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CHECKING THE WAKE Safety E-Newsletter MARCH 2012

HAPPY SPRING 

Volume 4, Number 5

MOTORCYCLE RIDING SEASON IS UPON US by Teresa S. Boucher Its motorcycle riding season again and I want to make sure that all you riders have the best information on personal protective gear there is. So in this issue of CHECKING THE WAKE I‟m going to focus on Cycle Safety Information for the Motorcyclist and How to sign-up for the upcoming Motorcycle Safety Training Courses. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE GEAR Helmets

Spring begins on March 20th.

The most important piece of protective gear you can wear is a helmet manufactured to meet DOT standards. There was a study done at the University of Southern California called “The Hurt Report” which essentially documented the use of helmets and protective gear in 900 motorcycle crashes. This report established that helmets saved lives by reducing the occurrence of head injuries. But it also documented that wearing a helmet did not reduce essential vision or hearing which has been an aurgument of many motorcyclist as to why they did not like wearing a helmet. So – wear a helmet people……no excuses. Face Protection “The Hurt Report” found that riders who wore helmets with shields covering their faces suffered fewer facial injuries than those without. Helmets with full-face coverage with strong chin pieces and energy-absorbing liners were also especially effective in reducing facial injuries. Windshields, eyeglasses and goggles simply did not offer as much face protection as a full-face helmet. Footwear The best footwear is sturdy, over-the-ankle boots that can protect you from a variety of riding hazards. They can protect against burns from hot exhaust pipes and flying road debris.

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Gloves

Did you know . . . . .that over half of all fatal motorcycle crashes involve another vehicle and most of the time, the „motorist‟, not the „motorcyclist‟, is at fault? Because of its small size, a motorcycle can be easily hidden in a car‟s blind spot. MOTORCYCLE SAFETY LINK: www.navymotorcyclerider.com

Gloves that fit properly will improve your grip on the handlebars. Gloves should also be full-fingered motorcycle gloves to protect hands from blisters, sun, wind and cold. Motorcycle gloves are available in many styles, weights and thicknesses. Jackets, Pants “The Hurt Report” found that covering the body with leather or an abrasion-resistant fabric also provides a high level of injury protection. Other types of materials in this category were Cordura, Kevlar or ballistic nylon. Protective apparel designed specifically for motorcycling will afford the best combination of comfort and protection. Ref: Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) To find out more information on how to stay safe as a Motorcycle Rider, go to: www.msf-usa.org There is a wealth of good information there including booklets and pamphlets and safety tips for your use.

SIGNING UP FOR NDW MOTORCYCLE SAFETY TRAINING CLASSES This year marks the 3-year Anniversary since the mass push towards motorcycle safety training. Classes will fill early so you need to register NOW and be sure to attend your scheduled class since classes will be ‘fully populated’. NOTE: If you happen to end up on a ‘stand-by list’, I suggest you plan on attending that class. Over the past two years, only 1 ‘stand-by’ person has been turned away because the class was actually full on the training date. To sign up for motorcycle operator safety training classes you must log onto http://navymotorcyclerider.com/ Once on this site, select the region “Naval District Washington”; then follow the simple step by step instructions using the associated program “pull downs” for answer selections. Then select the motorcycle course type and date which meets your desired or available training time. I‟ve listed some upcoming courses on the next page. 2


COURSE BRC BRC BRC BRC BRC BRC BRC BRC BRC BRC-2 BRC-2 BRC-2 BRC-2 BRC-2 MSRC MSRC MSRC BRC BRC BRC-2 BRC-2 BRC-2 MSRC MSRC MSRC BRC BRC BRC BRC-2 BRC-2 MSRC MSRC MSRC

LOCATION DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN DAHLGREN ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS FT MEADE FT MEADE FT MEADE FT MEADE FT MEADE FT MEADE FT MEADE FT MEADE

DATE 3/14 3/26 3/26 4/02 4/16 4/16 4/30 5/14 6/04 3/16 3/19 4/06 5/04 6/08 3/23 4/05 5/03 4/23 5/21 3/27 4/25 5/23 3/26 4/26 5/24 3/26 4/23 5/21 3/28 4/26 3/29 4/25 5/23

FOR FURHTER QUESTIONS/INFORMATION: CONTACT: MR. DAN MOORE (LEAD INSTRUCTOR) (301) 751-3199 Dan Moore – Lead Instructor NDW Motorcycle Safety

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Summer is coming. Get that vehicle ready! by Teresa S. Boucher It‟s not too early to get your vehicle ready for Summer‟s heat, dust and stop-and go traffic: Here are some tips to get you started: Air Conditioning: If your system is marginally operating – have it examined by a qualified technician now and beat the rush. Cooling System: The greatest cause of summer breakdowns is overheating. It is recommended that the cooling system be completely flushed every two years. Hoses and Belts: Open the hood and check every hose and belt you can reach. If cracked or brittle or soft – replace them. Oil: Your owner‟s manual will specify when to change your oil and oil filter (usually every 3,000 miles). Engine Performance: Your operator‟s manual should also cover when to replace other filters (air, fuel, etc.). Windshield Wipers: Replace worn wipers and keep windshieldsolvent tank filled. Lights: Replace burned-out bulbs and keep lights clean for best visibility. Tires: Rotate tires every 5,000 miles. Check tire pressure once a month. Brakes: Have the brakes inspected by a qualified technician per manual. Battery: Keep the battery clean of corrosion. Avoid direct contact with corrosive deposits and battery acid. Wear eye protection and rubber gloves. Have battery replaced if weak. Emergencies: Be prepared! Carry some basic tools. Include a first-aid kit, flares and a flashlight. Also consider carrying a cell phone, but pull off the road before using it.

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A Friendly Reminder About Smoke Detectors A good rule of thumb to remember with smoke and carbon monoxide detectors is to change the batteries at daylight savings time, twice a year. If your detector starts chirping or beeping off and on, it‟s time to change the batteries. To Change the Battery: Step 1) Make sure your detector runs on batteries and is not just hard-wired to the electricity in your home. Step 2) Take the top off the detector and follow the manufacturer‟s instructions for changing the batteries.

CONTACT INFORMATION: Deputy to Regional Safety Program Director/Traffic Safety Program Mgr. (410) 293-9827 teresa.boucher@navy.mil

Step 3) Replace the whole detector if it is a detector that runs on a 10-year lithium battery. Tips & Warnings:  Test your detector once a month.  Buy a few extra batteries when you purchase your detector so that you always have some on hand. It‟s easy to put this important, life-saving task on hold.  You may want to consider purchasing a combination smoke/carbon monoxide detector, which costs more money but is well worth it.  If a smoke detector goes off in your home, you literally have seconds to respond. Your best response is to leave the home immediately, gather at your pre-arranged meeting place and call 911 from a neighbor‟s home.  Avoid getting any paint or dust on your smoke detector.  Make sure that the smoke detector you choose has been tested by an independent testing laboratory.

We’re on the Web—go to: https://www.hgwllc.com/ESAMS_GEN_2/Logi nESAMS.asp and click the Checking the Wake link on the front page.

“If we all work together, we can keep ourselves and our loved ones safe to enjoy another tomorrow”

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Checking the Wake, March 2012