OC Waves Vol 2.3

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W A V E S

VOL 2.3



The Rugged southern oregon coast see more on page 45 PHOTOS BY: JEREMY BURKE


OC W A V E S Publisher Jeremy Burke Editor Steve Card

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Oregon Coast Gift Guide

Recipe's -From Glazed Donuts to Rabbit Stew

Dream Home of the Month

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Nikki Price and her quest for the arts

Washed Ashore

Veterans Learn to Surf

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Clay Exhibit at the VAC

Blue Heart Exhibit

Judy Deam's

©2021 and J.burkephotos ©2021 Oregon Coast Waves 2021

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A News-Times Publication

Tom Hasiting Wood Turning Gallery

Oregon's south coast

Milky Way season comes to a close.

Advertising Sales Teresa Barnes Kathy Wyatt Jenna Bartlett Jeanna Petersen Misty Berg Suzanne Tarbet Contributing Writers News-Times Staff Leslie O'Donnell Susan Schuytema Photographers Jeremy Burke About the Cover Shot

Long exposure of the commericial fishing fleet at Port Dock 5. Located in Newport's Historic Bayfront. photo by Jeremy Burke

oregoncoastwaves.com Facebook @OregonCoastWaves Instagram @oregoncoastwaves All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission from this publisher. Photographs, graphics, and artwork are the property of Newport Newspapers LLC

831 NE Avery Newport Or 97365


contents

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LOCAL

GIFT IDEAS ALL PHOTOS BY JEREMY BURKE

FREED GALLERY. Photo by Jeremy Burke


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GRUMBLEFISH MUSIC

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Photo by Luke Whittaker

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GIFT GUIDE INDEX GRUMBLEFISH MUSIC

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18


CELESTE’S KITCHEN PNW BY CELESTE MCENTEE AND GUESTS

Glazed Doughnuts Homemade doughnuts are a bit of a project, but they’re less work than you might think, and the result is a truly great, hot, crisp doughnut. Once you’ve mastered this basic recipe for a fluffy, yeasted doughnut, you can do pretty much anything you like in terms of glazes, toppings and fillings. For the doughnuts • 1 ¼ cups milk • 2 ¼ teaspoons (one package) active dry yeast • 2 eggs • 8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter, melted and cooled • ¼ cup granulated sugar • 1 teaspoon salt • 4 ¼ cups all-purpose unbleached flour, plus more for rolling out the dough • 2 quarts canola oil, for frying. For the glaze • 2 cups powdered sugar • ¼ cup milk. • 1 teaspoon vanilla • Dash of salt Preparation 1. Heat the milk until it is warm but not hot, about 90 degrees. In a large bowl, combine it with the yeast. Stir lightly, and let sit until the mixture is foamy, about 5 minutes. 2. Using an electric mixer or a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook, beat the eggs, butter, sugar and salt into the yeast mixture. Add half of the flour (2 cups, plus 2 tablespoons), and mix until combined, then mix in the rest of the flour until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl. Add more flour, about 2 tablespoons at a time, if the dough is too wet. If you’re

using an electric mixer, the dough will probably become too thick to beat; when it does, transfer it to a floured surface, and gently knead it until smooth. Grease a large bowl with a little oil. Transfer the dough to the bowl, and cover. Let rise at room temperature until it doubles in size, about 1 hour. 3. Turn the dough out onto a well-floured surface, and roll it to 1/2-inch thickness. Cut out the doughnuts with a doughnut cutter, concentric cookie cutters or a drinking glass and a shot glass (the larger one should be about 3 inches in diameter), flouring the cutters as you go. Reserve the doughnut holes. If you’re making filled doughnuts, don’t cut out the middle. Knead any scraps together, being careful not to overwork, and let rest for a few minutes before repeating the process. The doughnuts 1. Put the doughnuts on two floured baking sheets so that there is plenty of room between each one. Cover with a kitchen towel, and let rise in a warm place until they are slightly puffed up and delicate, about 45 minutes. If your kitchen isn’t warm, heat the oven to 200 at the beginning of this step, then turn off the heat, put the baking sheets in the oven and leave the door ajar. 2. About 15 minutes before the doughnuts are done rising, put the oil in a heavybottomed pot or Dutch oven over medium heat, and heat it to 375. Meanwhile, line cooling racks, baking sheets or plates with paper towels. 3. Carefully add the doughnuts to the oil, a few at a time. If they’re too delicate to pick up with your fingers (they may be this way only if you rose them in the oven), use a metal spatula to pick them up and slide

them into the oil. It’s OK if they deflate a bit; they’ll puff back up as they fry. When the bottoms are deep golden, after 45 seconds to a minute, use a slotted spoon to flip; cook until they’re deep golden all over. Doughnut holes cook faster. Transfer the doughnuts to the prepared plates or racks, and repeat with the rest of the dough, adjusting the heat as needed to keep the oil at 375. Glaze or fill as follows, and serve as soon as possible. Icing 1. Whisk together 2 cups powdered sugar, 1/4 cup milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla and a dash of salt until smooth. When the doughnuts are cool enough to handle, dip into the glaze; if you like, flip them so they’re completely covered. Put on racks to let the glaze harden. My number one suggestion is to eat these doughnuts while they are still warm — each bite is such a treat. I love making this recipe! Give it a try and don’t be intimidated. I’m always happy to share recipes and give tips if needed. Reach me on Instagram @celesteskitchen-pnw and at celeste@moschowder.com

19


THE KITCHEN WILD

BY KATIE WILEY

Tempura Coral Mushroom Udon Noodle Soup your dish with its umami flavor.

Wild Rice Soup

I may not be able to tell you where these beautiful coral mushrooms were harvested, but I can show you! The Kitchen Wild is now on YouTube thanks to the News-Times Media Group, so keep an eye out for this mushroom recipe on my YouTube channel, “The Kitchen Wild,” and watch all the fun we had harvesting them. You might even recognize this picturesque central Oregon coast location.

As many of you may know, The Kitchen Wild was first launched on Instagram, and over the past couple of years, I’ve received so many amazing messages from people all over the world about my wild food recipes. But nothing gains as much attention as mushrooms, and that includes pleas to never, ever disclose mushroom foraging locations. Mushrooms are serious business, and those of us who love to hunt them here on the central Oregon coast have our favorite spots that we return to time and time again in hopes that another mushroom forager hasn’t gotten to them first. So although I can’t tell you the exact location where I harvest these beautiful fungi — because people on the internet get really upset about that kind of thing — I can tell you that we live in such a unique climate that some of the most incredible and delicious mushrooms flourish here all over these incredibly abundant Oregon coast forests. Therefore, you’re never far from a fantastic fungi that’s ready to infuse

Ingredients: 6-12 coral mushroom bunches 1 can Rogue Newport Daze beer Krusteaz Tempura Batter mix 1 quart chicken stock (or vegetable stock to keep this recipe vegetarian) 1 tablespoon dark mushroom soy sauce 4 cups udon noodles 2-3 whole scallions, sliced Oil for frying Directions: • Preheat oil to 375 degrees • Mix your tempura batter mix with Rogue Newport Daze beer until it’s a very thin pancake batter consistency. • In a separate bowl, use an additional cup of dry tempura batter mix for dusting coral mushrooms before dipping them in the wet batter. • Carefully deep fry battered mushrooms until golden brown on both sides. Approximately 1 minute per side. Set aside on cooling rack or paper towels to drain excess oil. • In a small stockpot, add chicken stock (or vegetable stock to keep this recipe vegetarian), dark mushroom soy sauce and scallions. Bring to a simmer then add udon noodles. • Simmer 5-10 minutes. Serve with tempura fried coral mushrooms on top, and enjoy!

The rain has started to fall here on the Oregon coast, which means all of those beautiful mushrooms are starting to pop up like crazy! Every season here on the coast has something thrilling, adventurous and seriously delicious to look forward to, but mushroom foraging has to be at the tip top of my adventure list. Not only do mushrooms add the most incredible umami flavor to foods, but hunting for these beautiful golden fungi in the lush, green, moss-covered forest is truly a treasure hunt that you must experience. This guilt-free soup is loaded with meaty lobster mushrooms foraged by my little ones and me, just minutes from our house in Waldport, combined with homemade chicken stock, Waldport Farmers Market zucchini and shredded chicken. It’s slow simmered with a naturally nutty wild rice then served with a warm baguette. Ingredients: 1 tablespoon butter 4 cups lobster mushrooms, sliced 1 large shallot 2 quarts chicken stock


4 cups cooked chicken, shredded 2 cups zucchini, chopped 1/2 cup wild rice 3 teaspoons fresh thyme 1/4 teaspoon dried basil Salt and pepper Directions: In a stockpot, melt butter and sauté shallot and lobster mushrooms until shallot is soft. Add chicken stock, shredded chicken, thyme, basil, salt, pepper and wild rice. Reduce the heat and slowly simmer for 20 minutes. Add zucchini and continue to simmer for 10 more minutes. Serve with a warm baguette.

Traeger-Grilled Black

taken to nearby wholesale fish and seafood markets to sell to the market’s customers and watermen to enhance the flavor of all those blue crab they were catching, which were so abundant they were just considered the spiders of the sea at that time. J.O. wanted a way to showcase how delicious those blue crab were, and his incredible spice mix was the perfect way to do it. Over the years they’ve expanded their flavor profile, now offering J.O. No.2 (my personal favorite), J.O. Garlic Crab Spice, Homestyle Shrimp, Crawfish & Seafood Boil, Blackened Steak Seasoning, Maryland Style Crab Soup Mix, and so much more. Sadly, J.O. passed away in 1974, but J.O. Spice Company still remains family owned and operated after 76 years in business and has always made their customers their number one priority. J.O. used to say, “If we don’t look out for our customers, someone else will,” and although the majority of J.O. Spice Company’s customers may be on the East Coast, their mission statement of “give the customer what they want, when they want it” still holds true to us here on the West Coast as well. And their seafood blends might have originally been formulated for those blue crab, but they are perfectly delicious on our Dungeness crab as well as on all of the abundant seafood we have available here on the Oregon coast. J.O. Spice Company has always put the quality of their products, their customers and their hard working employees before their profit margin, so this seasoning isn’t available in stores here on the West Coast. But it can be easily ordered at www.jospices.com or by calling 410-247-5205 or 1-800-537-5714.

There are a few things I know about black bass: they’re easy to cook, a blast to catch, and when they’re paired with J.O. Spice seasoning, a Maryland seafood staple I was first introduced to by my mother-in-law, Barbara Wiley, who was born and raised in Maryland, they are incredibly delicious! J.O. Spice Company was established in 1945 in Baltimore City, Md. by J.O. (James Ozzle) Strigle as a way to market the blends handed down to him when he was growing up on a small island in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay, where everyone’s livelihood depended on seafood. Back in 1945, J.O. Spice Company started with J.O. No.1. It came in a little can that was

Ingredients: 1 whole black bass/ 2 filets 1 stick salted butter 1.5 tablespoons J.O. Crab Seasoning #2 Directions: Preheat Traeger to 325° In a small saucepan, melt butter over medium heat, cooking the butter until it begins to foam and brown specks float up through the foam. Remove from heat and add J.O. Seasoning. Brush Brown J.O. Butter over top and bottom of fish. Place nonstick paper or foil on Traeger to prevent fish from sticking to the grill. Grill fish for approximately 7 minutes or until internal temp reaches around 130 degrees. Remove from the grill and enjoy!

Rabbit Stew

Oregon Coastal Cutters will also have a limited supply of holiday meats, ranging from rib roasts that have been dry aged for 45 days to whole smoked turkeys just in time for Thanksgiving. Ordering will be available for these holiday favorites starting Nov. 1. With such a large variety of superior quality meats, including some unique cuts that you certainly won’t find anywhere else here on the central Oregon coast, it’s no surprise that Oregon Coastal Cutters has won Butcher of the Year for the past two years in a row. Oregon Coastal Cutters is located at 4627 S Coast Highway, suite F, in South Beach, and can be reached at 541-867-6328. Ingredients: 1 whole rabbit, quartered 3 carrots 1 large onion 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons butter Salt Black pepper Garlic powder Fresh thyme 1 McCormick beef stew packet 3 cups water Directions: Season rabbit with salt, pepper and garlic powder (I didn’t measure, just eyeball ingredients to your liking). For Instant Pot: On sauté setting, heat olive oil then brown rabbit on all sides. Remove from instant pot, set aside. Add butter, onions and carrots and sauté until onions have started to brown. Add rabbit back into the Instant Pot with a few sprigs of fresh thyme, 3 cups water and stew seasoning. Set Instant Pot for 35-40 minutes. At this point, I transferred most of my liquid to a saucepan and simmered it on the stove, reducing it by half until it was a deep, rich brown color. Serve with mashed red potatoes. For stovetop: In a stockpot or Dutch oven, heat olive oil on medium-high then brown rabbit on all sides. Remove rabbit, set aside. Reduce heat to medium, add butter, onions and carrots and sauté until onions have started to brown. Add rabbit back into the stockpot or Dutch oven with a few springs of fresh thyme, 3 cups water and stew seasoning. Cover, simmer for at least two hours. Remove lid, simmer for the last 30 minutes uncovered to reduce stock. Serve over mashed red potatoes. 21



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The metal sculpture of the Warrenton Warrior mascot was “built by students of Mr. Ernest Moon’s metal fabrication class at Warrenton High School in the 1968-69 school year,” according to the Oregon Coast Visitors Association.


A BEACH WALK WITH A MISSION

Niki Price, of the Lincoln City Cultural Center, is hiking the coast to raise money for the center and awareness of public art Life threw a few challenges her way, but Niki Price finally got her Oregon coast trek underway. The first leg was every inch as amazing as she expected. “It was grand,” Price, executive director of the Lincoln City Cultural Center, said of the 21-mile stretch from the north trailhead at Fort Stevens State Park to Seaside, with a side trip to Warrenton. “It was truly grand. I had a wonderful time.” Price did the trip over two days and plans to hike the entire 425 miles of the Oregon Coast Trail for a journey she is calling “On the Path of Public Art.” The idea is to help spread word both of the Oregon Coast Public Art Trail, which features more than 800 pieces of public art, and of fundraising efforts to create the cultural plaza at the cultural center. “This is a personal goal of mine,” said Price, who was recently named chair of the Oregon Cultural Trust‘s board of directors. “But at the same time, I am really interested in public art and bringing public art to the cultural plaza. My goal is to get the name of the plaza out there, get people to associate the plaza with our public art dreams and to know that the plaza is still very much happening and very much in need of their support.” Price originally planned to set out in March, but bad weather, an injury, and family matters kept her grounded. While disappointing at the time, Price thinks now it might have been lucky. “Really, the September date was the first I could do anything serious,” she said. “It was glorious. The best weather. It was like Bali. I got to explore a different part of the coast than I’ve explored before. It was everything I hoped it would be.”

She was surprised to find cars and trucks on the beach of the north coast. Lincoln City has some spots where the beach is auto-accessible, but this was the first time Price saw the beach used as an actual highway. “I saw people driving to find picnic spots, four-wheeling. I also saw people learning to paraglide off the beach. I saw a lot of kites and a paragliding class.” Sadly, she saw a lot of trash, too, which she tried to carry out until her pack became too heavy. Price’s BHAG (big hairy audacious goal) was inspired by tales from the Pacific Crest Trail, but she questioned if she had the stamina and backcountry skills to hike that. She also would have had to take significant time off from her job. “So, I tried to think about a similar goal that was more accessible to me, and the Oregon Coast Trail really fit the bill. I walk on a bit of it nearly every day in my neighborhood beach in Lincoln City. Walking this Oregon Coast Trail also makes my mother and husband happy. They always worry about me when I’m off on a wander.” Price is accepting donations, hoping to raise $5,000 to buy a pedestal for the cultural plaza. There are two kinds of donations, Morale Boosters, which are one-time donations, and pledges per mile, which can be any amount and are due at the end of the trek. This story is supported in part by a grant from the Oregon Cultural Trust, investing in Oregon’s arts, humanities and heritage, and the Lincoln County Cultural Coalition.

Above Left: Niki Price, executive director of the Lincoln City Cultural Center, plans to hike the entire 425 miles of the Oregon Coast Trail. Above Right: Niki Price’s public art walk along the Oregon Coast Trail began with a bit of history at Fort Stevens State Park, where the wreck of the Peter Iredale has been slowing disintegrating since it ran aground in 1906. (Photos courtesy of Niki Price)

25


‘BOMB CYCLONE’ HITS COAST

An offshore storm with the barometric pressure of a Category 4 hurricane — referred to as a “bomb cyclone” — produced gale-force winds on the coast in late October, and surf as high as 35 feet crashed into shores, when this photograph was taken near Cape Foulweather. (Photo by Jeremy Burke)



RECYCLED ART TO SAVE THE OCEAN

After spending 11 years creating art from washed-up trash and touring the country with it to raise awareness of ocean pollution, Angela Pozzi ended her decade-plus journey Saturday by introducing the Washed Ashore sculpture exhibit for the final time at the Lincoln City Cultural Center. Through the help of volunteers and partnerships with organizations like the Smithsonian, Disney, SOLVE and more, Pozzi has crafted dozens of sculptures reminiscent of various sea life from nearly every discarded manmade item one might find washed ashore. The goal of the project is to inspire people to think more on where their discarded items might end up and encourage them to think carefully about their choices as a consumer. From a giant penguin made of spent shotgun shell casings and strips of rubber to a marlin made of shredded water bottles, cans and fishnets, the vibrant sculptures are meant to first catch the eye and then draw passersby in for a closer look, a goal accomplished easily Saturday as dozens of people pulled off of Highway 101 to inspect the sculptures. “Everyone loves giant animals, and it’s the kind of thing everyone would love to get their picture taken with,” Pozzi said. “Part of the idea is to sort of ‘lure’ people from a distance with the vibrant sculpture and then when they see what they’re made of, that’s when you can then teach them what it’s all about.”

To date, Washed Ashore has spent over 14,000 volunteer hours collecting more than 60,000 pounds of garbage from Oregon beaches, 95 percent of which it has fashioned into sculptures for the project’s touring art exhibit. Pozzi said she has crafted at least 85 works of art since, not counting smaller, individual pieces of larger art displays. Each piece of artwork includes an information plaque, detailing what the sculpture is made of. Pozzi began Washed Ashore 12 years ago when she moved to the Oregon coast after losing her husband in 2007. As she walked the beaches near Bandon, she more often than not caught herself walking over different pieces of garbage and eventually decided to do something about it. “I moved to Bandon in 2007 after my husband died of a brain tumor,” she said. “I was very bereaved and came to the ocean from the Portland area to try and heal really. I walked the ocean beaches every day trying to find a purpose for my life. I had been an art teacher for 30 years, but I was such a mess that I couldn’t teach anymore.” “I kept stepping over garbage and just didn’t want to see it,” Pozzi continued. “I wanted to find beauty and happiness, and instead I was just seeing so much garbage. Then one day I saw so much garbage that I decided it was too much. Suddenly, it hit me really hard and I thought, ‘It’s the ocean that needs healing, not just me.’ I thought that maybe if I could help save the ocean, then

STORY AND PHOTOS BY MATHEW BROCK

ABove: Flash the Marlin, one of Washed Ashore’s many sculptures, is made primarily from plastic water bottles, fishing nets, fishing poles and other miscellaneous pieces of recycled plastic. A penguin sculpture made from plastic and rubber is one of Washed Ashore’s largest sculptures.


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T-SHIRTS and SWEATSHIRTS Available Online www.winosdingbatsriffraff.com Susan Spence Susan Spence

Pozzi decided to address the issue in multiple ways, one by vowing not to purchase art supplies that may one day end up in the ocean, and two by recycling the junk salvaged from the beach. Today, Pozzi even wears jewelry crafted from ocean plastic. Hundreds of volunteers have helped Pozzi by sewing portions of Washed Ashore’s sculptures onto wire panels and eventually combining them into the huge, one-piece sculptures of various sea life, which have toured the U.S. as a traveling exhibit for the last 11 years. One sculpture has even remained on display at the Smithsonian Institute since 2016

The project will continue on with Pozzi as a consultant, but she will be moving on to other endeavors, which include starting a business with her daughter to help promote environmental-friendly clothing. Washed Ashore will remain display at the Lincoln City Cultural Center at 540 NE Highway 101 for the next six months. Visitors are welcome to visit the center and view the outside sculptures anytime, while the indoor sculptures can be viewed during operating hours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Thursday through Sunday. To learn more about Washed Ashore, go to www.washedashore.org.

A shark made from recycled ocean plastic sits in front of the Lincoln City Cultural Center as part of the Washed Ashore art exhibit.

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Washed Ashore’s first big show was at the Newport Visual Arts center in 2010, with Pozzi’s involvement coming full circle last weekend when she gave her last presentation as the head of the project last Saturday in Lincoln City.

“This is my grand finale, and there’s really this nice sort of symmetry to coming back to the Oregon coast,” Pozzi said. “It’s going to keep going though. I’ve got a great crew, and really the goal of a good nonprofit is to reach a point where you can just give it away and it will just keep going.”

Denise Joy McFadden Denise Denise Joy Joy McFadden McFadden

that would be something new worth living for.”

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VETERANS LEARN TO SURF WITH OSSIES

U.S. military veterans and surfers from Lincoln County and beyond hit the water at Agate Beach last Friday, Oct. 15, with the return of the annual Ossies Surf Shop veteran’s surfing workshop. The workshop had been on hiatus since 2019 due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, but it resumed this year now that COVID restrictions have loosened somewhat, bringing around a dozen veterans to Agate Beach to enjoy a sunny day on the water. During this event, Ossies helps match up experienced surfers with military veterans who have little to no experience with the sport, providing an opportunity for them to learn something new and possibly discover a lifelong hobby in the process. “We partnered with the Wounded Warriors here to help expose veterans to the lifetime sport of surfing,” Ossies owner Dan Hasselschwert said. Hasselschwert said he grew up playing football, but “I got to 22 years old and they told me I couldn’t play football anymore.” He said one of his favorite things about surfing is “surfing really is a lifetime sport. Surfing you can do forever and there are so many health benefits, mentally, physically and spiritually.”

Ossies donated half the price of the rentals for the event, while Mike Shilo, an outreach specialist with the Wounded Warriors program, donated the rest, making the workshop free for the participating veterans and instructors, 18 people total. Jaime Lusk, a marine veteran and reintegration councilor for the Salem Vet Center, is one of the event’s main organizers and an annual participant in the event. A surfer herself, Lusk said the sport has served as a good way to both challenge and relax her body, while helping others she knows cope with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other lingering issues from their time serving. “I’m a vet and I work at the Salem Vet Center. I’m a reintegration councilor, and we really push to get veterans into the outdoors and do stuff together,” Lusk said. “We find that a lot of our healing comes from being part of the community and being able to interact with people in a way that lets us let our guard down.” Lusk said surfing was a good match for many veterans because it provides both a challenging and relaxing activity that can be learned at one’s own pace. “It gives us a way to get into our bodies, use our intuition and trust that the ocean’s got us to help find our limits in a way that feels like a gradation, rather than black and white,”

STORY AND PHOTOS BY MATHEW BROCK

Two U.S. military veterans learning to surf receive instructions from an experienced surfer teaching at Friday’s workshop. (Photo by Casey Felton)

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“One of my friends who is also a vet sometimes describes it as a rat inside you, trying to claw its way out, but things like this provide a way to soothe the rat,” Lusk continued. Hasselschwert said that while surfing is a great activity, it’s important to start with a proper lesson, especially on the Oregon coast, which can have particularly harsh conditions depending on the time of year.

Shilo said that as an outreach specialist, he often keeps an eye out for events like these that Wounded Warriors can help support, noting that the national group is always looking for new ways to help veterans, whether that’s through introducing them to new activities, finding them a suitable community to interact with or even matching them up with someone they can talk to for awhile. “While I’m based out of the Tacoma office, we work with the vet centers down here all the time to put on these events for wounded warriors who might want to participate,” Shilo said. This year’s participants spent a couple hours learning the basics of surfing and riding small waves at Agate Beach, after which they returned to Ossies for a free barbecue before wrapping up the day.

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Attendees of a veteran’s surfing workshop held by Ossies Surf Shop on Friday, Oct. 15, pose in front of the shop before hitting the beach to surf, some for the first time. Participants in the Ossies Surf Shop veteran surfing workshop wear wetsuits and carry boards down to the water not long before noon on Friday. (Photos by Mathew Brock)

Tal ey Woodmark

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Shilo, who himself is a U.S. Army veteran who served in Iraq, was one of the event’s participants that hit the water for the first time Friday. Before the event began, he wasn’t sure if he would hit the water, but he ended putting on a wet suit for a few trips

into the surf before calling it a day.

Denise Joy McFadden Denise Denise Joy Joy McFadden McFadden

Lusk said. “It’s still a formidable enemy though. The ocean will kick your butt, but it’s not personal. Sometimes it seems like vets still need something to fight, so why not fight the ocean? Sooner or later it’ll wear you out.

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‘LINCOLN COUNTY CLAY’ COMING TO VAC Exhibition celebrates local talent

The Oregon Coast Council for the Arts presents the exhibition, “Lincoln County Clay,” from Nov. 6 to Dec. 23 in the Runyan Gallery and the Upstairs Gallery at the Newport Visual Arts Center. The exhibition will include 13 of Lincoln County’s leading ceramic artists in a facility-wide celebration of ceramics in conjunction with the redesign and reopening of the VAC’s clay studio. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, Nov. 6, from noon to 4 p.m., with available artists speaking at 2 p.m. “Lincoln County Clay should prove to be a significant and contemporary survey of the many talented clay artists working in Lincoln County,” OCCA VAC Director Tom Webb said. “The show will include numerous masters in the field as well artists who have come to ceramics somewhat later in life.”

we are better together. I think this collection of artists will display the vast array of possibilities within clay creation.” Other VAC clay advisory group members include Liz Fox, Kristy Lombard and Sara Siggelkow. OCCA’s focus on ceramics this fall comes as the VAC is set to reopen its clay studio in late November. The clay studio will feature all new equipment, furnishings and supplies and will be managed to serve youth and adult learners in an intimate setting. The Clay Studio Project has received support from the Oregon Community Foundation, the City of Newport, the Coastal Arts Guild and individual patrons. Trial classes will run in December, with more formal offerings beginning in January. Artist bios

Participating artists include Jacob Accurso, Frank Boyden, Chasse Davidson, Steve Dennis, Taunette Dixon, Liz Fox, Julie Fiedler, Erica Leach, Alice Martin, Liisa Rahkonen, Christy Steenkolk, Martha Wallace and Pam Young. “Lincoln County is so rich with ceramic activity, I am honored to be a part of bringing together a collection of that talent to be showcased under one roof. It has been a personal goal to help expand the local clay community in this area,” said Chasse Davidson, a senior curator for Lincoln County Clay and a member of the VAC’s clay advisory group. “As a ceramic artist I love to create, but I’ve always thought that

Jacob Accurso found pottery while serving as a novice monk at the Mount Angel Abbey. Today, he stays connected to his roots by producing pieces like those in the monastery — attractive to the eye, comfortable in the hands, and practical for everyday use. Working in his woodland studio, he lives by the labor of his hands. Frank Boyden has worked with clay for 53 years. He is trained as a painter, printmaker, art historian and anthropologist. The wondrous properties of clay and the ability to draw in the round seduced him in 1968. Having no training in the field, he worked


with native clays in raku and terra sigillata applications until 1982. Since 1993, he has worked only in porcelain. Boyden says his greatest pleasure is drawing and incising — figuring out how to unite three-dimensional objects by lineal means. His work is included in more than 100 museums, and he has received a major NEA grant, the Janet Mansfield Fellowship award and the NCECA Outstanding Achievement award with his wife, Jane, for founding Sitka Center for Art and Ecology in 1970. Chasse Davidson received her Bachelor of Science in Studio Art in from Western Oregon University in 2005. From 2015 to 2020, she owned and managed Toledo Clay Works, and from 2014 to 1016, she served as president of the Toledo Arts Guild. She currently sells dishware and raku at Oceanic Arts in Newport and at Land and Sea in Florence. She is collaborating with Ram Papish on a series incorporating his wildlife imagery on her thrown forms.

she has had her hand in clay most days over the last five years. She has her own private studio and is selling her work at Wind Drift Gallery and Newport Bay Candle Company. Liz Fox has lived on the Oregon coast for most of her life and has had a myriad of careers since graduating with a soil science degree from Oregon State University in 1980. Retiring as a high school librarian in 2020, she has been a full-time potter ever since, pursuing an interest she dabbled in for over 40 years. She first took ceramics classes in the 1970s and went on to take dozens of community workshops.

Steve Dennis has been a full time studio artist for the past 45 years and is the owner and curator of Earthworks Gallery in Yachats. He is a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship recipient and spent two years at the Archie Bray Foundation in Helena, Mont. He received his MFA from the University of Minnesota and his BA from Eastern Washington University.

After showing an affinity for drawing, Julie Fiedler enrolled in Lee Chucci’s School of Art in Kent, Wash., at age 10, and began oil painting at age 11. In college at the University of Puget Sound, she was required to take a 3-D art course to complete her art history degree, and she worked in clay for eight weeks. That ignited an interest in hand-building clay sculptures. She exhibited her sculptures in galleries and art shows, and spent many Friday afternoons at the home of Joy Huttar, a long-time china painter, learning the craft. A project reviving a neglected 1904 home led to china painting on tile for the kitchen. That blossomed into a custom tile-painting business that she continues to operate to this day.

Taunette Dixon is fairly new to ceramics. After catching the pottery bug, she dove in head first, taking every class and private lesson available. Falling in love with every aspect of ceramics,

Erica Leach is the woman behind Erica Rose Pottery, an online ceramic outlet. While she always had a passion for drawing and painting, she wasn’t satisfied to just hang 35


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something on the wall — she wanted to make functional pieces. That’s when she took an introductory class at a local clay studio and then began to teach herself everything she could. Leach started Erica Rose Pottery three years ago and has been selling her pots exclusively online. Alice Martin is a former Alaskan whose work in clay has been exhibited in over 24 gallery shows, 12 local and national invitational exhibitions, and 17 regional and national juried exhibitions. Her work is included in three museum collections and three corporate and Alaska state office branches. Martin has been the recipient of four grants and commissions from the Alaska State Council on the Arts. Before leaving Alaska, Martin was teaching ceramics at the University of Alaska, Anchorage. Martin left Alaska (and the world of clay) over 25 years ago in pursuit of other creative outlets. She has returned to the world of visual art and is one of 11 artist owners of For ArtSake Gallery in Newport, where she shows her works in clay as well as photography. Liisa Rahkonen is a sculptor, painter and mixed-media artist whose work has been shown nationally and

internationally. She was invited by the U.S. State Department to participate in the Art in the Embassies Program and had her artwork in the U.S Embassy, Sal Salvador El Salvador. Her work has been included in shows juried by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Oregon Arts Commission, among many other exhibits and recognition. Christy Steenkolk is a lifelong Oregon coast local. Originally a glass blower, she blended her love of creating artistic forms with functionality to create her pottery. Steenfolk has been honing her skills on the pottery wheel since 2019. She loves to create from the heart and finds inspiration from mother nature. Martha Wallace has been doing ceramic art for about 30 years. She retired to the coast in 2013 after working 25 years in manufacturing management, and 20 years as an Episcopal priest. Since 2013, She has been working to refine her skills on the wheel and about five years ago, began teaching pottery. Clay has entertained Pam Young for over 45 years. For the last nine years, it’s taken over her life, with farmer’s markets, shows and galleries. She likes whimsy, humor, color and texture.

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‘BLUE HEART’ EXHIBIT OPENS AT SCIENCE CENTER

An exhibit of works featuring the traditional Japanese folk art style of gyotaku, or fish rubbing, is now on display in the Gladys Valley Marine Studies Building at Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center. “Blue Heart: Beauty and Change Along America’s Western Shoreline,” by artists Dwight Hwang and Duncan Berry, will be on display through October 2022. The exhibit, sponsored by OSU’s Marine Studies Initiative and Hatfield Marine Science Center, is free and open to the public. Gyotaku is a method of applying ink to the surface of the subject and placing lightweight paper on top and rubbing until the contours of the subject are transferred to the paper. Hwang creates classical gyotaku art using traditional materials, and Berry uses modern ink and application methods. The 25-piece exhibit features pieces by each artist as well as works on which they collaborated. The collection reflects the power and beauty of the Pacific Ocean as well as the deep and lasting climate-driven changes occurring along the western shoreline. In an artists’ statement, Hwang and Berry said: “For us, making these impressions directly from the bodies of creatures that frequent the land, sea and air along our coastlines is an ‘active form of reverence’ like a giant living Braille. ... And in doing so we get to witness the fascinating stories of their lives and the dramatic climactic changes they are adapting to everyday. “We hope that these images will connect you in a deeper way with the ocean and our relationship and responsibility to find

ways to lessen the impacts of climate change.” The Gladys Valley Marine Studies Building, completed last year, is a 72,000-square-foot classroom, lab and office building that also includes a 250-seat auditorium, a café and other public spaces. In addition to the “Blue Heart” exhibit, the new building features a number of other works of art from regional artists commissioned through Oregon’s Percent for Art in Public Places Program, managed by the Oregon Arts Commission. Among those works is “44°37’19.668” N 124°2’43.86” W (for Charles),” by OSU art instructor Michael Boonstra. The eightpanel piece combines photographic processes, digital manipulation, drawing and hands-on experimentation with water and environmental phenomena along the Oregon coast. “This is Water” is an installation of 19 circular vitrines, or glass display cases, by artist Joe Thurston. They display imagery associated with the marine science campus and nearby bodies of water. The installation, in the first floor entry, the main stairwell and second floor mezzanine, features an infinity design, with images etched onto mirror and reflected with LED lights. The installation also features sound to accompany the images. “Blue Heart” and other artwork in the Gladys Valley Marine Studies Building can be viewed during regular business hours, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Parking is available at no charge. State and university policies related to COVID-19, including requirements for masks in indoor public spaces, are in effect.


SEEING THE NATURAL WORLD UNNATURALLY

Judy Deam’s sculptures and reverse paintings on glass come from what she calls “ideas waiting inside me, waiting to get out.” Those ideas, which take shape as clay sculptures enhanced with found objects, or brightly colored acrylic reverse paintings on glass, have an otherworldly style to them and pull in the viewer to look further.

what the piece will be. In my sculptures, I keep adding objects and only stop when I feel the piece is finished.”

Deam has been making art most of her life. She grew up in Gunnison, Colo., and in grade school won a camera for her artwork. “I was always cutting up egg cartons to make ornaments, and as a kid, I was always drawing,” she said. “Then I married an artist.”

They may include broken glass, bones, bird beaks, light bulbs and different kinds of metal. “I’m inspired by things I find discarded,” she said.

She said an uncle who was an artist would send her drawings he had made. “I remember sitting on his lap when I was about 5 and watching him as he sketched. In junior high and high school I realized I was really good at art — and not too good at everything else,” she said with a laugh. She and her husband, Dick Deam, who is also an artist, have been married 46 years. And while Judy’s art and inspiration come from within, her husband paints what he sees. “Dick’s oil paintings are so realistic that people sometimes mistake them for photographs,” she said. “And he always encourages me.” She noted, “I work intuitively, without a final conception of

She describes her approach as “seeing the natural world unnaturally,” and many of her sculptures are part animal, part human.

In 1990, Deam said she became serious about her art and decided it was time to apply herself to the goal of having gallery shows. She had her first gallery exhibit the following year in Sandpoint, Idaho. At the time she was sculpting with clay — little sculptures in shadow boxes that told a story, or masks to hang on the wall. A handful of additional exhibits followed near her home in the Sandpoint area. When the Deams moved to Boise, she showed her work in several galleries there, and was juried into shows in Seattle, Boise and elsewhere in the Northwest. The Deams moved from Boise eight years ago — first to Lincoln City and then to Baja in Mexico before settling in Waldport, where she has a studio at her home. 41


Deam is self taught, although she said that over the course of 30 years, she has taken workshops in sculpture, watercolor, clay, and pastel — the latter medium something she chose not to pursue. She started painting in watercolor about 20 years ago, but turns to that medium infrequently now. In 2008, she began reverse painting on glass, mostly animals that tend to be realistic in appearance, although not in color — pink dogs, for example. “I wanted a challenge,” she said of her move to reverse painting. “And painting upside down and backwards seems to suit me.” She said that unlike in regular painting, everything is done in reverse. “You put the foreground on the glass first, then paint the layers backwards,” she explained. “I even have to sign my name backwards. Reverse painting is not a new technique but it’s a challenge to think and paint backwards, and I wanted to do something different. “I really enjoy it because a lot of it is abstract, coming right out of my brain,” she said. “And as you layer on the paint, you cover up the layers below, so you 42

don’t know what it will look like until you flip over the glass when it’s done.

in resin sits on his chest, and he carries bells.

“I think we’re going to stay here,” she said of the couple’s move to Waldport. “I love the coast. The patterns and bird tracks on the sand look like abstract art. I’m inspired by the ocean and the beaches in a lot of my reverse paintings, and many of those paintings look like sea creatures. They’re very rich in color. We did a lot of snorkeling in Mexico, and I was inspired by what I saw there as well.”

“The Protector” has horseshoe nails coming out of the clay head, copper feathers, a glass egg wrapped in wire, and a base of crushed glass and an old oil lamp frame.

But Deam has never given up her passion for creating clay sculptures. Some of her most unusual pieces incorporate objects ranging from pieces of old oil lamps to glass eggs, windshield glass and plenty of wire and bronze. Her sculptures range from about 11 inches to 40 inches in height. They often are images of strength and protection, Deam said, with some featuring bird’s nests of wire, sheltering a glass egg. For example, her sculpture “Bell Boy” features legs from an antique bird’s claw foot stool, a head and beak of clay, a brass napkin ring for a cap, and “feathers” of thin brass sheets used at one time in a print shop. A butterfly

One of her sculptures, which she calls “Mind Spring,” portrays a woman’s head and upper body, with a highly realistic face. “I don’t know where her face came from,” Deam said. “I wasn’t looking at anything — I just let my hand form the face. It feels like I was just following my hands.” Deam said enthusiastically that she loves doing art, and “I will do it as long as I’m able. I’ve been very passionate about it for 30 years, and who knows what I’ll be doing next year, but it will definitely be art. I’ve been a watercolorist, a sign painter, an assemblage maker … and that’s just for my adult life. When I’m 80, I hope to still be doing art.” Deam can be reached at 1-541-272-7245 or 1-541-563-6325. Her watercolor note cards can be found at Pirate’s Coffee in Depoe Bay and at Seagals in South Beach.


Tom Hasting — the art of woodcraft Ask Tom Hasting how he got started working with wood, and he’s likely to tell you he was born into it. His father had a cabinet shop in Grants Pass, and Hasting has worked with wood for as long as he can remember. Although ostensibly retired, he operates Hasting Coastal Woodworks in South Beach and keeps busy teaching woodturning classes and operating a gallery of creations fashioned from wood. While he took some time off from working in wood, spending eight years in the Navy and working for IBM for 30 years, he always had a shop and built furniture. “When I retired in 2004, I still had to have a shop,” he said, noting he was living in Portland but had a condo at the coast. He taught part time for Woodcraft of Portland, but ended up selling his home and moving full time to the Newport condo in 2008. He found a building in South Beach that he remodeled into the workshop and gallery that he operates today. The gallery is in the front of his shop and includes work by other local woodturners along with his own creations, ranging from pens to Christmas ornaments, walking sticks to bowls. Hasting no longer builds furniture but instead focuses on woodturning on the lathe. “I got hooked on the lathe and pretty well gave up everything else,” he said, noting he now creates platters, bowls, plates and other similar objects. “I sell what I make, along with woodturning kits and tools. Hasting uses whatever hardwood he can get, but prefers using local wood, as most of his customers are tourists who are not from the coast and are looking for local products. “Once in a while I get a piece of exotic wood,” he said. Wood also “just shows up” for him to use. People know he works in wood, he said, and will come to him when their neighbor cuts down an apple tree or a maple tree falls in a storm. “They would rather I make something from it than having to burn it,” he said. Much of Hasting’s time in his shop is devoted to teaching classes. “I have a class that starts people out who have never turned, and I teach them the basics,” he said. “I also rent time, which includes use of my tools and the lathe, for people to come back and work on something. Once they come back two or three times, they usually decide whether to buy their own equipment, or they’re done.” 43


Advanced woodturners who may never have made a pepper mill, for example, also come back for his classes. “I’m definitely available to people who have never done any woodwork at all,” he said. “About 70 percent of the training I do is for people who have never done this before.” His initial class lasts about four hours and costs $75. Other classes focus on making a pepper mill, a pen, a bowl, a natural edge bowl, and bottle stoppers. Classes run from three to six hours, depending on the topic. He also occasionally offers classes to home-schooled children, trading them time so they can help him out if they have learned the basics. Hasting said he did not offer classes or rent time last year during the height of the COVID pandemic, but now classes are picking up again. “You can’t stay six feet apart in these classes, so people have to be vaccinated,” he said. Minimum age for classes is 9 or 10, he added. “I’m a one-man shop,” he explained. “I have a calendar on the wall, and we schedule classes when someone calls or comes in.” Classes are usually one-on-one. Hasting said Oregon has seven or eight woodturning clubs. “I know most of those guys and a lot of times they send people to

me if they have people who want to learn woodturning,” he said. He’s a member of Oregon Coast Woodturners, which meets at his shop the third Saturday of the month, although these days it meets on Zoom. The club has about 40 members from Tillamook to Florence. He is also a member of the Coastal Carvers and always has a booth at the group’s annual carving show at Chinook Winds Casino Resort in Lincoln City. The COVID pandemic has canceled the show for several years because of attendance limitations, and it is now scheduled for 2023. Hasting is quick to acknowledge that working with wood has been a big part of his life, and now his son and grandson know how to do woodturning as well. He noted that his grandson will often ask to come to the shop to make presents at Christmas. “It’s being carried on,” he said proudly of his craft. “I plan to continue doing what I’m doing until I can’t move,” he concluded with a laugh. “Come visit and see what it’s all about.” Hasting Coastal Woodworks LLC is at 3333 SE Ferry Slip Road in South Beach. Hasting can be reached at 541-867-2992, or hcoast33@gmail.com. Hours are 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays. Classes are by appointment only.


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