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QUALITY OF LIFE PROGRESS REPORT A guide for building a better community

Dedicated to the memory of Marian Chambers Visionary for Jacksonville’s quality of life JCCI Executive Director from 1979 through 1994

Funded by the City of Jacksonville and the United Way of Northeast Florida


TABLE

OF

C ONTENTS

Twenty Years Measuring Progress

3

Introduction to the 2004 Document

5

Executive Summary

7

About the Region

9

Quality of Life Indicators: Achieving Educational Excellence Growing a Vibrant Economy Preserving the Natural Environment Promoting Social Wellbeing and Harmony Enjoying Arts, Culture, and Recreation Sustaining a Healthy Community Maintaining Responsive Government Moving Around Efficiently Keeping the Community Safe

11 25 33 39 46 52 62 69 74

Indicator Index

82

About JCCI

84

More information about JCCI and detailed reference data for the indicators may be found on the CD on the inside back cover or on www.jcci.org

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Jacksonville Community Council Inc.


TWENTY YEARS MEASURING PROGRESS

by David Swain, DPA, JCCI consultant and former associate director

…Community indicators? There's a jargon term that fogs the mind. …Measuring community progress? That I can understand, and it's a good idea. As the Jacksonville Community Council Inc. began contemplating a quality-of-life community indicators project 20 years ago, in 1984-85, many versions of this brief dialogue may well have occurred. At that time, no community had set a goal to systematically track a set of quantitative measures of its quality of life, seeking patterns of progress and areas needing improvement. Previous work at the national level in the U.S. and through the United Nations internationally had adopted the term "indicators" to describe such sets of quantitative measures. "Economic indicators" had become readily recognized and used at national, state, and local levels in the U.S. However, no community had committed itself to creating a process to develop, track, and report on a set of indicators that comprehensively assess the community's quality of life.

Evolution of the Indicators Program JCCI was indeed pioneering, but not alone. The Jacksonville Regional Chamber of Commerce was an active collaborator with JCCI from the beginning. From the Chamber's perspective, the immediate need was to provide quantitative trend information, beyond the traditional economic indicators, that was being requested by companies considering moving into the Jacksonville market–information about education, the natural environment, cultural and recreational opportunities, social conditions, and other aspects of the community's quality of life. The Chamber's goal, then, was to produce an annual indicators report that it could use in its marketing efforts for economic development. JCCI's perspective was different, but complementary. By 1985, we had ten years of experience producing citizen-based studies on major community issues and advocating through citizen volunteers for implementation of each study's recommendations. Naturally, the questions arose of whether, as a result of these efforts and other efforts in the community, Jacksonville's quality of life was improving, and what areas still needed improvement. JCCI's goal, thus, was to produce an annual report tracking a set of key indicators of the community's quality of life, revealing both progress and unmet needs. Initially, JCCI and the Chamber shared a limited common purpose: to inform citizens as well as public and private leaders and decision makers. As the project matured, an additional purpose was added: to influence and guide community decision making to reinforce progress being made and to address shortcomings revealed by the indicator trends. Expansion of the purpose led, over the next 20 years, to a series of significant improvements in the report, including: • • • • • • •

expanding the explanatory information to help readers understand the information presented; including comparative information where available; setting priorities of importance among indicators; setting targets (community goals) toward which the community is challenged to strive, reinforced by the annual assignment of "Gold Stars" and "Red Flags" to indicators moving toward or away from their targets; expanding the geographic scope to include information for some indicators for the Northeast Florida region and/or for sub-county areas within Duval County; identifying important linkages by which certain indicators influence the trends of others; and expanding the annual indicators reporting from only a printed volume to a printed document, expanded information on a CD, and access with a search capability through JCCI's website, www.jcci.org.

As time passed, the initial collaboration also expanded to include the City of Jacksonville, which provides significant funding support, and United Way of Northeast Florida, which also provides major funding support. The United Way also supported development, in 1995, of JCCI's second indicators project (the Community Agenda), focused on human-services indicators. This was subsequently adopted for use by the Human Services Council and, in 2002, was "amalgamated" with the initial quality-oflife set of indicators into a larger, more comprehensive indicators set. 2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

3


Consistent with JCCI's mission, all of this indicators work has been accomplished through a productive combination of extensive and intensive citizen involvement, learning, and advocacy; open access to expert information and perspectives; and competent staff support for organization, research, and group facilitation. Its success has been reinforced by the community's recognition of JCCI as a reputable, credible, and effective "neutral convener " of community interests around significant issues in order to achieve consensus-based improvement and progress. We have indeed had a highly successful 20 years. JCCI's community indicators have become recognized as a unique and useful source of high-level information about the status of our community and its trends. The indicators, with assistance from the media, help keep the public informed about our community’s strengths, weaknesses, and disparities in important aspects of the quality of life. Public and private institutions and decision makers use the indicators for both planning (what needs to be done and where limited resources should be targeted) and evaluation (how successful or not our efforts have been) purposes. At JCCI, we ourselves use the indicators each year as a guide for selecting our annual citizen-based studies and for assessing the overall impact JCCI is having on the community's well-being.

Emulation of the JCCI Indicators Model Along the way, JCCI's pioneering work on community indicators has had a positive impact far beyond Jacksonville. Our efforts have provided guidance and synergy, especially via the Internet, that have helped spawn a large number and wide variety of community indicator projects throughout North America and elsewhere in the world. JCCI and the Jacksonville community have become recognized as a model of excellence in community indicators work to be emulated and adapted for use in a myriad of other communities. In addition, JCCI is playing a leading role in the recent emergence and ongoing development of a burgeoning community indicators "movement" that is rapidly becoming truly global. What should we expect in the next 20 years for JCCI's community indicators work? The only sure answer is that it will certainly continue to evolve, mature, and improve. Maintaining the status quo would soon leave JCCI behind as the movement progresses. The increasingly active international network of community indicators practitioners, researchers, and technicians is becoming a major source of information, insights, and exemplary practices in community indicators work. After playing the role of pioneer for many years, JCCI is increasingly finding itself learning from those it previously has guided. Thus, the next 20 years may be a time to benefit from the experiences of others through active participation and continued leadership in the community indicators movement. Improvements in the next 20 years are likely to emerge both in the processes of involving the community in indicators work and in the area of technology. Major research is being done now around the world to document approaches that work well in developing, tracking, reporting, and using indicators. Determining the most effective role of and approach to citizen involvement is a major element in this research. On the technological side, innovative thinking and planning are well underway toward developing national and global computerized systems that store and provide user-friendly access to the data needed for successful indicators work at all levels, from the globe down to separate neighborhood blocks. The continuing rapid advance of computer and telecommunications technology is sure to provide new opportunities and challenges in community indicators work. Additional kinds of indicator project improvements may not yet be conceivable but may emerge during the next 20 years. That's how rapidly the field is growing and maturing. After 20 years, JCCI can be proud. We have pioneered an exemplary model, which has helped energize and synergize an entire international movement. We have devoted ourselves to continuous improvement of our own indicators work with remarkable results, and we continue as both a leader and a learner in the international movement. For the next 20 years, our challenge is clear: to maintain the quality of JCCI's indicators work, to continue to improve it toward becoming more effective and more responsive to community needs, and to remain actively involved in the larger movement, both providing and receiving valuable guidance as it continues to mature and expand.

For a database of community indicator projects around the world, follow the “Understanding Indicators” link in the Statistics section of JCCI’s website, www.jcci.org. To learn more about how the Quality of Life project has served as a global model, follow the link to “JCCI’s Worldwide Impact” in the About JCCI section of www.jcci.org.

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Jacksonville Community Council Inc.


INTRODUCTION What are Quality of Life Indicators? Indicators are quantitative measures of the quality of community life. These indicators measure important aspects of the community that, if improved, would be of significant benefit. Indicators that are meaningful (provide valuable information) and useful (provide guidance toward community improvement) usually reflect a combination of idealism (what we would like to measure) and pragmatism (what we are able to measure). Taken as a set, the Quality of Life Progress Report provides a roadmap for the community, showing where we have been, where we are now, and what critical areas need attention if we are to arrive where we want to go. For the purposes of this effort, “quality of life� refers to a feeling of well-being, fulfillment, or satisfaction resulting from factors in the external environments. For many people, the quality of close interpersonal relationships, rather than the external environments, is the primary factor in determining happiness. Nevertheless, this project concentrates on the external environments, examining the quality of life from a community perspective. In 2004, the twentieth anniversary edition of the Quality of Life Progress Report includes 119 indicators that reflect trends in nine external environments: Achieving Educational Excellence; Growing a Vibrant Economy; Preserving the Natural Environment; Promoting Social Wellbeing and Harmony; Enjoying Arts, Culture, and Recreation; Sustaining a Healthy Community; Maintaining Responsive Government; Moving Around Efficiently; and Keeping the Community Safe. More than twenty years of data are now available for many indicators. Much of the data is obtained from the records and documents of various public and private organizations. An annual opinion survey provides the remaining data. This random telephone survey was conducted for the project each September from 1985 through 1992 by AT&T American Transtech. Beginning in 1993, the survey was conducted by American Public Dialogue. Each organization generously has donated the survey each year as a service to the community. The survey measures citizen opinions and reported behaviors on various quality of life questions. Twenty years of data are available for many of the survey-based indicators. Several factors of the Quality of Life Progress Report should be kept in mind: 4 The indicators are explicitly designed to compare the community to itself (and to the goals set in the Targets for 2005), but not to evaluate the community against the progress of other communities. 4 The data provide only numerical indicators of the quality of life. Some important dimensions of the quality of life are not included, because quantitative indicators are not available. 4 The indicators themselves are pieces of a much larger picture. They do not, by themselves, explain why trends move as they do or what should be done to make improvements. They provide the information we need to generate those conversations. JCCI responds to these indicators through its annual citizen-based studies. Each study researches a community issue in depth and makes recommendations for positive change. Each is followed by an implementation process though which volunteers advocate for community action. Positive change is reflected in the indicator trends. The 2004 Quality of Life Progress Report Review Committee was chaired by Tom Van Berkel, representing the Jacksonville Regional Chamber of Commerce. Committee members included: Lee Brown, Howard Dale, Ajani Dunn, Jeanne Eddy, Michael Gilbert, Stephen Goldman, Carol Hladki, Kevin Holzendorf, Levander Lilly, Melanie Moore, Melanie Patz, Lane Welch, Robert White, and Delphia Williams. The new Expanding Literacy section was reviewed by Tim Ballentine, Julia Burns, Gayle Florence Cane, Paula Chaon, Tricia Egbert, Sharon Hastings, Susan Main, Melanie Moore, and Kay Redington Rowell. Additional detail and documentation of the methodology used for the project's processes and data collection are found in the accompanying Reference Documents on the enclosed CD (see inside back cover) and on the JCCI website, www.jcci.org. For further information about the Quality of Life Progress Report or specific indicators, mail to JCCI, 2434 Atlantic Boulevard, Suite 100, Jacksonville, Florida 32207-3564, call (904) 396-3052, e-mail to mail@jcci.org, or visit www.jcci.org.

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Guidelines for Indicator Selection The Quality of Life indicators have been selected and are maintained based on the following criteria: Purpose: The indicator is both meaningful (it provides information valuable for community members to understand important aspects of their quality of life) and useful (it offers a sense of direction for additional research, planning, advocacy, and action toward positive community changes and a means of assessing progress toward these desired changes). Importance: The indicator measures an aspect of the quality of life which a diverse group of people in the community would agree is important in relation to the priorities in the community’s shared vision or goals. Validity and accuracy: If the indicator trend line moves upward or downward, a diverse group of people in the community would agree on whether the quality of life is improving or declining. Relevance: The indicator measures an aspect of the community’s quality of life concerning which the community can achieve positive change through public decision making and action at the community level. Responsiveness: The indicator trend line responds relatively quickly and noticeably to real changes in the quality of life. Anticipation: The indicator anticipates future trends rather than reacting to past trends. A “leading” indicator, e.g., cigarettes sold, is generally more useful than a “lagging” indicator, e.g., lung cancer deaths, because it allows a proactive response. Understandability: The indicator measures an aspect of the community’s quality of life in a way that most citizens can easily understand and interpret in relation to their own lives. Availability and timeliness: Data for the indicator are readily available and affordably accessible on an annual basis from a credible public or private source. If data come from multiple sources, staff can readily compile and calculate the indicator. Stability and reliability: Data for the indicator are consistently collected, compiled, and calculated in the same way each year. Outcome orientation: Where possible, the indicator measures the actual condition of the community’s quality of life. Alternatively, it measures an outcome of the community’s response to the issue rather than the input of the response itself. Asset orientation: Where possible, the indicator measures a positive aspect of the community’s quality of life (to focus on community assets) and a trend line increase clearly denotes an improvement in the quality of life. Scale: The indicator is reported for a geographic area that is most meaningful for community understanding and most helpful for improvement. For many indicators, both regional and single-county trendlines are reported; others have sub-county measures. Linkages: The indicator reports important inter-relationships among indicators and over time. Some of these linkages may positively reinforce one another. Others may conflict with one another, possibly reducing the quality of life. Clarity: The indicator uses clear measures that filter out extraneous factors. Per-person rates filter out the effect of population growth, and constant dollars eliminate the effect of inflation. Raw numbers are used where total magnitudes are important. Representativeness: Taken together, the indicators measure the major dimensions of the community’s quality of life.

What Can You Do? The Quality of Life Progress Report provides information about the status of our community and of our collective and individual wellbeing. By familiarizing ourselves with these indicators, we become better informed. By using these indicators, we can work together to build a better community. Share the information. Learn more. Advocate for positive change. Support efforts in the community to measure, track, and improve elements of the quality of life. Get involved in the community to make a difference. Join JCCI, and through your membership, support this project and the many other efforts of JCCI to improve the quality of life in Northeast Florida and beyond.

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Jacksonville Community Council Inc.


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In 1985, JCCI published what was then called Life in Jacksonville: Quality Indicators for Progress, containing 83 indicators and a vision of citizen involvement to build a better community. In its introduction, William A. Hightower, chair of the project, said: As far as we can determine, no other city has attempted a task such as this in such a comprehensive manner with the intent of annual review and monitoring. There has been no effort nationally to develop or standardize such data. Jacksonville can be proud of this project for it signifies tangible evidence of a forward looking Chamber of Commerce, with a strong commitment to monitor and improve the livability of our city. The value of this project will increase over the years, as trends become apparent. If used properly, it will become a yardstick for community improvement. It sets forth both the implicit and explicit needs of the community and the resources currently allocated to these needs, providing community decision makers and leaders with the capability of further improving what is already a highly attractive quality of life. Twenty years later, many of the expectations for this project have been exceeded. In a new book, Smart Communities (2004), author Suzanne W. Morse applauds JCCI’s efforts to use strategic thinking to build a brighter future. She writes: Perhaps the most significant achievement of all has been the Quality of Life Indicators assessment. Created in Jacksonville, it was the first of its kind and is now used in more than a thousand communities throughout the United States and the world. Today, trends are apparent in the 119 indicators measured. Many indicators have changed over the years, reflecting changing needs in the community and availability of new data. Throughout the report, you’ll find “20 years ago” signs on 36 original indicators, showing just how far the community has come in the last two decades. The report shows that Jacksonville and Northeast Florida continue to experience “a highly attractive quality of life.” The trends show evidence of community commitment to addressing needs, and in many cases, demonstrate significant progress. Gold Stars mark those indicators where the progress has been particularly gratifying. The report also highlights areas of concern with Red Flags signifying priorities for community action. More than the specific indicators themselves, this twentieth anniversary edition shows a community committed to improvement. Reporting on last year’s Quality of Life release, Binyamin Appelbaum wrote: In some ways, the best news for Jacksonville is the report itself. The very premise of the report, and of JCCI, is the belief in Jacksonville as a community where the problems of some are the responsibility of everyone. (The Florida Times-Union, January 27, 2004, p. B-1.) Here, then, are the highlights of the report, identifying both progress and the work still to be done by the community: Achieving Educational Excellence For the third straight year, the public high school graduation rate rose, earning a Gold Star. School attendance rose and public satisfaction with the quality of the Duval County Public Schools improved. But concerns remain about tenth-grade reading scores and the college readiness of graduating seniors. And while public school teacher salaries continue to rise, finding and retaining the best teachers in a highly competitive environment remain a community concern, and the Quality of Life Progress Report notes with a Red Flag that the percentage of teachers with advanced degrees remains low. A new special section, Expanding Literacy, compiles what we know about early literacy, school-age literacy, and adult literacy in Jacksonville. The message is one of some improvement, especially in early literacy, positive performance in early grades in the school system, and a more optimistic outlook regarding adult literacy. However, taken together, the indicators suggest the need for both a continued community emphasis on literacy and better, more comprehensive data. Growing a Vibrant Economy Many economic indicators improved, led by housing construction and including positive job growth and increased average wages. Indicators of poverty and financial need, on the other hand, received Red Flags; children participating in free and reduced-price lunch programs rose, public assistance recipients increased, and unemployment benefit claims remained high.

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Preserving the Natural Environment River quality improved, the air quality index remained good, and water conservation and recycling increased. The Floridan Aquifer showed signs of recovering from the steep declines of 1999 and 2000. A Gold Star was awarded to acres of park and conservation land. Despite the cost of gasoline, however, motor fuel consumption increased. And the number of septic-tank permits increased, which remains a concern for potential health and environmental problems in the future. Promoting Social Wellbeing and Harmony Homelessness, racism, and children in foster care top the list of community priorities identified in this section. And while total philanthropic giving and volunteerism both increased, showing a willingness to devote both time and money to community causes, volunteers who gave more than seven hours a week decreased. Enjoying Arts, Culture, and Recreation The operative word in this section was more: more parks, more people at the parks, more performances, more people at musical shows, more money allocated for recreation activities and maintenance, and more people using the library. Of special note was the return of the Jacksonville Jazz Festival in 2003, which brought in a total attendance of 60,000. The only sour notes were attendance at sporting events, with attendance at Jaguars football games leading an overall decline, and support for the arts, which dipped slightly on lower private contributions. Sustaining a Healthy Community This section was of particular concern to the 2004 Quality of Life Review Committee, which considered awarding the entire section a Red Flag. The infant mortality rate rose, with the infant death rate for people of color climbing to 16.0 per 1,000 live births. The complementary indicators of newborn birth weights, early prenatal care, and childhood immunizations all remain below community expectations. Fewer people reported having health insurance. Deaths due to cancer (especially lung cancer) and heart disease spiked upwards in 2003. Sexually-transmitted-disease reports remain more than double the state average, and fewer of the needy elderly received home-delivered meals. Maintaining Responsive Government The 2004 Presidential election saw a surge in voter registration and voter turnout. In local government, however, fewer people reported keeping up with local government news; only 36 percent of survey respondents felt they could influence local government; and just one in six survey respondents could name two of the nineteen Jacksonville City Council members. More positively, satisfaction with government services, especially public safety services, remained high. Moving Around Efficiently Community priority areas in this section included the Jacksonville International Airport, where destinations served by direct flights, number of available seats, and total passengers remain below targeted levels. And although public bus miles increased substantially, average weekday bus ridership remained low. Two-thirds of Duval County residents still reported commuting times of 25 minutes or less, however. Keeping the Community Safe The crime rate continued to fall in Duval County, and more people reported feeling safe walking around at night in their neighborhoods. Student conduct violations in the public schools declined, as did motorvehicle accidents and violent deaths among youth. While this is good news, more troubling statistics call for community attention. A higher number of survey respondents reported being victims of a crime in 2004. Police and emergency response times remained below targets. Child abuse reports continued to climb, and 2003 saw an increase in both domestic violence crime reports and domestic-violence-related homicides.

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Jacksonville Community Council Inc.


ABOUT

THE

REGION

The indicators presented in this report all occur and change within the context of the physical and demographic characteristics of the five counties of Northeast Florida: Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, and St. Johns. Some of the indicators are specific to Jacksonville/Duval County alone. This section summarizes some characteristics of this region.

Geography: Northeast Florida covers 3,221 square miles in land area. Besides the oceanfront, the major geographic feature of the area is the St. Johns River and its tributaries, which meander through the region. The waterways provide an opportunity for economic development through commercial seaport and U.S. Navy activities, as well as recreational opportunities.

Climate: Northeast Florida’s temperatures range fairly uniformly each day in summer from the 70s (Fahrenheit) to 90s. More variability is experienced in winter, when temperature ranges vary from the 60s to 80s on some days to the 20s to 40s on a few days. Average annual precipitation is about 53 inches, much of which falls in summer thunder showers.

People: The total population of Northeast Florida was estimated at 1,208,584 in 2003 by the Bureau of Economic and Business Research at the University of Florida. By county, population estimates were: Baker 23,383; Clay 156,011; Duval 826,279; Nassau 63,062; and St. Johns 139,849. The 2000 U.S. Census provided more information about Northeast Florida’s population: African Native White American American Asian Hispanic Other Baker 84.0% 13.9% 0.4% 0.4% 1.9% 1.2% Clay 87.4% 6.7% 0.5% 2.0% 4.3% 3.4% Duval 65.8% 27.8% 0.3% 2.7% 4.1% 3.4% Nassau 90.0% 7.7% 0.4% 0.5% 1.5% 1.3% St. Johns 90.9% 6.3% 0.3% 1.0% 2.6% 1.6% Total 72.9% 21.5% 0.3% 2.3% 3.8% 3.0%

Northeast Florida has a high youth population, higher than the state average of 22.8 percent, and a growing elderly population. Population under 18, 2000 Population 65 and older, 2000 Baker 27.5% 9.2% Clay 28.0% 9.7% Duval 26.3% 10.5% Nassau 25.0% 12.5% St. Johns 23.1% 15.8% Total 26.1% 11.0% In 2003-04, public-school enrollment in Northeast Florida was 199,232 students, with 4,605 students in Baker County, 31,368 in Clay County, 129,545 in Duval County, 10,544 in Nassau County, and 23,170 in St. Johns County. In Northeast Florida, 81.6 percent of students attended public school, 16.7 percent attended private school, and 1.7 percent were home schooled.

Workforce: I n December 2003, 604,303 people were working in Northeast Florida. Civilian employment in Northeast Florida's (Jacksonville Metropolitan Statistical Area’s) economy was distributed as follows: Professional/business services Retail trade Government Education and health services Finance, insurance, and real estate Leisure and hospitality services Manufacturing Construction Transportation, communication, and public utilities Wholesale trade Other services Information and telecommunications

2003 15% 12% 12% 11% 10% 9% 6% 6% 5% 5% 5% 2%

2000 16% 12% 12% 11% 10% 9% 7% 6% 6% 5% 4% 3%

1990 9% 14% 15% 10% 10% 9% 8% 6% 6% 5% 5% 3%

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Poverty At the root of most health and human-service needs is poverty. The 2000 Census provides the incidence of officially defined poverty in the counties of Northeast Florida. Statewide, the poverty rate was 12.5 percent; by county, the rates were: Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns

Total population 14.7% 6.8% 11.9% 9.1% 8.0%

Children 0-17 22.9% 9.1% 16.5% 11.2% 9.7%

The official definition of a poverty-level income was first established in the 1930s, using a formula based on the cost of an inexpensive but nutritious food diet. That formula has been questioned and criticized over the years, frequently with the political intent either to increase or decrease the poverty line. Some deplore its continued reliance on a food budget as the basis for calculation, when patterns of basic-spending needs may be shifting toward other kinds of needs, such as housing, childcare, healthcare, and transportation. Others point out that "money income" leaves out the value of other "in-kind income" from programs such as Food Stamps and Medicaid. In practice, the political controversy has led to gridlock, and the formula has remained in effect very much as originally designed. This situation has not deterred other organizations from proposing alternative measures of poverty. The dual problems with these alternatives are that they tend to reflect political bias, and they lack the official status of the federal government's definition. Therefore, the official poverty-line figures continue to be the most widely accepted. The 2000 Census figures show that about 1.1 of every 10 residents in our area lived in poverty in 1999. Almost 1.5 of every 10 children lived in poverty, and 1.0 of every 10 elderly people had incomes below the poverty line. What does it mean to have an income below the poverty line? In 1999, the year for which the Census figures apply, it meant having a money income in 2003 dollars of less than $8,870 for a single, unrelated person. For a family of four, it meant having an income below $17,976. Different figures apply on a sliding scale, depending on the number of people in the family. The federal government revises its poverty-line figures annually, based on inflation. In 2004, the federal poverty threshold incomes (based on the 2000 cost of living) were as follows for the 48 contiguous states: Size of family unit 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 each additional person

Poverty threshold income $ 9,310 or less 12,490 15,670 18,850 22,030 25,210 28,390 31,570 3,180

Unfortunately, no authoritative figures are available at the local level for any definition of the incidence of poverty between Censuses. This has led many to use eligibility for the free or reduced-cost school lunch program as a proxy for the level of poverty. Students are eligible for free lunches if their family income is within 130 percent of the official poverty line. To receive reduced-cost lunches, family income must be within 185 percent of the poverty line.

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ACHIEVING

EDUCATIONAL E X C E L L E N C E THE VISION: Educational institutions in the region achieve excellence in

the delivery of learning opportunities, and citizens achieve educational attainment sufficient to enjoy a high quality of life. Citizens young and old have access to a broad range of learning opportunities in pre-K to 12th grade, higher education, and life-long learning, based on their educational needs and desire to learn. WHERE ARE WE NOW? Since 2001, public high school performance has been improving. Graduation rates were up, and attendance –a prerequisite to learning–has improved. These figures reverse the downward trend seen over the previous five to ten years. At the same time, perception of the quality of public education in Duval County has been edging upward. However, several key indicators are still lagging. Tenth grade FCAT performance in reading has been stagnant. Even though average teacher salaries have been increasing, the percentage of teachers with advanced degrees continued to decline. Fewer students participated in magnet programs, fewer magnet programs were offered, and a smaller percentage of students attended racially balanced schools. In a new section, Expanding Literacy, the Quality of Life Progress Report explores literacy efforts and indicators, including early literacy, school-age literacy, and adult literacy. While the indicators show some improvement, they also demonstrate a need for ongoing community attention to literacy. Gold Stars: High school graduation rates, exceptional-education students completing high school, and fourth-grade writing. Red Flags: High school dropout education outcomes, tenth-grade reading scores, college readiness, and teachers with advanced degrees. Targets: Fourth-grade writing.

A Gold Star is an indicator moving in a positive direction.

A Red Flag is an indicator moving in a negative direction.

A Target shows that the Target for 2005 has been met.

All indicators within this Element are, to varying degrees, interrelated. The report also lists those indicators in other Elements a volunteer committee has identified as affecting or being affected by each indicator.

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ACHIEVING EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE Public high school graduation rate: Duval Co. 2005 Target: 78% 2003-04: 67.2% NE Florida 2005 Target: 80% 2003-04: 70.7% What does this measure? The number of students

who graduate from Duval County/Northeast Florida high schools within four years, as tracked by student I.D. numbers. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Education

What other indicators affect this trend? Unemployment rate, poverty, child abuse, School Board leadership, student conduct, foster care, and divorce.

What does this trend affect? This indicator strongly affects the trend of most other indicators in this document, too many to list separately.

Why is it important? One necessary stepping stone to ensure the eventual employment of youth is graduation from high school.

How are we doing? Statewide, the graduation rate was 71.6 percent.

Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003-04 68.2% 73.8% 67.2% 81.1% 78.3% 70.7%

2002-03 67.3% 75.4% 63.7% 79.5% 78.2% 68.4%

Public high school dropout rate: Duval Co. No Target for 2005 2002-03: 5.1%

Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Education

What other indicators affect this trend? Poverty, public assistance needs, child abuse, teen births, divorce, youth alcohol use, juvenile delinquency, juvenile arrests, and domestic violence.

What does this trend affect? Births to teen

mothers, mother education, employment growth, poverty, prenatal care, School Board leadership, and crime rates.

12 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

What does this measure? The percentage of Duval County high school students who drop out between 9th and 12th grades. Beginning with the 1998-99 school year, the reported dropout rate is for all dropouts in grades 9-12. Prior rates only included dropouts 16 or over. Because of this, the previous Target for 2005 no longer applies. Why is it important? Youth who do not complete high school have a difficult time finding employment or advancing beyond lower-paying jobs. How are we doing? Statewide, the dropout rate was 3.0 percent. 2003-04 2002-03 Baker 4.0% 3.7% Clay 1.9% 2.2% Duval 5.1% 4.6% Nassau 2.5% 2.7% St. Johns 2.3% 2.0%

20

Years Ago

4.7% 1983-84 Duval Co.


ACHIEVING EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE High school dropout education outcomes: Duval Co. No 2005 Target 2002-03: 20.0% NE Florida 2005 Target: 50% 2002-03: 17.8% What does this measure? The percent of Duval County/Northeast Florida public school dropouts who were successful in continuing their education (55 percent reporting in 2002-03).

Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Education and Training Placement Information Program

What other indicators influence this trend? Employment growth, unemployment rate, poverty, teen births, alcohol use, juvenile delinquency, and juvenile alcohol/drug arrests.

What does this trend affect? Crime rates, teen

births, prenatal care, juvenile delinquency, and juvenile alcohol or drug arrests.

Why is it important? Once students have dropped out of school, they may require special services to continue their education. How are we doing? Statewide in 2002-03, 12.5 percent of dropouts continued their education. By county, rates were: 2002-03 2001-02 Baker N/A N/A Clay 13.4% 14.0% Duval 20.0% 20.6% Nassau N/A 11.7% St. Johns 14.3% 12.0% NE Florida 17.8% 18.8%

High school dropout employment outcomes: Duval Co. No 2005 Target 2002-03: 20.8% NE Florida 2005 Target: 25% 2002-03: 20.6% What does this measure? The percent of Duval County/Northeast Florida public school dropouts who were successfully employed for at least three months (55 percent reporting in 2002-03).

Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Education and Training Placement Information Program

What other indicators influence this trend? Employment growth, unemployment rate, poverty, teen births, alcohol use, juvenile delinquency, and juvenile alcohol/drug arrests.

What does this trend affect? Crime rates, teen

births, prenatal care, juvenile delinquency, and juvenile alcohol or drug arrests.

Why is it important? Once students have dropped out of school, they may require special services to gain and maintain employment. How are we doing? Statewide in 2002-03, 20.6 percent of dropouts were employed. By county, rates were: Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2002-03 N/A 17.5% 20.8% 28.6% 24.2% 20.6%

2001-02 25.0% 18.4% 21.9% 23.3% 28.3% 22.1%

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

13


ACHIEVING EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE 10th graders reading at grade level: Duval Co. NE Florida

No 2005 Target No 2005 Target

2003-04: 33% 2003-04: 35%

What does this measure? The number of Duval

County/Northeast Florida 10th graders who achieve at the top three (out of five) levels on the FCAT in reading.

Why is it important? Level 3 represents grade level work. Students who are below grade level are at risk for not graduating from high school. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Education

What other indicators affect this trend? Poverty, public assistance, racism, child abuse, foster care placement, mother’s education, divorce, prenatal care, library use, School Board leadership, and student conduct.

What does this trend affect? See below.

How are we doing? Statewide in 2003-04, 34 percent of 10th graders tested at grade level in reading on the FCAT. Throughout the region, scores were: Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003-04 29% 35% 33% 39% 46% 35%

2002-03 31% 43% 34% 36% 50% 38%

10th graders at grade level in math: Duval Co. NE Florida

No 2005 Target No 2005 Target

2003-04: 62% 2003-04: 65%

What does this measure? The number of Duval County/Northeast Florida 10th graders who achieve at the top three (out of five) levels on the FCAT in math.

Why is it important ? Level 3 represents grade level Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Education

What other indicators affect this trend? Poverty, public assistance, racism, child abuse, foster care placement, education of mother at time of birth, divorce, prenatal care, library use, School Board leadership, and student conduct.

What does this trend affect? Employment

growth, unemployment, poverty, racism, birth to teen mothers, student conduct, School Board leadership, public assistance, and juvenile delinquency.

14 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

work. Students who are below grade level are at risk for not graduating from high school.

How are we doing? Statewide in 2003-04, 63 per-

cent of 10th graders tested at grade level in math on the FCAT. Throughout the region, scores were as follows: Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003-04 62% 68% 62% 74% 78% 65%

2002-03 55% 69% 58% 65% 74% 63%


ACHIEVING EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE Public school attendance: Duval County Elementary Middle High

Target for 2005: 95% Target for 2005: 94% Target for 2005: 96%

2003-04: 92.2% 2003-04: 87.6% 2003-04: 91.4%

What does this measure? The average percent daily attendance at Duval County public schools. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Why is it important? An important prerequisite for success in school is regular school attendance.

How are we doing? Average attendance figures are not available from the other public school systems in Northeast Florida. Public school officials have no specific explanation for the rapid downward trend for high school attendance between 1997-98 and 1999-2000.

Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

While average school attendance is one indicator of student attendance, another indicator is the percentage of students who miss 21 or more days of class during the school year. In 2002-03, 13.9 percent of Duval County public high school students missed 21 or more days of school, as did 15.1 percent of middle school students and 7.7 percent of elementary school students. The Targets for 2005 reflect the community’s desire for high attendance, while recognizing the impracticality of perfect attendance. They also recognize the difficulties of the middle school years for some students. Figures were not available for Duval County Public Schools for 1996-97.

Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Duval County Public Schools

What other indicators affect this trend? Unemployment rate, poverty, child abuse, foster care, mother’s education, divorce, prenatal care, homelessness, health insurance coverage, student conduct, and domestic violence .

What does this trend affect? Births to teen

mothers, student conduct violations, juvenile delinquency, and juvenile alcohol or drug arrests. 2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

15


ACHIEVING EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE Public school 1st grade promotions: Duval Co. No 2005 Target 2002-03: 92.1% NE Florida 2005 Target: 95% 2002-03: 93.1% What does this measure? The number of public school students in Duval County/Northeast Florida who successfully move on to second grade.

Why is it important? First-grade promotions often

Source: Florida Department of Education

reflect successful pre-school preparation. However, no uniform standard is used by the schools to determine student promotion. The teacher’s judgment is the primary determining factor for student promotion.

What other indicators affect this trend?

How are we doing?

Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Poverty, child abuse, births to teen mothers, mother’s education, divorce, prenatal care, and low birth weights.

What does this trend affect? No indicator from any other Element links strongly to influence the trend of this indicator.

Statewide, the first-grade promotion rate was 91.8 percent in 2002-03. Across the region, the rates were: 2002-03 2001-02 Baker 94.2% 96.9% Clay 94.5% 94.6% Duval 92.1% 92.6% Nassau 92.7% 93.3% St. Johns 97.8% 96.9%

Fourth-graders writing at grade level: Duval Co. No 2005 Target 2003-04: 92% NE Florida 2005 Target: 80% 2003-04: 90% What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County/Northeast Florida fourth-graders who achieve at the top three (out of five) FCAT levels in writing.

Why is it important? Early school success has been Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Education

What other indicators affect this trend? No indicator in another Element links strongly to influence the trend of this indicator.

What does this trend affect? No indicator from any other Element links strongly to influence the trend of this indicator.

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identified as a positive factor in children’s lives.

How are we doing?

The comparable figure for Florida in 2003-04 was 90 percent. By county, scores were: 2003-04 2002-03 Baker 81% 76% Clay 90% 92% Duval 92% 88% Nassau 82% 89% St. Johns 85% 90% NE Florida 90% 89%


ACHIEVING EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE Average public school teacher salary: Duval Co. 2005 Target: $47,368 2002-03: $40,973 What does this measure? The average of all Duval County teacher salaries, adjusted for inflation.

Why is it important? Salary ranges, as well as the average salary, affect the ability to attract and retain qualified teachers in Duval County public schools. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Education

What other indicators affect this trend? School Board leadership.

What does this trend affect?

School Board

leadership.

How are we doing? In 2002-03, average teacher

salaries increased from $39,566 in 2003 dollars to $40,973. The 2002-03 average public school teacher salary in Florida was $40,275. The lowest entry salary with a bachelor’s degree and no experience was $30,000 in Duval County in 2002-03. The highest possible salary with a doctoral degree and over 22 years experience was $54,484. Salary figures have been adjusted to 2003 constant dollars.

20

Years Ago

$31,070

(in 2003 $$)

1982-83 Duval Co.

Teachers with advanced degrees: Duval Co. 2005 Target: 45% 2003-04: 34% What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County public school teachers holding a masters, specialist, or doctoral degree.

Why is it important? Quality in teaching is often

Source: Duval County Public Schools

subjective. One way to measure quality teaching is the percentage of teachers who have continued their education in order to improve subject knowledge and teaching skills.

What other indicators affect this trend?

How are we doing? The percentage was also 34 per-

Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

School Board leadership.

What does this trend affect? leadership.

School Board

cent in 2002-03. In 2003, 40 percent of public school teachers in Florida held advanced degrees. Duval County public schools does not reimburse teachers for the cost of college courses that they take. Upon completion of an advanced degree, teachers can expect an initial salary increase ranging between $2,060 and $5,843, depending on whether they earn a master’s or doctoral degree and years of experience.

20

Years Ago

40% 1983-84 Duval Co.

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

17


ACHIEVING EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE Students attending racially balanced schools: Duval Co. 2005 Target: 90% 2004-05: 57.2% What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County students attending schools in which the student body is at least 20 percent black and at least 45 percent white, using the definition of desegregated schools found in the 1990 Agreement between the NAACP and the Duval County School Board. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Duval County Public Schools

What other indicators affect this trend? Racism, people of color in elected positions, and School Board leadership.

What does this trend affect? Perceptions of

and experiences with racism and commuting times.

Why is it important? After the 1954 Supreme Court

decision against school segregation, community efforts to desegregate schools have been motivated by both concerns for social integration and for academic opportunities

How are we doing? The percentage declined from

57.3 percent in 2003-04. In 1999, the federal district court declared Duval County Public Schools “unitary,� indicating the end of court-ordered desegregation. This decision was upheld on appeal in 2001.

Magnet school enrollment: Duval Co.

No 2005 Target

2004-05: 14.5%

What does this measure? The percentage of Duval County students enrolled in magnet school programs.

Why is it important? Magnet schools are the primary means the Duval County Public Schools uses to address racial diversity in the schools. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Duval County Public Schools

What other indicators affect this trend? No indicators have been identified.

What does this trend affect? No indicator from any other Element links strongly to influence the trend of this indicator. This indicator was added after the Targets for 2005 were set.

18 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

How are we doing? In 2004-05, magnet enrollment

declined from 15.5 percent of total school enrollment to 14.5 percent, while 18,570 students participated in 30 magnet programs offered at 61 schools. That year, 43 percent of magnet schools were racially balanced (meaning the student body is at least 20 percent black and at least 45 percent white, using the definition of desegregated schools found in the 1990 Agreement between the NAACP and the Duval County School Board.) The number of schools offering magnet programs has declined from a high of 79 in 1999-2000.


ACHIEVING EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE High school graduates employed or in college: NE Florida: 2005 Target: 25% 2002-03: 2005 Target: 70% 2002-03:

Employed College

24.4% 67.8%

What does this measure? The percentage of

Northeast Florida graduates reporting (about 80 percent of those graduating) who continued their education or were employed for at least three months. Some of those working may also have continued their education. Upward movement in the trend lines are positive.

Source: Florida Education and Training Placement Information Program

What other indicators affect this trend? Job

growth, unemployment, poverty, School Board leadership, teen births, juvenile delinquency, and youth alcohol/drug arrests.

What does this trend affect? Unemployment,

School Board leadership, crime rate, crime victims, and people lacking health insurance.

Why is it important? An important outcome for the

community’s youth is that they take part in positive activities after graduation from high school.

How are we doing? Statewide, 17.2 percent were employed and 59.5 percent were in higher education. County figures were: Employment Education Baker 48.9% 58.9% Clay 25.5% 67.5% Duval 24.3% 66.1% Nassau 27.9% 63.1% St. Johns 18.0% 78.5%

High school graduates prepared for college: NE Florida: Reading Math

2005 Target: 85% 2005 Target: 80%

2002-03: 74.8% 2002-03: 60.0%

What does this measure? The percentage of

Northeast Florida public high school graduates who go to Florida public colleges and universities who pass math and reading college placement tests. Upward movement in the trend lines are positive.

Source: Florida Department of Education

What other indicators affect this trend? Poverty, child abuse, teen births, foster care, School Board leadership, student conduct, juvenile delinquency, and juvenile alcohol/drug arrests.

What does this trend affect?

Employment growth, births to teen mothers, mother education, and School Board leadership.

Why is it important? Effective preparation for higher education is an important measure of student success.

How are we doing? In 2002-03, 4,635 Northeast

Florida public school graduates sought degrees in Florida institutions. Readiness figures by county were: Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns Florida

Reading 63.1% 76.9% 72.6% 71.5% 85.5% 72.8%

Math 44.2% 59.5% 57.4% 50.2% 79.6% 65.0%

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

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ACHIEVING EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE Exceptional ed students complete high school: NE Florida Diploma Certificate

2005 Target: >40% 2002-03: 2005 Target: 2.3% 2002-03:

66.6% 2.2%

What does this measure? The percentage of Northeast Florida exceptional education students (not including gifted) 14 and older who complete high school by earning a certificate or diploma. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Education

What other indicators affect this trend? School Board leadership.

What does this trend affect? Poverty, School Board leadership, job placement for people with disabilities, and mother education.

In 2002-03, 16.2 percent of NE Florida public school students were in exceptional education programs, above the state average of 15.6 percent.

Why is it important? Florida law mandates free public education for children ages 3 to 20 with special needs.

How are we doing? Diplomas were up from 61.3

percent in 2001-02. In 2002-03, 75.9 percent of reporting graduates were employed and 50.7 percent continued their education. Diplomas Certificates Baker 75.7% 0.0% Clay 78.2% 3.6% Duval 61.4% 2.0% Nassau 45.0% 10.0% St. Johns 73.8% 1.1%

Satisfaction with public education: Duval Co.

No 2005 Target

2004: 39%

What does this measure? The percentage of people surveyed in Duval County who responded “good” or “excellent” to the question: Education is also important for the quality of life. In your opinion, is the quality of education provided by the Duval County Public Schools excellent, good, fair, or poor? Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend? The unemployment rate and School Board leadership. What does this trend affect? Poverty, School Board leadership, and job placement for individuals with disabilities.

20 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

Why is it important? Citizen satisfaction itself is an important criterion for success in the delivery of all public services, including public education.

How are we doing? Satisfaction improved from 35 percent in 2003.

Excellent Good Fair Poor

2004 8% 31% 33% 20%

2003 7% 28% 35% 22%


ACHIEVING EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE Higher education degrees and certificates: Duval Co. 2005 Target: 12,000 2002-03: 8,797 What does this measure? The total degrees and vocational training certificates awarded annually by EWC, FCCJ, JU, UNF, and Florida Coastal School of Law.

Why is it important? Continuing education or Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Edward Waters College; Florida Community College at Jacksonville; Jacksonville University; University of North Florida; and Florida Coastal School of Law

What other indicators affect this trend? Net employment growth, unemployment rate, and poverty.

What does this trend affect? This indicator

strongly affects 15 indicators in civic involvement, economic growth, and support for the arts.

certification increases knowledge and may improve employment opportunities.

How are we doing? The 2002 and 2003 vocational certificate data reported by FCCJ appears anomalous. The following degrees and certificates were reported: Vocational (AS/AAS) Associate (AA) Undergraduate Graduate Vocational certificate

2002-03 824 1,942 2,748 803 2,480

2001-02 646 1,803 2,556 752 8,304

20

Years Ago

2,740

(degrees only)

1982-83 Duval Co.

Total participation in continuing education: Duval Co. 2005 Target: 90,000 2002-03: 36,473 What does this measure? The number of students enrolled in noncredit vocational, continuing education, and enrichment programs at FCCJ and UNF.

Why is it important? Continuing education may Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Community College at Jacksonville; Jacksonville University; and the University of North Florida.

What other indicators affect this trend? No indicator in another Element links strongly to affect the trend of this indicator.

What does this trend affect? Attendance at

public performances, attendance at musical events, and use of public libraries.

provide both career advancement and a sense of personal enrichment.

How are we doing? In 2002-03, 26,810 noncredit

students were enrolled at FCCJ, down from 27,764 in 2001-02. Enrollment at UNF decreased from 11,183 in 2001-02 to 9,663 in 2002-03. In 2000-01, JU stopped offering noncredit courses. Increasingly, people interested in furthering their learning appear to be turning to alternative sources of education, including local nonprofit organizations as well as the Internet, public TV, public schools, and for-profit sources of workforce training and distance learning. 2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

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ACHIEVING EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE

EXPANDING LITERACY Early Literacy JCCI’s 2004 study, Public Education Reform: Eliminating the Achievement Gap, found that “Parents’ literacy structures their child’s access to language” (study included on enclosed CD). The earliest indicator of literacy, then, is the education level of the mother at the child’s birth. In 2003, 19.3 percent of children in Duval County (18.4 percent in Northeast Florida) were born to mothers without a high school diploma or equivalent (see p. 43). This represents an improvement from 1992, when 23.2 percent of all Duval County children (23.1 percent of all children in Northeast Florida) were born to mothers without a high school education. In 2002, comparable figures were 19.0 percent and 18.3 percent, respectively. Additional indicators that may affect early learning include low birth weight and early prenatal care (see p. 54), as well as poverty (see p. 10).

88 percent of kindergartners are prepared to learn to read.

More mothers have completed high school.

In Florida public schools, all incoming kindergartners are tested for school readiness in several areas. The Florida School Readiness Uniform Screening System evaluates the five-year-old child’s language and literacy readiness, rating each child as “Ready now,” “Getting ready,” or “Not ready yet.” In 2003, 12 percent of public school kindergartners in Duval County (12 percent in Northeast Florida) were “not ready yet” to learn language and literacy skills, mirroring statewide results. This shows no change from 2002. 33 percent of Duval County kindergartners (34 percent for Northeast Florida) were scored as “ready now.” This test remains the best currently-available measure of early literacy, but is considered inadequate for the community’s needs for consistent, objective data of early literacy. Florida School Readiness Uniform Screening System Language and Literacy, 2003

Source: Florida Department of Education

Ready now Getting ready Not ready yet

Baker 50% 39% 12%

Clay 36% 48% 16%

Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida 33% 31% 37% 34% 54% 59% 54% 53% 12% 10% 9% 12%

Another measure of early literacy is the first grade promotion rate (see p. 16). Children who are not prepared to learn may be held back in first grade. Currently, no uniform standard has been mandated or adopted to determine student promotion. The teacher’s judgment concerning individual student promotion is the primary determining factor. In 2002-03, 92.1 percent of Duval County public school first graders (93.1 percent of Northeast Florida public school first graders) were promoted to second grade. This is a decrease from 1991-92, when 94.7 percent of Duval County first graders (95.0 percent of Northeast Florida first graders) were promoted to second grade. In 2001-02, comparable figures were 92.6 percent for Duval County and 93.5 percent for Northeast Florida. This data only covers public school students, however. In 2003-04, 18.8 percent of schoolage children in Duval County were enrolled in nonpublic schools (see p. 9).

22 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

Fewer children were promoted out of first grade.


ACHIEVING EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE

EXPANDING LITERACY School-Age Literacy Public Education Reform: Eliminating the Achievement Gap reports that Florida educators expect children to be reading by third grade. The Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) measures reading ability in five levels, with Level 3 and above representing grade-level performance or better. In this measure of literacy, both Duval County and Northeast Florida public school children are improving and are doing better than the state average. In 2003-04, 67 percent of Duval County public school third graders performed at or above grade level on the FCAT, as did 71 percent of those in Northeast Florida. The comparable state figure was 66 percent. The FCAT also measures writing ability. Fourth-grade writing scores continue to show improvement in 2003-04, with 92 percent of Duval County public school students scoring at or above grade level (up from 88 percent in 2002-03) along with 90 percent of those in Northeast Florida (up from 89 percent in 2002-03). See p. 16 for more information.

Third graders are reading above the state average.

3rd Grade FCAT Reading Level 3 and Above

Fourth grade writing is improving. To graduate from high school, a student must demonstrate proficiency on Source: Florida Department of Education the FCAT, scoring at least 300 (approximately a Level 2.5). This test is first given in the tenth grade, and students have up to six chances to pass the test before they graduate. Tenth grade reading scores measure literacy needs and identify those at risk of not graduating from high school. In 2003-04, 33 percent of Duval County public school tenth graders scored at least a three in reading on the FCAT, as did 35 percent of those in Northeast Florida. The comparable statewide number was 34 percent. This represents a decrease in performance from 2002-03, when 34 percent of Duval County and 38 percent of Northeast Florida tenth graders scored at grade level in reading (see p. 14).

Fewer students are ready for collegelevel reading.

Tenth grade FCAT reading scores are stagnant.

After graduating from high school, many students go on to higher education. In Florida, students at public colleges and universities are assessed for their readiness for college-level work. These assessments identify which students may need remedial courses before taking more difficult coursework. In 2002-03, 25.2 percent of incoming college students from Northeast Florida were not ready for college work in reading. This represents a setback from 2001-02, when 16 percent were not ready in reading. The percent of Duval County high school graduates needing remedial reading classes was 27.4 percent (see p. 19).

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

23


ACHIEVING EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE Adult Literacy

EXPANDING LITERACY

Measuring adult literacy is extraordinarily difficult. While two national efforts have sought to estimate literacy in Jacksonville, local indicators may someday provide a clearer picture of the effectiveness of Jacksonville’s efforts to improve adult literacy. In 2003, 49 percent of the Duval County population had library cards, below the state average of 50 percent. However, total library circulation in Jacksonville was 6.61 items per person, higher than the state average of 5.21 (see p. 50). Jacksonville Public Libraries reported a gate count (duplicated visitors) of 3,461,025 in 2003, or 4.2 visits per person in the total population. This is above the 2002 Florida average of 4.0 visits per person,and below the national average of 4.5.

Compared nationally, Jacksonville has fewer bookstores or local magazines.

More people are using the library.

In 2004, the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater released its second annual ranking of “America’s Most Literate Cities.” Of the 79 cities with populations of 200,000 and above, Jacksonville ranked 64th. The ranking was based on educational attainment, publishing and circulation of local magazines and journals, newspaper circulation, library holdings and use, and the number of booksellers in the community. The study found that Jacksonville had 71 bookstores, 12 local journals or magazines, and a newspaper circulation rate of 23 out of 100 people in the population.

In 1993, Dr. Stephen Reder of Portland State University used the National Adult Literacy Survey and 1990 U.S. Census data to create synthetic estimates of adult literacy. By comparing demographic information (such as educational attainment and type of employment) to survey results, he found that certain data appeared to correlate with functional literacy. Through a statistical formula he was able to create estimates of adult literacy in every county in the United States. Through 2004, no one had duplicated this work; these remain the most recent nationally-available (and locally-available) estimates of adult literacy. (More about Dr. Reder’s estimate methodology and limitations can be found in JCCI’s Improving Adult Literacy study or at www.casas.org/lit/litcode/). Based on 1990 Census data, Dr. Reder estimated an “adult functional illiteracy” rate of 47 percent for Duval County, meaning that 47 percent of adults functioned at less than a tenth-grade level. Comparable figures were 54 percent for Florida and 51 percent for the United States as a whole.

Adult literacy is improving.

With the assistance of Dr. Elizabeth Stearns of the University of North Florida and using the 2000 U.S. Census data, JCCI found that many of the characteristics used to estimate literacy had improved. The statistical formula was not tested against a new national literacy survey, nor does the formula take into consideration any efforts to improve local literacy levels. It only compares the demographic characteristics and their presumed influence on literacy between the 1990 and 2000 Census. Using these same formulas, that rate would decrease to 45 percent for Jacksonville in 2000. However, without more accurate local surveying efforts and an ability to include outcomes of local efforts to improve literacy, these estimates can only suggest concern for literacy issues, not define its magnitude. Significant changes in literacy predictors include the following: •

In 1990, 23 percent of the adult population had less than a high school education. In 2000, only 18 percent had failed to finish high school.

In 1990, 46 percent of the adult population had gone to college, with 17 percent receiving at least a bachelor’s degree. In 2000, 52 percent of the population had some college, with 20 percent having at least a bachelor’s degree. (For those 25 and over, the number rises to 22 percent.)

24 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.


G R O W I N G A

V I B R A N T

E C O N O M Y

THE VISION: The regional economy supports a vibrant and diversified

mix of economic activities, which combine to provide ample opportunities for productive employment, a strong consumer market, the capacity to fund needed public services, and a high standard of living that is shared widely among all citizens. WHERE ARE WE NOW? In 2003, the economy in Jacksonville and Northeast Florida began to recover from the hits it took in 2001 and 2002. Duval County had a net increase in employment, bringing total employment back over 1999 levels (but still below the high set in 2000.) Average annual wages increased substantially. 2003 also saw the unemployment rate decline, unemployment benefit claims level off, and new home construction continue to climb. Port activity and tourism remained strong. At the same time, however, more people received public assistance. More children qualified to receive free or reduced-cost lunches at school, a measure of family poverty. While utility rates remained low through 2003, housing costs continued to increase– positive news for property values, but a concern for those who are struggling to make ends meet. The indicators suggest a community priority to continue to address job creation and the working poor, especially those who need to provide for their children. Gold Stars: Average annual wage, new housing starts. Red Flags: Recipients of public assistance, children in poverty. Targets: Utilities costs, housing starts, real property value.

A Gold Star is an indicator moving in a positive direction.

A Red Flag is an indicator moving in a negative direction.

A Target shows that the Target for 2005 has been met.

All indicators within this Element are, to varying degrees, interrelated. The report also lists those indicators in other Elements a volunteer committee has identified as affecting or being affected by each indicator. 2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

25


GROWING A VIBRANT ECONOMY Net employment growth: Duval Co.

2005 Target: 40,000 2003:

over five years (averaging 8,000 per year)

1,044

(loss of 16,336 since 2000)

What does this measure? The current-year total people formally employed in December in Duval County minus the total for the previous December.

Why is it important? Employment growth is an essential component of a thriving economy. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Statistical Abstract and Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation. Data for 2002 and 2003 are provisional.

What other indicators affect this trend? Graduation rate, FCAT scores, degrees awarded, air quality, racism, government satisfaction, commuting times, air flights, bus service, and the crime rate.

What does this trend affect? This indicator strongly affects the trends of 14 other indicators.

How are we doing? In December 2003, 432,070

people were employed in Duval County, up from 431,026 in 2002 but down from the high of 448,406 in 2000. 2003 2002 Baker +104 +651 Clay -5,104 +4,688 Duval +1,044 -11,852 Nassau +514 +644 St. Johns +1,657 +2,387 NE Florida -1,785 -3,482

Average annual wage: Duval Co.

No 2005 Target

2003: $37,023

What does this measure? The average annual wage of persons employed in Duval County, adjusted to 2003 constant dollars.

Why is it important? Increased wages allow people Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation

What other indicators affect this trend? Educational attainment and degrees awarded may affect the trend of this indicator.

What does this trend affect? This indicator

may affect arts performances and funding; music, sports, and cultural attendance; philanthropic giving; and bus ridership.

26 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

to better enjoy the quality of life. The average annual wage also helps measure the quality of the new jobs created.

How are we doing? The average annual wage,

adjusted for inflation, rose from $35,799 in 2002. The statewide average annual wage was $33,553 in 2003. Around the region, average annual wages were: Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns

2003 $25,389 $26,816 $37,023 $31,384 $29,725

2002 $24,525 $23,881 $35,799 $31,234 $29,442


GROWING A VIBRANT ECONOMY Unemployment rate: Duval Co. NE Florida

2005 Target: 3.25% 2005 Target: 4.3%

2003: 5.7% 2003: 5.2%

What does this measure? The total unemployed Duval County/Northeast Florida residents, divided by the total Duval County/Northeast Florida workforce.

Why is it important? Individuals and families need Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Division of Labor, Employment, and Training, Florida Department of Labor and Employment Security

consistent employment to remain strong and self-sufficient.

How are we doing? The unemployment rate in 2003

was 5.1 percent for Florida and 6.0 percent in the U.S.

What other indicators affect this trend? Graduation rates, FCAT scores, degrees awarded, graduate success, racism, and bus service.

What does this trend affect?

This indicator strongly affects the trends of nine other indicators in other Elements.

Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003 4.4% 4.3% 5.7% 4.7% 3.7% 5.2%

2002 4.5% 4.7% 5.7% 4.5% 3.8% 5.3%

20

Years Ago

8.1% 1983 Duval Co.

Unemployment benefit claims: No 2005 Target 2003: 35,379 Duval Co. NE Florida 2005 Target: <33,861 2003: 45,608 What does this measure? The total number of unemployment benefit claims filed during each year in Northeast Florida.

Why is it important? Unemployment often creates Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Division of Labor, Employment, and Training, Florida Department of Labor and Employment Security

economic hardship and inability to meet basic needs, which may quickly result in family stress and crisis.

How are we doing? Statewide, 535,455 claims were filed in 2003. Claims by county were:

What other indicators affect this trend? Domestic violence crime reports.

What does this trend affect? Child abuse, health insurance, homelessness, and domestic violence.

Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003 595 4,709 35,379 2,003 2,922 45,608

2002 577 4,398 35,426 2,060 2,839 45,300

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

27


GROWING A VIBRANT ECONOMY Children in Poverty (free lunch program participation): Duval Co. 2005 Target: <40% 2003-04: 42.2% NE Florida 2005 Target: <40% 2003-04: 36.2% What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County/Northeast Florida public school students determined eligible for free or reduced-cost lunch programs.

Why is it important? Poverty is at the root of most health and human-service needs (see p. 10). Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Education

What other indicators affect this trend? Graduation rates, FCAT scores, dropout rates, exceptional education school outcomes, motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s education, prenatal care, teen births, divorce, insurance coverage, and bus service.

What does this trend affect? This indicator strongly affects the trends of most other indicators in this report.

How are we doing? Eligibility for these programs is

determined by household income. In 2003, a family of four making less than $23,920 qualified for free lunch; less than $34,040 qualified for reduced-price lunch. The comparable rate for Florida was 44.6 percent. 2003-04 2002-03 Baker 39.7% 40.2% Clay 25.4% 23.7% Duval 42.2% 40.7% Nassau 32.1% 33.3% St. Johns 18.5% 19.7% NE Florida 36.2% 35.3%

20

Years Ago

39.4% 1983-84 Duval Co.

Income available per person: Duval Co. 2005 Target: $19,687 2003:

$19,118

What does this measure? The total Duval County

adjusted, effective buying income divided by the total Duval County population.

Why is it important? Effective buying income Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Survey of Buying Power published annually by Sales and Marketing Management

What other indicators affect this trend? No indicator in another Element links strongly to influence the trend of this indicator.

What does this trend affect? Arts performances and funding; music, sports, and cultural attendance; philanthropic giving; and bus ridership.

28 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

(personal income less personal tax and nontax payments such as fines and contributions to social insurance) is essential for individuals to meet basic needs and have enough left to enhance their quality of life.

How are we doing? In 2003, the national average was $18,799. The Florida average was $19,960. Comparable figures by county (adjusted to 2003 dollars) were: 2003 2002 Baker $13,598 $14,215 Clay $19,706 $19,508 Duval $19,118 $19,647 Nassau $21,643 $22,413 St. Johns $27,959 $27,913

20

Years Ago

$16,404 (in 2003 $$)

1983 Duval Co.


GROWING A VIBRANT ECONOMY Recipients of public assistance: NE Florida: Food Stamps Cash (TANF)

2005 Target: 50,000 2003: 2005 Target: 25,000 2003:

71,762 7,307

What does this measure? Total number of recipients of Food Stamps and of TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) cash assistance in Northeast Florida.

Why is it important? For some families in crisis, assisDownward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Children and Families

What other indicators affect this trend? FCAT scores, graduation rates, teen births, motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s education, homelessness, insurance, and bus service.

What does this trend affect? Graduation rates, FCAT scores, and dropout rates.

Note: Time limits on TANF (but not Food Stamps) imposed in 1996 came due in 2001, reflecting a downward trend in TANF recipients.

tance is needed to help establish the stability required to improve the familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s situation.

How are we doing? In 2003, Florida had 69.9 Food

Stamp recipients and 7.0 TANF recipients per 1,000 people, compared with 59.4 and 6.0 in NE Florida. Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns

Food Stamps 2,643 5,196 55,827 2,861 5,235

TANF 245 522 5,700 299 541

Requests for emergency assistance: Duval Co.

No 2005 Target

2003: 22,965

What does this measure? The annual number of requests to the City of Jacksonville for emergency assistance.

Why is it important? People and families in crisis

Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Mental Health and Welfare Division, City of Jacksonville

What other indicators affect this trend? Graduation rates, homelessness, health insurance coverage, crime victimization, and domestic violence.

What does this trend affect? This indicator does not strongly affect the trend of another indicator.

often need emergency assistance to meet immediate, basic needs before they can begin to stabilize and improve their lives.

How are we doing? In 2003, 19,498, or 85 percent

of those requesting assistance, received it, up from 18,006 in 2002. The number of those receiving assistance is determined primarily by the amount of money budgeted by the City for this purpose each year and by the number of staff available to take applications. Similar data are not available for other Northeast Florida counties. In 1999, the data source recalculated its numbers, making the Target for 2005 obsolete. 2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

29


GROWING A VIBRANT ECONOMY Affordability of a single-family home: Duval Co.

No 2005 Target

2003: 2.47

What does this measure? The ratio between

median family income and the average cost of a singlefamily home in Duval County.

Why is it important? Families need housing costs to Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Real Estate Strategy Center; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

What other indicators affect this trend? Graduation rates and degrees awarded.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

stay affordable. The National Homebuilders Association suggests that a family reasonably should invest no more than 2.8 years of its income in the purchase of a house.

How are we doing? Average housing prices have increased from 2.19 times the median family income in 2002. For 2003, the average cost of a single-family home was $135,674, and the median family income was $54,900. This indicator includes homes sold by owners as well as those sold through the Multiple Listing Service. In 2002, homeownership in Northeast Florida declined to 65.9 percent, down from 70.4 percent in 2000. This was below the 2002 Florida average of 68.7 percent and the national average of 67.9 percent.

20

Years Ago

1.72 1983 Duval Co.

Typical monthly household JEA utilities costs: NE Florida 2005 Target: $110.04 2003: $111.32 What does this measure? Total adjusted monthly

cost to consumers in December each year of 1,000 kilowatt hours of electricity and 900 cubic feet of water consumption.

Why is it important? Utility costs are an essential Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: JEA (formerly the Jacksonville Electric Authority)

What other indicators affect this trend? Water level in the Floridan Aquifer.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element. JEA provides electric, water, and sewer services to most households in Duval County.

30 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

part of a household budget and impact disposable income.

How are we doing? In December 2003, the house-

hold cost for 1,000 kilowatts of electricity was $68.15, and the cost of 900 cubic feet of water, including sewer charges, which are assessed based on water consumption, was $43.17. Utility costs in actual dollars have not risen since 1996; the result is a continued decrease in adjusted dollar costs. One cubic foot of water contains 7.5 gallons. JEA officials consider monthly consumption of 1,000 kilowatt hours of electricity and 900 cubic feet of water to be typical residential uses.

20

Years Ago

$176.26

(in 2003 $$)

1983 Duval Co.


GROWING A VIBRANT ECONOMY New housing starts: Duval Co. 2005 Target: 25,000 over five years

2003: 8,399

(23,427 since 2000)

What does this measure? The total single-family

and multi-family residential housing units in Duval County for which building permits were issued.

Why is it important? New housing starts may be Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: University of Florida Bureau of Economic and Business Research, Building Permit Activity Annual Report

What other indicators affect this trend?

important in meeting the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s housing needs, especially when population is growing and job opportunities are increasing. However, new housing starts may also signal unmanaged growth.

How are we doing? In NE Florida, new starts were:

Air quality.

What does this trend affect? Air quality, water

quality, septic tanks, and accidents are affected negatively, while airplane seats and destinations and bus ridership and service are affected positively.

Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns

Single-family 143 2,547 5,942 781 3,371

Multi-family 6 6 2,457 18 550

Total taxable value of real property: Duval Co. 2005 Target: $29.18 billion 2003: $32.53

billion

What does this measure? Total adjusted assessed value of taxable real property in Duval County, as determined by the Property Appraiser, after subtraction of exemptions.

Why is it important? Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville Annual Financial Report

What other indicators affect this trend? Commuting times, crime rates, feelings of safety, and fire-call response times.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

Strong real estate values indicate a strong economy and provide stability for homeowners. They also show local governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capacity to raise money to pay for services. In the absence of a state income tax, the Ad Valorem Tax on real property is the most important revenue source available to local government, including school systems.

How are we doing? Real property value increased from $30.22 billion in 2002. Real property (real estate) includes land and buildings. A 1995 state constitutional revision limits the annual increase in the value of homesteaded properties to 3 percent or the increase in the national Consumer Price Index, whichever is less.

20

Years Ago

$7.02 billion (in 2003 $$)

1983 Duval Co.

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

31


GROWING A VIBRANT ECONOMY Gross tonnage handled by marine terminals: JAXPORT 2005 Target: 9 million tons 2004: 7.69

million

What does this measure? Total tons of products and

materials shipped in or shipped out of the Jacksonville Port Authority’s (JAXPORT’s) marine terminals.

Why is it important? Located at the most western Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Jacksonville Port Authority

What other indicators affect this trend? No indicator in another Element strongly influences the trend of this indicator .

What does this trend affect? This indicator may affect river quality.

point of the U.S. Atlantic coast, Jacksonville is a major transfer point for water-land transport. Shipping is a key indicator of Jacksonville’s economy.

How are we doing? Tonnage rose from 7.30 million

in 2003. This indicator measures weight rather than dollar value of materials shipped. Because most of the goods shipped are large and bulky, this is a more meaningful way to measure seaport activity. Although air freight is carried in and out of the Jacksonville International Airport, the tonnage is minimal compared to the tonnage moving through the Port Authority’s marine terminals.

Tourism (as measured by Bed-Tax revenues): Duval Co. 2005 Target: $2.53 million 2003: $1.90

million

What does this measure? Total adjusted revenues

from the Bed-Tax received by the City of Jacksonville per penny of tax levied.

Why is it important? Because tourists who stay

overnight must pay the Bed-Tax, growth in revenues demonstrates increasing tourist activity. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville Annual Financial Report

What other indicators affect this trend?

Air quality, river cleanliness, public events, sports attendance, trail miles, airline flights, and the crime rate.

What does this trend affect? Attendance at

events and performances and airline and bus travel indicators are affected positively, while motorvehicle accidents are affected negatively.

32 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

How are we doing? Tourism stayed at the adjusted $1.90 million level from 2002. Tourism can also be measured by the local hotel-room occupancy rate, which Smith Travel Research reported as 67.1 percent in 2003. In 2003, St. Johns County collected $1.35 million per penny from a three-cent tax; Nassau County (Amelia Island only) collected $680,000 per penny from a two-cent tax; Clay County collected $120,000 per penny on a three-cent tax; and Baker County collected $12,500 per penny from a two-cent tax.

20

Years Ago

$1.02 million (in 2003 $$)

1983 Duval Co.


PRESERVING

THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT THE VISION: The resources of the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural environment

positively enhance the quality of life of citizens, and air, water, and ground pollution is kept below levels harmful to ecosystems, human health, or the quality of life. The built environment is developed in ways that preserve natural ecosystems and is maintained in ways that enhance natural beauty and visual aesthetics. WHERE ARE WE NOW? 2003 saw some positive strides in the natural environment. The environmental quality of the St. Johns River and its tributaries, as measured by compliance with dissolved oxygen and fecal-coliform-bacteria standards, improved; for bacteria in particular, this represents a sustained improvement. Water levels in the Floridan Aquifer have risen to 1997 levels. Some of the indicators that measure individual behavior supporting environmental protection moved in a positive direction. Recycling increased and per household water consumption decreased, a positive sign for water conservation efforts. However, motor-fuel consumption increased, which has the potential to harm air quality. Gold Stars: Conservation and park land, aquifer water levels. Red Flags: Gallons of motor fuel sold per person, new septic-tank permits issued. Targets: Dissolved-oxygen content in the river, water level in the Floridan Aquifer.

A Gold Star is an indicator moving in a positive direction.

A Red Flag is an indicator moving in a negative direction.

A Target shows that the Target for 2005 has been met.

All indicators within this Element are, to varying degrees, interrelated. The report also lists those indicators in other Elements a volunteer committee has identified as affecting or being affected by each indicator.

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

33


PRESERVING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT Days the Air Quality Index is “good”: Duval Co. 2005 Target: 335 days 2003: 331 days What does this measure? Total days that the value of the Air Quality Index in Duval County is less than or equal to 50.

Why is it important? The Air Quality Index is a nationally standardized measure of air quality in relation to its effects on health. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville, Air and Water Quality Division

What other indicators affect this trend? Net employment growth and new housing starts negatively affect this trend.

What does this trend affect? Employment

How are we doing? The number of days in the

“good” range declined from 353 in 2002. No recognized health problem results from breathing air in the Good or Moderate ranges. Between 1983 and 2003, the air in Duval County was measured in the unhealthful range on only 17 days. State-mandated autoexhaust emission testing began in Duval County in April 1991 and was discontinued at the end of June 2000.

growth, new housing starts, and tourism.

20

Years Ago

289 1983 Duval Co.

Gallons of motor fuel sold per person: Duval Co. No 2005 Target 2003: 636.2 NE Florida 2005 Target: <573 2003: 622.2 What does this measure? The total gallons of motor

fuel certified sold in Northeast Florida by the Florida Department of Revenue, divided by the population of Northeast Florida. This includes nonresident purchases.

Why is it important? Increasing use of motor fuels Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Revenue

What other indicators affect this trend? Tourism, commuting times, and bus ridership.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has

no strong link that influences the trend of an indicator in any other Element. However, increasing motor fuel sales may be a sign of positive economic growth or increased tourism.

34 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

harms air quality, depletes nonreplaceable resources of fossil fuels, and may indicate increasing urban sprawl.

How are we doing? If the average gas mileage is

about 20 mpg, the 2003 figure of 622.2 gallons represents almost 12,500 miles traveled by car by each resident. 2003 2002 Baker 737.9 762.8 Clay 489.3 504.7 Duval 636.2 635.5 Nassau 539.0 557.6 St. Johns 706.2 700.8 NE Florida 622.2 624.7


PRESERVING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT St. Johns River compliance with DO standards: River 2005 Target: 100% 2003: 100% Tributaries 2005 Target: >87% 2003: 72% What does this measure? The annual percentage frequency of compliance of water samples from the St. Johns River and tributary streams in Duval County with Class III water standards for dissolved oxygen (DO).

Why is it important? Dissolved oxygen (DO) is Source: City of Jacksonville, Air and Water Quality Division

essential for maintaining a healthy aquatic ecosystem. The St. Johns River and its major tributaries need DO to support the propagation and maintenance of a healthy, well-balanced population of fish and wildlife.

What other indicators affect this trend?

How are we doing?

Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Net employment growth and new housing starts negatively affect this indicator.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has

no strong link that influences the trend of an indicator in any other Element.

River only

The river and tributaries improved from 99 percent and 59 percent, respectively, in 2002. Excessive organic material from sewage and fertilizer run-off are the main causes of the depletion of dissolved oxygen. Compliance in Duval County streams in 2003 ranged from 100% in Broward River/Dunn Creek to 43% in Julington/Durbin Creek.

St. Johns River bacteria standards compliance: Tributaries 2005 Target: >78% 2003: 75% What does this measure? The annual percentage

frequency of compliance of water samples from the St. Johns River and tributary streams in Duval County with Class III water standards for fecal-coliform bacteria of less than 800 bacteria per 100 ml.

Why is it important? Bacteria levels are an indicator Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville, Air and Water Quality Division

What other indicators affect this trend? No indicator in another Element links strongly to influence the trend of this indicator.

What does this trend affect? Tourism.

of the possible presence of human waste and of the pathogens found in inadequately treated sewage, which can lead to a variety of human illnesses.

How are we doing? Compliance improved from 63

percent in 2002. Major possible sources of fecalcoliform bacteria include the pipes and pumps that transfer sewage to a treatment plant, incomplete treatment and disinfection at the treatment plant itself, or failing septic tanks. Compliance in Duval County streams in 2003 ranged from 100% in Julington/Durbin Creek to 51% in downtown minor tributaries. 2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

35


PRESERVING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT Average monthly water consumption: Duval Co. 2005 Target: 840 cu ft 2003: 869 cu ft What does this measure? The average potable (drinkable) water billed as consumed to Duval County residential (single-family) JEA accounts in cubic feet.

Why is it important? Individual households can have Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: JEA (formerly the Jacksonville Electric Authority)

What other indicators affect this trend? Households watching TV news may be more likely to conserve water. Available personal income increases may result in increased water use.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

a significant impact on water conservation efforts. Residential water use accounts for 45 percent of all potable water consumption in Duval County.

How are we doing? Average water consumption fell

from 879 cubic feet in 2002. A cubic foot of water contains about 7.5 gallons. Thus, the 2003 average household consumption figure of 869 cubic feet per month equals 78,210 gallons per year or about 214 gallons per day on average. In 2003, potable-water consumption of all kinds through the JEA water utility totaled 4.5 billion cubic feet, including all residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, fire protection, and governmental uses.

Water level in Floridan Aquifer: Duval Co. 2005 Target: >32.0 feet 2003: 36.7 feet What does this measure? Average annual water

level above mean sea level in nine Floridan Aquifer wells located throughout Duval County, which are monitored by the City of Jacksonville.

Why is it important? Slowing the water-level decline Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville, Air and Water Quality Division

What other indicators affect this trend? New housing starts may influence the trend of this indicator.

What does this trend affect? This indicator on

well levels has a strong link that can negatively influence the trend of the indicator of utility prices.

36 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

in Floridan Aquifer wells might become important to protect the quality of drinking water available. Already it is important to protect water quality by preventing salt-water intrusion into freshwater wells, especially along the Atlantic Coast and the St. Johns River.

How are we doing? Water levels rose from 33.0 feet

in 2002. Between 1983 and 2003, the water level in the wells monitored dropped an average of 0.1 feet each year. The long-range, historical trend shows an annual decrease of between 0.3 and 0.7 feet.


PRESERVING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT Tons per person of solid waste recycled: Duval Co. 2005 Target: 1.0 tons 2003: .87 tons What does this measure? The annual per-person

tons of solid waste processed for recycling in Duval County.

Why is it important? Reducing solid waste disposal in landfills decreases the need for new landfills. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville, Environmental Resource Management Department

What other indicators affect this trend? Households watching TV news may be more apt to recycle.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

How are we doing? Recycling increased from .58

tons in 2002. Jacksonville residents can recycle plastic bottles labeled with a 1 or 2, glass bottles, metal and aluminum cans, newspapers and inserts, magazines, catalogs and telephone books, brown paper bags, and corrugated cardboard. The following are not accepted for recycling: plastic bags, milk cartons, juice boxes, motor oil, pool chemical, pesticide, or fertilizer bottles. In addition, lawn and yard waste, appliances, and some construction and demolition debris are recycled.

New septic-tank permits issued: Duval Co.

2005 Target: 400

2003: 599

What does this measure? Annual number of permits issued for new septic tanks in Duval County.

Why is it important? Only about 5 percent of unde-

Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Duval County Public Health Department, Environmental Engineering Division

What other indicators affect this trend? New housing starts may negatively affect this indicator.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

veloped land in Duval County is suitable for septic-tank use. Septic-tank failures may cause serious health and environmental problems.

How are we doing? Permits increased from 560 in

2002. A 1999 study by the Duval County Health Department estimates that over 100,000 septic tanks were in use in Duval County. Of that amount, approximately 26,000 may be failing or in need of repair. In addition to permits for new septic tanks, the City of Jacksonville issued 588 permits in 2003 for the repair of existing septic tanks. The Better Jacksonville Plan calls for replacement with sewer service of more than 5,000 additional septic tanks between 2000 and 2010.

20

Years Ago

1,601 1983 Duval Co.

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

37


PRESERVING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT Manatee deaths in Northeast Florida waters: Duval Co. NE Florida

No 2005 Target No 2005 Target

2003: 19 2003: 28

What does this measure? The annual number of manatee deaths in Northeast Florida.

Why is it important? The Florida manatee is native Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Fish and Wildlife Research Institute

What other indicators affect this trend? The number of boat ramps might affect this trend.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

to Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coastal and river waters and is an endangered species. Both human-related and natural factors could negatively affect the long-term survival of the species.

How are we doing?

The number of deaths increased from 14 in Duval County and 22 in Northeast Florida in 2002. In 2003, five manatee deaths in Northeast Florida were caused by watercraft, down from 13 in 2002. Other causes of death in 2003 included eight perinatal deaths, five deaths due to cold stress, two deaths to natural causes, eight deaths due to undetermined causes, and one unrecovered body.

Conservation and park land: Duval Co.

No 2005 Target

2003: 70,057

What does this measure? Total acres of park and

conservation land in Duval County, including land owned or maintained by government agencies (federal, state, and local) as well as private conservation groups.

Why is it important? Protecting land from growth Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Duval County Public Health Department, Environmental Engineering Division

What does this trend affect? Satisfaction with government services.

What other indicators affect this trend?

Satisfaction with government services and public park acreage.

38

Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

and development preserves ecological habitats for future generations.

How are we doing? In 2003, including all park and

conservation land, Jacksonville had the largest urban park system in America, totalling 70,057 acres. This accounts for 13 percent of the land area in Duval County or 84.8 acres per 1,000 people. Jacksonvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Preservation Project coordinates the purchase of land with the St. Johns River Water Management District, the State of Florida, the National Park Service, JEA, the Nature Conservancy, and the Trust for Public Land. This indicator includes about 8,000 acres in parkland, part of which includes active parks (see p. 48.)


PROMOTING

SOCIAL WELLBEING AND HARMONY THE VISION: Social-service institutions in the region provide services

with excellence to those in need; citizens and institutions support philanthropy and volunteerism to enhance the social environment; and citizens share social interactions characterized by equality of opportunity and racial harmony. WHERE ARE W E NOW? In measures of caring and involvement, Jacksonville residents showed an increased willingness to address problems in the social environment in 2003. Philanthropic giving and volunteerism both increased over 2002 levels. And in some areas, these efforts were rewarded with good news: the teen birth rate was down, and fewer people reported experiencing racism. However, some needs increased in 2003. More children entered foster care, more children saw their parents divorce, and more individuals were homeless. The divide on perceptions of racism in Jacksonville increased. And while fewer teen mothers gave birth, one in five teen mothers in 2003 were giving birth to a second child. Gold Stars: Teen births. Red Flags: Racism, children in foster care, homelessness. Targets: Teen births, length of stay in foster care, children of divorce.

A Gold Star is an indicator moving in a positive direction.

A Red Flag is an indicator moving in a negative direction.

A Target shows that the Target for 2005 has been met.

All indicators within this Element are, to varying degrees, interrelated. The report also lists those indicators in other Elements a volunteer committee has identified as affecting or being affected by each indicator.

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

39


PROMOTING SOCIAL WELLBEING AND HARMONY Is racism a local problem? Duval Co.

2005 Target: 45%

2004: 48% yes

What does this measure? Duval County survey

respondents who answer “yes” to this question: In your opinion during the last year, do you feel that racism is a problem in Jacksonville?

Why is it important? The perception of racism in a Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey conducted by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend? Graduation rates, desegregated schools, elected officials who are people of color, crime rates, and perceptions of safety.

What does this trend affect? All indicators of

community may create as many, if not more, problems than the experiences of racism in a community.

How are we doing? “Yes” responses decreased from

49 percent in 2003, with 43 percent of white respondents perceiving racism to be a local problem (down from 44 percent in 2003), compared to 70 percent of people of color surveyed (up from 65 percent in 2003). At 27 points, the racial divide on the perception of racism as a community problem is the largest since this indicator was first measured in 1985.

racial disparities, as well as poverty.

20

Years Ago

28% yes 1985 Duval Co.

Have you personally experienced racism? Duval Co.

2005 Target: <18%

2004: 27% yes

What does this measure? Duval County survey

respondents who answer “yes” to this question: Thinking about your own possible experience with racism, do you believe that you have personally experienced racism during the past year while shopping, while at work, or while renting or buying housing in Jacksonville? Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey conducted by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend?

Why is it important? Experiencing racism is a direct

assault on one’s quality of life. In 2003, 28 percent reported experiencing racism.

Graduation rates, desegregated schools, crime rates, the unemployment rate, elected officials who are people of color, and perceptions of safety.

How are we doing? Responses varied by race.

What does this trend affect? All indicators of

People of color Whites

racial disparities, as well as poverty.

40 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

Shopping Work 41% 31% 11% 8%

Housing 17% 2%


PROMOTING SOCIAL WELLBEING AND HARMONY Births to teen mothers per 1,000 live births: 15-17 2005 Target: <45.0 2003: 35.9 2005 Target: <3.3 14 & under 2003: 2.1 What does this measure? Total annual live births in

Northeast Florida to females under 18 per 1,000 live births divided by age.

Why is it important? Teen pregnancies often result in Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Office of Vital Statistics, Florida Department of Health

What other indicators affect this trend? FCAT scores, school attendance, dropout rates, dropout outcomes, poverty, youth alcohol use, and domestic violence.

What does this trend affect? Poverty, public

assistance needs, infant death rates, low-birthweight infants, dropout rates and outcomes, STD reports, school promotions, and post-high school outcomes.

health problems for mother and baby, and parenting problems can create social and economic hardship. The risks are especially high for younger teens.

How are we doing? Rates changed from 38.9 and

1.9 in 2002, respectively. Total births to teen mothers declined from 667 in 2002 to 649 in 2003. By county, rates were: Ages 15-17 14 & under Baker 68.0 0.0 Clay 22.5 1.4 Duval 37.7 2.4 Nassau 36.9 1.4 St. Johns 32.3 1.3

Subsequent births to teen mothers: NE Florida 2005 Target: <15%

2003: 20.0%

What does this measure? The percentage of births to mothers under 20 in Northeast Florida in which the mother had a previous child.

Why is it important?

Subsequent births to teen mothers illustrate ongoing needs not met by previous community prevention efforts. Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Office of Vital Statistics, Florida Department of Health

What other indicators affect this trend? FCAT scores, school attendance, dropout rates, dropout outcomes, poverty, youth alcohol use, and domestic violence.

What does this trend affect? Poverty, public

assistance needs, infant death rates, low-birthweight infants, dropout rates and outcomes, STD reports, school promotions, and post-high school outcomes.

How are we doing? In 2003, 19.6 percent of births to teen mothers statewide were subsequent births. By county, the figures were: Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003 26.2% 14.7% 20.8% 19.3% 17.3% 20.0%

2002 21.6% 14.5% 20.2% 23.3% 20.2% 19.8%

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

41


PROMOTING SOCIAL WELLBEING AND HARMONY Foster children per 10,000 children: NE Florida

No 2005 Target

47.5

2003:

What does this measure? Total number of foster children in Northeast Florida per 10,000 children in Northeast Florida under age 18.

Why is it important? Children are more likely to

develop positively when they live in a home with a permanent family. Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Children and Families

How are we doing? The statewide rate per 10,000 children was 42.2 in 2003. Rates per county were:

What other indicators affect this trend? The unemployment rate.

What does this trend affect? Graduation rates, FCAT scores, school attendance, juvenile delinquency and alcohol/drug arrests, readiness for college. This indicator was added after the Targets for 2005 were set.

Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003 18.0 22.4 57.4 31.1 26.7 47.5

2002 21.1 23.2 50.0 11.9 19.0 40.9

Median length of stay in foster care: NE Florida: Adopted Reunited

2005 Target: <36 months 2003: 2005 Target: <12 months 2003:

What does this measure? The median length of stay

in months that children in Northeast Florida live in foster care for children subsequently reunited with their families and for those who are adopted. Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Children and Families

What other indicators affect this trend? The unemployment rate.

What does this trend affect? Graduation rates, FCAT scores, school attendance, juvenile delinquency and alcohol/drug arrests, readiness for college. In 2002, the indicator changed from average to median length of stay. Figures prior to 2002 are not available.

42 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

Why is it important? When children must be

removed from home because of family crises, the goal is to place them in a safe, permanent home as soon as possible, with their own family or an adopted family.

How are we doing? By county, median lengths of stay in 2003 were: Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns

Reunited 0.0 12.4 13.2 7.9 9.6

Adopted 0.0 0.0 33.6 0.0 0.0

33.6 months 11.9 months


PROMOTING SOCIAL WELLBEING AND HARMONY Births to mothers with 12 years of education: NE Florida 2005 Target: >85% 2003: 81.6% What does this measure? The percentage of all

births in Northeast Florida in which the mother had at least 12 years of education.

Why is it important? Children of parents with

Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Office of Vital Statistics, Florida Department of Health

What other indicators affect this trend?

Graduation rates, dropout rates, poverty, and exceptional education student success.

What does this trend affect? Poverty, public assistance needs, infant death rates, low-birthweight infants, immunizations, prenatal care, library use, and the childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public school outcomes.

limited education may live in an environment lacking in stimulation for positive development, literacy, and school success.

How are we doing? Statewide in 2003, 79.3 percent of children were born to mothers with at least 12 years of education. 2003 2002 Baker 72.8% 73.5% Clay 84.9% 85.6% Duval 80.7% 81.0% Nassau 81.3% 76.6% St. Johns 87.0% 87.3% NE Florida 81.6% 81.7%

Children of parents becoming divorced: NE Florida 2005 Target: <5,600 2003: 4,864 What does this measure? The total number of

children under 18 in Northeast Florida whose parents become divorced during each year.

Why is it important? Children are often severely negatively affected by divorce of their parents. Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Office of Vital Statistics, Florida Department of Health

What other indicators affect this trend? The unemployment rate, domestic violence, and poverty.

What does this trend affect? Poverty, gradua-

tion rates, FCAT scores, student conduct violations, school promotions and attendance, juvenile delinquency and alcohol arrests, and dropout rates.

How are we doing? Statewide, the number of chil-

dren whose parents divorced during 2003 was 55,489. Comparable figures by county were: Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003 102 636 3,405 270 451 4,864

2002 118 658 3,277 238 397 4,688

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

43


PROMOTING SOCIAL WELLBEING AND HARMONY Do you volunteer? Duval Co.

2005 Target: 75%

2004: 64% yes

What does this measure? The number of Duval

County respondents who said â&#x20AC;&#x153;yesâ&#x20AC;? to: Some people in our community are contributing their time to causes they consider worthwhile. In the past year, have you given your time without pay to any charitable, civic, religious, or other volunteer organization? Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend? Poverty.

What does this trend affect? Supervised sports

activities as well as all indicators on civic involvement.

Why is it important? Many important needs in the community are met through unpaid service.

How are we doing?

The indicator rose from 60 percent in 2003. In a 2001 national survey by Independent Sector, 44 percent of adults reported having volunteered in their community in the previous year, representing the equivalent of over 9 million fulltime employees at a value of $266 billion.

20

Years Ago

64% yes 1985 Duval Co.

Do you volunteer more than 7 hours/week? Duval Co.

2005 Target: 33%

2004: 16% yes

What does this measure? Of the number of people

who reported volunteering in the last year, the number who reported volunteering more than seven hours per week on average. If you volunteered during the past year, about how many total hours do you think you have volunteered, on average per week (1-3, 4-7, 8-10, 11-15, more than 15)? Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend? Poverty.

What does this trend affect? Supervised sports

activities and the perceived ability to influence local government decision-making.

44 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

Why is it important? People who volunteer for

longer periods of time provide significant service to the community.

How are we doing? The 2003 survey found that 26

percent of respondents who volunteered did so for more than seven hours per week. According to the Independent Sector, the average dollar value of volunteering seven hours per week for a full year would be $6,257.


PROMOTING SOCIAL WELLBEING AND HARMONY Philanthropy given to federated campaigns: NE Florida 2005 Target: $26.32 2003: $22.23 million

million

What does this measure? The sum of annual giving

to the following five federated charitable fundraising efforts in Northeast Florida: United Way of Northeast Florida, United Way of St. Johns County, Twogether for Life, Combined Federal Campaign, and Florida State Employees Charitable Campaign (FSECC). Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Why is it important? Charitable giving pays for a

Sources: United Way of Northeast Florida; United Way of St. Johns County; American Cancer Society

significant amount of health and human services in the region. The total amount of charitable giving is much larger than reflected in this indicator.

What other indicators affect this trend?

How are we doing? Giving increased from an adjust-

Employment growth and income available per person affect this indicator.

What does this trend affect? Number of performances and events and financial support for the arts.

ed $21.16 million in 2002.

United Way of Northeast Florida Combined Federal Campaign United Way of St. Johns County Twogether for Life FSECC

2003 $18,121,207 $ 2,372,991 $ 1,004,748 $ 518,185 $ 212,396

Homeless count per 100,000 people: Duval Co.

No 2005 Target

2003: 312

What does this measure?

The total homeless individuals identified in an annual survey in Duval County per 100,000 Duval County population.

Why is it important? Lacking housing can be a Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: The State of Homelessness in Jacksonville, Florida, Emergency Services and Homeless Coalition of Jacksonville

What other indicators affect this trend? Unemployment, poverty, housing affordability, unemployment-benefit claims, and domestic violence.

What does this trend affect? School attendance, requests for emergency assistance, and public-assistance recipients.

significant impediment to obtaining employment and stabilizing a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life.

How are we doing? In 2003, the count of homeless individuals was done, but the accompanying survey was not. The count found 2,580 homeless people in Duval County, up from 2,122 in 2002. The rate per 100,000 people in Duval County rose from 262 to 312. The statewide rate is estimated at 452 per 100,000.

Because the Emergency Services and Homeless Coalition recalculated its homeless count in 2003, excluding children in emergency foster care services, the previous Target for 2005 of 360 no longer applies. 2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

45


E N J O Y I N G ARTS, CULTURE, AND RECREATION

THE VISION: Citizens desire, support, have access to, and actively patronize a great diversity of opportunities in the region for cultural and artistic enrichment and for recreational, leisure, and entertainment activities. WHERE ARE WE NOW? Jacksonvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arts and culture scene took some important steps forward in 2003. The Jacksonville Museum of Modern Art, in its new facility downtown, had 38,000 visitors. The number of public performances and events rose over 30 percent from 2001. Attendance at musical performances rose sharply from 2002, reversing a downward trend, sparked by a return of the Jacksonville Jazz Festival. During the same year, however, financial support for the arts declined. Opportunities for recreation increased with the growth in parks, increased participation in structured sporting events and activities at parks, and increased funding for activities and maintenance at public parks. The community still lacks sufficient boat ramps for all of its boaters with one public boat ramp for every 1,369 registered boats. And attendance at sporting events declined, despite the new facilities available. Gold Stars: Sports participants, library use. Red Flags: None. Targets: Library use.

A Gold Star is an indicator moving in a positive direction.

A Red Flag is an indicator moving in a negative direction.

A Target shows that the Target for 2005 has been met.

All indicators within this Element are, to varying degrees, interrelated. The report also lists those indicators in other Elements a volunteer committee has identified as affecting or being affected by each indicator.

46 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.


ENJOYING ARTS, CULTURE, AND RECREATION Public performances/events at selected facilities: Duval Co.

2005 Target: 550

2003: 470

What does this measure? The total events and

performances open to the public each year at Metropolitan Park, the Florida Theatre, and the TimesUnion Center for the Performing Arts.

Why is it important? Opportunities for entertainUpward movement in the trend line is positive.

Sources: Jacksonville Department of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment; Florida Theatre, Inc.; and SMG Facilities Management Worldwide

What other indicators affect this trend? Degrees awarded, participation in noncredit courses, employment growth, personal income, tourism, and philanthropy.

What does this trend affect? Increased tourism

ment and cultural enrichment are essential ingredients in the quality of life of the community.

How are we doing? The number of performances

rose from 398 in 2002. Jacksonville also has many other events open to the public not included in this indicator, such as events at Swisher Auditorium and Terry Concert Hall at Jacksonville University, Robinson Auditorium at the University of North Florida, and the Wilson Center for the Performing Arts at FCCJ. No accurate data were available for these facilities.

may encourage more performances and events.

Public and private support per person for arts: Duval Co.

2005 Target: $33.40

2003: $29.11

What does this measure? Total public and private funding of arts organizations receiving Cultural Services Grants through the Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville divided by total Duval County population.

Why is it important? Most arts organizations rely on Source: Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville

a combination of public funding and private financial support in order to provide art and cultural services to the community.

What other indicators affect this trend?

How are we doing? Support decreased from an

Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Degrees awarded, available personal income, and philanthropy.

What does this trend affect? This indicator on financial support for arts organizations has no strong link that influences the trend of an indicator in any other Element.

adjusted $31.36 in 2002. Twenty-six local cultural organizations received $3.3 million in public service funding for fiscal year 2004-05, up from $2.5 million in 2003-04. Not all local arts organizations receive funding from the Cultural Council, however, this indicator reports on the largest arts organizations in the community, because they do receive support through Cultural Services Grants. 2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

47


ENJOYING ARTS, CULTURE, AND RECREATION Public-park acreage per 1,000 people: Duval Co. No 2005 Target 2003: 10.1 acres What does this measure? The indicator measures

the total public park acreage of the City of Jacksonville Department of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment, the three beach municipalities, and Baldwin per 1,000 people in the total Duval County population. This indicator does not include conservation land. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville; beach municipalities; and Baldwin

What does this trend affect? Satisfaction with government services.

What other indicators affect this trend? Satisfaction with government services.

Why is it important? The availability and ease of access to public parks provide opportunities for relaxation and community recreation.

How are we doing? Total acreage grew from 7,968

acres in 2002 to 8,332 acres in 2003, which made the indicator rise from 9.84 in 2002. Park acreage in 2003 included 8,184.88 acres owned by the City of Jacksonville (5,486.86 acres of "active" parks, 1,440.49 acres of "passive" parks, and 1,257.43 acres of "mixed" parks), as well as 39 acres in Jacksonville Beach, 12 acres in Neptune Beach, 89.1 acres in Atlantic Beach, and 6.5 acres in Baldwin.

20

Years Ago

5.35 1983 Duval Co.

Sports participants at parks and pools: Duval Co. 2005 Target: 3.5 million 2004: 9.60 million What does this measure? The total individuals (young people and adults) participating in organized, supervised athletic and aquatic activities at City of Jacksonville parks and pools during each year. Participants at multiple events are counted each time they participate. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Why is it important? Supervised sports activities pro-

Source: City of Jacksonville, Department of Recreation, Parks, and Entertainment

vide opportunities for youth recreation, build character, and decrease the risk of youth involvement in delinquent activities.

What other indicators affect this trend?

How are we doing? Participation increased from

Volunteering and satisfaction with government services.

What does this trend affect? Crime rate and reports of crime victimization.

48 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

7.79 million in 2003. This indicator reports on youth and adult participation in supervised athletic activities in public parks and aquatic activities in pools operated by the Jacksonville Recreation Department. Additional undocumented sports activities of many kinds take place in public parks, school facilities, and other places in the community but are not included in the indicator.


ENJOYING ARTS, CULTURE, AND RECREATION Attendance at musical shows per 1,000: Duval Co.

2005 Target: 400

2003: 270

What does this measure?

The total annual attendance at the Jacksonville Symphony series, FCCJ Artist Series, and Jazz Festival performances per 1,000 people in the Duval County population.

Why is it important? Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Jacksonville Symphony; FCCJ Artist Series; WJCT (Jazz Festival)

What other indicators affect this trend? Degrees awarded, participation in noncredit programs, personal income, and tourism.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has

no strong link that influences the trend of an indicator in any other Element.

Increased attendance at musical performances is evidence of strength in the performing arts in the community.

How are we doing? Attendance per 1,000 people increased from 225 in 2002. 2003 FCCJ Artist Series 88,163 Jacksonville Symphony 74,822 Jazz Festival 60,000

2002 106,634 75,369 Not held

The Jazz Festival was not held in 2001 and 2002. Beginning in 2003, the Jazz Festival has been a free event sponsored by the City of Jacksonville.

Attendance at sports facilities per 1,000: Duval Co.

2005 Target: 2,000

2003: 1,154

What does this measure? Total annual attendance at major sports events at Alltel Stadium, the Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville (was Wolfson Park), and the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena (was Coliseum) per 1,000 people in the Duval County population. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: SMG Facilities Jacksonville Jaguars

Management

Worldwide;

What other indicators affect this trend? Personal income and tourism.

What does this trend affect? Tourism.

Why is it important? Attendance at sporting events provides a shared sense of community among fans.

How are we doing? Attendance at sports facilities per 1,000 people declined from 1,232 in 2002. Total attendance, by facility, was: 2003 2002 Alltel Stadium 522,137 546,061 -Jaguars games Alltel Stadium 176,478 183,878 -other sporting events Baseball Grounds 220,682 230,156 Arena 34,326 36,838

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

49


ENJOYING ARTS, CULTURE, AND RECREATION Attendance at selected events per 1,000: Duval Co.

2005 Target: 1,550

2003: 1,310

What does this measure? The total annual atten-

dance at the Jacksonville Zoo, Greater Jacksonville Agricultural Fair, and the World of Nations per 1,000 people in the Duval County population.

Why is it important? Participation in community Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Jacksonville Zoo; Greater Jacksonville Fair Association; City of Jacksonville, Office of Special Events

events strengthens the sense of place and quality of life of a community.

How are we doing? Attendance declined from 1,329 per thousand in 2002.

What other indicators affect this trend? Personal income and tourism.

What does this trend affect? This indicator on

attendance at selected cultural facilities and events has no strong link that influences the trend of an indicator in any other Element.

Agricultural Fair Jacksonville Zoo World of Nations

Library use Duval Co.

2003 482,522 525,618 75,000

2002 475,391 524,889 75,000

(as measured by circulation per person): 2005 Target: 5.5

2003: 6.61

What does this measure? Total resources circulated by Duval County public libraries divided by the total Duval County population.

Why is it important? Public libraries provide an

opportunity for all residents to enjoy free use of books, videotapes, audiotapes, CDs, and other materials. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville, Public Library

What other indicators affect this trend? High school graduation rates, degrees awarded, and participation in noncredit classes.

What does this trend affect? Satisfaction with City services.

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Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

How are we doing? Circulation rose from 6.44 in

2002. The library system recorded 3,461,025 visits in 2003, up from 3,102,184 visits in 2002. Total borrowers also increased from 383,905 in 2002 to 401,286 in 2003 (including 300,065 adult borrowers and 101,221 juveniles). In 2004, the library system had available one main library and 15 branch libraries. In 2005, the library expects to open a new main library and provide 20 branch libraries and a bookmobile.

20

Years Ago

3.16 1985 Duval Co.


ENJOYING ARTS, CULTURE, AND RECREATION Recreation expenditures per person for activities and maintenance: Duval Co. 2005 Target: $26.91 2003: $23.32 What does this measure? Total annual adjusted City

of Jacksonville operating expenditures for recreation activities and park maintenance per person in the Duval County population.

Why is it important? While money itself does not Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville, Department of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment

What other indicators affect this trend? Satisfaction with City services.

What does this trend affect? Satisfaction with City services.

guarantee improved service, increased funding for activities and maintenance is an indicator of priorities and commitment to quality.

How are we doing? Expenditures increased from an

adjusted $21.22 in 2002. In a February 2002 City of Jacksonville survey, 68.1 percent of respondents rated park maintenance “good,” “very good,” or “excellent” (11.3 percent had no opinion). In the same survey, 65.6 percent of respondents similarly rated Jacksonville’s recreational services good to excellent (9 percent had no opinion).

Boat ramps per 100,000 people: Duval Co.

2005 Target: 5

2003: 2.5

What does this measure? The total City of Jacksonville public boat ramps per 100,000 people in the Duval County population.

Why is it important? The river and ocean are natu-

ral assets in Jacksonville, and the community benefits from access to these assets. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville, Department of Recreation, Parks, and Entertainment

What other indicators affect this trend? Satisfaction with City services.

What does this trend affect? Satisfaction with City services and manatee deaths.

How are we doing? The indicator declined from 2.6

in 2002. In 2003, 28,741 boats under 26 feet long were licensed in Duval County. During that year, the City provided water access at 21 boat ramps, which is one boat ramp for every 1,367 boats. To reach the Target for 2005 level of 5 water-access parks per 100,000 people, Duval County would need 41 boat ramps for the 2003 population of 826,279.

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

51


SUSTAINING A HEALTHY COMMUNITY

THE VISION: Health-care institutions in the region provide medical and

preventive health-care services with excellence; all citizens have access to these services, regardless of financial means; and citizens generally experience a high level of physical and mental health. WHERE ARE WE NOW? In this annual checkup on the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health, several serious problems were diagnosed. The infant death rate climbed, as did the racial disparity in infant deaths. Indicators related to healthy infants, including newborn birth weights and early prenatal care, also declined or remained stagnant. Fewer people had health insurance. More people died of heart disease, cancer, and lung cancer. More people were diagnosed with AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. But, the checkup also showed some positive signs, especially in those indicators that point to future health improvement. Fewer youth reported drinking alcohol, fewer packs of cigarettes were sold, and the percentage of children receiving immunizations increased. Gold Stars: Youth alcohol use. Red Flags: Infant mortality, racial disparity in infant deaths, health insurance, home-delivered meals, and STD reports. Targets: Nursing home patient days, HIV/AIDS related deaths, youth alcohol use.

A Gold Star is an indicator moving in a positive direction.

A Red Flag is an indicator moving in a negative direction.

A Target shows that the Target for 2005 has been met.

All indicators within this Element are, to varying degrees, interrelated. The report also lists those indicators in other Elements a volunteer committee has identified as affecting or being affected by each indicator.

52 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.


SUSTAINING A HEALTHY COMMUNITY Racial disparity in infant deaths: Duval Co.

2005 Target: <75%

2003: 119%

What does this measure? The percentage gap

between the Duval County infant death rate for people of color and the Duval County infant death rate for white people.

Why is it important? The infant mortality rate reflects

Source: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics

the quality of health care received by mothers and infants, including prenatal, postnatal, and (perhaps most importantly) interconceptional health care. The disparity in infant deaths points to disparities in health care use and treatment.

What other indicators affect this trend?

How are we doing? The increase in disparity in 2003

Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Graduation rates, poverty, racism, and teen births.

What does this trend affect? This indicator on the racial disparity in infant deaths has no strong link that influences the trend of an indicator in any other Element.

from 73 percent in 2002 was caused by diverging death rates. White infant death rates decreased from 7.5 in 2002 to 7.3 in 2003, while the infant death rate for people of color increased substantially from 13.0 in 2002 to 16.0 in 2003.

Infant death rate: Duval Co. NE Florida

2005 Target: <8.0 2005 Target: <7.0

2003: 10.8 2003: 10.0

What does this measure? The total number of

Northeast Florida/Duval County infants who die before one year of age per 1,000 Northeast Florida/Duval County live births.

Why is it important? The infant mortality rate reflects Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics

What other indicators affect this trend? Graduation rates, poverty, teen births, and mothersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; education.

What does this trend affect? This indicator on infant mortality has no strong link that influences the trend of an indicator in any other Element.

the availability and quality of prenatal and postnatal health care for mothers and infants.

How are we doing? The statewide infant death rate totaled 7.5 per 1,000 in 2003. By county, rates were: Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003 8.5 9.1 10.8 5.7 7.4 10.0

2002 8.5 5.9 9.6 10.2 5.0 8.8

20

Years Ago

12.5 1983 Duval Co.

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

53


SUSTAINING A HEALTHY COMMUNITY Newborns with healthy birth weights: No 2005 Target 2003: 90.3% Duval Co. NE Florida 2005 Target: >93% 2003: 90.9% What does this measure? The total number of newborns in Duval County/Northeast Florida with birth weights of 5.5 pounds and over divided by the total Duval County/Northeast Florida newborns.

Why is it important? Babies born with a healthy birth Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

weight have lower rates of health and developmental problems.

Source: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics

How are we doing? In 2003, the statewide rate was

What other indicators affect this trend? Poverty, teen births, and mothersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; education.

What does this trend affect?

Public school

promotions.

91.5 percent.

Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003 91.5% 93.4% 90.3% 91.9% 91.4% 90.9%

2002 91.3% 93.1% 90.4% 91.8% 91.9% 90.9%

Early prenatal care: NE Florida Teen mothers All mothers

2005 Target: >83% 2003: 2005 Target: >90% 2003:

What does this measure? The number of Northeast

Florida mothers/teen mothers who began prenatal care within the first three months of their pregnancies as a percentage of the total number of births. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Why is it important? Early, continued prenatal care

Source: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics

for pregnant women is an important step in developing a community of healthy children. Pregnant teens are especially at risk for health problems.

What other indicators affect this trend?

How are we doing? Rates changed only slightly from

FCAT scores, dropout rates, poverty, and bus service.

What does this trend affect?

Public school promotions, FCAT scores, school attendance, child abuse and reabuse, poverty, and student conduct violations.

54 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

70.4 percent for teen mothers in 2002 and 84.5 percent for all mothers. Teen mothers All mothers Baker 84.6% 83.9% Clay 75.8% 88.5% Duval 68.8% 83.0% Nassau 80.7% 87.9% St. Johns 71.8% 87.5%

70.8% 84.3%


SUSTAINING A HEALTHY COMMUNITY Children receiving scheduled immunizations: Duval Co.

2005 Target: >95%

2003: 83.1%

What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County respondents to an annual survey by the Bureau of Immunization of the Florida Department of Health of randomly selected two-year-old children in Florida who state that the child had received all appropriate immunizations. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Health

What other indicators affect this trend? Child abuse and neglect, teen births, and reabuse of children.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong links that affect the trend of any indicator in another Element.

Why is it important? Children who do not receive immunizations on time are more susceptible to disease, developmental problems, and sometimes even death. Immunization alone, however, does not indicate that children are healthy.

How are we doing? Immunization rates improved

from 77.1 percent in 2002. In 2003, 85.3 percent of surveyed two-year-olds in Florida received scheduled immunizations, up from 79.4 percent in 2002. Data are not available for other counties in Northeast Florida.

20

Years Ago

71.5% 1983 Duval Co.

Alcohol use reported by youth: Duval Co.

2005 Target: <46%

2003: 40%

What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County youth in grades 6-12 surveyed (9,370 in 2003) who report having ever used alcohol.

Why is it important? Alcohol use by youth is illegal and may lead to other risky and/or delinquent behavior. Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Weaver-Wilburn and Wilburn, Duval Public Schools Secondary Level Alcohol, Tobacco, Other Drugs and Violence Survey: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors, conducted annually

What other indicators affect this trend? Child abuse and student conduct violations.

What does this trend affect? Student conduct violations, perceptions of neighborhood safety, motor vehicle accidents, child abuse, and births to teen mothers.

How are we doing? Reported use decreased from

41 percent in 2002. In 2003, 14 percent of those surveyed reported using alcohol within the last 30 days, down from 22 percent in 2002. Other reported uses of substances (past or present) were: 2003 Cigarettes 21% Marijuana 12% Inhalants 11% Ecstasy/Designer 4% Amphetamines 4%

2002 25% 16% 9% 6% 6%

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

55


SUSTAINING A HEALTHY COMMUNITY People with no health insurance: Duval Co.

2004: 12%

2005 Target: <8%

What does this measure? The percentage of people surveyed in Duval County who responded “no” to the question: Are you currently covered by any type of health insurance coverage through your employer, Medicaid, Medicare, or private coverage?

Why is it important? Individuals and families lacking Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend? Unemployment and poverty.

What does this trend affect? Poverty.

health insurance are vulnerable to a dangerous combination of health and financial crises.

How are we doing? The percentage without health

insurance increased from 10 percent in 2003. The 2000 Census reported that 17.3 percent of Floridians had no health insurance. In 2003, 7.8 percent of Duval County residents discharged from Florida hospitals were identified as “charity” or “self-pay” patients. The comparable figure for all Florida residents was 7.0 percent.

Jacksonville health care rated as high quality: Duval Co.

2005 Target: >74%

2004: 69%

What does this measure? Percentage of Duval

County residents surveyed who answered the following question with “good” or “excellent”: In your opinion, is the health and medical care available in Jacksonville excellent, good, fair, or poor?

Why is it important? Perceptions of the quality of the Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend? No indicator in another Element links strongly to influence the trend of this indicator.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

56

Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

health and medical care available may reflect the quality of care, accessibility, and costs of health care in the community.

How are we doing? Respondents may perceive the care available to include some combination of healthcare facilities, health-care practitioners, and/or healthinsurance institutions. Responses were: Excellent Good Fair Poor

2004 25.4% 43.4% 15.7% 11.8%

2003 26.8% 39.1% 19.5% 11.8%

20

Years Ago

78% 1985 Duval Co.


SUSTAINING A HEALTHY COMMUNITY Deaths due to heart disease per 100,000: Duval Co. 2005 Target: <190 2003: 248.6 NE Florida 2005 Target: <200 2003: 233.1 What does this measure? Total annual Duval County/ Northeast Florida resident deaths due to heart disease per 100,000 people in the Duval County/Northeast Florida population.

Why is it important? With proper diet and exercise, Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics

What other indicators affect this trend? Rescue-call response times.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

some heart problems that lead to death are avoidable.

How are we doing? The statewide rate was 281.9, which may reflect the relatively older population of the state as a whole. 2003 2002 Baker 226.7 226.2 Clay 185.9 188.8 Duval 248.6 202.1 Nassau 214.1 207.9 St. Johns 203.8 188.1 NE Florida 233.1 199.6

20

Years Ago

294.4 1983 Duval Co.

Cancer deaths per 100,000 people: Duval Co. NE Florida

No 2005 Target 2005 Target: <185

2003: 230.9 2003: 221.3

What does this measure? Total annual Duval

County/Northeast Florida resident deaths due to cancer per 100,000 people in Duval County/Northeast Florida.

Why is it important? Cancer is a leading cause of Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics

death across the nation.

How are we doing? Statewide, the rate of deaths from cancer was 229.8 in 2003. By county, rates were:

What other indicators affect this trend? No indicators link strongly to influence the trend of this indicator.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003 196.7 188.4 230.9 233.1 200.2 221.3

2002 126.1 206.8 188.2 230.8 228.4 196.1 2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

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SUSTAINING A HEALTHY COMMUNITY Lung cancer deaths per 100,000 people: 2005 Target: <57 2003: 69.1 Duval Co. 2005 Target: <50 NE Florida 2003: 68.1 What does this measure? Total annual Duval County/Northeast Florida resident deaths due to lung cancer per 100,000 people in Duval County/Northeast Florida.

Why is it important? Many cases of lung cancer can Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics

be traced to smoking, making these deaths preventable.

How are we doing? The total death rate from lung cancer in Florida was 69.5. By county, the rates were:

What other indicators affect this trend? No indicators in other Elements link strongly to influence the trend of this indicator.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

2003 47.0 75.6 69.1 63.4 59.3 68.1

Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2002 39.1 68.7 56.1 83.5 76.9 61.2

20

Years Ago

63.9 1983 Duval Co.

Packs of cigarettes sold per person: Duval Co.

2005 Target: <72

2003: 78

What does this measure? The annual number of packs of cigarettes sold in Duval County per person in the total Duval County population.

Why is it important? Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer. Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Business Regulation, Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco

How are we doing? In 2004, 23.9 percent of all

Florida adults smoked. The comparable national figure was 22.0 percent Packs of cigarettes sold per person statewide in 2003 were 71. By county, rates were:

What other indicators affect this trend? No indicator in another Element links strongly to influence the trend of this indicator.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

58 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns

2003 106 71 78 69 69

2002 86 71 78 67 69

20

Years Ago

131 1983 Duval Co.


SUSTAINING A HEALTHY COMMUNITY Nursing-home patient days per person over 65: NE Florida 2005 Target: <16.5 days 2003: 15.3 days What does this measure? The sum of days during a year that all Northeast Florida patients spent in nursinghome care divided by the total Northeast Florida population 65 and older.

Why is it important? Many elderly people need Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Health Planning Council of Northeast Florida, Inc.

What other indicators affect this trend? Poverty and elder abuse and neglect.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

nursing-home care, and demand for care is anticipated to increase as Northeast Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population ages.

How are we doing? The Agency for Healthcare Administration reports the comparable statewide rate as 8.7 days in 2003. 2003 2002 Baker 30.0 days 27.5 days Clay 23.0 days 20.3 days Duval 15.4 days 14.6 days Nassau 11.6 days 10.6 days St. Johns 9.8 days 9.1 days NE Florida 15.3 days 14.3 days

People receiving home-delivered meals: NE Florida Unserved Served

No 2005 Target No 2005 Target

2003: 423 2003: 1,067

What does this measure? The unduplicated count of

individuals served in Northeast Florida counties during each year through home-delivered-meal programs that receive federal Older Americans Act or Community Care for the Elderly funding. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Northeast Florida Area Agency on Aging

What other indicators affect this trend? Poverty, philanthropy, volunteering, elder abuse, and bus service.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element. This indicator was redefined after the Targets for 2005 were set.

Why is it important? All community members need

nutritious meals to stay healthy. Some elderly people are unable to shop, prepare meals, or travel for food.

How are we doing? Total served declined from 1,364 in 2002, while unserved rose from 274. Unserved Baker 0 Clay 4 Duval 344 Nassau 51 St. Johns 24

Served 136 280 227 145 279

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

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SUSTAINING A HEALTHY COMMUNITY Newly diagnosed AIDS cases per 100,000: No 2005 Target 2003: 32.7 cases Duval Co. NE Florida 2005 Target: <15 2003: 24.8 cases What does this measure? The number of newly-

diagnosed AIDS cases in Duval County/NE Florida per 100,000 people in Duval County/NE Florida.

Why is it important? AIDS remains a debilitating and often fatal disease. Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Health

What other indicators affect this trend?

How are we doing? The national rate was 14.8 in

2002, and the comparable statewide rate was 28.3 in 2003. Rates per county were:

Juvenile alcohol/drug arrests and domestic violence.

Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

2003 12.8 7.1 32.7 4.8 9.3 24.8

2002 13.0 6.0 20.3 6.5 7.5 16.1

STD reports per 100,000 people: Duval Co. NE Florida

No 2005 Target No 2005 Target

2003: 842 2003: 645

What does this measure? The number of individuals

per 100,000 people in Duval County/Northeast Florida who have been diagnosed with gonorrhea, syphilis, or chlamydia (sexually transmitted diseases or STDs).

Why is it important? Individuals who contract STDs Source: Florida Department of Health

may suffer severe medical problems. They may also be likely to contract HIV that can result in AIDS.

What other indicators affect this trend?

How are we doing? The statewide rate was 363 in

Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Teen births, juvenile alcohol/drug arrests, and domestic violence.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element. Due to data corrections, the Target for 2005 no longer applies.

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2003.

Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003 398 250 842 230 149 645

2002 339 176 845 234 152 639


SUSTAINING A HEALTHY COMMUNITY HIV racial disparity: Duval Co.

No 2005 Target

2003: 124%

What does this measure?

The percentage difference between the number of newly-diagnosed HIV cases reported each year among African Americans in Duval County and the remaining population.

Why is it important? The disparity in the incidence of Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Health, AIDS Surveillance Program

What other indicators affect this trend? Perceptions of racism.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

HIV suggests that anti-HIV efforts should be focused on the African American population and the factors that affect the incidence of HIV.

How are we doing? African Americans comprised 29

percent of the population in Duval County in 2003 but represented 69 percent of all newly-diagnosed HIV cases. In 2003, 253 new cases of HIV were diagnosed among African Americans in Duval County (down from 292 in 2002) compared to 113 in the remaining population (down from 115 in 2002.) The resulting disparity declined from 154 percent in 2002.

HIV/AIDS-related deaths per 100,000 people: Duval Co. 2005 Target: <13 deaths 2003: 10.9 deaths What does this measure? The total annual number of HIV/AIDS-related deaths in Duval County per 100,000 people in Duval County.

Why is it important? HIV stands for Human Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Health, AIDS Surveillance Program

What other indicators affect this trend? Unemployment rate, poverty, and racism.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

Immunodeficiency Virus. People who test positive for HIV may or may not have AIDS, the disease by which the virus attacks the bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s immune system. AIDS stands for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. AIDS kills by weakening the immune system that helps the body ward off diseases.

How are we doing? The death rate from HIV/AIDS

declined from 12.7 deaths per 100,000 in 2002. In 2003, resident HIV/AIDS-related deaths in Florida were 10.2 per 100,000 people. The equivalent death rate for African Americans in Duval County from HIV/AIDSrelated causes was 27.7.

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

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MAINTAINING RESPONSIVE GOVERNMENT

THE VISION: Local governmental bodies in the region are led by competent, representative, and responsive elected and appointed officials; they provide public services effectively and equitably to citizens; and citizens are well informed about public affairs and actively participate in civic activities. WHERE ARE WE NOW? With a higher opinion of the quality of local government officials (including City of Jacksonville and School Board elected leadership), survey respondents felt more comfortable saying that they had the ability to influence local decision making. Accompanied by a rise in voter registrations, these indicators seem to point to greater civic engagement and citizen involvement in local governance. However, fewer people reported keeping up with local government news, fewer people watched local news on television, and only one in six respondents could name two of the 19 members of the Jacksonville City Council. Gold Stars: Voter registration, satisfaction with public-safety services. Red Flags: City Council member recognition. Targets: Voter registration, satisfaction with public-safety services.

A Gold Star is an indicator moving in a positive direction.

A Red Flag is an indicator moving in a negative direction.

A Target shows that the Target for 2005 has been met.

All indicators within this Element are, to varying degrees, interrelated. The report also lists those indicators in other Elements a volunteer committee has identified as affecting or being affected by each indicator.

62 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.


MAINTAINING RESPONSIVE GOVERNMENT Elected leadership rated as high quality: Duval Co. 2005 Target: 70% 2004: 64% What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County respondents who answer “excellent” or “good” to the question: In your opinion, is the quality of elected leadership in the City of Jacksonville government excellent, good, fair, or poor?

Why is it important? The quality of local elected Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend? No indicators in other Elements link strongly to influence the trend of this indicator.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

leadership is often reflected by their perceived effectiveness in the community.

How are we doing? Survey responses have ranged from a high of 71 percent in 2000 to a low of 26 percent in 1992. 2004 2003 Excellent 13.1% 8.9% Good 51.0% 53.2% Fair 25.6% 28.6% Poor 7.3% 6.1%

20

Years Ago

50% 1985 Duval Co.

School Board leadership rated as high quality: Duval Co.

2005 Target: 55%

2004: 42%

What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County respondents who answer “good” or “excellent” to the question: In your opinion, is the quality of elected leadership on the Duval County School Board excellent, good, fair, or poor?

Why is it important? The effectiveness of the public Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend? The graduation rate, FCAT scores, teacher salary, teacher advanced degrees, degrees awarded, and student conduct violations.

What does this trend affect? This indicator affects the trends of all public-school indicators.

education system relies on the quality of its leadership.

How are we doing? The indicator asks about the quality of the seven members of the elected School Board, but some people may respond to the question with the Superintendent or principals in mind. Excellent Good Fair Poor

2004 6.0% 36.3% 29.7% 14.2%

2003 4.8% 30.5% 35.0% 16.1%

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MAINTAINING RESPONSIVE GOVERNMENT Can you influence local government? 2005 Target: 50% Duval Co. 2004: 36%

yes

What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County respondents who answer “great” or “moderate” to the question: Our governmental system values citizen input and involvement. As a citizen of Jacksonville and Duval County, how would you describe your ability to influence local government decision making? Would you say that you have great influence, moderate influence, a little influence, or no influence at all? Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend? The graduation rate, volunteerism, and degrees awarded.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

Why is it important? Civic participation is an essential part of a well-functioning government.

How are we doing? Responses rose from 32 percent in 2003.

2004 Great influence 7.3% Moderate influence 28.8% A little influence 35.5% No influence 25.6%

2003 6.6% 25.7% 40.9% 23.4%

Voter registration: Duval Co.

2005 Target: 80%

2004: 83.3%*

What does this measure? The total Duval County registered voters as a percentage of the total Duval County population 18 and older.

Why is it important? Registering to vote is one of the first steps in civic participation. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville, Supervisor of Elections Office

What other indicators affect this trend? Graduation rates, degrees awarded, poverty, and volunteerism.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element. *Provisional estimate based on projected adult population 18 and over.

64 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

How are we doing? Voter registration rose from 71.1 percent in 2003. Total registered voters rose 19 percent in 2004 from 433,514 in 2003 to 515,202. In 2003, registered voters by county in Northeast Florida were: Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida Florida

2004 73.3% 90.8% 83.3% 83.6% 97.5% 85.8% 76.4%

2003 69.2% 81.3% 71.1% 76.8% 88.2% 74.7% 70.1%

20

Years Ago

72.8% 1984 Duval Co.


MAINTAINING RESPONSIVE GOVERNMENT Percent of registered voters who vote: Duval Co. 2003 Target: 60% 2003: Local elections 2006 Target: 70% 2002: State elections Presidential elections 2004 Target: 80% 2004:

49.6% 54.6% 73.6%

What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County people registered to vote who actually vote in scheduled general elections. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Why is it important? Registering to vote is one step in civic participation, but voter turnout demonstrates a higher level of civic involvement.

How are we doing? In 2004, 515,202 people were registered to vote in Duval County. Registrations by political party were: Democratic Republican No Party Other

238,264 190,111 70,356 16,471

20

Years Ago

67.5% 1984 Duval Co.

Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville, Supervisor of Elections Office

What other indicators affect this trend? Graduation rates, degrees awarded, poverty, and volunteerism.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has no strong link that affects the trend of any indicator in another Element.

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

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MAINTAINING RESPONSIVE GOVERNMENT Satisfaction with public-safety services: 2005 Target: 90% Duval Co. 2004: 94% What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County respondents who answer “somewhat satisfied” or “very satisfied” to the question: As you think about the effectiveness of public services provided by the City of Jacksonville, how satisfied are you with public-safety services such as rescue, fire, and police? Very satisfied, somewhat satisfied, not very satisfied, or not at all satisfied? Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend?

The crime rate, feelings of safety, victimization, rescue-call response times, fire-call response times, and police-call response times.

What does this trend affect?

Employment growth and all crime-related indicators.

Why is it important? In public safety, important goals are to reduce the fear of crime and to increase security and confidence in fire and rescue services.

How are we doing? Satisfaction increased from 90 percent in 2003. Duval County:

Survey responses differed within

Arlington/Beaches Northside/Urban Core Southside Westside

2004 93% 87% 96% 97%

2003 91% 84% 95% 90%

Keeping up with local government news: Duval Co.

2005 Target: 70%

2004: 52%

What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

County respondents who answer “frequently” to the question: People generally obtain local government news from television, radio, newspapers, the Internet, or from other people. How often do you keep up with news from any source about City Council, the Mayor, the School Board, or other local government bodies? Would you say frequently, sometimes, seldom, or never?

Why is it important? Civic participation is enhanced

What other indicators affect this trend?

when the community has an informed citizenry.

The graduation rate, volunteerism, and degrees awarded.

How are we doing? Responses declined from 54

What does this trend affect? This indicator has

no strong link that influences the trend of any indicator in another Element.

66 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

percent in 2003. In a 2001 poll conducted by Marshall Marketing, 38 percent of respondents in Northeast Florida said that a daily newspaper was their primary source of news about local government. 36 percent said TV was their primary source.


MAINTAINING RESPONSIVE GOVERNMENT People of color

Diversity of elected officials: Duval Co. People of color Female

2004: 29% 2004: 40%

2005 Target: 30% 2005 Target: 50%

What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County elected officials who are female or people of color.

Why is it important? People of color comprised 35 Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Female

percent of the total population of Duval County in 2003, while females comprised 52 percent of the population.

How are we doing? This indicator does not include

the elected judiciary, which is less diverse. In 2003, of 41 elected judges, 17 percent were female and 12 percent were people of color. City Council School Board Other

People of color 32% 29% 25%

Female 47% 86% 13%

What other indicators affect this trend? Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville; Duval County Public Schools; Duval State Legislative Delegation

Graduation rate, racism, and degrees awarded.

What does this trend affect? Desegregated schools and experiences with and perceptions of racism.

20

Years Ago

16% people

of color 11% female 1983 Duval Co.

Satisfaction with basic city services: Duval Co.

2005 Target: 85%

2004: 80%

What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend? Park acreage, library use, recreation expenditures, and number of water-access parks.

What does this trend affect?

Employment growth and all indicators of public recreation.

County respondents who answer “somewhat satisfied” or “very satisfied” to the question: As you think about the effectiveness of public services provided by the City of Jacksonville, how satisfied are you with basic public services, such as streets, parks, libraries, and trash removal? Would you say that you are very satisfied, somewhat satisfied, not very satisfied, or not at all satisfied?

Why is it important? Citizen satisfaction itself is an important criterion for success in local government’s delivery of public services.

How are we doing? Responses declined from 82 percent in 2003. Within Duval County, responses were: Arlington/Beaches Northside/Urban Core Southside Westside

2004 84% 75% 78% 84%

2003 84% 73% 89% 81%

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

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MAINTAINING RESPONSIVE GOVERNMENT Can you name two City Council members? Duval Co.

2005 Target: 65%

2004: 16% yes

What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County respondents who accurately responded, at least by accurately identifying the last name, to the question: Can you name two members of the Jacksonville City Council?

Why is it important? Civic engagement is enhanced Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend? Volunteerism.

What does this trend affect? This indicator has

no strong link that influences the trend of any indicator in another Element.

to the extent that citizens know which local elected officials are making decisions on their behalf.

How are we doing? Responses declined from 25 per-

cent in 2003. In the survey, an acceptable answer includes either the full name of the City Council member or just his or her last name. Jacksonville has 19 members of the City Council, 14 of whom represent specific districts and five of whom are elected at large. In the spring 2003 elections, eight new members were elected to the City Council.

20

Years Ago

32% 1985 Duval Co.

Households watching local early-evening news: NE Florida

2005 Target: 45%

2003: 35.3%

What does this measure? The combined Northeast

Florida viewership of local television news programs broadcast at 6:00 or 6:30 p.m. on stations WJXT Channel 4, WTLV Channel 12/WJXX Channel 25 (same program on both channels), and WTEV Channel 47, as measured by Nielsen ratings during the “February sweeps.” Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Viewer ratings for Northeast Florida from the “sweeps” conducted each February by Nielsen Media Research, Inc.

What other indicators affect this trend? The graduation rate, volunteerism, and degrees awarded.

What does this trend affect? Households that

watch local news may be more likely to conserve water and recycle.

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Why is it important? Informed citizens are a critical piece to a functioning democracy.

How are we doing? This indicator rose from 28.7

percent in 2002. The Jacksonville/Northeast Florida television market is defined to include Clay, Duval, Nassau, and St. Johns counties. These are the only TV stations in the Northeast Florida market that broadcast daily news programs at these times. In February 2003, the Jacksonville Metropolitan Area contained 596,100 households, 587,200 of which had television sets.


M O V I N G

A R O U N D

E F F I C I E N T L Y

THE V ISION : Citizens in the region have access to affordable, convenient, and accessible transportation services with the capacity to convey them around the community and around the world to their chosen destinations at their chosen times. WHERE ARE WE NOW? The communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to move around efficiently depends on cars, buses, planes, and a Skyway system. Of those transportation options, cars are used most often, with 94 percent of workers surveyed driving alone to work. The indicators show different trends for these transportation modes. For the motorists, commute times are getting longer. Bus headways and miles of bus service have been improving and more people are riding the public bus system (though bus ridership remains far from its target). While the number of available seats on airplane flights has gone up, both total passengers and destinations served out of the Jacksonville International Airport have declined. Average weekday Skyway ridership declined as well. Gold Stars: Miles of bus service. Red Flags: Destinations served by direct flights, bus ridership. Targets: Miles of bus service

A Gold Star is an indicator moving in a positive direction.

A Red Flag is an indicator moving in a negative direction.

A Target shows that the Target for 2005 has been met.

All indicators within this Element are, to varying degrees, interrelated. The report also lists those indicators in other Elements a volunteer committee has identified as affecting or being affected by each indicator.

2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

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MOVING AROUND EFFICIENTLY Commute times of 25 minutes or less: 2005 Target: 70% Duval Co. 2004: 66% What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County respondents who reported a commuting time of 25 minutes or less when asked: If you are employed, on the average, how many minutes does it take you to go from your home to where you work?

Why is it important? Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend? Desegregated schools, employment growth, and housing starts.

What does this trend affect?

Employment growth, property values, motor-fuel consumption, and rescue, fire, and police response times.

Commuting times affect personal wellbeing, employment growth, public-safety services, and motor-fuel consumption.

How are we doing? The indicator declined from 70

percent in 2003. An increasing proportion of commuting in Northeast Florida is between, rather than, within counties. Those commuting between counties would be expected to have longer average commuting times. The typical commute in Northeast Florida, according to the Road Information Program, increased from 22.6 minutes in 1990 to 26.6 minutes in 2000.

Average seats on airplane flights: JIA

2005 Target: 14,000 seats

2004: 10,271seats

What does this measure? The total number of seats

available to be sold each day on all departures of scheduled commercial flights from Jacksonville International Airport (JIA) during May each year. The number of seats on arriving flights is the same.

Why is it important? The indicator measures the Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Jacksonville Airport Authority

What other indicators affect this trend? Employment growth, housing starts, and tourism.

What does this trend affect?

Employment

growth and tourism.

70 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

number of seats available, not the number of seats sold. Thus, it measures capacity rather than use.

How are we doing? The average number of seats

rose from 9,907 in 2003. When this indicator was modified in 2000, data were not available for 1996 or before 1991. During the time this indicator has been measured, the number of seats available has ranged from a low of 8,015 in 1993 to a high of 11,794 in 2001.


MOVING AROUND EFFICIENTLY Destinations served by direct flights from JIA: JIA

2005 Target: 70

2004: 57

What does this measure? The total destinations served with one stop or nonstop by scheduled commercial flights to and from Jacksonville International Airport (JIA) during May each year.

Why is it important? The quality of life of the region Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

How are we doing? The indicator declined from 58

Source: Jacksonville Airport Authority

What other indicators affect this trend? Employment growth, housing starts, and tourism. What does this trend affect?

is enhanced to the extent that more air travel destinations are accessible to the community.

Employment

growth and tourism.

in 2003. A destination is defined as being accessible by direct flight if it is served by one or more flights per weekday coming from or going to the destination with one stop or nonstop. Total destinations served by nonstop flights in 2004 were 25. During the time this indicator has been measured, direct destinations (one stop or nonstop) have ranged from a high of 67 in 1994 and 2000 to a low of 43 in 1983.

20

Years Ago

50 1983 Duval Co.

Total passengers flying in or out of JIA: JIA

No 2005 Target

2003: 4.9

million

What does this measure? The total number of

passengers who enplaned on or deplaned from a commercial airline flight at the Jacksonville International Airport (JIA) each year.

Why is it important? This indicator measures actual Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Jacksonville Airport Authority

How are we doing? Passengers declined from 5.0

What other indicators affect this trend? Employment growth, housing starts, and tourism. What does this trend affect?

use of airline seats rather than the capacity of airline flights.

Employment

million in 2002. When this indicator was added in 2001, data were available back to 1990. The attack on September 11, 2001 sharply reduced airline traffic across the country.

growth and tourism.

This indicator was added after the Targets for 2005 were set. 2004 Quality of Life Progress Report

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MOVING AROUND EFFICIENTLY Average weekday JTA bus ridership per 1,000: Duval Co.

2005 Target: 52

2003: 35

What does this measure? The annual average num-

ber of Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) bus riders on weekdays per 1,000 people in the Duval County population.

Why is it important? Mass transit is an alternative Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Jacksonville Transportation Authority

What other indicators affect this trend? Employment growth, unemployment rate, poverty, personal income, and new housing starts.

What does this trend affect?

Motor-fuel

consumption.

source of transportation for those who do not choose to drive a personal car. It is also a necessary source of transportation for those who do not own a personal car.

How are we doing? Average bus ridership in 2002

was 34 riders per 1,000 people in the population. The average weekly ridership for all JTA bus routes in 2003 was 29,240, up from 27,669 in 2002. The indicator describes only the size of ridership relative to the population, not the purpose, duration, or convenience of riding JTA buses.

Average weekday miles of JTA bus service: Duval Co. 2005 Target: 32,000 miles 2003: 34,890

miles

What does this measure? The sum total of

Jacksonville Transportation Authority bus miles during all weekdays in the year, divided by the total weekdays in the year.

Why is it important? Mass transit, to be effective, Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Jacksonville Transportation Authority

What other indicators affect this trend? Employment growth and new housing starts.

What does this trend affect?

Employment

growth, unemployment, and poverty.

72 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

needs to take people from where they are to where they want to go.

How are we doing? The average weekday miles

increased from 29,408 in 2002. The indicator does not reveal the number of routes served or the frequency of service on each route. The indicator includes only miles driven by JTA buses on regular, scheduled bus routes. It excludes the operation of demand-responsive bus services for the handicapped and charter-bus operations.

20

Years Ago

19,084 1983 Duval Co.


MOVING AROUND EFFICIENTLY JTA bus headways within 30/60 minutes: Peak hours Nonpeak hours

2005 Target: 80% 2003: 2005 Target: 100% 2003:

51% 88%

What does this measure? The percentage of

Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) bus headways that are within 30 minutes for peak-hour routes and within 60 minutes for nonpeak-hour routes.

Why is it important? For mass transit to be effective, Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Jacksonville Transportation Authority

What other indicators affect this trend? No indicators in other Elements link strongly to influence the trend of this indicator.

What does this trend affect? Unemployment and poverty.

it must take people where they want to go at the times that they want to go there.

How are we doing?

Peak hour bus headways improved from 46 percent in 2002. Headway is the number of minutes between the time buses come by a scheduled route. This provides one measure of the convenience of JTA bus service. Peak hours are from 6:45 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. to 5:45 p.m. Nonpeak hours are from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Average weekday Skyway ridership: Duval Co.

2005 Target: 10,000 2003:

2,824

What does this measure? The total annual number of weekday riders on the Skyway divided by the total weekdays in a year to obtain the average weekday ridership.

Why is it important? The Skyway (previously known

What other indicators affect this trend? Tourism.

as the Automated Skyway Express or ASE) is a raised, automated, monorail system that operates small transit vehicles on routes that center on downtown Jacksonville and reach out to the edges of the downtown area. The intent is to accommodate downtown commuters while reducing the pressure on downtown parking.

What does this trend affect? This indicator

How are we doing? Ridership declined from 2,871

Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Jacksonville Transportation Authority

does not strongly affect the trend of any indicator in another Element.

in 2002. The 2.5-mile system was completed in 2000. No further construction has been planned.

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KEEPING THE C O M M U N I T Y

S A F E

THE VISION: Public-safety agencies in the region provide rescue, fire,

and law-enforcement services with excellence, and citizens generally experience a low level of crime and a high level of personal safety. WHERE ARE WE NOW? People reported feeling safer in Jacksonville in 2004. The crime rate fell in 2003, and fewer people were involved in traffic accidents. Fewer youth died from violent causes, and the schools saw fewer incidents of serious student code violations. However, not all the news is positive. More people reported being a victim of a crime in the last year. Police response times took longer. Domestic violence crime reports increased, as did child abuse reports and domestic-violence-related homicides.

Gold Stars: Crime rate. Red Flags: Reported victimization, response times, child abuse. Targets: Violent crime rates, student conduct violations.

A Gold Star is an indicator moving in a positive direction.

A Red Flag is an indicator moving in a negative direction.

A Target shows that the Target for 2005 has been met.

All indicators within this Element are, to varying degrees, interrelated. The report also lists those indicators in other Elements a volunteer committee has identified as affecting or being affected by each indicator.

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KEEPING THE COMMUNITY SAFE Index crimes per 100,000 people: Duval Co. Violent crimes 2005 Target: 950 2003: Nonviolent crimes 2005 Target: 5,400 2003:

847 5,574

What does this measure? Total Duval County

Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

reported Index Crimes divided into violent (murder, forcible sex, robbery, and aggravated assault) and nonviolent (breaking and entering [burglary], larceny, auto theft, and arson) per 100,000 people in Duval County.

Source: The Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Division of Criminal Justice Information Systems, Uniform Crime Reports; Jacksonville Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office

Why is it important? Crime is a direct attack on the

What other indicators affect this trend?

How are we doing? The total index crime rate of

Graduation rates, job growth, unemployment, poverty, racism, child abuse, supervised sports activities, and satisfaction with public-safety services.

What does this trend affect?

Employment growth, property values, tourism, racism, and satisfaction with City services.

quality of life of a community.

6,421 decreased from 6,604 in 2002, with the violent crime rate decreasing from 906 and the nonviolent crime rate decreasing from 5,698. Changes in the indicator may reflect changes in law-enforcement activities and/or publicity of certain crimes, as well as changes in actual crime rates.

20

Years Ago

7,639 1983 Duval Co.

Juvenile delinquents per 1,000 youth: No 2005 Target 2003: 6.8 Duval Co. No 2005 Target NE Florida 2003: 6.3 What does this measure? The number of Northeast

Florida youth adjudicated delinquent per 1,000 youth ages 10 to 17 years old in Northeast Florida.

Why is it important? Juvenile delinquents are youths Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Juvenile Justice

What other indicators affect this trend?

FCAT scores, school attendance, dropout outcomes, poverty, child abuse, length of stay in foster care, divorce, and supervised sports activities.

What does this trend affect?

Readiness for higher education, graduate success, dropout rates, and dropout outcomes. Because the data source changed the method of calculation, the Targets for 2005 no longer apply.

adjudicated to have committed a delinquent act. This is equivalent to adults being found guilty of criminal acts.

How are we doing? In 2003, 7,217 juvenile arrests

(most did not result in adjudications of delinquency) were reported, 42.3 percent of which were female. Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida Florida

2003 4.6 5.7 6.8 9.1 3.3 6.3 5.0

2002 4.1 8.0 6.2 6.8 3.3 6.2 5.1

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KEEPING THE COMMUNITY SAFE Serious student conduct violations: Duval Co. 2005 Target: <2,400 2003-04: 1,772 What does this measure? The total number of Class

Three and Class Four violations of the Code of Student Conduct reported by all Duval County public schools during the school year. These violations are the most serious, and include violent acts, threats, and the possession or distribution of drugs or alcohol. Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Duval County Public Schools

What other indicators affect this trend? Child abuse and youth alcohol use.

What does this trend affect?

FCAT scores, youth alcohol use, and School Board leadership.

Why is it important? The number and prevalence of Class Three and Four violations may reflect potential for youth crime in the community, and reflect disruption in the quality of life and educational experience for all students within the public schools.

How are we doing? 2002-03:

School enrollment rose from 128,452 in 2002-03 to 134,801 in 2003-04. The rate of serious violations fell from 19.7 to 13.1 per 1,000 students.

Elementary Middle High School

Violations decreased from 2003-04 220 777 775

2002-03 301 1,219 1,011

Juvenile alcohol/drug arrests per 1,000 youth: No 2005 Target Duval Co. NE Florida 2005 Target: <10.0

2003: 9.2 2003: 11.4

What does this measure? The total number of arrests of Northeast Florida juveniles on drug or alcohol charges per 1,000 youth ages 10 through 17 in Northeast Florida.

Why is it important? Substance abuse, including Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Law Enforcement

What other indicators affect this trend?

FCAT scores, school attendance, dropout outcomes, poverty, child abuse, length of stay in foster care, divorce, supervised sports activities, and youth alcohol use.

What does this trend affect?

Readiness for higher education, graduate success, dropout rates, dropout outcomes, STD reports, and new AIDS cases.

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alcohol abuse, is illegal for youth. It also contributes to increased physical and mental-health risks that may prevent youth from reaching their full potential.

How are we doing? The statewide rate was 9.0 in 2003.

Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003 8.4 8.6 9.2 66.4 3.7 11.4

2002 8.9 7.2 9.1 13.1 1.7 8.3


KEEPING THE COMMUNITY SAFE People feel safe in their neighborhood at night: Duval Co. 2005 Target: 70% 2004: 67% What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County respondents who answered “yes” to the question: Do you feel safe walking alone at night in your neighborhood?

Why is it important? The perception of safety, which Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend?

Racism, experiences of discrimination, youth alcohol use, and satisfaction with public-safety services.

What does this trend affect? Property values, perceptions of and experiences with racism, and satisfaction with City public-safety services.

may or may not correlate with actual safety or the crime rate, is critical to one’s quality of life in a community.

How are we doing? Responses rose from 63% in

2003. If the responses to this survey are typical for Duval County, about 273,000 people would have reported not feeling safe in 2003. During the same year, the total number of Index Crimes reported was 53,057. In a 2000 national survey conducted by the Pew Research Center for People and the Press, 82 percent of respondents felt very or somewhat safe when walking in their neighborhood after dark.

20

Years Ago

64% 1985 Duval Co.

People report being victims of a crime: Duval Co. 2005 Target: <16%

2004: 24%

What does this measure? The percentage of Duval

County respondents who answered “yes” to the survey question: During the last year, have you had money or property stolen, property vandalized, home broken into, car stolen, or personal assault or attack?

Why is it important? Being a victim of a crime Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue

What other indicators affect this trend?

Graduation rates, job growth, unemployment, poverty, racism, child abuse, supervised sports activities, and satisfaction with public-safety services.

What does this trend affect? Satisfaction with City public-safety services.

directly impacts the quality of life of an individual.

How are we doing? Responses increased from 22

percent in 2003. If responses to this survey are typical for the total Duval County population, about 198,000 people would have reported being victimized by crime in 2003. During the same year, the total number of Index Crimes reported was 53,057. The survey question is not limited to Index Crimes, and responses may include other, less serious crimes.

20

Years Ago

26% 1985 Duval Co.

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KEEPING THE COMMUNITY SAFE Rescue-call response times under four minutes: Duval Co. 2005 Target: >50% 2003: 41.2% What does this measure? The percentage of rescue

responses in Duval County that arrive in under four minutes.

Why is it important? The speed at which a rescue team arrives may be critical to save a life. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville, Fire and Rescue Department

What other indicators affect this trend? Commuting times . What does this trend affect? Heart disease deaths and satisfaction with City services.

Response time covers from the time adequate information has been given to the dispatcher to the time when the first piece of equipment arrives.

Rescue calls: In 2003, the total number of rescue calls was 75,607, up from 71,641 in 2002. By Planning District, rates were: Urban Core Northwest Southwest Southeast Greater Arlington North Duval County

2003 74.7% 44.3% 35.1% 32.2% 28.7% 24.8% 41.2%

2002 74.8% 42.9% 34.0% 32.0% 32.9% 22.3% 40.8%

Fire-call response times under four minutes: Duval Co. 2005 Target: >50% 2003: 36.9% What does this measure? The percentage of firecall responses in Duval County that arrive in under four minutes.

Why is it important? The speed at which a fire

response team arrives may affect the damage a fire causes. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville, Fire and Rescue Department

What other indicators affect this trend? Commuting times . What does this trend affect? Property values and satisfaction with City services.

Response time covers from the time adequate information has been given to the dispatcher to the time when the first piece of equipment arrives.

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Fire calls: In 2003, the total number of fire calls was 15,059, down from 15,251 in 2002. By Planning District, rates were: Urban Core Northwest Southwest Southeast Greater Arlington North Duval County

2003 71.5% 41.3% 32.2% 28.5% 26.1% 22.2% 36.9%

2002 70.3% 40.9% 33.2% 28.0% 27.3% 23.8% 36.9%


KEEPING THE COMMUNITY SAFE Police-call response times under five minutes: Duval Co. 2005 Target: >55% 2003: 30.3% What does this measure?

The percentage of “priority-one” police calls in Duval County that are responded to in under five minutes. A “priority-one” police call is a call involving a reported felony in progress or any other life-threatening situation.

Why is it important? The speed at which the police respond to a priority-one call may save a life. Upward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: City of Jacksonville, Office of the Sheriff

What other indicators affect this trend? Commuting times.

What does this trend affect? Public satisfaction with public-safety services.

The indicator excludes calls answered by the police departments of Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach, Atlantic Beach, and Baldwin.

How are we doing? In 2003, the total number of priority-one calls was 27,601, down from 31,811 in 2002. 2003 2002 Urban Core 42.1% 46.7% Northwest 32.0% 33.0% Southwest 26.5% 33.3% Greater Arlington 29.0% 29.8% Southeast 27.7% 28.0% North 25.7% 28.9% Duval County 30.3% 33.0%

Child abuse reports per 1,000 children: NE Florida

No 2005 Target

2004: 9.4

What does this measure? The total annual verified

reports to the Department of Children and Families of child abuse or neglect per 1,000 children in NE Florida.

Why is it important? Children who are abused or neglected suffer harms that may have significant, longterm negative impacts on their lives. Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Children and Families

What other indicators affect this trend? Graduation rates, unemployment rates, prenatal care, unemployment-benefit claims, and domestic violence .

What does this trend affect?

Graduation rates,crime rates, student conduct violations, youth alcohol use, domestic violence, juvenile delinquency and alcohol arrests, youth violent deaths, school attendance, immunizations, and dropout rates.

How are we doing?

During 2004, 12,142 abuse and neglect reports were filed, including those identified as “verified,” “with some indication,” or “no indication.” Data were not available for 2003. Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2004 10.6 12.6 8.8 8.5 9.6 9.4

2002 8.6 13.6 7.0 9.7 8.1 8.2

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KEEPING THE COMMUNITY SAFE Domestic-violence-related crime reports: NE Florida 2005 Target: <12,085 2003: 9,514 What does this measure? The total number of reports of domestic-violence-related Northeast Florida.

crimes

in

Why is it important? Women and children are

Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Law Enforcement

What other indicators affect this trend? Unemployment, child abuse, and unemploymentbenefit claims.

What does this trend affect? School atten-

dance, dropout rates, requests for emergency assistance, child abuse, teen births, children in foster care, divorce, children affected by divorce, homelessness, new AIDS cases, and STD reports.

negatively impacted by family violence. However, evidence exists that many domestic crimes are not reported because of fear and shame on the part of victims.

How are we doing? Report rates per 100,000 people were 787 for Northeast Florida, compared to a state rate of 707. By county, total reports were: Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003 51 902 7,141 326 1,094 9,514

2002 66 964 7,519 498 116 9,163

Domestic-violence-related homicides: Duval Co.

No 2005 Target

2003: 13

What does this measure? The indicator measures

the total number of homicides in Duval County related to domestic violence.

Why is it important?

When domestic violence escalates into homicide, the community is no longer able to intervene to protect the victims. Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: The Domestic Violence Intervention Project's Subcommittee on Domestic Homicide

What other indicators may affect this trend? Unemployment, child abuse, and unemploymentbenefit claims.

What does this trend affect? No linkages have been identified for this indicator.

80 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

How are we doing? The number of homicides relat-

ed to domestic violence rose from six in 2002. The majority of homicides related to domestic violence involve intimate partners, though other individuals may be victims as well. Of the 87 victims identified since December 1996, 53 were white, 31 black, 2 Asian, and 1 Hispanic. 71 victims were in cases involving intimate relationships (including marriage and cohabitation), and 16 victims were in cases involving non-intimate relationships (parents, grandparents, siblings, or children).


KEEPING THE COMMUNITY SAFE Motor-vehicle accidents per 1,000 people: Duval Co. 2005 Target: <15.9 2003: 16.3 What does this measure? The total annual motorvehicle accidents in Duval County per 1,000 people in the Duval County population.

Why is it important? Getting around safely is an important part of the quality of life. Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles Annual Report on Florida Traffic Crash Facts

What other indicators affect this trend? Employment growth, housing starts, tourism, and youth alcohol use.

What does this trend affect? This indicator does not have a strong link that influences the trend of another indicator in any other Element.

How are we doing? In 2003, the comparable statewide figure was 14.3 accidents per 1,000 people. The most dangerous intersection for traffic crashes was Atlantic Boulevard and Kernan Road with 247 crashes in 2003. 2003 2002 Baker 9.4 10.2 Clay 11.3 12.4 Duval 16.3 18.7 Nassau 7.3 9.5 St. Johns 13.4 11.7 NE Florida 14.7 16.4

20

Years Ago

19.8 1984 Duval Co.

Violent deaths per 10,000 youth: Duval Co. NE Florida

No 2005 Target 2005 Target: <2.0

2003: 3.3 2003: 3.1

What does this measure? The total annual number

of Northeast Florida youth 10 through 19 years old who die as a result of homicide, suicide, or accident per 10,000 youth in Northeast Florida.

Why is it important? When youth die from violent Downward movement in the trend line is positive.

Source: Office of Vital Statistics, Florida Department of Health

What other indicators affect this trend? Poverty, youth alcohol use, and child abuse.

What does this trend affect? Public satisfaction with public-safety services.

In 2002, 4 Northeast Florida youths died from homicide, 15 from suicide, and 33 from accidents.

causes, many of them in motor-vehicle accidents, they may be victims of the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s failure to offer needed assistance when youth are in crisis.

How are we doing? The statewide rate was 3.1 in 2003.

Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns NE Florida

2003 0 2.8 3.3 6.9 1.1 3.1

2002 0 3.3 3.4 3.5 1.1 3.1

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INDICATOR INDEX Achieving Educational Excellence Public high school graduation rate Public high school dropout rate High school dropout education outcomes High school dropout employment outcomes Tenth graders reading at grade level Tenth graders at grade level in math Public school attendance Public school first grade promotions Fourth graders writing at grade level Average public school teacher salary Teachers with advanced degrees Students attending racially balanced schools Magnet school enrollment High school graduates employed or in college High school graduates prepared for college Exceptional ed students complete high school Satisfaction with public education Higher education degrees and certificates Total participation in continuing education Expanding literacy: Early literacy Expanding literacy: School-age literacy Expanding literacy: Adult literacy

Growing a Vibrant Economy

Net employment growth Average annual wage Unemployment rate Unemployment benefit claims Children in poverty (free lunch participation) Income available per person Recipients of public assistance Requests for emergency assistance Affordability of a single-family home Typical monthly household JEA utilities costs New housing starts Total taxable value of real property Gross tonnage handled by marine terminals Tourism (as measured by Bed-Tax revenues)

Preserving the Natural Environment Days the Air Quality Index is â&#x20AC;&#x153;goodâ&#x20AC;? Gallons of motor fuels sold per person St. Johns River compliance with oxygen standards St. Johns River bacteria standards compliance Average water consumption Water level in Floridan Aquifer Tons per person of solid waste recycled New septic-tank permits issued Manatee deaths Conservation land

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Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

11 12 12 13 13 14 14 15 16 16 17 17 18 18 19 19 20 20 21 21 22 23 24

25 26 26 27 27 28 28 29 29 30 30 31 31 32 32

33 34 34 35 35 36 36 37 37 38 38

Promoting Social Wellbeing/Harmony

39

Enjoying Arts, Culture, and Recreation

46

Sustaining a Healthy Community

52

Is racism a local problem? Have you personally experienced racism? Births to teen mothers per 1,000 live births Subsequent births to teen mothers Foster children per 10,000 children Median length of stay in foster care Births to mothers with 12 years of education Children of parents becoming divorced Do you volunteer? Do you volunteer more than seven hours a week? Philanthropy given to federated campaigns Homeless count per 100,000 people Public performances/events at selected facilities Public and private support per person for the arts Public-park acreage per 1,000 people Participants in sports activities at parks and pools Attendance at musical shows per 1,000 people Attendance at sports facilities per 1,000 people Attendance at selected events per 1,000 people Library use (as measured by circulation per person) Recreation expenditures for activities/maintenance Boat ramps per 100,000 people Racial disparity in infant deaths Infant death rate Newborns with healthy birth weights Early prenatal care Children receiving scheduled immunizations Alcohol use reported by youth People with no health insurance Jacksonville health care rated as high quality Deaths due to heart disease per 100,000 people Cancer deaths per 100,000 people Lung cancer deaths per 100,000 people Packs of cigarettes sold per person Nursing-home patient days per person over 65 People receiving home-delivered meals Newly diagnosed AIDS cases per 100,000 people Sexually transmitted disease reports HIV racial disparity HIV/AIDS-related deaths per 100,000 people

40 40 41 41 42 42 43 43 44 44 45 45 47 47 48 48 49 49 50 50 51 51 53 53 54 54 55 55 56 56 57 57 58 58 59 59 60 60 61 61


Maintaining Responsive Government

62

Moving Around Efficiently

69

Keeping the Community Safe

74

Elected leadership rated as high quality School Board leadership rated as high quality Can you influence local government? Voter registration Percent of registered voters who vote Satisfaction with public-safety services Keeping up with local government news Diversity of elected officials Satisfaction with basic city services Can you name two City Council members? Households watching local early-evening news Commute times of 25 minutes or less Average seats on airplane flights Destinations served by direct flights from JIA Total passengers flying in or out of JIA Average weekday JTA bus ridership Average weekday miles of JTA bus service JTA bus headways within 30/60 minutes Average weekday Skyway ridership Index crimes per 100,000 people Juvenile delinquents per 1,000 youth Serious student conduct violations Juvenile alcohol/drug arrests per 1,000 youth People feel safe in their neighborhood at night People report being victims of a crime Rescue-call response times under four minutes Fire-call response times under four minutes Police-call response times under five minutes Child abuse reports per 1,000 children Domestic-violence-related crime reports Domestic-violence-related homicides Motor-vehicle accidents per 1,000 people Violent deaths per 10,000 youth

63 63 64 64 65 66 66 67 67 68 68 70 70 71 71 72 72 73 73 75 75 76 76 77 77 78 78 79 79 80 80 81 81

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Board of Directors Gerald Weedon, President Mary Ellen Smith, President-Elect Helen Jackson, Secretary-Treasurer Judge Henry Adams Christine Arab Ron Autrey Dave Balz William H. Bishop III David Boree Michael Boylan Joy Burgess John Cobb Randy Evans Ronnie Ferguson Dana Ferrell Birchfield David M. Foster Allan T. Geiger Eric Holshouser Earl Johnson, Jr. William Kwapil Wally Lee Tony Mahfoud Carla Marlier Guy Marlow Marsha Oliver Bryant Rollins Susan McCranie Siegmund Glenda Washington Richard Weber Mary Lou Zievis

Executive Director Charles R. “Skip” Cramer

Past Presidents J.J. Daniel Jack H. Chambers Yank D. Coble, Jr. Robert D. Davis George W. Corrick Howard R. Greenstein Jacquelyn D. Bates David M. Hicks James C. Rinaman Kenneth W. Eilerman J. Shepard Bryan, Jr. Juliette Woodruff Mason Lucy D. Hadi Charles P. Hayes, Jr. Steve Pajcic Tracey I. Arpen, Jr. Guy Marvin III Luther Quarles III W.O. Birchfield Michael J. Korn William E. Scheu Afesa Adams William D. Brinton Sherry Burns Sue K. Butts Edgar Mathis David M. Foster John Cobb

84 Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

ABOUT JCCI Jacksonville Community Council Inc. (JCCI) was created in 1975 with the goal of improving the quality of life in Jacksonville through informed citizen participation in public affairs. JCCI is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, broad-based civic organization. It involves citizens in community issues through open dialogue, impartial research, consensus building, and leadership development. Each year, JCCI produces an annual report on the quality of life in Jacksonville. It also selects issues for in-depth community study. Diverse study committees meet weekly for about six months, gaining a thorough understanding of the problem and reaching consensus on key findings as well as recommended solutions. Following completion of the study and publication of a report, an implementation task force of citizens takes the report to the community and seeks to place the issues on the community agenda. The goal is to seek further deliberation, increased public awareness, and finally, action by appropriate officials. In addition to its annual studies and the Quality of Life Progress Report, JCCI plans and coordinates services for United Way of Northeast Florida and the Human Services Council (HSC), a coalition of local funders of human services. JCCI Forward, an initiative that seeks to involve community-minded people with important issues facing the community, provides the venue for up-and-coming leadership to be involved, engaged and connected with government and business leaders. Upon request, JCCI provides a variety of planning, research, consultation and facilitation services under contract. JCCI receives funding from United Way of Northeast Florida, the City of Jacksonville, the Duval County Public Schools, Jacksonville Children’s Commission, corporations, and individual members. JCCI membership is open to all interested in building a better community. More information about JCCI and its projects is available at www.jcci.org.

JCCI Staff Charles R. “Skip” Cramer Executive Director Ben Warner Associate Director

Clanzenetta “Mickee” Brown Chandra Echols Earlene Hostutler Laura Lane Anne-Marie Logrippo

Tess Mork Cheryl Murphy Scott Sanborn Michelle Simkulet Lashun Stephens



2004 Quality of Life Progress Report