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2012 Quality of Life Progress Report for Jacksonville and Northeast Florida Summary Document

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Twenty-Eighth Annual Edition

Jacksonville Community Council Inc. www.jcci.org/indicators


Northeast Florida is fortunate to have JCCI’s 28th Quality of Life Progress Report to monitor the critical issues facing our region and help shape the strategies that can create lasting, positive change. This work is essential for directing our community’s resources and responses to the most challenging community concerns, as well as providing a benchmark to measure our effectiveness. United Way of Northeast Florida is proud to support and acknowledge the vital analysis and trend data presented in the nation’s longest-running community quality of life indicators program. Congratulations to the volunteers and staff who provided the leadership to produce this outstanding product.

Connie Hodges, President United Way of Northeast Florida

Making Community Works work....for you! The consulting division of JCCI, Community Works uses our more than 35 years of experience in engaging people for community change to work with individuals and organizations around the world to replicate our success. Community Works’ strength is in building capacity in communities to create positive change. We emphasize diverse participation, shared interaction, data-driven decision making, and consensus building.

www.communityworks.us.com

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We realize that one size does not fit all. Community Works works with each client to develop a customized community proposal, tailored to your specific needs. We look forward to hearing from you as you work to improve your community!

JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report


4

Executive Summary

5

Regional Demographics

6

Quality of Life Indicator Set

Indicator Champion

Achieving Educational Excellence

Community First Credit Union

7

Growing a Vibrant Economy

8

Preserving the Natural Environment

Lazzara Family Foundation Wells Fargo

Promoting Social Wellbeing and Harmony

Community Hospice of NEFL

10

Enjoying Arts, Recreation, and Culture

11

Sustaining a Healthy Community

St. Vincent’s Health Care

12

Maintaining a Responsive Government

Rayonier

13

Moving Around Efficiently and Safely

14

Keeping the Community Safe

CSX Transportation

9

Table of Contents

Introduction to Community Indicators

15

Indicator Index

16

About JCCI

18

JCCI Model for Community Change

19

The Community Foundation is committed to building a better community through philanthropy. We believe that philanthropy must be based on values and recognize that reliable research makes good decisions possible. The Community Foundation congratulates JCCI for the exceptional and innovative work it does in identifying emerging trends and presenting a clear picture of our community’s progress in this 28th edition of its Quality of Life Progress Report. We are proud to serve as Title Sponsor and to be a partner in this important work, along with United Way of Northeast Florida and the special Champions listed above. ~ Paul Perez, Chairman JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report

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Introduction to Community Indicators Page 4

Quality of Life Progress Report This is the 28th annual edition of the nation’s longest-standing community quality of

life indicators report, recently recognized as a national model by the Government Accountability Office (GAO). When JCCI first gathered volunteers together to talk about community indicators, the hope was to create a “yardstick for community improvement” that would provide “community decision makers and leaders with the capacity to further improve what is already a highly attractive quality of life.” No one had done this before. Little did that group know that thousands of communities across the globe would look to this report as a model for sustainable community change, and that the debate on how progress is measured globally would be shaped by this report. Taken as a set, the Quality of Life Progress Report, both this Summary Document and the online Reference Document, provide a roadmap for the community, showing where we have been, where we are now, and what critical areas need attention if we are to arrive where we want to go. For 28 years this report has been used by decision makers in government, private business, nonprofit organizations, and community groups in two primary ways: • for planning (determining priorities for action, identifying areas to invest resources, and developing programs and policies to address needs) • for evaluation (assessing results of those decisions and actions.) JCCI is proud to be a part of so many of these efforts, and applauds all those who work so tirelessly to build a better community.

Race Relations Progress Report JCCI’s 8th Annual Race Relations Progress Report

measures progress toward eliminating disparities in Education, Employment and Income, Neighborhoods and Housing, Health, Justice, and Politics and Civic Engagement. Annual Progress Reports are available at www.jcci.org.

Community Snapshot Community Snapshot is an interactive map

that allows you to have full access and control over the indicators in your community. The database provides information to compare a geography over time, in context with progress in other geographic areas. Reports, graphs and charts are customizable at the click of a button. We offer quarterly trainings to help you best use all of that these tools offer. Visit www.jcci.org to learn about Community Snapshot and the Jacksonville community.

Much of the data in this report is obtained from the records and documents of various public and private organizations. An annual opinion survey provides the remaining data. This random telephone survey was conducted for the project each September from 1985 through 1992 by AT&T American Transtech. Beginning in 1993, the survey was conducted by American Public Dialogue. Additional detail and documentation of the methodology used for the project’s processes and data collection are found in the accompanying Reference Document on the JCCI website. For further information about the Quality of Life Progress Report or specific indicators, mail to JCCI, 2434 Atlantic Boulevard, Suite 100, Jacksonville, Florida 32207-3564, call (904) 396-3052, e-mail ben@jcci.org, or visit www.jcci.org. The 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report Review Committee was chaired by Greg Smith, incoming chair of the Jacksonville Regional Chamber of Commerce.

Committee members included: Martha Barrett Dawn Gilman Nelson Bradshaw Barbara Gubbin Terrence Ashanta-Barker Coley Jones Co’Relous Bryant Irene Lazarra Lorrie DeFrank Julie Mason Tillis DeVaughn Lisa Moore

Jason Parry Keto Porter Grace Sacerdote Brenda Simmons-Hutchings Susan Ponder-Stansel Justin Spiller JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report


The dozens of charts and tables in these pages tell stories about Jacksonville’s quality of life from many points-of-view. One striking story concerns the effects of the most recent recession. Those effects are still with us, as is evident in the decrease in per capita income, the current unemployment rate, and decline in sales tax collections (p.8). The overall sluggish economic growth in Jacksonville continues to weaken the social fabric. Some holes in the fabric are beginning to show. Double-digit unemployment for the past three years has made for difficult lives., both for individuals and families. In 2011, Jacksonville saw: • 176,719 individuals and families use Food Stamps • Over 1,000 unsheltered homeless people on any given day • A higher suicide rate than the previous year. You’ll notice in these pages that indicators feature a gold star or red flag , which the Quality of Life Review Committee assigns. When a trend is disturbing or cause for concern, the committee assigns a red flag, and when the trend looks like something to celebrate, it earns a gold star.

JCCI indicators are “believed to have been instrumental in reducing infant mortality rates.”

Beyond GDP Indicators

For example, despite the effects of the recent recession: • The arts community makes good use of their resources and shows increases in public and private support for the arts and increases in attendance at museums and musical performances. • Activity at JAXPORT, as measured by tons of material handled, increased; and • 11,108 higher education degrees were awarded in 2011, the highest since the first year in the trend line, nearly 30 years ago .

Executive Summary

In January 2013, the BRAINPOol project (www.brainpoolproject.edu), which is funded by the European Commission, recognized JCCI’s Quality of Life Progress Report. It said that this document is effective in making “direct contact with the people who can use these indicators and have influence in the community.” You are holding an example for the world when it comes to measuring changes in society.

Taken as a whole, these indicators suggest that Jacksonville is at a critical decision point. Like a worker who steps toward a new future by entering college or university, the city is facing a question of whether or not to make public and private investments in the future. Will we invest our time, money, and energy in children, elders, infrastructure and our natural environment? Or will we accept what is, and hope for the best in coming years? As a city, residents and decisionmakers can invest time, talent, and treasure in Jacksonville’s potentials. We will see the fruits of that investment later. Public and private investments in Jacksonville’s future result in success. In 2004, the rate of children who lived in foster care was 7.6 per 1,000 Jacksonville children. Over the past nine years, the entire system of protecting vulnerable children has changed dramatically. The major overhaul in the system succeeded, and the rate declined by half. Most importantly, hundreds of children have been kept out of foster care because of this significant investment in their future. Significant investment is needed in other areas now. Tributaries of the St. Johns River are less capable of supporting a variety of vegetation and fish and more likely to show traces of harmful bacteria (p.9). The high rate of suicide amongst elders is not acceptable (p.12). This report serves as a roadmap of the problems and issues that lie ahead, and those successes and problems solved that are in Jacksonville’s rearview mirror.

JCCI’s indicators move “general debate from ‘Is there a problem?’ to one about ‘How do we deal with the problem?’”

The only way to understand the complexity of our lives here in Jacksonville is to see the connections between our health, economic activity, education, natural resources, political activity, transportation, safety, social wellbeing and cohesion, and arts and sports. Or as another report puts it, quality of life is “people’s Beyond GDP Indicators- Annex Report health and education, their everyday activities (which include the right to a decent job and housing), their participation in the political process, the social and natural environment in which they live, and the factors shaping their personal and economic security” (2009 www.stiglitz-sen-fitoussi.fr). The Quality of Life Progress Report gives you a chance to learn more about life in Jacksonville and Northeast Florida. Learn about your city and region, engage in decisions about its future, and take action to preserve what you like and change what you don’t. Make this report more than a story told with numbers-- make it your action plan.

JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report

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Regional Demographics

The indicators presented in this report all occur and change within the context of the physical and demographic characteristics of the five counties of the Jacksonville Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA): Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, and St. Johns, even the indicators that are specific to Jacksonville/Duval County alone. Geography The Jacksonville MSA covers 3,221 square miles in land area. Besides the oceanfront, the major geographic feature of the area is the St. Johns River and its tributaries, which meander through the region. The waterways provide a rich ecological treasure, an important economic engine, and opportunities for recreation, transportation, and military uses. Climate The MSA’s temperatures range each day in the summer from the 70s (Fahrenheit) to 90s. In the winter, temperature ranges vary from the 60s to 80s on some days to the 20s to 40s on a few days. Average annual precipitation is about 53 inches. African American

Native Hispanic American

Asian

Baker

13.7%

0.4%

2.2%

Clay

10.0%

3.0%

Duval

29.0%

Nassau

6.6%

White

Other

0.1%

82.2%

1.3%

8.0%

0.3%

76.5%

2.2%

4.0%

7.9%

0.3%

56.3%

2.4%

0.4%

3.5%

0.3%

87.0%

2.2%

St. Johns

5.5%

1.5%

5.5%

0.1%

84.8%

2.5%

Total

21.4%

3.3%

7.2%

0.3%

65.4%

2.4%

Education In 2011-12, public-school enrollment in the Jacksonville MSA was 208,833 students, with 5,050 students in Baker County, 35,659 in Clay County, 125,429 in Duval County, 11,115 in Nassau County, and 31,580 in St. Johns County. In the Jacksonville MSA, 84 percent of students attended public school, 12 percent attended private school, and four percent were home schooled. Workforce In December 2011, 600,600 people were working in Northeast Florida. Civilian employment in the Jacksonville MSA’s economy was distributed as follows: 2011 Professional/business services 16% Retail trade 12% Government 14% Education and health services 16% Finance, insurance, and real estate 8% Leisure and hospitality services 12% Manufacturing 5% Construction 5% Transportation, warehousing, and utilities 5% Wholesale trade 4% Information and telecommunications 3%

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2000 1990 16% 9% 12% 14% 12% 15% 11% 10% 10% 10% 9% 9% 7% 8% 6% 6% 6% 6% 5% 5% 3% 3%

People The total population of the Jacksonville MSA was 1,359,960 in 2011. By county, population estimates were: Baker 26,863; Clay 192,370; Duval 870,709; Nassau 74,195; and St. Johns 195,823. The racial and ethnic makeup of the region varies by county. The 2011 American Community Survey provided these estimates of the MSA’s population.

In 2011, the counties in Jacksonville’s MSA had both a high youth population and a growing elderly population, according to Florida CHARTS: Population under 18

Population 65 and older

Baker

25.5%

11.4%

Clay

25.5%

12.2%

Duval

23.5%

11.7%

Nassau

21.3%

16.9%

St. Johns

22.6%

16.2%

Region Total

23.6%

12.7%

Legend

In this report, the arrows display the trend direction over the previous year (up, down, or unchanged) Red Arrows mean that the trend was in a negative direction. Green Arrows mean that the trend was in a positive direction. Yellow Arrows mean that the trend was unchanged.

JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report


Our Vision for Achieving Educational Excellence:

Education institutions in the region achieve excellence in the delivery of learning opportunities, and citizens achieve educational attainment sufficient to enjoy a high quality of life. Citizens young and old have access to a broad range of learning opportunities in pre-K to 12th grade, higher education, and life-long learning, based on their educational needs and desire to learn.

How Are We Doing?

Good News:

Needs Improvement:

Despite a new calculation method for graduation rates, Jacksonville experienced a sixth year of continual increases. Major conduct violations (includes aggression, possession of weapons) are down.

Per pupil spending decreased when investment in education and preparation of workforce is needed. Comparisons for reading indicators are not possible due to changes in assessments. The percentage of 3rd graders reading at grade level is too low, as is the percentage of 10th graders reading at grade level.

Key Indicators

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org/indicators.

Duval Public High School Graduation Rate Previous: Latest:

63.3% 67.7%

Kindergarten Readiness (2 measures) Previous: Latest:

Source: Florida Department of Education

88 % ECHOS 86 % ECHOS

71 % FAIR 75 % FAIR

Source: Florida Department of Education

Supporting Indicators Previous

Latest

Difference % Change

Third Grade

N/A

51%

N/A

N/A

Tenth Grade

N/A

45%

N/A

N/A

Reading at Grade Level - FCAT 2.0

Per Pupil Expenditures

$8,803

$8,648

-$155

- 1.8 %

Major Conduct Violations (assault, illegal possession)

4,912

4,314

- 598

- 12.2 %

Higher Education Degrees Awarded

10,906

11,108

+202

1.9 %

Achieving Educational Excellence

Graduation Rates Up for 6 Consecutive Years

Education Champion We remain dedicated to constantly improving our educational system and promoting lifelong learning throughout the First Coast. ~John Hirabayashi, CEO JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report

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Growing a Vibrant Economy

Slow Recovery is a Long Tunnel; JAXPORT is a light Our Vision for Growing a Vibrant Economy:

The regional economy supports a vibrant and diversified mix of economic activities, which combine to provide ample opportunities for productive employment, a strong consumer market, the capacity to fund needed public services, and a high standard of living that is shared widely among all citizens.

How Are We Doing?

Good News:

Needs Improvement:

The percent of residents holding a bachelors degree or higher in Northeast Florida increased, suggesting the workforce is taking advantage of higher education opportunities. Business at JAXPORT, as measured by tonnage handled, increased slightly. This is the third year in a row that JAXPORT tonnage has increased.

Unemployment remains high, and per capita income (when adjusted for inflation) is only as powerful as it was in 2004. Too many renters and homeowners pay a large portion of their income for housing. These indicators of household financial stability are related to the indicator of retail sales tax collected which dipped slightly.

Key Indicators

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org/indicators.

Duval Unemployment Rates Previous: Latest:

10.6 8.3

Duval: MSA:

Duval County Per Capita Income Previous: Latest:

8.8% 8.3%

Source: Florida Dept. of Economic Opportunity

$39,392 $40,139

Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis

Supporting Indicators Previous

Latest

26.9%

27.2%

+0.3%

+1.1%

Households Paying More than 30 Percent of Income for Housing

42%

41%

-1 %

-2.4%

JAXPORT Tonnage (millions)

8.1

8.2

+ 0.1

+1.2%

$117.5

$116.6

- $0.9

-0.8%

Adults with Bachelors Degrees or Higher (MSA)

Retail Sales (by Sales Tax Collections) (millions)

Lazzara

Family Foundation Page 8

Difference % Change

Economy Champion Developing a vibrant economy is the key to sustaining Jacksonville’s citizens and essential in engancing our quality of life. ~Irene & Gaspar Lazzara JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report


Our Vision for Preserving the Natural Environment:

The resources of the region’s natural environment positively enhance the quality of life of citizens, and air, water, and ground pollution is kept below levels harmful to ecosystems, human health, or the quality of life. The built environment is developed in ways that preserve natural ecosystems and is maintained in ways that enhance natural beauty and visual aesthetics.

How Are We Doing?

Good News:

Needs Improvement:

The effort to preserve land continues with 114 acres added, bringing the total to nearly 85,000 acres. This is the fifth year of incremental increases in land set aside for future generations.

Indicators of changes in individual behaviors, such as careful water consumption and recycling household waste, are not moving in the right direction. For the second year in a row, St. Johns River tributaries met standards for dissolved oxygen only about half of the times they were tested.

Key Indicators

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org/indicators.

Days Duval County Air Quality is “Good” Previous: Latest:

Average Duval County Daily Water Use

305 346

Previous: Latest:

Source: City of Jacksonville, Air and Water Quality Division

195 Gallons 205 Gallons

Source: JEA

Supporting Indicators Previous

Latest

Difference % Change

Dissolved Oxygen (fertilizer runoff and algae growth)

54%

47%

- 7%

- 13%

Fecal-Coliform Bacteria (human & animal waste)

65%

60%

- 5%

- 7.7%

Tributary Compliance with Water Quality Standards

Residential Recycling (pounds per person)

57

54

-3

- 5.3%

Acres of Conservation/Preservation Land

84,781

84,895

+ 114

0.1%

Preserving the Natural Environment

Preservation of an Asset Yields Mixed Results

Environment Champion It is the responsibility of our entire community to maintain these essential natural treasures for our future generations to enjoy. ~Kelly Madden, Wholesale Regional President JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report

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Promoting Social Wellbeing

More Than Half of Jacksonville Identifies Racism as a Problem Our Vision for Promoting Social Wellbeing and Harmony:

Social-service institutions in the region provide services with excellence to those in need, citizens and institutions support philanthropy and volunteerism to meet community needs, and citizens share social interactions characterized by equality of opportunity and racial harmony.

How Are We Doing?

Good News:

Needs Improvement:

Conditions such as teen motherhood and births to mothers with a high school diploma continue to improve. The rate of children in foster care decreased for the sixth year in a row.

More than half of residents think racism is a problem, which is too high. The rate of unsheltered homeless residents is too high and affect everyone’s quality of life, including the the overall health of neighborhoods, schools, and businesses. Resources, such as volunteer time and donations, experienced a decrease over the previous year.

Key Indicators

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org/indicators.

Survey: Is Racism a Problem in Duval County? Previous: Yes 49 % Latest: Yes 57 %

Unsheltered Homeless per 100,000 People Previous: 166 Latest: 132

Source: American Public Dialogue

Source: Emergency Services and Homeless Coalition

Supporting Indicators Previous

Latest

Difference % Change

Percent of People Who Volunteer

68%

62%

- 6%

8.8%

Foster Children per 1,000 children

4.1

3.9

- 0.1%

-2.5%

Philanthropic Giving to Federated Campaigns (millions)

$ 26.9

$ 26.8

- $0.1

-0.4%

Percent births to: Single mothers

48.2%

47.5%

-.7

-1.5%

Mothers without a high school diploma

16.7%

15.5%

-1.2%

-7.2%

Teen mothers

2.7%

2.2%

-0.5

-19%

Social Wellbeing Champion We continue our commitment to the social wellbeing of Jacksonville’s citizens by bridging cultural differences and strengthening our relationships. ~Susan Ponder-Stansel, CEO Page 10

JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report


Our Vision for Enjoying Arts, Recreation, and Culture:

Citizens desire, support, have access to, and actively patronize a great diversity of opportunities in the region for cultural and artistic enrichment and for recreational, leisure, and entertainment activities.

How Are We Doing?

Good News:

Needs Improvement:

Both financial support for the arts and arts attendance show strength despite effects of the recession in other areas of Jacksonville’s quality of life. All the supporting indicators, except for library circulation, are trending in a positive direction. An increase in funds available for park maintenance ended a six-year decline in funding.

Library circulation per person decreased for the fourth year in a row, while the total number of items circulated decreased for the second year in a row. Cuts to library hours and the introduction of digital devices has changed the consumption of CDs, DVDs, books, and newspapers, both of which have contributed to a 5 percent decrease in items circulated from 2009 to 2011.

Key Indicators

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org/indicators.

Public Performances and Events

Public and Private Support for the Arts Previous: Latest:

Previous: Latest:

$31.23 per person $33.19 per person

Source: Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville

Supporting Indicators

535 505

Source: Dept. of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment; Florida Theatre; SMG

Previous

Latest

$16.28

$18.11

+ $1.83

11.2%

1,418

1,743

+ 325

22.9%

Museums

363

375

+12

-3.3%

Musical Performances

235

237

+2

+.9%

797

896

+ 99

12.4%

10.5

10.1

- 0.4

- 4%

Recreation Funding per Person Attendance at Sporting Events (per 1,000 people)

Difference % Change

Attendance at Cultural Activities (per 1,000 people)

Zoo Library Circulation per Person

Enjoying Arts, Recreation & Culture

Our City Values Culture, Sports, and the Arts

Learn More Learn more about all 154 indicators that JCCI tracks and how we compare with other communities in Florida. Visit Community Snapshot online at www.jcci.org/indicators. JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report

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Sustaining a Healthy Community

We Are Not as Healthy as We Were Last Year Our Vision for Sustaining a Healthy Community:

Health-care institutions in the region provide medical and preventive health-care services with excellence, all citizens have access to these services, regardless of financial means, and citizens generally experience a high level of physical and mental health.

How Are We Doing?

Good News:

Needs Improvement:

Despite three consecutive years of high unemployment rates, the percent of residents without health insurance has not significantly increased. Health insurance is available to many workers, although not all, and it is not good news that 1 in 5 residents are without it.

The racial disparity in infant deaths widened after years of narrowing the gap. The suicide rate amongst elders is not acceptable. The number of new HIV cases amongst all races increased over the previous year. Too many indicators are moving in the wrong direction, which suggests worsening health overall.

Key Indicators

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org/indicators.

Infant Mortality Rates Previous: Latest:

Black 11.7 12.8

White 5.8 2.8

People Without Health Insurance - Duval Previous: Latest:

Source: Florida Department of Health

Supporting Indicators Cancer Death Rate per 100,000 people New HIV Cases White Black

17.3 % 17.1 %

Source: American Community Survey

Previous

Latest

Difference % Change

186.4

194.0

+7.6

4.1%

298

377

+79

26.5%

60

72

+12

20%

211

262

+51

24.2%

889.2

902.8

+13.6

1.5%

12.1

14.2

+2.1

17.4%

Seniors (65 and over)

14.4

19.8

+5.4

37.5%

Youth (10 - 19)

0.9

4.5

+3.6

400%

STD Rate per 100,000 people Suicide Rates per 100,000 people

Health Champion Our community’s vision must be one of excellent, compassionate health care that is accessible to all citizens. ~Moody Chisholm, CEO Page 12

JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report


Our Vision for Maintaining a Responsive Government:

Local governmental bodies in the region are led by competent, representative, and responsive elected and appointed officials. They provide equitably to citizens, and citizens are well informed about public affairs and actively participate in civic activities.

How Are We Doing?

Good News:

Needs Improvement:

Diversity of elected officials is moving in the right direction as 28 percent are African-American, which is in line with Jacksonville’s population. The 2012 presidential election brought out the second highest percent of voters since 1983. Only the 2008 presidential election saw a higher turnout.

A smaller percent of survey respondents feel they can influence local government than last year. This disaffection is reinforced by the decrease in respondents who are satisfied with their local elected leadership. While the trend in diversity of elected officials is moving in the right direction, 26 percent of them are female while approximately half of the population is female.

Key Indicators

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org/indicators.

Voter Turnout for Local Elections 2008 2012

Satisfaction with Elected Leadership

77.8 % 73.9%

Previous: Latest:

Source: Supervisor of Elections

46% 40%

Source: American Public Dialogue

Supporting Indicators Previous

Latest

Difference % Change

Elected Officials: People of Color

24%

28%

+4

16.6%

Elected Officials: Women

21%

26%

+5

23.8%

Diverse and Representative Government

Neighborhood Organizations

596

601

+5

0.8%

Survey: Can you influence local government?

32%

28%

-4

-12.5%

Voter Registration

79%

85%

+6

7.6%

Maintaining a Responsive Government

Election Sparks Healthy Voter Turnout But Many Say They Do Not Influence Local Decisions

Government Champion Rayonier is proud to support the vision of a responsive government effectively serving the needs of its well-informed and active constituents. ~Paul Boynton, CEO JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report

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Moving Around Efficiently & Safely

Number of Bus Riders Up As Bus Service Shrinks Our Vision for Moving Around Efficiently and Safely:

Citizens in the region have access to affordable, convenient, and accessible transportation services with the capacity to convey them around the community and around the world to their chosen destinations at their chosen times.

How Are We Doing?

Good News:

Needs Improvement:

A larger portion of Jacksonville residents are using public transportation every week, and roads seem safer for motorists. Almost two-thirds of survey respondents said they get to work in 25 minutes or less. More than a third of respondents are able to get to work in 15 minutes.

Average miles driven per week by JTA bus service declined, suggesting less coverage in a city that is geographically large. Rate of injuries and fatalities amongst bicyclists increased, suggesting roads are increasingly unsafe.

Key Indicators

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org/indicators.

Commute Times of 25 Minutes or Less Previous: Latest:

Duval Weekly Bus Ridership (% of population) Previous: Latest:

65% 62%

Source: American Public Dialogue

35,484 37,456

4.1% 4.3%

Source: Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA)

Supporting Indicators Previous

Latest

Airport Passengers (millions)

5.6

5.5

-.1

-1.8%

Serious Bicycle Accidents per 100,000 people

23.1

26.0

+2.9

+12.5%

27,697

25,997

- 1,700

- 6.1%

15.5

14.5

- 1.0

- 6.5%

JTA Miles of Service Motor Vehicle Accidents per 1,000 people

Difference % Change

Learn More Learn more about all 154 indicators that JCCI tracks and how we compare with other communities in Florida. Visit Community Snapshot online at www.jcci.org/indicators. Page 14

JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report


Our Vision for Keeping the Community Safe:

Public-safety agencies in the region provide rescue, fire, and law-enforcement services with excellence, and citizens generally experience a low level of crime and a high level of personal safety.

How Are We Doing?

Good News:

Needs Improvement:

The murder rate declined for the fourth year in a row. 2007 was the worst year, when 125 people were murdered. In the four years since that time, Jacksonville experienced a 39 percent decrease in the number of murders. Indicators of feeling safe and, the opposite, being a crime victim, are both improving.

Our homes and families are less safe for children, as verified child abuse reports increased for the second year in a row. Within two years, the number of reports of abuse or neglect verified as requiring action has increased by 25 percent, suggesting perhaps that as families are more frequently struggling with stagnant incomes and high unemployment, children are suffering.

Key Indicators

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org/indicators.

People Feel Safe in their Neighborhood Previous: Latest:

Index Crime Rate

61% 66%

Previous: Latest:

Source: American Public Dialogue

5,106 5,149

Keeping the Community Safe

Murder Rate Decreases and Child Abuse Increases

Source: Florida Department of Law Enforcement

Supporting Indicators Previous

Latest

Difference % Change

People Reporting Being Victims of Crime

16%

23%

+7%

+43.8

Youth Adjudicated Delinquent per 1,000

5.4

5.4

0

0

Murder Rate per 100,000

9.0

8.8

- 0.2

- 2.2%

Verified Child Abuse Reports per 1,000

8.2

9.3

+1.1

13.4%

Safety Champion As a community, we must be dedicated to achieving a vision where all citizens live with the peace of mind that they are safe and their families are secure. ~Michael Ward, CEO JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 15


2012 Indicator Index

The Quality of Life Prog Indicator (Year)

Data Trend

Indicator (Year)

Data Trend

Preserving the Natural Environment

Achieving Educational Excellence

Key Indicators:

Key Indicators:

Days the Air Quality Index is “good” (2012)

346

Average daily water consumption (gallons) (2011)

205

Public high school graduation rate (2011-12)

67.7%

Kindergarten readiness (2010-11)

86.0%

Third graders reading at grade level (2011-12)

51%

NA

Streams meeting dissolved oxygen standard (2011)

47%

Tenth graders reading at grade level (2011-12)

45%

NA

Streams meeting bacteria standard (2011)

60%

Per pupil expenditures (2011-12)

$8,648

Residential recycling (pounds per person) (2011)

54

Total annual major conduct violations (2011-12)

4,314

Acres of conservation/preservation land (2011)

84,895

Higher education degrees awarded (2011-12)

11,108

Additional Indicators:

Supporting Indicators:

Additional Indicators:

Supporting Indicators:

Gallons of motor fuels sold per person (2011)

619

New septic-tank permits issued (2011)

182

Students absent 21+ days (2010-11)

5.9%

Public school first grade promotions (2010-11)

93.1%

Public high school dropout rate (2011-12)

2.9%

HS graduates ready for college: Reading (2009-10)

75.6%

Key Indicators:

HS graduates ready for college: Math (2009-10)

67.6%

Is racism a local problem? (2011)

57%

Satisfaction with public education (2011)

29%

Usheltered homeless per 100,000 people (2012)

132

Exceptional students receive diplomas (2010-11)

38%

Supporting Indicators:

Growing a Vibrant Economy Key Indicators:

Total employment (2011)

444,052

Unemployment rate (2012)

8.8%

Per capita income (2010)

$40,139

Supporting Indicators: Adults with bachelor’s degrees or higher (2011)

27.2%

Households paying >30% for housing (2011)

41%

JAXPORT tonnage (millions) (2012)

8.2

Sales tax collections (millions) (2011)

$116.6

Additional Indicators: Total taxable value of real property (billions) (2010)

$50.39

Recipients of public assistance: TANF (2012)

7,039

Recipients of public assistance: Food Stamps (2012) 176,719 Average monthly JEA utilities costs (2011)

$192.87

New housing starts (2011)

1,589

Average annual wage (2011)

$45,554

Unemployment benefit claims (2011)

55,776

Downtown residents (2011)

3,266

Promoting Social Wellbeing and Harmony

Births to single mothers (2011)

47.5%

Birth to mothers without high school degree (2011)

15.5%

Percentage of all births to teen mothers (2011)

2.2%

Do you volunteer? (2012)

62%

Foster children per 1,000 children (2012)

3.9

Philanthropic giving to federated campaigns (2011)

$26.8

Additional Indicators: Have you personally experienced racism? (2011)

28%

Volunteer more than 7 hours per week? (2011)

27%

Births to teen mothers per 1,000 teens (2011)

6.2

Subsequent births to teen mothers (2011)

18.9%

Children of divorcing parents (2011)

3,414

Foster care children reunited <12 months (2012)

68.6%

Foster care children adopted < 24 months (2012)

52.9%

Enjoying Arts, Recreation, and Culture Key Indicators:

Public and private arts support per person (2011)

$33.19

Public performances and events (2011)

505

Supporting Indicators: Park expenditures for activities/maintenance (2011) $18.11

Page 16

Attendance at sports events per 1,000 (2011)

1,743

Museum attendance per 1,000 people (2011)

375

Musical performances attendance per 1,000 (2011)

237

Zoo attendance per 1,000 people (2011)

896

Library circulation per person (2011)

10.12

JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report


Indicator (Year)

Data Trend

Indicator (Year)

Data

Sustaining a Healthy Community

Moving Around Efficiently and Safely

Key Indicators:

Key Indicators:

Infant mortality rate per 1,000 (2011)

Commute times of 25 minutes or less (2012)

62%

Duval weekly bus ridership (% of pop.) (2011)

4.3%

Trend

White

2.8

Black

12.8

Supporting Indicators:

17.1%

Total JIA passengers (millions) (2011)

5.5

Serious bicycle accidents per 100,000 (2011)

26.0

Average weekday miles of JTA bus service (2011)

25,997

Motor vehicle accidents per 1,000 people (2011)

14.5

People without Health Insurance (2011)

Supporting Indicators: Cancer deaths per 100,000 people (2011)

194.0

New HIV Cases (2011)

377

White

72

Additional Indicators:

Black

262

JTA bus headways within 30/60 minutes (2011)

41% /80%

902.8

Average weekday Skyway ridership (2011)

1,957

14.2

Nonstop flight destinations at JIA (2011)

27

Seniors (65 and older)

19.8

9,616

Youth (10-19)

4.5

Average available seats on airplane flights (2011)

STD reports per 100,000 people (2011) Suicide rates per 100,000 people (2011)

Additional Indicators: Early prenatal care (2011)

75.5%

Newborns with healthy birthweight (2011)

91.0%

Seniors feel safe in their neighborhoods (2012)

55%

HIV/AIDS related deaths per 100,000 people (2011) 9.8% Packs of cigarettes sold per person (2012)

57

Lung cancer deaths per 100,000 people (2011)

51.0

Heart disease deaths per 100,000 people (2011)

184.2

Local health care seen as good or excellent (2012)

68%

Maintaining Responsive Government Key Indicators:

Keeping the Community Safe Key Indicators:

People feel safe in their neighborhood (2012)

66%

Index crimes per 100,000 people (2011)

5,149

Supporting Indicators: People report being victims of a crime (2012)

23%

Youth Adjudicated Deliquent per 1,000 (2011)

5.4

Murder rate (2011)

8.8

Verified child abuse reports per 1,000 (2011)

9.3

Additional Indicators: Police-call response times (2011)

7.11

Rescue-call response times < four minutes (2011)

33% 34%

Voter Turnout (2012)

73.9%

Fire-call response times < four minutes (2011)

Satisfaction with elected leadership (2012)

40%

Juvenile alcohol/drug arrests per 1,000 youth (2011) 3.4

Supporting Indicators:

Domestic violence crime reports (2011)

7,604

Racial diversity of elected officials (2012)

28%

Domestic violence related homicides (2011)

6

Gender diversity of elected officials (2012)

26%

Violent deaths per 10,000 youth (2011)

1.6

Neighborhood organizations (2012)

601

Survey: Can you influence local government (2012)

28%

Voter registration (2012)

85%

Additional Indicators: Keeping up with local government news (2012)

42%

Satisfaction with public-safety services (2012)

88%

Can you name two City Council members? (2012)

11%

Satisfaction with basic city services (2012)

80%

School Board leadership rated high quality (2012)

22%

JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report

2012 Indicator Index

ress Report at a Glance

Legend

In this report, the arrows display the trend direction over the previous year (up, down, or unchanged) Red Arrows mean that the trend was in a negative direction. Green Arrows mean that the trend was in a positive direction. Yellow Arrows mean that the trend was unchanged. Page 17


About JCCI

2012-13 JCCI Board of Directors Directors Jennifer Chapman

Jeanne Miller

Jarik Conrad

Peter Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien

Rena Coughlin

Amanda Patch

Anne Egan

Lee Poechmann

Mary Goldsmith

Stephen Pollan

Secretary/Treasurer Lee R. Brown III

Broderick Green

Crystal Rountree

Matthew Kane

Derrick Smith

Immediate Past President John Hirabayashi

Coley Jones

James Stevenson

Jennifer Mansfield

Candace Thompson

William C. Mason

John Thompson

President JF Bryan IV President-Elect Joshua B. Lief

David Meyer

JCCI Staff Ben Warner President & CEO Laura Lane Vice President & COO

Tonia Eastman Program Planner

Steve Rankin Director of Implementations & Special Projects

Candace Long Administrative Assistant

Michelle Simkulet Director JCCI Forward & CFO

Loren Mullins Logistics Support

Molly Wahl Director of Development & Community Outreach

Engaging People for Community Change Every day, JCCI is driven by the bold idea that together we can build a better community. We bring people together to learn about our community, engage in problem solving, and act to make positive change. JCCI was created in 1975 as a result of the Amelia Island Community Planning Conference to examine community issues by bringing together a broad cross-section of the population. In its 38 years, JCCI has provided a forum and a structure through which groups of informed, concerned citizens have made a difference in public policy decisions. When enough people care to act, the course of an entire city can change. JCCI receives funding from United Way of Northeast Florida, grants, corporations, and individuals - anyone interested in building a better community. For more information about JCCI and how you can get involved or to donate to JCCI, visit www.jcci.org. Page 18

JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report


Model for Community Change

We are often asked why JCCI is so successful in creating positive change in Northeast Florida. You may recall that we were designated one of 19 “Solutions for America” after a three-year study of our process and results by the Pew Partnership for Civic Change. We reply that our results come from two critical factors: first, the wonderful volunteers without whom we could not exist; and second, the process we follow, built around a research-tested Model for Community Change.

Vision The JCCI Model for Community Change begins with working with the community to understand and articulate a

shared vision for the future, based on the values and priorities of the people who live, work, and play in the area. Change must be driven by a vision of both what needs to improve and what needs to be preserved; the vision serves as a destination for the road map to follow. Model for Community Change

Knowledge The vision provides a destination, but no more. Each year, JCCI engages community members to develop and review community indicators. Community indicators are a set of data or information that provide insight into the trends in a community over time. Together, the collection of community indicators tells the story about where a community is in relation to its vision and the direction in which the community is heading. We provide this story in three distinct ways, our annually published Quality of Life Progress Report, the Race Relations Progress Report, and our continually-updated Community Snapshot on our website. Planning With the knowledge we gain from community indicators, we

can determine our priorities for action. The indicators by themselves don’t tell us what to do; they are merely descriptive. JCCI, along with other community organizations, uses our indicators to inform planning processes. Our community studies provide forums to determine how we as a community need to move forward, addressing issues identified by the indicators where we have fallen short of our vision. The community inquiry process engages community members to develop solutions, by consensus, to get us moving in the right direction.

Action The recommendations from our inquiries are effective because of the volunteers who work tirelessly to turn reports into action through our advocacy and implementation process. JCCI reports never stay on a shelf. Instead, our volunteers use them to advocate to civic institutions to implement changes. Because of this action component, JCCI is often described as where to go to learn, engage, and act to make a better community.

Our Model In Action at JCCI

Results The volunteers’ actions and advocacy get results. Recommendations

are implemented. Policies change. Programs develop and respond. But that is not enough. JCCI monitors the results and outcomes of its inquiry and implementation efforts and assesses results. Beyond those reports, however, we are interested in lasting, sustainable community change. The community indicators reports serve as the final piece in the community change model, keeping us focused on measuring progress toward the vision. They serve as the ultimate evaluation tool to ensure that our efforts are making a real difference for the community. You can read the assessments in the final implementation reports of all 75 JCCI community studies on our website. We are pleased to have served Jacksonville for the last 38 years, and we look forward to many more years of making lasting change. For more information about how JCCI works with volunteers to change our community, and how you can be a part of that process, visit our web site at www.jcci.org.

JCCI 2012 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 19


We would like to thank the many people and organizations whose support and efforts make this report possible.

Primary Funder 2012 Review Committee Greg Smith, Chair Terrance Ashanta-Barker Martha Barrett Nelson Bradshaw Co’Relous Bryant Lorrie DeFrank Tillis DeVaughn Dawn Gilman

Barbara Gubbin Coley Jones Irene Lazzara Fred “Fel” Lee Julie Mason Lisa V. Moore Jason Parry

Susan Ponder-Stansel Keto Porter Grace Sacerdote Ali Korman-Shelton Brenda Simmons-Hutchins Justin Spiller

Title Sponsor Champions

Lazzara Family Foundation

JCCI - Jacksonville Community Council Inc. 2434 Atlantic Boulevard | Jacksonville, Florida 32207 | (904) 396-3052 | www.jcci.org


2012 Quality of Life Summary Document