Page 1


J. Craig Babe AIA NCARB Associate Professor of the Practice Department of Architecture Texas A&M University 3137 TAMU College Station TX, 77843-3137 cbabe@tamu.edu instagram: johncraigbabe www.linkedin.com/in/craig-babe 979-676-2732


Statement on Teaching Working in the discipline of architecture, our graduates will take leadership roles in solving complex design problems, typically defined by a large constellation of parameters, including tight budgets, socio-political responsibilies, and commercial factors. They will have numerous collaborators, including specialized consultants, constructors, stakeholders, clients, communities, and multiple levels of government. In studio, I challenge students with complex multi-layered problems. My goal is to develop the design skills they will require as professionals to conceive and execute architecture that can rise to standards of excellence within this challenging environment of contemporary practice. The act of design is a process centered on the synthesis of program, function, precedent, and form. In my studio, this unfolds through three phases: research, design and communication. In the research phase, students define their projects through the program lens of goals, facts, function, and requirements. They discover relevant typologies through the careful reading of precedents. They study context, and implement relevant data in site mapping. They learn how targeted research builds intelligence into design. In the design phase, students learn how to conceptualize projects in an act of synthesis, using formal design moves to solve problems defined in the research phase. Students develop their knowledge of architectural composition (form making) and they are encouraged to build upon their knowledge of the history and theory of architecture. I emphasize formal

rigor, but I am an advocate of pluralism. I readily

encourage students to develop their own preoccupations rather than push a particular style of architecture. In the communication phase, students learn how to develop and present their designs as proof of a rigorously conceived project. Drawing from my professional experience with architectural competitions, public and client presentations, and design publications, I show my students how to present their work to an audience. Clearly drawn plans, sections, diagrams and renderings, at a full range of scales, are the backdrop for effective verbal explanations. The portfolio is the prime expression of an architecture studentĘźs design intelligence. It is critical to their admittance to MArch programs and the hiring at architectural firms. The work students have produced in my studio has led to successful placement in competitive MArch programs, including Columbia, Cornell, MIT, Michigan, Penn, Princeton, Rice, SCI-ARC, UMich, and Yale, as well as jobs at prominent firms in Texas, and across the United States, such as HKS, Page, Perkins & Will, Gensler, and Corgan. With eleven years of studio teaching experience, I have published my teaching pedagogy in two conference proceeding papers, co-authored with Dr. Sarah Deyong (Texas A&M). In spring 2015, Routledge Architectural Press asked us to produce a book (now in progress) based on the paper that we presented at the 2015 National Conference for the Beginning Design Student in 2014. The book is intended as a manual to help architecture students to succeed in design studio.


Table of Contents ARCH 606 (MArch yr. 1) .................................. - ARCH 605 (MArch yr. 1) .................................. - ARCH 693 (MArch Final Study) ....................... - ARCH 405 (BED Integrated Studio) ................. - ARCH 305 (BED Theory Intensive Studio) ....... - -


ARCH 606

Catalogue Description: “Application of verbal, graphic, research, critical thinking and fundamental design skills to architectural projects that emphasize the integration of structural, environmental, life safety, building envelope systems, and building service systems; includes code compliance, resource conservation, cost control and economic analysis. Core design studio for professional degree candidates.” Instructor Emphasis: Site analysis, precedents, program generation, urban response, spatial idea (parti), interior space, structural expression, skin articulation, expression of idea at multiple scales, character, graphic representation NAAB SPCʼs: A.4 Technical Documentation, B.1 Pre-Design, B.2 Accessibility, B.5 Life Safety, B.12 Building Materials and Assemblies; B.10 Building Envelope Systems Required Readings: Mari, Anthony and Yoo, Nora. Operative Design, A Catalogue of Spatial Verbs. BIS Publishers (2012) Balmond, Cecil. Informal. Prestel (2001) Sandaker, Bjorn, Eggen, Arne, and Cruvellier, Mark. The Structural Basis of Architecture. Routledge, (2011) Allen, Edward and Iano, Joseph. The Architect's Studio Companion: Rules of Thumb for Preliminary Design. Wiley, (2011) Ching, Francis and Winkel, Steven. Building Codes Illustrated: A Guide to Understanding the 2012 International Building Code. Wiley (2012)

Master of Architecture Design II (2-12) credit 6 Taught: 2011-2018 Dallas Mavericks Training Facitlty. Ryan Lawrence,Client: Mark Cuban, 2016 Houston FM1960 Commercial Strip Remake. Preston Scott, Victor Badillo, Yesenia Suchil, Paige Pickens, 2014. Gallery of Contemporary Art, Toronto. Trey Rice, 2012.


ARCH 606: Dallas Mavericks Training Facility,Ryan Lawrence, 2016

MAVERICKS PLACE | DALLAS, TEXAS Situated on the banks of the Trinity River in the in the Dallas Design District, 41 Mavericks Place and the sur rounding master planned development is set to become a new focal point and gateway between downtown and the proposed Trinity River Park development. The building itself takes advantage of its proximity to the river by rising up to meet the levee, in doing so provid ing a link with the local site and the Trinity River Park. 41 Mavericks Place is set to become the new training facility for the Dallas Mavericks. The building itself con sists of a Great Hall on the main floor that serves as the meeting point between the Mavericks team organi zation and their fan base. The Great Hall includes two regulation basketball courts with stadium seating and dressing rooms, a team store, gallery spaces, meet ing spaces, and a cafe. Above this level in the tower is team training facilities, sports medicine research spac es, an office incubator, and the Administration offices for the entire Mavericks organization. Between these programmatic changes are internal three story atriums which serve as mixing chambers for the occupants. 41 Mavericks Place will become a new Icon that embodies the aesthetic of Dallas.

PARTI

INITIAL VOLUME

CONNECT

TEAM PUBLIC

ACTIVATE + ICON

0 ft 175 ft 250 ft

500 ft

1000 ft


ARCH 606: Dallas Mavericks Training Facility, Ryan Lawrence, 2016

GREAT HALL

ORGANIATION/ RESEARCH MIXING AREA

LEVEL 1 MAIN FLOOR

0

ADMINISTRATION/ INCUBATOR MIXING AREA

200FT

LEVEL 16

400FT


ARCH 605

Catalogue Description: Application of verbal, graphic, research, critical thinking and fundamental design skills to architectural projects that emphasize design theory, systems of ordering in architecture and urban design, use of precedents, site and contextual issues; includes program development and concerns for public health, safety and welfare. Core design studio for professional degree candidates.

Instructor Emphasis: Site analysis, masterplan generation precedents, program generation, urban response, urban character, spatial idea (parti), skin articulation, graphic representation NAAB SPCĘźs: A.3 Visual Communication Skills, A. 6 Fundamental Design Skills, A.7 Use of Precedents, A.8 Ordering Systems Skills, B.3 Sustainability, B.4 Site Design, C.1 Collaboration Required Readings: Rowe, Collin and Koeter, Fred. Collage City. MIT Press, (1984) Koolhaas, Rem. Delerious New York. Monacelli, (1997) Venturi, Robert, Izenour, Steve, and Scott Brown, Denise. Learning From Las Vegas. MIT Press, (1977) Pope, Albert. Ladders. Princeton Architectural Press, (1997)

Master of Architecture Design I (2-12) credit 6 Taught: 2009-17 Mixed Use Development for TorontoĘźs Main Streets 2016-17 A New Downtown for College Station, Masterplan, 2009-10. Urban Street Case Studies, 2009-10. A New Downtown for College Station. Mixed use projects. Will Patton, Yan Lu, Kevin Vandersall, 2009-10.


ARCH 605: Urban Masterplan and Mixed-Use Achitecture, A New Downtown for College Station, Masterplan Generation, 2009-10

Residential Area, Bryan

Texas A&M Campus

Northgate

The site is an underutilized zone just to the north of the main campus of Texas A&M University in College Station.

Zoning Envelopes Parkway

1. Each student analyzed and presented an urban street of their choice.

Public Square

2. The studio worked as a group to create urban design guidelines and then design a masterplan.

Woonerf Streets

University Drive

The proposal is to create a new mixed-use urban precinct. Each block is to contain housing, as well a combination of other uses. Structured parking will be incorporated into each block.

Market

3. Each student selected a block and was tasked with programing and de-signing a unique project to fit on it.


ARCH 605: Urban Masterplan and Mixed-Use Achitecture, A New Downtown for College Station, Urban Street Case Studies 2009-10


ARCH 693

Catalogue Description: “Professional Study. Application of verbal, graphic, research and critical thinking skills to an approved, individually selected architectural issue or design project that will advance the broad understanding of architecture and its impact on people. The terminal requirement for the Master of Architecture degree.�

Master of Architecture Final Study Taught: 2010 - 2018 A New Langford Architecture Center, Texas A&M Eric Gordon, 2018 Austin Music Center. Make Liang, 2014 Dance Center and Theater. San Antonio, Veronica Villaneuva, 2014


The Power of Place, Reimagining the Langford Architecural Center at Texas A&M University MArch Final Study, Eric Gordon, 2018. Craig Babe, Chair


The Power of Place, Reimagining the Langford Architecural Center at Texas A&M University MArch Final Study, Eric Gordon, 2018. Craig Babe, Chair


The Power of Place, Reimagining the Langford Architecural Center at Texas A&M University MArch Final Study, Eric Gordon, 2018. Craig Babe, Chair


The Power of Place, Reimagining the Langford Architecural Center at Texas A&M University MArch Final Study, Eric Gordon, 2018. Craig Babe, Chair


The Power of Place, Reimagining the Langford Architecural Center at Texas A&M University MArch Final Study, Eric Gordon, 2018. Craig Babe, Chair


0

45

90

180

plan level 1


0

45

90

180

plan level 2

daylighting analysis jun. 21 9am

daylighting analysis sep. 21 9am

daylighting analysis dec. 21 9am

daylighting analysis jun. 21 3pm

daylighting analysis sep. 21 3pm

daylighting analysis dec. 21 3pm


concrete panel

gfrg louver

gallery 30700 sf

wide flange

education 3000sf

wide flange

administration 4000sf

cantilever frame

core

library + public 40000sf


Steel angle Light frame at top and bottom edges of panel

Backer rod and caulking Double track runner W54 beam 3/8” Thin reinforced stone veneer

Rigid insulation

Bituthene membrane

Precast concrete

W18 column beyond

W18 diagonal bracing End cap

Glass mullion 5/8” CF board Steel channel

Embed steel plate

Welded steel plate

W54

2”x4” Steel wall framing stud

Steel angle

Steel embed plate Steel angle Concrete slab W54 beam

Duct hanger Supply air duct

Drop ceiling hanger

0

1

2

Drop ceiling and light fixture panel

0

1

2

wall assembly details

louvers details

Concrete slab

Beam

Girder

Steel plate

Column beyond

0

1/2

1

beam to beam details

Glass mullion Concrete slab

Anchor bolts

Beam

Steel Plate

Retaining wall

0

1/2

1

concrete wall to beam details

W12 column

Floor finishing

Anchor bolts

Slab with reinforcement top and bottom both directions

Steel embed plate

Vapor barrier Masonite 6” Collapsable carton form PVC drain in drainage material

3’ Deep grade beam

6” Collapsable carton form between piers Pier

Longitudinal reinforcement

Ties

0

4

8

16

wall section

0

1

2

foundation details


0

15

30

60

section 2


0

45

90

180

section 1

load tracing diagram


Pavilion at the Langford Architecture Center Quad The Pavilion at the Grassy Knoll is a student pavilion in the central core of Texas A&M’s campus. Located in an area historically referred to as “The Grassy Knoll,” the project aims to stimulate the area by adding a place to study and eat to an area already used on nice days for sunbathing, studying and doing outdoor activities (soccer, frisbee, etc.) The pavilion is conveniently located near two parking lots and a bus route for the nearly 60% of students that stay on campus into the night (when safety becomes an issue). It is also situated among many academic buildings belonging to a variety of colleges. This makes it available to a variety of students and serves as a meeting place. The pavilion occupies the northeastern half of group sporting activities. In order to leave natural walking paths unobstructed, the main cores of the pavilion’s functions are lifted to a second story with These pillars provide the services to access the top

The pavilion’s heavy concrete appearance attempt to introduce new typologies to the campus as well as give validation to the adjacent Langford Architecture Center. site context map

student survey results

How do you commute?

walking vehicle 49% buses 35% biking 29%

What times are you on campus?

morning afternoon evening night

What type of pavilion do you wish to see?

building uses

parking areas and bus stops

dining study social

70%

92% 88% 69% 58% 67% 55%

35%


42 ARCH 305: Final Project, Art Gallery, Dallas Design District


ARCH 305, Final Project: Art Gallery, Dallas Design District

43


44 ARCH 305: Final Project, Art Gallery, Dallas Design District


Course Evaluations (Past Six Years) 2017

2014

Semester

Course/Credit Hours

Enrolled

Score

Semester

Course/Credit Hours

Enrolled

Score

Spring

Arch 305-9315 (2-9)

15

4.20

Spring

Arch 305-9315(2-9)

19

4.06

Spring

Arch 606-6016 (2-12)

10

4.82

Spring

Arch 606-6036 (2-12)

10

4.77

Summer

Arch 603-3006 (3-9)

13

4.85

Summer

Arch 606-3006 (3-9)

8

4.56

Fall

Arch 405-5035 (2-9)

16

4.85

Fall

Arch 405-5005 (2-9)

20

4.76

Fall

Arch 605-6036 (2-12)

12

4.90

Fall

Arch 405-5035 (2-9)

21

4.81

2016

2013

Semester

Course/Credit Hours

Enrolled

Score

Semester

Course/Credit Hours

Enrolled

Score

Spring

Arch 305-9315 (2-9)

15

4.50

Spring

Arch 305-9315 (2-9)

15

4.65

Spring

Arch 606-6016 (2-12)

10

4.82

Spring

Arch 606-6016 (2-12)

14

4.35

Summer

Arch 603-3006 (3-9)

4

4.72

Summer

Arch 603-3006 (3-9)

12

4.49

Fall

Arch 405-5015 (2-9)

18

4.84

Fall

Arch 305-9325 (2-9)

17

4.38

Fall

Arch 605-6046 (2-12)

12

4.68

Fall

Arch 405-5015 (2-9)

19

4.07

Semester

Course/Credit Hours

Enrolled

Score

Spring

Arch 305-5015(2-9)

15

4.68

Spring

Arch 312-901 (0-2)

15

4.77

Spring

Arch 606-3005 (2-6)

4

4.75

2015

2012

Semester

Course/Credit Hours

Enrolled

Score

Spring

Arch 305-9315(2-9)

13

4.55

Spring

Arch 606-6036 (2-12)

10

4.93

Summer

Arch 606-3006 (3-9)

4

4.89

Summer

Arch 603-3006 (3-9)

8

4.76

Fall

Arch 405-5024 (1-6)

16

4.55

Fall

Arch 405-5034 (1-6)

16

4.71


2018 04 12 craig babe teaching portfolio  

draft teaching portfolio - still adding and revising

2018 04 12 craig babe teaching portfolio  

draft teaching portfolio - still adding and revising