public safety lectures to school children. Corrections officers also provide oral and written reports on inmate conduct and on the quality and quantity of work done by inmates. “Those in law enforcement need to have very good communication skills,” said Matt Heins, chief of police for the City of Jackson and JCC Board of Trustees member. “You need a very solid background in English because when you enter the field you will be doing quite a bit of report writing.”

Open all night While law enforcement and corrections work offer many diverse opportunities, new graduates should realize they will likely not see daytime shifts for a while. “Corrections is a 24-hour operation, and when you start in new, you will end up on the second or third shift,” Lindsey said. “You also end up with days off in the middle of the week.” “You will not have a weekend or holiday off for quite a while,” Pohl said. “You give up your spare time to help other people.”

Crimes not solved in an hour Technology and science have helped police investigation tremendously, but in-depth forensic work often takes weeks to receive, not an hour like shown on television. While the Michigan State Police have a local laboratory, most agencies send forensic work to a state crime lab in Lansing. “We have a lot of technology that helps,” Kennedy said. “But results often take months to get back.”

Risks not something you dwell on While many may think of the high-risk situations that can come with jobs in these area, those working the field say that’s not what they think about each day. “There is risk in any job,” Lindsey said.

Kennedy said it’s not something you dwell on. “Officers go through rigorr ous training and are taught the tools of the trade to protect themselves. You learn every precaution to keep yourself safe, and it will kick in when you need it.” Jackson Community College offers programs for those interested in going into law enforcement and corrections. Corrections officers may complete a 15 credit hour program to become State of Michigan certified, the minimum requirement. They may also continue on to earn a certificate or Associate in Applied Science degree. “There is opportunity for advancement within the Department of Corrections, but some positions require an associate or bachelor’s degree,” Lindsey said. “The pay for the Department of Corrections is good, and it gets better as you go further.” JCC offers both a certificate and an Associate in Applied Science degree in law enforcement. Requirements for law enforcement agencies vary, but an associate degree is a good start. Students may also go on to a four-year university to earn a bachelor’s degree. JCC has an agreement with Siena Heights University in which students may transfer up to 90 credits from JCC toward a bachelor’s degree, and all Siena Heights courses are offered on JCC’s campus.

Looking for more information? careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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Top 10 hot jobs for the area Looking for a career that will be in demand? Here are several key fields for the Jackson area expected to be in demand through 2012 with educational programs available at Jackson Community College.

by Marilynn Fryer

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Medical Records/Health Information Technicians

Demand for skilled medical records technicians is expected to climb more than a 46 6 percent by the ye ea ar 2012. These health care workers manage an individual patient’s medical record, containingg observations, medical or surgical interventions and treatment outcomes. Some specialize in coding patients’ medical information for insurance purposes. JCC offers an associate degree and certificate in medical assisting, a medical receptionist/ insurance biller certificate, and a medical receptionist/ transcriptionist certificate.

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Medical Assistants

Medical assistant are multiskilled health practitioners trained to work in both the business and clinical parts of a medical office. With increasing utilizations of medical office assistants in the rapidly growing health care industries, demand is expected to grow 38 percent by the year 2012. Clinical duties may include taking medical histories, explainingg treatment procedurres to patients, preparing ng patients for examination and assisting in the exam room. Administrative tasks may include office communications, managing patient health information, n processing insurance claims and

Fall 2008 • Career Choices • 517.796.8467

billing, scheduling appointments and arranging hospital admissions and diagnostic tests. JCC offers an associate degree and certificate in medical assisting.

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Registered Nurses

Registered nurses provide care, treatment, counseling and health education to the sick and injured. Th hey assist in the maintenance off health and the prevention or man nage ement of illness, injjuryy or disability. Nurssing is the N la arggest health ccare e occupation, and demand for reggiste ered nurses is expected to t increase 21.9 percent by the year 2012. JCC offers an associate degree in nursing which is an excellent entry into the field, as well as an associate degree programs for licensed practical nurses who would like to become RNs. Nurses may also continue on to earn a bachelor’s degree or even a master’s degree, which will open up more job opportunities.

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Police and Sheriff’s Patrol Officers

P Police and sheriff’s patrol officers perform a very important job as the ey work to protect the public’s lives and a property. The enforce laws and statutes, statute investigate accciden nts, patrol an area, apprehend and arresst subjects, and servve legal processes of the courts. The jjob ca arries personal risk, bu ris ut many can’t think of doin ng anything else. Demand for police and sheriff’s


patrol officers is expecting to grow 19.9 percent by the year 2012.

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Licensed Practical Nurses

Licensed practical nurses play a big supporting role in patient care. They care for the sick, injured, convalesccent c t or disabled underr the direction of physicians and registered nurses. They may provide basic bedside care, perform routine tine laboratory tests, monitor patients for adverse reactions to medications and treatments and teach family members how to care for a relative or teach patients about good health habits. Employment of LPNs is expected to grow 15.3 percent by the year 2012. JCC offers a certificate program in practical nursing, necessary for entry into the field.

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Computer Support Specialists

The explosive use of computers has created demand for specialists who provide advice to users, as well as for the day-today administration, maintenance, and support of computer systems and networks. Computer support specialists provide technical assistance e, support and advice to computer system users. They answer questions and help to resolve computer problems for clients in person,, by telephone or from a remote location. Demand for specialists is expected to increase 14.9 percent by 2016. JCC offers an associate degree and certificates in microcomputer

applications and networking specialist, and a concentration in computer service technician.

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Electricians

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Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics

Electricians bring electricity into homes, businesses, and factories. Electricians lay out, asssemble, install, maintain and ttestt electrical fixtures, apparatus, con ntrol equipment, and wiring used in h heating and refrigeration, lighting, pow wer, intercommunications, air conditio oning, and electrical systems e of ho ome, facto ories and othe er buildings. Emp ployment of electrricians is exxpecte ed to increase 13.6 percent by the year 2016. 2016 JCC offers offe an associate degree, certificate in electrician and a concentration in electrical basics.

Automotive service technicians’ and mechanics’ responsibilities have evolved from simple mechanical repairs to high-level technology-related work. The increasing sophistication of automobiles requires workers who o can use computerized shop equipment q p and work witth ele ectronic co omponents while main m ntaining ttheir skills with ttradittional hand to ools. JCC offers asssocia ate degree, certificate, and several concentrations in the automotive a service area to help students get

their start in the field. Employment of automotive service technicians and mechanics is expected to grow 13.1 percent by the year 2016.

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Industrial Machinery Mechanics

Machinery maintenance and repair workers work in industry and are responsible for cleaning and lubricating machinery, performing basic diagnostic tests, checking performance and testing damaged machine parts to determine whether major repairs are necesssary. Demand for industrial trial mechanics is expected to increase 12 percent by the year 2016. JCC offers associate degree programs in manufacturing technology/ machining and manufacturing technology/maintenance.

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Machinists

Machinists use machine tools, such as lathes, milling machines, and machining centers, to cent t produce precission metal parts. p Theyy use their kno owledge of the working properties of m metals and their skill with machine tools to to o plan and carry out th he operations needed to make mac machined products that meet precise specifications. Employment of machinists is expected to increase 5.2 percent by the year 2016. JCC offers an associate degree in manufacturing technology/machining.

Looking for more information? careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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hen someone’s life hangs in the balance, the decisions and reactions of emergency personnel are vital. Incidents as varied as automobile accidents, heart attacks, drownings, childbirths and gunshot wounds all require immediate attention. To meet the demand for qualified emergency medical technicians and paramedics, Jackson Community College is working in partnership with Huron Valley Ambulance to provide instruction for the College’s emergency medical services program.

Depending on the nature of the emergency, EMS personnel typically are dispatched to the scene by a 911 operator and often work closely with police and fire department personnel. Once they arrive, they determine the nature and extent of the patient’s condition, while trying to ascertain whether the patient has pre-existing medical problems. Following policies and protocols, they give appropriate emergency care and when necessary, transport the patient. EMTs and paramedics also treat patients with minor injuries on the scene of an accident or at their home without transporting them to a medical facility. Some paramedics work as part of helicopter flight crews that transport critically ill or injured. All treatments are carried out under the supervision of medical doctors.

by Marilynn Fryer


There are various levels to emergency care in the state of Michigan. The beginning level comprises training in basic first aid and CPR. The next is Medical First Responder, which several fire and police officials complete. An EMT has the emergency skills to assess a patient’s condition and manage respiratory, cardiac and trauma emergencies. An EMT-Specialist is trained in more advanced procedures such as administration of intravenous fluids, application of advanced airway techniques and equipment to assist patients experiencing respiratory emergencies. Paramedics provide the most extensive prehospital care, including administering drugs orally and intravenously, interpreting electrocardiograms (EKGs), performing endotracheal intubations, and using monitors, manual defibrillators and other complex equipment. Shaun Pochik, education manager with Huron Valley Ambulance, is

working in joint partnership with JCC in re-developing the EMS program. A paramedic himself, he says there is a demand for qualified EMTs and paramedics today. “Growth is projected through the year 2014,” Pochik said. Most opportunities for EMTs and paramedics are expected in hospitals and private ambulance services. Competition will be greater for jobs in local government, including both fire and police. Opportunities will be best for those who have advanced certifications, such as EMT-Paramedic, as clients and patients demand higher levels of care before arriving at the hospital. For those considering a career in emergency medical services, some important characteristics include the ability to work and use sound judgment under stress, leadership qualities, the ability to make decisions and be quick thinking, Pochik said. Huron Valley Ambulance is a nationally accredited, nonprofit

community service providing health transportation and call center services in an eight-county region in southeast and south central Michigan. Headquartered in Ann Arbor, HVA operates Jackson Community Ambulance, Monroe Community Ambulance, Lenawee Community Ambulance, and Albion Community Ambulance. They also dispatch for Alliance Mobile Health. HVA is the only private EMS Education facility whose paramedic program is nationally accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs. Earnings of EMTs and paramedics depend on the employment setting and geographic location as well as the individual’s training and experience. According to a survey conducted by the Journal of Emergency Medical Services, average annual salaries were $35,259 for an EMT-Paramedic, $28,527 for an EMT-Intermediate, and $28,064 for an EMT-Basic.

Looking for more information? careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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o you marvel at the art work that goes into a video game or wonder how the stunning three-dimensional environments and characters are built for games or movies?

JCC now offers a degree program in three-dimensional design and animation that can help put interested students on the road to an exciting and growing career. The new Associate in Applied Science degree in 3D design and animation focuses on the visual and artistic side of modeling and animation. Completion prepares students for entry-level careers in digital illustration for motion picture and video industries, advertising and computer systems design services.

Video game design is just one aspect of the career opportunities.

Digital art by Jason Welsh

by Marilynn Fryer

“That is so limiting to what the degree is. The degree focuses on use of the software in a wide variety of aspects of the production of artwork and animation,” said Jason Welsh, an adjunct instructor who has taught for several years at the Jackson Area Career Center and is a freelance animator and artist. “Think of it this way: a customer calls the student up and wants a logo done on a web site for a concept for a new product, and they want to see it in a 3D form. This student can say yes. The same student starts doing more and more unique things that others cannot because he knows a workflow that others do not.”


JCC students learn the latest in industry standard software, including: • Zbrush 3.1, a high-resolution sculpting program. • Maya, a product of Autodesk used for polygon modeling, animation, dynamics, rendering and more, with literally 100s of potential jobs available for those who use it well. • Students will also use a game engine that can be used in conjunction with Maya, Photoshop, Blender and Zbrush to produce 3D worlds and player characters. Student Bob Kulka hopes to put his skills in 3D animation to work in industry. “After spending 25 years working with customers, suppliers and employees in the manufacturing industry, the ability to effectively Bob Kulka

communicate stands out as essential,” Kulka said. “Workplace diversity in language, culture and education requires a new approach. Globalization has only magnified the need for new ways to communicate. This program at JCC offers potential solutions to this problem. Using 3D computer models and animation, most business processes can be broken down into simple visual stories. Whether it’s adjusting a machine tool, measuring a part, assembling a product or processing paperwork, visual 3D animated instructions can transcend language, cultural and educational barriers.” Careers in the 3D modeling and animation may not be the typical 8 to 5. Digital artists can have options that will allow them to travel, or work out of a home-based studio. For those with the talent and determination, the career can provide a good income. “You must be a very hard working, dedicated individual,” Welsh said. Artistic ability can help, but

interested students shouldn’t be scared away if they don’t necessarily consider themselves an “artist.” They should, however, be flexible and able to continue learning even after their education is complete. Kulka said, “Many students equate this program to their video gaming experiences. Their intent is to work for game manufacturers as character designers, texture artists, programmers and so on. Like video games, this program is fun, but it also requires hard work and adherence to deadlines. In a world that delivers video content to cell phone and iPods, the future opportunity to develop content using 3D modeling and animation is enormous.” “The student must realize that by completing this degree, their learning will never stop. The software changes, and new technology comes into play all the time. What employers are looking for are people that are flexible enough to change along with this sea of technology,” Welsh said.

Looking for more information? careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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College Briefs JCC awards scholarship dollars for coming year Concerned about how to pay for college? Jackson Community College and the JCC Foundation offer a variety of scholarships to help students with their college expenses. JCC offers institutional scholarships for students, and several private donors have endowed student scholarships with the JCC Foundation. JCC has awarded more than a quarter million dollars in scholarships to students for the 2008-09 academic year. For the coming academic year, JCC and the Foundation awarded $293,900 in scholarships to 326 students. JCC awarded $15,000 in Presidential Scholarships and $53,900 in Recognition of Excellence Scholarships. The JCC Foundation awarded $225,000 in scholarships. Several scholarships are available to students who qualify. Scholarship monies can significantly cut a student’s college costs and break down financial barriers. “While our tuition may be modest by some standards, many students would not be able to afford a JCC education without financial assistance,” said Jason Valente, executive director of the Jackson Community College Foundation. “JCC and the Foundation, through its many friends and donors, are pleased to assist deserving students with scholarship funds.” Don’t miss this opportunity for financial assistance with your college education. Visit the JCC web site at www.jccmi.edu to find one convenient application for scholarships.

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Fall 2008 • Career Choices • 517.796.8467

In addition, many civic clubs and organizations, churches, youth programs, business organizations and more offer scholarships. Check out different resources you, a parent or family member may have available when seeking scholarship money.


GED tests offered at JCC

For those who haven’t finished high school, Jackson Community College offers the tests necessary to complete a GED on campus. The Tests of General Educational Development (GED Tests) are designed to measure the major and lasting academic outcomes that students would normally acquire by completing high school. Multiple choice tests in five subject areas are used, and each GED candidate must write a timed essay on an assigned topic in order to pass the GED. Subject areas are language arts-writing, social studies, science, language arts-reading and mathematics. JCC offers the GED test in Bert Walker Hall, room 108, on the Jackson campus. Upcoming schedule is as follows: • • • •

Sept. 5 & 26 Oct. 10 & 24 Nov. 7 & 21 Dec. 5 & 19

Generally, on the first Friday of the month writing and math are offered in the morning and science, social studies and reading in the afternoon. The schedule reverses on the next Friday of the month. Each test is $25 and pre-registration is required. Please Contact Mary Pallesen at 517.841.5637 to pre-register for tests or for further information. Contact GED Examiner Mary Ann Rainey at 517.796.8454 for more information or for GED transcripts. For those who need GED preparation prior to testing, we offer these suggestions: • Purchase a book on GED preparation through a local bookstore or the JCC college bookstore; • Contact the JCC Center for Student Success (CSS), at 517.796.8435 to register for a computer based interactive program with JCC instructor, Susan Berendes Wood; • Contact Mary Pallesen at the Jackson Office of South Central MI Works at 517-841-5637 for individualized instruction; • Visit one of these web sites for other individual study options: JCC GED Preparation http://www.jccmi.edu/success/prep-ged.htm ACE: GED Testing Service http://www.acenet.edu/AM/Template. cfm?Section=GEDTS Learning Express Library http://www.learnatest.com/ LearningExpressLibrary/ Steck-Vaughn: GED Practice http://www.gedpractice.com/ Test Prep Review: GED http://www.testprepreview.com/ ged_practice.htm

JCC to offer men’s and women’s soccer this fall Men’s and women’s soccer is in play for the Fall 2008 season! “The game of soccer is popular for both men and for women,” said Stephen Bloomfield, JCC athletic director and assistant dean for student life. JCC will compete in the Andy Hosmer National Junior College Athletic Association Division I men’s and women’s soccer. Twelve scholarships per team will be awarded to soccer players. Andy Hosmer, varsity boys and girls soccer coach at Columbia Central High School, has been named the women’s coach. The men’s coach, Jason Smith, a Spring Arbor University graduate, was recently hired. This will make nine intercollegiate sports teams for the JCC Jets: men’s and women’s cross country, men’s baseball and women’s softball, women’s volleyball, men’s and women’s basketball, and men’s and women’s soccer.

Looking for more information? careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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Career Programs at JCC: Looking for a career that’s the right fit for you? Students at JCC have the opportunity to meet with an academic advisor prior to registration to discuss career programs. Students may also meet with faculty advisors to discuss career opportunities in their disciplines. *Information on these pages is subject to change without notice. Please check the current catalog for the most up-to-date information.

ACADEMIC SKILLS JCC offers courses that enhance your opportunities for academic and workplace success, including courses in reading, writing, problem solving and study skills.

ACCOUNTING Certificate in Accounting (30 credits) Prepares you for: Entry-level accounting positions with accounting and tax services, CPA firms, and small businesses, where you'll provide accounting skills, computer competence, computer literacy and office support. Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree in accounting.

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Associate in Applied Science Degree in Accounting (60 credits) Prepares you for: Jobs with duties assigned to a beginning accountant, such as verifying additions, checking audits, postings, and vouchers, analyzing accounts, and preparing financial statements.

APPRENTICESHIP INSTRUCTION Apprenticeships provide earn-

Financial Services Concentration (17 credits) Prepares you for: Work in the banking and the financial services industries. Job opportunities could include beginning positions with banks, trust offices, pension and retirement firms, personal financial planning groups and investment broker houses (clerk or customer service representative). Also gives you: Credits that may be used toward a JCC associate degree.

Fall 2008 • Career Choices • 517.796.8467

Associate in Applied Science/ Electrician (62 credits) Electrical Basics Concentration (17 credits) Prepares you for: Jobs as an electrician where you may lay out, assemble, install, maintain and test electrical fixtures, apparatus, control equipment and wiring used in heating and refrigeration, lighting, power, intercommunications, air conditioning, and electrical systems of homes, factories, and other buildings.

Also gives you: Credits that transfer to select four-year accounting degree programs. See a JCC advisor. Average Yearly Earnings: Bookkeeping, auditing clerks – $28,570 Accounting, tax preparation, bookkeeping, and payroll services – $29,040

Electrician Certificate (40 credits)

while-you-learn opportunities that develop into lifelong careers. They provide planned, on-the-job experience under skilled supervision and related trade instruction in the classroom. Apprenticeships are sponsored by an employer, trade organization or union in conjunction with JCC and the Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training/U.S. Department of Labor. Apprenticeships are determined by occupation and industry standards but are typically four years or 8,000 hours. Upon completion, you'll receive a certificate from the Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training and may qualify for a JCC certificate and continue on to earn an associate in applied science degree.

Average Yearly Earnings: $33,436-$42,000

ASSOCIATE DEGREES Associate in Arts/Transfer (minimum of 60 credits) Prepares you for: A four-year college or university program where students may elect to major in such fields as art, business, education, English, music, psychology, social work, and theatre. Also gives you: Two years of transferable credits/education. Associate in Science/Transfer (minimum of 60 credits) Prepares you for: A four-year college or university program where students may elect to


major in such fields as engineering, medicine, or computer science, just to name a few. Also gives you: Two years of transferable credits/education.

AUTOMOTIVE Associate in Applied Science Degree in Automotive Collision Repair (68 credits) Prepares you for: A career as an automotive body repairer, often called collision repair technician. JCC utilizes the Inter-Industry Conference on Automotive Collision Repair (I-CAR) Enhanced Delivery Curriculum, an industry standard in the field. Average Yearly Earnings: $27,040 - $46,446 Certificate in Automotive Collision Repair (55 credits) Prepares you for: A coordinated set of courses to enable students to quickly achieve their specific occupational goal.

ART Certificate in Studio Art (30 credits) Get a start in the field of studio art with this new certificate program. Courses are taught by working artists. Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward a JCC associate degree. JCC offers transferable courses in drawing, design, painting, art education, and art history.

Concentration in Collision, Mechanical & Electrical Components (24 credits) Prepares you for: A coordinated set of courses to enable students to quickly achieve their specific occupational goal. Also gives you: Coursework that may be applied toward an associate degree. Concentration in Collision Repair Body Technician (16 credits) Prepares you for: A coordinated set of courses to enable students to quickly achieve their specific occupational goal. Also gives you: Coursework that may be applied toward an associate degree. Skill Set in Collision Repair Non-Structural Body Technician (6 credits) Prepares you for: A coordinated set of courses to enable students to quickly achieve their specific occupational goal. Also gives you: Coursework that may be applied toward an associate degree. Skill Set in Collision Repair Structural Body Technician (12 credits) Prepares you for: A coordinated set of courses to enable students to quickly achieve their specific occupational goal.

Also gives you: Coursework that may be applied toward an associate degree. Skill Set in Collision Repair Refinishing Technician (9 credits) Prepares you for: A coordinated set of courses to enable students to quickly achieve their specific occupational goal. Also gives you: Coursework that may be applied toward an associate degree. Certificate in Automotive Service Technology (42 credits) Prepares you for: Entry-level jobs in the field of automotive technology where you'll work under the supervision of an experienced mechanic, or for career enhancement if you are already in the field. You’ll develop entry-level skills in brakes, steering/suspensions, engine repair, manual transmissions/drive trains, automatic transmissions, engine performance, electrical systems, and air conditioning/ heating systems. Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree in automotive technology.

engine performance, electrical systems, and air conditioning/ heating systems. JCC meets ASE/NATEF national standards in all eight areas of automotive repair - an important statement to employers.

Also gives you: Corporatesponsored programs through both Toyota and Ford. As part of the Toyota Technical Education Network, students have the option to enter into the Toyota T-TEN program. Our Ford corporate-sponsored connection is called MLR, the Ford Maintenance and Light Repair network. This provides more flexibility for career options nd opens the door for employment opportunities in the corporate setting. Concentration - Wheel Service (17 credits) Prepares you for: A coordinated set of courses to enable students to quickly achieve their specific occupational goal. Courses include brakes, steering & suspension, and co-op.

Associate in Applied Science Degree in Automotive Service Technology (62 credits) Prepares you for: Passing state and national exams to become a certified Master Automotive Technician; the exams cover brakes, suspension/steering, engine repair, manual transmissions/drive trains, automatic transmissions,

Concentration - Driveability (21 credits) Prepares you for: A coordinated set of courses to enable students to quickly achieve their specific occupational goal. Courses include engine performance 1 & 2, electrical systems 1 & 2, heating & air conditioning systems, and co-op. Concentration - Powertrain (17 credits) Prepares you for: A coordinated set of courses to enable students to quickly achieve

Looking for more information? careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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their specific occupational goal. Courses include engine repair, automatic transmission, manual transmission & drivelines, and co-op. Concentration - Undercar (17 credits) Prepares you for: A coordinated set of courses to enable students to quickly achieve their specific occupational goal. Courses include engine repair, automatic transmission, manual transmission & drivelines, and co-op. Concentration - High Speed Diesel Service (18 credits) Prepares you for: A coordinated set of courses to enable students to quickly achieve their specific occupational goal. Courses include engine repair, automatic transmission, manual transmission & drivelines, and co-op. Concentration - Hybrid Vehicles (18 credits) Prepares you for: A coordinated set of courses to enable students to quickly achieve their specific occupational goal. Courses include engine repair, automatic transmission, manual transmission & drivelines, and co-op. Concentration - Maintenance and Light Repair (18 credits) Prepares you for: A coordinated set of courses to enable students to quickly achieve their specific occupational goal. Courses include engine repair, automatic transmission, manual transmission & drivelines, and co-op. Average Yearly Earnings: Automotive technicians can expect to earn between $26,124 and $39,353. Advanced training and experience can lead to a supervisory position where the salary in Michigan ranges from $33,612 to $43,680.

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AVIATION

BUSINESS

Individual Certification (non-degree) Prepares you for: Certification in private pilot, commercial pilot, instrument rating, flight instructor and instrument flight instructor.

Certificate in Business Administration (30 credits) Prepares you for: Immediate employment in fields that require skills in sales presentation, negotiation, customer service, display preparation, inventory analysis and basic market research. Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree. Certificate in Management (30 credits) Prepares you for: Will build on your natural ability to get along with people and help develop your leadership potential for management roles.

Associate in Applied Science Degree in Aviation Technology (62 credits) Prepares you for: This program for pilots includes all simulator training, flight training and appropriate ground schooling to qualify you for private, commercial, multi-engine or flight instructor certification. Aviation transfer Prepares you for: Start at JCC, then transfer to complete a bachelor's degree.

Also gives you: Skills that can be applied in almost any industry.

Also gives you: More flexibility for career options. Average Yearly Earnings: The wide salary range depends on airlines and job experiences, $20,000-$110,070

BIOLOGY Prepares you for: JCC offers individual courses for transfer in biology, botany, microbiology, human anatomy & physiology and zoology. These courses can be the foundation for four-year college studies in biology, preprofessional health programs (pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, pre-pharmacy, physical therapy, etc.), or biotechnology. See associate in science.

Fall 2008 • Career Choices • 517.796.8467

Concentration in Advanced Management (16 credits) Prepares you for: Management, leadership and supervisory positions in any business and industry. Designed for those who already possess a college degree or have work experience. Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree. Certificate in Marketing (30 credits) Prepares you for: Positions in retail, sales and customer service. Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree.

Associate in Applied Science Degree in Business Administration (60 credits) Prepares you for: Broad-based occupational opportunities in business. This program allows students to customize a program of study to meet specific employment needs. Also gives you: Credits to transfer to select four-year programs. See a JCC advisor. Business Transfer Prepares you for: Transfer degree program at a fouryear college or university, where you'll further develop your communication and interpersonal skills while developing a specialty in accounting, economics, finance, management, computer information systems or some other aspect of business. Average Yearly Earnings: Advertising sales agents $40,300, Retail management $32,720 General manager $77,420, Customer service representative - $27,020 Note: What you earn will depend on the industry, work setting and level of responsibility. The career planning database lists 230 job titles that begin with the word "manager," and this doesn't include the jobs that require management skills but do not have the words "manager" or "management" in their title. The same is true for supervisory positions - there are hundreds listed, covering every imaginable business, industry, and work


environment. To explore all the titles that might fit you, make an appointment with an advisor.

COMPUTER NETWORKING

Certificate in Computer Programming Specialist (41 credits) Prepares you for: Entry-level computer programmer positions working with a systems analyst in an applications environment to support information processing functions.

CAREER EXPLORATION JCC offers individual courses in career planning. Students attending JCC have free access to career guidance advisors, databases and other materials.

CHEMISTRY Prepares you for: JCC offers individual courses in introductory, general, organic, and inorganic chemistry. These courses can be the foundation for four-year college studies in pre-professional health (premedicine, pre-veterinary, prepharmacy, physical therapy) and professional chemistry. See associate in science.

COMMUNICATIONS

Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree in computer programming. Certificate in Networking Specialist (35 credits) Prepares you for: A job as a Novell or Microsoft technician, where you'll install, configure, and troubleshoot Local Area Networks. The knowledge you'll need to pass the required exam for either the Certified Novell Engineer, Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer, Microsoft Certified Database Administrator, or Certified Novell Administrator. After each Novell or Microsoft class, students can apply to take the certification testing in the specific topic area. Associate in Applied Science Degree Networking Specialist (61 credits) Prepares you for: Computer networking positions within many businesses and organizations. Networking involves the hardware, software and communications channels that allow computers to talk to each other.

Prepares you for: JCC offers individual courses in the basic communication skills so highly sought after both in relationships and in business and industry. Employers are looking for people with the ability to express themselves clearly, to speak persuasively, to think on their feet and to work well with others. These are the skills developed in courses such as the fundamentals of speaking, interpersonal communications, argumentation and debate. Many transfer students also enroll in these classes.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING

Also gives you: Coursework prepares students for industry standard exams in both A+ and Network+ certifications. Students who pass the appropriate related certification exams can also achieve the premier certifications of CompTIA Security+, Microsoft速 Certified System Administrator (MCSA) and Certified Cisco Network Administrator (CCNA). Average Yearly Earnings: Network Administrator $58,190, Computer Support Specialist, $40,430

Associate in Applied Science Degree Computer Programming (65 credits) Prepares you for: Job opportunities may include applications programmer, computer operators, information systems manager, systems analyst, and programmer.

Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree in microcomputer application specialist. Associate in Applied Science Degree in Microcomputer Application Specialist (61 credits) Prepares you for: Career choices that include applications specialist, data processing manager, end-user support technician and information systems associate or software specialist. You will learn to generate all types of documents, worksheets, graphic and multimedia presentations.

Also gives you: The opportunity to focus your program in a particular discipline by choosing from a list of elective courses covering visual basic, C++, Java. Also provides courses for transfer and learning that can be applied to four-year programs. Average Yearly Earnings: Computer Programmer $45,000-$62,890

COMPUTER SYSTEMS SUPPORT Certificate in Microcomputer Application Specialist (31 credits) Prepares you for: Entrylevel positions that provide technical support, assistance, troubleshooting, training for end-users in word processing, spreadsheet, database and graphics software. Common job titles include user support specialist, customer service representative and software trainer. As the use of microcomputers extends to most workplaces, the demand is great for specialists who can assist non-technical users to manage, operate, maintain and support the technology.

Certificate in Microsoft速 Office速 Specialist (33 credits) Prepares you for: A variety of positions in an automated office setting, such as administrative assistant and administrative support personnel. The program recognizes the increasingly important role of the microcomputer in modern business and is designed to assist students in developing skills in the use of microcomputer applications for word/information processing, record keeping and database development. Also gives you: Industryrecognized standard for measuring an individual's mastery of "Office" automation. Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree in office automation.

Looking for more information? careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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Concentration - Microsoft® Office® Specialist (17 credits) Prepares you for: Get a foundation in the programs and systems used in an automated office setting. Also gives you: Credits that may be building blocks to an existing JCC certificate or associate degree program.

Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree in law enforcement.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE/ CORRECTIONS/ LAW ENFORCEMENT Concentration – Correctional Officers' Program (16 credits) Prepares you for: In Michigan, the Department of Corrections requires correctional officers to earn 15 credits of postsecondary education prior to or within 18 months of employment. JCC courses that meet this requirement include classes in the area of corrections, criminal justice, sociology or psychology. Also gives you: Preparation for the Michigan Civil Service exam, which is required to work as a corrections officer.

Average Yearly Earnings: Police Officer $45,210, Detectives $53,900

ECONOMICS JCC offers individual courses in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Associate in Applied Science in Corrections (63 credits) Prepares you for: Certification to work in correctional jobs in the State of Michigan. Also gives you: Credits to transfer to select four-year degree programs. See a JCC advisor. Average Yearly Earnings: Corrections Officers and Jailers $33,600-$44,200

Associate in Applied Science Degree Administrative Assistant (60 credits) Prepares you for: Expanded job opportunities in office settings where technical skills in computer usage, spreadsheet and database software packages, desktop publishing and telecommunications are important, and where increased responsibilities require time management, human relations and general office skills. Also gives you: The opportunity to customize your program by selecting from a list of elective courses in other disciplines including the option to select classes with a legal emphasis. Average Yearly Earnings: Administrative Assistant $28,500-$43,430 Word Processors and Typists -$22,850-$28,030

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Criminal Justice General Transfer Prepares you for: A four-year college or university program where students may go on to earn a Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice and work at occupations such as local, state and federal law enforcement officers, parole and probation officers, juvenile counselors and prison administrators. Certificate in Corrections (31 credits) Prepares you for: Taking the required exams for jobs in county- and state-level correctional facilities and for advancement within state correctional facilities. Also gives you: The first of what could be many career advancements. Corrections is an advancement-oriented field, as long as you're successful on the job, willing to continue your education and able to pass the required exams.

Fall 2008 • Career Choices • 517.796.8467

EDUCATION A popular transfer program at JCC, education is a field that is rapidly changing. Students pursuing either an elementary or secondary teaching certificate need to major and/or minor in subject disciplines they plan to teach. All education students should plan to take the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification: Basic Skills (reading, writing, mathematics) during the second semester of their freshman year at JCC. All colleges require successful completion of this test before acceptance into their college of education

Also gives you: Two years of transferable credits/education. See associate in arts. Associate in Applied Science in Law Enforcement (60 credits) Prepares you for: A career as a police officer in a city or county government agency. Police officers function to keep the peace, protect life and property, detect and prevent crime, and maintain public order through the application of the law. Certificate in Law Enforcement (31 credits) Prepares you for: A career in law enforcement.

ELECTRONICS Concentration - Electrical Basics (17 credits) Prepares you for: Provides solid electrical foundation for the person seeking electrical or industrial maintenance mechanic training.


Also gives you: Credits that can be building blocks toward an existing JCC certificate or associate degree program. Average starting salary: $26,000

the electronics cluster of occupations, such as digital computer maintenance, voice and data communications, radio and TV broadcasting, and hightech manufacturing. Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree in electronics technology. Associate in Applied Science Degree in Electronic Technology/ELT (64 credits) Prepares you for: Entrylevel training plus potential advancement opportunities within the field.

Average Yearly Earnings: Electronic equipment repair $31,000, Computer systems design $37,606

candidates are eligible to take the State of Michigan EMT or Paramedic exams to become licensed. Also, allows students to enter into a bachelor's degree completion program.

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES/PARAMEDIC

Skill Set Credential in Basic Emergency Medical Technician (12 credits) Prepares you for: Introductory positions in the emergency health field. Also gives you: Credits to build toward a JCC certificate or associate degree program. Average Yearly Earnings: EMT $25,310

Also gives you: Credits that transfer into select four-year programs. See a JCC advisor.

Concentration - Computer Service Technician - A+/ Network+ Certification (14 credits) Prepares you for: The rigorous Computer Technology Industry Association's (CompTIA) A+/Network+ Certification exam and for employment as a microcomputer service technician, where you'll be expected to be equally adept at hardware solutions, working with operating systems, and relating to customers. This certification is the "journeyman's card" for professionals in microcomputer maintenance.

Certificate in Electronic Technology/Microcomputer (35 credits) Prepares you for: Entrylevel jobs in almost any of the electronics cluster of occupations, such as digital computer maintenance, voice and data communications, radio and TV broadcasting, and hightech manufacturing. Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree in electronics technology.

Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree or certificate in electronic technology. Average Yearly Earnings: Computer systems technician $30,980-$40,430 Certificate in Customer Energy Specialist (48 credits) Prepares you for: Specific job positions within Consumers Energy. Although this certificate program is open to anyone, it is customized for Consumers Energy employees. Certificate in Electronic Technology/ELT (34 credits) Prepares you for: Entrylevel jobs in almost any of

Associate in Applied Science Degree in Electronic Technology/ Microcomputer (61 credits) Prepares you for: Entrylevel training plus potential advancement opportunities within the field. Also gives you: Credits that transfer into select four-year programs. See a JCC advisor.

ENGINEERING Certificate in Emergency Medical Services (66 credits) Prepares you for: A position as a member of a pre-hospital emergency medical team; an emergency medical technician may administer treatment for emergency care to sick and injured persons and transport them to medical facilities. Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree in emergency medical services. Upon successful completion of the program, candidates are eligible to take the State of Michigan EMT or Paramedic exams to become licensed. Candidates are eligible to take the National Registry Exam for EMT or Paramedic leading to State of Michigan licensure. Associate in Applied Science in Emergency Medical Services (82 credits) Prepares you for: Positions noted above, plus it allows students to further their career in EMS or beyond in health positions such as management, education or supervision. Also gives you: Upon successful completion of the program,

Certificate in Fundamentals of Engineering (41 credits) Prepares you for: Transfer to a four-year university to complete a bachelor’s degree in engineering, as well as entrylevel work in industry as an engineering technician. JCC’s engineering curriculum is patterned on the first two years of engineering courses at the University of Michigan. Students commonly transfer to U-M, MSU, WMU, GVSU, and MTU. Students completing their Bachelor of Science degree at an accredited college or university qualify for licensure as a professional engineer. Average Yearly Earnings: Chemical, $48,503 Civil, $43,679 Electrical, $51,888 Mechanical, $50,236

Looking for more information? careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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ENGLISH

Certificate in Electrician Entrepreneur (34 credits) Prepares you for: A career in the electrical field as owner and operator of one’s own business. Certificate in Graphic Design Entrepreneur (40 credits) Prepares you for: Launch your own graphic design business with this program. Certificate in Marketing Entrepreneur (34 credits) Prepares you for: A career as a business owner and operator with one’s own venture, with emphasis on marketing.

JCC offers individual courses in technical and business writing, basic writing, creative writing, writing fundamentals, communication skills, journalism, composition, Shakespeare, and literature, including poetry, drama, short story, novel and children's literature, as well as AfricanAmerican and world literature. Offerings also include courses on women's role in society, film appreciation and courses in the humanities. Students also get the opportunity to produce The Phoenix, JCC's student newspaper, and the opportunity to be published in The Trillium, JCC's literary and arts magazine. A course in photojournalism includes instruction on use of a 35mm camera and dark room procedures.

FRENCH JCC offers individual courses in first- and second-year French and conversational French, beginning and intermediate. Proficiency in a foreign language can enhance your job opportunities. Transfer students may consider taking foreign language as some four-year colleges recommend two years of it regardless of your field of study.

GENERAL STUDIES

Certificate in Medical Insurance Biller Entrepreneur (41 credits) Prepares you for: Work in the medical billing field, with emphasis on launching one’s own business. Certificate in P.C. Technician Entrepreneur (33 credits) Prepares you for: A career as a computer service professional in one’s own business venture.

Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree in visual communication. Associate in Applied Science Degree in Visual Communication/Graphic Design (63 credits) Prepares you for: Staff positions and freelance assignments where you might design product packages, publications, book covers, annual reports, magazines, advertisements, trade publications, and more. You will have to blend creativity and computer savvy with resourcefulness and people skills. Newspaper art departments, art studios, agencies, and magazines are among the employers you could work for. An associate degree can also prepare you for potential job advancement opportunities. Also gives you: Credits for transfer to select four-year programs. See a JCC advisor.

JCC offers an Associate in General Studies degree that can be adapted to a student's needs and interests. To earn this associate degree, you will need to earn a minimum of 60 credits.

Average Yearly Earnings: Desktop publisher, $32,340 Graphic designer, $38,030

GEOGRAPHY ENTREPRENEURSHIP Certificate in Entrepreneur (30 credits) Prepares you for: A career as owner of one’s own business venture. Certificate in Automotive Entrepreneur (36 credits) Prepares you for: A career in the automotive field with the knowledge of the fundamentals of starting and operating one’s own business.

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JCC offers individual courses in world regional, physical, and U.S. and Canadian geography. Concentration - Entrepreneur (16 credits) Prepares you for: A career as owner of one’s own business venture. Average Yearly Earnings: Earnings by individual business owners vary greatly depending on the size of business, location, range of services and a variety of factors.

Fall 2008 • Career Choices • 517.796.8467

GRAPHIC DESIGN Certificate in Visual Communication (37 credits) Prepares you for: Entry-level positions where you might design product packages, publications, book covers, annual reports, magazines, advertisements, trade publications, and more. The program is also beneficial to students who already have degrees in other fields and are interested in design skills only.

3D Design and Animation Associate in Applied Science (64 credits) Prepares you for: Careers focusing on the visual and artistic side of modeling and animation. Students prepare for entry-level positions in digital illustration, computer-generated (CG) film and video game design industry. Emphasis is on taking a concept and turning it into reality, then packaging the concept into a portfolio piece


to help land a job. Career titles include animator, renderer, concept artist, character designer, art director, modeling supervisor, texture artist/ texture painter, production assistant, compositor, editor, and many more. Also gives you: Digital animation courses that can help other programs as well, such as graphic design and web design. Average Yearly Earnings: Range from $48,000 to $80,000 depending on experience and portfolio. Freelance work also available.

HUMANITIES JCC offers individual courses that can transfer to fouryear institutions, fulfill core requirements in a JCC associate degree program and enrich your understanding of the human experience. See associate in arts.

HVAC/CLIMATE CONTROL

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

HISTORY JCC offers courses in AfricanAmerican and twentieth-century history, as well as courses in western civilization, ancient history, and the history of the U.S. See associate in arts.

MATHEMATICS JCC offers math courses to support career programs and transfer programs. Courses include preparatory learning, including basic mathematics, algebra and intermediate algebra; business mathematics; and general transfer, including probability and statistics, precalculus, discrete mathematics, calculus I, II and III, and differential equations.

MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY Certificate in Climate Control Systems (36 credits) Prepares you for: Entry-level jobs in the HVAC industry, where you'll combine your diagnostic and repair skills with customer relations to service equipment in a variety of commercial, residential and institutional settings.

JCC offers individual courses in cardiovascular training, such as golf, weight training and aerobics, which can be transferred to fulfill the physical education requirements in some four-year degree programs. JCC also offers courses in stress management, stress management for parents, and wellness.

Average Yearly Earnings: HVAC technician $28,100-$46,196

Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree in climate control. Associate in Applied Science in Climate Control Technology (60 credits) Prepares you for: Possible job advancement opportunities into a management position, as well as skills for entry-level jobs in the HVAC industries, where you'll combine your diagnostic and repair skills with customer relations to service equipment in a variety of commercial, residential and institutional settings. Also gives you: Business and general education courses to help prepare you for career advancement.

Associate in Applied Science in Manufacturing Tech/Machining (62 credits) Prepares you for: A career in the increasingly technical area of manufacturing and/or production machining. Also gives you: Many of the courses in this curriculum coincide with Jackson Area Manufacturers Association Academy of Manufacturing Careers Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training certificate program, making this an ideal continuation after completion of your journeyman’s certificate. Average Yearly Earnings: Machinists: $20,000-$40,000

Associate in Applied Science in Manufacturing Tech/ Maintenance (60 credits) Prepares you for: A career in the areas of manufacturing and/or industrial maintenance. Also gives you: Many of the courses in this curriculum coincide with Jackson Area Manufacturers Association Academy of Manufacturing Careers Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training certificate program, making this an ideal continuation after completion of your journeyman’s certificate. Average Yearly Earnings: Machinists: $20,000-$38,000 Associate in Applied Science in Manufacturing Tech/Tool Room (61 credits) Prepares you for: Career in the increasingly technical area of manufacturing tool room operations. Also gives you: Many of the courses in this curriculum coincide with Jackson Area Manufacturers Association Academy of Manufacturing Careers Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training certificate program, making this an ideal continuation after completion of your journeyman’s certificate. Average Yearly Earnings: Machinists: $20,000-$40,000

MEDICAL ASSISTANT Certificate in Medical Assistant (52 credits) Prepares you for: Work as a multi-skilled health care practitioner performing medical, administrative and clinical assisting. Your responsibilities may include working as a secretary/receptionist, preparing medical charts and reports, handling patient billing and taking vital signs, just to name a few. Upon completion of the program the student is eligible to take the AAMA exam to become a certified medical assistant.

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Associate in Applied Science Degree in Medical Assistant (61 credits) Prepares you for: The entrylevel positions described in the certificate program, plus courses that prepare you for possible job advancement within the field. Certificate in Medical Receptionist/Transcriptionist (34 credits) Prepares you for: Work in the administrative office setting where you will develop permanent patient records from physician and provider notes by transcribing from voice recordings using computer word processing and perform other support duties.

MUSIC

Average Yearly Earnings: $28,830-33,970 Associate in Applied Science in Nursing LPN to ADN (61 credits) Prepares you for: Work as a registered nurse in less than 18 months - if you have at least 1,000 hours LPN experience. One class is admitted each Fall.

Certificate in Practical Nursing (45 credits) Prepares you for: Provides direct nursing care to individuals in various settings under the direction of a registered nurse. Job tasks could include administering medications, giving injections, taking vital signs, providing bedside care and performing procedures. LPNs work in a wide variety of settings. Class is admitted in March, or late winter. There is only one admit per year. Also gives you: Graduates of JCC's program are eligible to

Also gives you: All the abovementioned certificates give you credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree in medical assisting. Average Yearly Earnings: Medical Assistants $18,000-$35,000 Medical Transcriptionist $28,371 Medical Record Technician -$25,590

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Fall 2008 • Career Choices • 517.796.8467

work, a bachelor's degree in nursing broadens advancement opportunities in administration, clinical education or supervision. Many positions are open only to nurses with a minimum of a BSN. Also gives you: The opportunity to enroll and complete the first three terms of a baccalaureate nursing program at JCC and complete the remaining five terms at the University of Michigan. Average Yearly Earnings: BSN or higher degree $43,370-$63,360

JCC offers individual courses in voice, stage presence, small instrumental groups, music theory and music appreciation. Students who qualify can study and perform with the JCC Community Concert Choir, Broadway Revue or Jackson Community Concert Band.

NURSING

Certificate in Medical Receptionist/Insurance Biller (35 credits) Prepares you for: Work as a billing clerk that includes preparing invoices, processing insurance claims and keeping payment records. You will work as a liaison between the provider, patient and insurance companies.

apply to write the state licensing exam required to become a practical nurse (LPN).

POLITICAL SCIENCE JCC offers individual courses in introductory political science. It is often a field chosen by transfer students who plan to go on to study government or law. See associate in arts. Associate in Applied Science in Nursing (74 credits) Prepares you for: Work as a registered nurse, which includes assessing the health and well being of individuals as well as caring for the sick. Responsibilities can also include coordinating the overall health care team, supervising LPNs, assisting physicians and educating the public about healthy living.

PHILOSOPHY JCC offers individual courses in introductory philosophy and logic. See associate in arts.

PHYSICS

Also gives you: Graduates of JCC's program are eligible to apply for the National Council of Licensing Examination, which is required to become a registered nurse (RN). RNs have tremendous flexibility in their careers - they can work fulltime or part-time, in a variety of settings, in many different roles virtually anywhere in the world. Average Yearly Earnings: $43,370-52,330 Transfer JCC/ U of M Bachelor's of Science - Nursing Prepares you for: In addition to traditional nursing career

JCC offers individual courses in astronomy and three levels of physics. Astronomy and conceptual physics serve as introductory courses and are


useful for those individuals needing a general laboratory science elective for their associate’s degree or are pursuing a career in elementary education. College physics is one of the foundation courses necessary for students who will be pursuing a four-year degree in a pre-professional career, such as architecture or health (pre-medicine, preveterinary, pre-pharmacy, physical therapy, or chiropractic). University physics is designed for students who will transfer to a physics or engineering program (mechanical, electrical, civil, chemical, or computer) at a fouryear institution.

also works together with the radiology physician in order to perform certain radiological examinations. Also gives you: Graduates of the JCC radiography program will be eligible to write the national board exam given by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. Upon successful completion of the national board exam the successful graduate will have the initials R.T.(R) after their name. Average Yearly Earnings: $36,170-$43,350

PSYCHOLOGY JCC offers individual courses in introductory psychology, social psychology, educational psychology, introduction to counseling, child psychology, abnormal psychology and human sexuality. Specialization begins after transfer and continues as you do graduate work.

RADIOGRAPHY

Associate in Applied Science Degree in Radiography (82 credits) Prepares you for: A radiologic technologist, or radiographer, is someone who administers x-rays to patients in order to help provide diagnosis of possible pathology. A radiographer

RESPIRATORY CARE Associate Degree in Applied Science in Respiratory Care (90 credits) Prepares you for: A career in an allied health profession whose practitioners focus on diagnosis and treatment of cardiopulmonary disorders and diseases. A respiratory care practitioner can be instrumental in assisting a physician in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of a wide spectrum of disorders affecting the heart and lungs, and specializes in the application of scientific knowledge and theory to practical, clinical problems of respiratory care. A respiratory care practitioner is qualified to assume primary clinical responsibility for all respiratory care modalities, including responsibilities involved in supervision of respiratory technician functions.

Also gives you: The program provides the student with the knowledge and experience that will qualify her/him to take the required NBRC examinations to become a Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT). Average Yearly Earnings: $37,650-$50,860

SONOGRAPHY & VASCULAR TECHNOLOGY Associate in Applied Science Degree in General Sonography (75 credits) Prepares you for: A career as a sonographer, where one uses high frequency sound waves to create cross-sectional images of a patient's anatomy. Sonographers explain the medical scanning procedure to patients, position them for scanning, scan and collect image data, and work with the imaging physician as a team to interpret the image scan. Also gives you: JCC has one of only fewer than 100 programs in the U.S. accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). This program leads to ARDMS certification in diagnostic medical sonography.

ultrasound technician who takes diagnostic recordings and measurements of the heart. Also gives you: Graduates of JCC's program are eligible to write the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonography (ARDMS) - Adult Echocardiography certification exams and, if successful, use the credentials RDCS AE (Registered Diagnostic Cardiac Sonographer, Adult Echocardiography). Associate in Applied Science Degree in Vascular Sonography (67 credits) Prepares you for: A career as a vascular technologist - which is a sonographer who specializes in ultrasound images of veins and arteries. Also gives you: JCC has one of only 30 programs in the U.S. accredited by the Commission for Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). This program leads to ARDMS certification in vascular technology. Average Yearly Earnings: $38,690

Average Yearly Earnings: $44,720-$52,490

SCIENCES

Associate in Applied Science Degree in Cardiac Sonography (68 credits) Prepares you for: A career as an echocardiographer, a skilled

Pre-Professional Science Certificate (30 credits) Prepares you for: Transfer to a four-year university as science majors or pre-professional students (pre-veterinary, premedical, pre-dental, physical and occupational therapy, optometry, pharmacy, physician’s assistant, etc.). Certificate graduates could

Looking for more information? careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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also find work as laboratory technicians. Average Yearly Earnings: $20,000-$30,000

SOCIAL WORK

Proficiency in a foreign language can enhance your job opportunities. Transfer students may consider taking foreign language as some four-year colleges recommend two years of it regardless of your field of study.

THEATRE

JCC offers individual courses in acting for the theatre and theatre production and participation in faculty-directed main stage productions. Certificate in Theatre Performance (32 credits) Prepares you for: Work in the performance of live theatre and its commercial applications. Job opportunities include actors, directors, voice-over artists, singer, drama teachers, and playwrights. Also gives you: Credits that may be used toward an associate degree and further study.

TELECOMMUNICATIONS JCC offers individual courses in principles of sociology, family relationships, criminology, minority groups in America, social problems, women in a changing society and juvenile delinquency. To become a social worker, you must transfer and continue on for a bachelor's or master's degree.

SPANISH JCC offers individual courses in first- and second-year Spanish and conversational Spanish, beginning and intermediate.

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JCC offers individual courses in telecommunications that may lead to work in the field or transfer for further study at a four-year college or university. Certificate in Technical Theatre (30 credits) Prepares you for: For students who are interested in backstage and production work, this certificate provides students hands-on experience in theatre, stagecraft, lighting and make-up or sound. Students benefit from the outstanding theatre facilities available in the Potter Center. Also gives you: Coursework that may be applied toward an associate degree.

Fall 2008 • Career Choices • 517.796.8467

VIDEO PRODUCTION Certificate in Video Production (30 credits) Prepares you for: Go behind the camera and learn the basics of video production with this program. Learn the many aspects of shooting and video editing, and work in the oustanding facilities of the Potter Center.

Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward a JCC associate degree.

WEB DESIGN Certificate in Multimedia and Web Design (36 credits) Prepares you for: Jobs that require well-rounded experience in all aspects of Internet development, including web design and programming for the web. Also gives you: Credits that can be used toward JCC's associate degree in visual communications. Associate in Applied Science in Multimedia and Web Design (62 credits) Prepares you for: Jobs that require well-rounded experience in all aspects of Internet development, including web design and programming for the web.



Career Choices