Issuu on Google+

street



king



street



king



s rojecttheatre



project t



king



street



king



street tre



projecttheatre



pro street



king



street



king



s rojecttheatre



project t



king



street



king



street tre



projecttheatre



pro


To design a public urban building which is a small th Weymouth. The Theatre must seat around 300 peo should look into the various technical and environm sues concerning the building and its context. The is also a vehicle for exploring how design is info empirical forces, technical means and regulatory The theatre should be constructed with the 201 pics in mind and also be functional after the


heatre in ople and mental ise project ormed by y issues. 12 Olymgames.

Programme Weymouth needs a 300 seater theatre that is designed for drama, and have a presence on the urban environment around it. The theatre must also explore the use of transparency and light. During the Olympics in 2012 the sailing events will be held in Weymouth. When the sporting activities finish at the end of the day, the athletes and spectators need cultural actives to keep them occupied and entertained. A small drama theatre would be perfect for a range of performances to suit a large range of tastes. The site is situated on part of the bus depot on King Street which is perfect as it has good access from the town and the opposing train station. This lends its self to when the olympics have finished as the theatre can be used and can easily be reached via train. The small size of the theatre also lends its self to being used after as it will be much easier to fill. The theatre can be a bold statement showing visitors what a new modern Weymouth means and what the city is looking towards. Looking along the main street from the train station your eye will instantly be drawn towards this new building which contrasts heavily to the buildings around. However the theatre will not look out of place as the contrast will compliment the surrounding buildings through the use of materials and form. The use of concrete will create this modern feel but not seem too out of place as concrete is used heavily around the town. The site is located on King Street which is a major road through the town from the esplanade to the marina. It passes the train station and bus depot so it is connected to the main transport links. The street is a mix of buildings that range from industrial warehouses to a stone church. The main bulk of the buildings are bare brick or rendered buildings that range from 2-3 stories. Many of which have a fourth story in the roof. This tall profile to the street makes it much easier to build higher with out overlooking properties and running into planning issues. The theatre is set out on two main levels with a third level on the front facade to allow for roof access and to match the height of the existing street scape. The facade will look very regimented as there are three equal levels that are divided by walls and slabs of the same thickness. Behind this facade is a long corridor that ties these levels together down one side. There is also a visible red lift shaft that can be seen from the outside. This facade is very transparent and allows people to see the activity and the excitement of people using the theatre, day or night. For the theatre to be a success the transparent qualities need to be adhered to. This transparency is not to be taken literally as to make the building from transparent materials but to have the building open up and make you want to go inside. I feel that the high ceilings and the large atrium has this effect. The large corridor that connects the side of the building also has a volume that draws you in. The entrance under the auditorium also completes this transparent feel by making the building seem open to the outside world. The material used for the main construction is a self compacting concrete that is set into orientated strand board

marked shuttering. This gives the concrete a subtly yet interesting texture that breaks it away from the stereotypical brutalist idea of concrete. Some of the interior walls will be painted either a mat or a gloss bold finish to help highlight certain areas or to break up large expanses of the concrete. I want to portray the feeling of this theatre as something clean and modern with drama. All of the fixtures, doors and windows are set flush to the wall surface. This gives a very clean feel as nothing looks ‘added on’. I have taken this detail to making sure that the windows are flush with the outside, flush with the interior floor and flush with the columns that are supporting them. All of the mirrors in the toilets and dressing rooms are at the same level as the walls surrounding them. These mirrors are the surrounded by a light gap that mimics the old style lights that used to surround dressing room mirrors in a modern way. This idea is used a lot throughout the theatre as there is the light gap around the ceiling in the corridor, the atrium and the auditorium. I feel that this light in the ceiling helps to make the roof float and takes away some of the heavy feeling of the building, which again helps to bring a sense of cleanliness to the theatre. Apart from the themes behind the theatre, I have looked into the comfort issues. The auditorium will not be stuffy as there is some active ventilation that draws air in through vents concealed in the columns of an external pavilion and gently cool it so that it slowly and silently travels through the auditorium and keeps it at a comfortable temperature. The air then passes out of vent concealed inside the light gaps and is expelled out of a chimney in the wall. The dressing rooms are also large in size and are all air conditioned. A theatre in Weymouth has more benefits that drawbacks. Firstly it provides a cultural centre for the Olympics. It then can continue its life after the Olympics have finished and its small seating capacity means that it will be easier to fill and maintain. The space will also mean that new drama clubs and societies can start and use the auditorium to practice for their own performances. This will be as well as having touring performances coming to the theatre. The theatre will also improve Weymouth’s revenue as people will come to visit shows at the theatre and inadvertently spend time in the local area and contribute to the local economy. The bar / cafe will also be used throughout the day by people passing, people waiting for a train at the station and people who are visiting the theatre. The roof terrace could also be used in the cafe and if high enough sea views might be obtained. This will then possibly make the bar / cafe a popular place to go. The theatre will also provide many jobs. These range from theatre technicians, technical director, stylists, bar staff, receptionists, administration workers, managers and cleaners. As well as these benefits the theatre is redeveloping an old site that was used to store busses. Surely a new modern theatre is much more appealing than a bus storage yard. Future research for the theatre is how it could possibly be used for other events such as comedy and music. The main things that would have to be looked at would be acoustic treatment and the amount of people that the venue would have to accommodate. The multi-functionalism would then make the theatre even more profitable.


Cars Lorries Site Bus Route Trains Pedestrians

The map to the right shows the transport links for a Theatre in Weymouth. As you can see, Kings Street is very busy all types of transportation is directed down the road. The large car park takes away most of the car traffic, but, cars still park in side roads for free, which means some of them have to drive down King Street. Lorries can avoid using the road directly in front of the site if they use the back roads to access. Using the Train and Bus links will ben-

efit the traffic problem and allow audience acting members to the Theatre easily and ciently. This will both b them and the environ

As the Theatre can 300 people the ac from the road must be to use as the large ber of people exiting the road could be da ous. Looking at theatr London could help this problem as it is a mon problem for


m best e and reach d efďŹ beneďŹ t nment.

hold ccess e safe numg onto angerres in solve comthem.

As the bus and train links are the best for people to get to the Theatre, I think using them as inspiration (as well as the site being on a bus depot) for the theatre design. The issue I could look at is the fact that the exterior of trains and busses are usually very dirty, while the interior is in contrast and is usually very clean. To use this in an architec-

tural sense is to think of the interior of the building contrasting to its exterior. This could be very literal with the exterior looking dirty an the interior looking clean and stark. This is very like David Adjaye’s Dirty house, which contrasts in this way very well. It could also be taken in a much broader sense with a contrast of colour, material or style.


The Site (marked in grey) is located on King Street opposite the train station. It is 16.6 metres wide and 46 metres long, with access from the east side via a small road running along the back of the entire site. The road then joins to another small access road on the western side. This road is narrower than on the eastern side but has a longer opening onto the site. This would make it easier for large set pieces and equipment to be off loaded and transported into the building. At the rear of the site is Weymouth bus depot. This tall building gives a rough height to the rear of the building and the large full height doors give precedent to what could be used for loading at the rear of the theatre.


The image to the right is of a derelict lean-to that is situated on the rear of one of the westerly located buildings on the entrance to the site off of King Street. This dirty building (along with the dirty nature of the outside of buses and trains) has given me the idea for representing the theatre with the use of contrast. This is because the vehicles and lean-to may be dirty on the outside but the inside is a stark clean contrast. The materials on the site mainly consists of brick work, whether it is visible, rendered, painted or dirty. The other materials on the site is painted stone, wooden window frames, concrete, black painted steel railings, roof tiles, terra-cotta chimney pots, metal paneling off of the bus depot and corrugated metal rooďŹ ng from the depot. The colours on the site can produce a palate to contrast or compliment with.


There is around W colour an materials the town. to rust or further. Th rust requi sibly goes Olympics weatherin will the m night and

The metal in the photo-montage above works well in the day light as it contrasts with the buildings around. However in the darkness it seems slightly lost due the fact it looks dull and the lighting of the train station over powers its colour. This could be resolved through lighting the facade during night. This will also bring out the shadows from where the sections of metal are joint. Despite this aesthetic working it seems heavy and un-welcoming (which later could be a good thing). From my initial research I found theatres worked best if they looked light and transparent on the outside. This can be seen in the Young Vic, which, because of the transparency, looks inviting and exciting during the night.


a large abundance of rusting / weathering metal Weymouth. This is mainly due to the sea air. This nd aesthetic contrasts heavily with the colours and in and around the immediate site yet still links to Whether the choice to use metal that is allowed r to use weathering steel can be researched into his is due to the fact that steel that is allowed to ires more maintenance in the long run. This poses against the longevity of the building after the and could easily be resolved through the use of ng steel. The main factor to think about is how well material stand out on the site during the day and d how the contrast will be achieved on the inside.


From looking at theatre precedents I have found that l a theatre. This is mainly due to the fact that most perf such as the Young Vic, and the Curve transform drama look like at night. The buildings both seems transparent and drawing you in. The images to the right have been would react on the site. As you can see the building stan of a presence. The lighting also adds drama to the surro There could also be an interaction between other eleme tie the theatre into Weymouth and the ‘square’ opposit different performances to enhance the feel and add som the experience of the architecture. Another take on ligh whole building glowing a bright neon colour to make the such as the Young Vic that light the interior, which can b look busy, inviting and welcoming. This subtle approac can make the building stand out and contrast rather th


lighting during the night is a very important issue with formances take place during the dark hours. Theatres atically from what they look like in the day to what they t and welcoming with their lighting glow adding interest used to show how a strongly coloured glowing building nds out from the darker buildings around and has more ounding area as the light changes the colour and mood. ents in the surrounding area that work with the light and te the site. The building could light different colours for mething to the experience of the production as well as hting the building could be more subtle. Rather than the e statement ‘look I am hear’, I can look closer at theatres be seen from the outside, which in turn makes the place ch can work well in the day as the architecture its self han relying on the building lighting up during the night.


The two images here shows the theatre in context in weymouth. The shots help to see what the form will look like against the current environment. From this shot I can see the theatre does not overpower the site due to the fact it is not much higher than surrounding buildings. The theatre also has the bus depot behind it and the large mass helps to justify the mass of the theatre. The colour is also very neutral and doesn’t seem to out of place as lots of grey is around. From this shot I can also se that the cantilevered front could add some interest from up the street. This is

becaus blocks as it let they ar could a mance The y height building cubed es opp of a pr examp


se the grey protrusion looks large and the path ahead. This space is great ts people know where the theatre is as re walking down the street to find it and also be a space to advertise perfores that are happening in the near future. y tower doesn’t seem a problem as the is matched by the front and side of the g. Another thought is that the ‘large’ form is similar to that of the warehousposite. This means that there is less roblem for planning as these existing ples in the close vicinity can be stated.


Folkestone arts centre is a good preced is because the theatre is on a similar s The 250 seater auditorium is on one ti side. This seating allows more people t enclose the space by cutting down on space is also very good as it highlights with out overpowering the space. The lar as it is on a main street like and mu


From my research i have found that the average seating dimensions are 700mm wide and 1000mm deep (from back rest to back rest) This gives the most comfort with out taking up too much room and compromising the small space.

The drawings to the left show the average rakes and dimensions for 300 seats on the site. The top diagram shows what 300 seats would look like if they were laid out in one large rectangle. If the seats were arranged like this half of the site would be used, which would not leave much space for any other facilities on the site. The bottom image shows what the theatre would look like if a second tire was added. The seating plan takes up a much smaller space but the seating is much higher (around 9 metres). With a small site there is always this dispute between taking up the ground plan or going high to ďŹ t all the seats in. Looking at the images on the right, none of these theatres have a second tier. This may because with such a small audience the space might seem very cramped. Lots of theatres I have seen add seating in boxes on the side rather than a second tier as the makes the space seem more open and inviting.

dent to look at for my theatre. This site to mine and is of a similar size. ier and has box like seating on the to view performances but does not the roof height. The lighting of the s the edges and the roof space well facade of the theatre is also simiust work well with its surroundings. The selection of images to the left show a number of three hundred seater venues. The image at the bottom is of a 120 seater venue and shows what a compact theatre looks like. The lager capacity venues have a wide range of seating arrangements from curved arrays to linear ones. Some are split into two halves and others are as one. The rakes of the seating changes dramatically from theatre to theatre. The top image shows a relatively low rake while the image below shows a steep rake. This all depends on how tall and deep the building can go with out looking out of place on the outside.


The new seating layout is 16 metres long by 11.5 metres widde. There is an 1.5 metre aisle on each side and a large block of seats in the centre. There are removable seats at the bottom for wheelchair users and some perminant designated spaces for wheelchair users at the back. Each seating level is 1 metre in lenght and rises 250mm The aisles are an extra step per level so there is a small stepped incline of 125mm steps that are 500 deep. There is level access at the top and bottom of the seating rake where you enter through light and sound lobbies. There is ventilatoion under the seating that helps to make the auditorium a more comfortable place. The

dimenstions

of

the

seats

are

:

(SEE

FINAL

CAD)

I feel that it is not nessacery to stagger the seats to optimise the view due to the size of the auditorium. Because of its small size a staggeres seating pattern would loose 32 seats and the seize of the stage means that you can easily see it all from any seat. I have calculated that the rake is sufďŹ cient for all the sight lines to have clear views of the stage. The seats them selves have the same absorptoin rates of people when they are not being sat in so that there is no effect on the noise quality in the auditorium.


EDD The Hag Netherlan


gue building ds

(Above) A lighting design by Zumtobel on a new Merans’ hotel and spar resort. The lighting on this building is very bold yet is made from subtle colours. The semi-translucent facade lets the light diffuse through in a calm manner yet it sill lights the building well, adding lots of interest and excitement.

(Left) The Hague, Netherlands has been light very well by the dutch firm LED-ART. The colours in the windows change the building dramatically during the dark hours and create and eerie atmosphere as the light seems to be lighting the whole room rather than just the facade. The lighting system is also very dynamic as it can change colour to suit any occasion. The technology used is called EED (embedded data-texture display) which can simply be fitted onto any window or surface to radically transform the skin and facade of any building; traditional or modern.


Grupa Lotus headquarters Gdansk, Poland Integrating LED technology into architecture can create a building that has both a structural luminescence and a presence. This is what the architects wanted to achieve for this building as they wanted to show that a large oil company has qualities such as playfulness and glamour that is not often associated with them. The building is visible for miles showing the power and wealth of the company and giving constant awareness to the people around that they exist. The main structure of this building as be described as a virtual paint pot. The ever changing colours adds a dynamic quality to the building that portrays the company in this light. This virtual

paint pot is controlled so well that complex patterns and sequences can be achieved as well as the application of images and graphics on the side of the building. This technology could be perfect for a theatre as the lighting could reect the play that is happening to widen the mood to the outside world before, during and after the performance. The facade could then also be used as advertising for current performances when the theatre is not in use to help make people aware of what is showing. I also like the transparency to the building as you can almost see the silhouettes of the people walking behind the facade.


Mini Cooper creativity party Roof Top,Manhattan

This New York roof top (located above Hells Kitchen on 10th Avenue and 36th street) was home (for 10 days) to a Mini-roof top party, Hosted by Mini Copper. The space was made available for creative professionals to showcase work and performances throughout the 10 days of the event. The large central mound created a focal point where people gathered to watch the projections and live acts from their comfortable cast concrete dipped seating. During the day this mound was used to host work out routines where the trainer could be seen easily by all. The interesting and unusual shape is very multifunctional and is a

great talking point to the space.

The lighting to this event is also very important. The subtle purple and red shades dramatise the event and creates a calm that is infectious and rapidly makes people want to ‘chill’ on the mound. A roof top space would be ideal for a theatre in weymouth as it would add another social space for people to gather, perform and relax. This roof top view would also allow views of the sea and beach that would add ambience to any event. This space can also become multifunctional and be use din the day for many other activities.


Louise Blouin James Turre

By

The lightin style is in out of the change th ing green Many of h that make can be us and to ac street out during the daylight h windows s


Foundation

el, London

ng of this building is very striking as the old industrial nterrupted with brightly coloured vivid lighting ooding e windows. The ever changing light can dramatically he mood of the building from a calm blue, to a menacn, to an angry red. James Turrell is the master of light. his pieces create unusual and powerful atmospheres e rooms and buildings seem very different. This idea sed in a theatre to capture the mood of a performance ccentuate this through out the building and into the tside. Many buildings that use light only take effect e night. However this building is lit rather well during hours. The image left highlights this very well as the seem to glow just as green as during the darker hours.


DanFlavinarchitectural lighting Pulitzer Foundation, St Louis Dan Flavin is often considered the master of neon. His tubular sculptures are world renowned and are is many of the worlds top art galleries. Flavin is also very good at placing light into architecture. The use of the neon green in the Pulitzer foundation for the arts (left) and in the Hamburg Train station (right) helps to dramatise the building and bring out the features such as the windows and the arches. I personally feel that the use of the green light adds lots of interest to the buildings because this aesthetic is rarely seen.

This aesthetic could be useful in a theatre as block lighting of certain parts of the facade can highlight certain areas to viewers attentions and create interest and excitement. The lighting of the rooms rather than just the windows is also another good idea. The picture on the far left highlights this well as you can see the different rooms due to the green glow. The lighting also puts the person standing in the room in silhouette adding further interest and some mystery.


Modulorbeat,w

Kubik,Multiple Lo


with lightlife

ocations

Kubik, designed by Modulorbeat (with lighting specialist LIGHTLIFE) was designed as a temporary light room instillation to revitalise a fallow area in the city centre of Berlin, Barcelona and Lisboa. The instillation reminded many people of a 3D tetris game that interacted with music. One of the instillations was converted into a bar on a disused site so that the instillation did not become waste when it was ďŹ nished with. I ďŹ nd the bright green colour very striking as it produces a neon glow to the whole surrounding area. The semi-transparent blocks a depth to the lighting and the silhouettes of the people standing in front of the light cubes creates a relaxing and chilled out mood. It creates a social feeling when people gather around it and reminds me of a hot summer night relaxing outside with friends.


Neon Lighting,new wave Sings,Las Vegas and LA

Neon Lighting can be used in very subtle and cleaver ways to light spaces and buildings. However, it has been stereotyped to being used on tacky signs in Las Vegas and may cities all over the world. The common impression is a poorly designed sign with letters that do not function. The down sides to using neon is that during the day it is almost impossible to see. The bent glass tubes are visible but give you only a small insight to what the sign might say. Also due to the advance meant of LED’s neon seems very out dated. LED’s are far more efficient, last much longer and can be easily set to a range of colours. They also take up a much smaller space. Because of this it is better to look at neon as a colour and intensity of light rather that the means to produce light.

For example the sculpture on the right uses neon tubes to illuminate different sections. This could easily be achieved now with LED’s but the neon in this case does the job very well. This is because the exposed neon tubes have an almost plasma effect as the light intensity changes through to the centre. LED’s could mimic the colour but they would not have the depth to them. This colour aesthetic might be good to look at for the lighting of a theatre as the intensity of colour would add interest and excitement along with the tradition of neon signs on theatres.


Chorus, Array,Co UK,united visua The works by London Based United Visual Artists uses light in a magical way to enhance spaces, architecture and performances. The three selected works demonstrate their range of techniques in these three ways. Chorus (pictured far right (top picture)) uses pendulum based lights that incorporated with sound produces a unique viewing experience. As the pendulums swing the light changes brightness and intensity to mimic the music and the swing. Depending on the syncing of all of the pendulums the sound can be disjointed or harmonic. The pendulums usually ďŹ nd the same rhythm because of weighting. This means the longer the performance goes on the more harmonic the sound becomes. This idea could be quite interesting to use in a theatre space as sound is mixed with light to create a multi-sensual experience. I am not sure how the piece could be used on a facade but it could be used in an atrium or in the main performance area. Array (pictured right) is a good example of exterior lighting. The interactive lighting is again mixed with sound and responds to the viewers movements in relation to the columns of light. The more people that are interacting with the piece the more complex and interesting the area becomes. This idea would be good to use in the landscaped part of the theatre or as a corridor, or even the facade. This is because it makes the architecture interact with the users creating a dynamic feel that is suited to a theatre.


onstellation

al artists Constellation (pictured left) was installed in convent gardens market to interact with musical performances played within. The LED tubes responded to the music being played and changed according to the mood. This would be very useful in a theatre as they could be used (optionally) to light performances to give a more sensually active performance. This idea could also be used to alter the lighting of the facade to make people aware to a performance happening within.


Michael Wolf ne ATransparent C Transparent city delivers a wonderful insight into how the city functions. The unsuspecting models in the pieces help to create an entirely natural shot that is unsurpassed by many. Looking at the images in an architectural manner we can see many features that can help with the designing of new buildings. The image directly right shows us how the lighting of a room in a strong colour can add interest and delight. The orange glow helps to tie the separate rooms together and unites the fragmented sections of the tower block. The building in the background also uses the same orange light for the lighting of the staircase. This again ties the buildings together and gives the whole view a unity. This was obviously seen through the eye of the photographer to give his shot a sense of unity. This application of uniting my theatre with the buildings around it through the use of light could be a very successful way to help tie this new alien structure to its surroundings.


ew york

City

The image on the far right shows a number of good architectural elements that use transparency very well (along with light) to produce good architecture. The green light helps to make an entire oor stand out and seem completely separate from the rest of the building. This is the opposite of what the buildings on the last image showed, however this individuality could be what the theatre needs rather than it being tied in with the surrounding buildings. The building on the far left of this picture also demonstrates semi-transparency very well. The building is currently under construction or redevelopment and has had a protective layer placed over the window. This screening helps to diffuse the light behind and create a good lighting quality that allows the area to stand out yet still have some privacy/mystery behind it.


Electrical Grid b

Seville,Spain Mariano

During the day the Electrical Grid building has a heavy monolithic feel as it seems to be made out of large pieces of marble. This feeling soon disappears during the night when the internal lighting makes the entire building glow. You then realise the marble is in fact sliced incredibly thin. The dynamic nature to this building could be very useful for a theatre. This is because during the day the building is seen as a plain functional building that seems suited for performance. This is because it seems impermeable to light which is suited to performances. By as the night comes around the building magically transforms into an exciting transparent venue that creates interest and draws people to go and see it. The use of marble might not be the best for the location in weymouth but another suitable material could be found.

The vary and s are lo light ent e behin sign


building

oBayón

transparency of a material could also throughout creating interesting patterns shapes. Where private or secluded areas ocated the material could let not as much through. This still creates the transpareffect yet doesn’t let people see what is nd. This also gets rid of the need to descreens and or areas that are walled in.


Pachinko Parlor

Japan,Kazuyo S

Pachinko is a very popular game that combines chance w played all over the country in ings that are all laid out in the umns and rows. This building designed to alter this trend a players a unique place to play number II uses a very transp wall with text printed over it to advert to the building and to pr privacy to the buildings facade night the lighting with in the b minates this text to make it vi the night. This technique could a theatre as a way to advertise during the day and during the n wouldn’t be an issue with sola was used on the site as the fro north facing. However the very glass might make the building when it is surrounded by othe

Parlor number III uses a boa ding that has gaps to allow lig through. This facade is more has just as much impact as the This facade also works very w idea of contrast as the internal almost a negative of what is ha the outside. This type of clad transparent but does provide a might stand out more on the two facades were combined th facade might have an even s pact. This combined facade w nate text, allow some parts to and fully transparent yet have s have the boarding for privacy some more interest to the facad


or II&III

Sejima

r Japanese with skill. It is large builde same colg has been and give the y. The parlor parent glass o act as an rovide some e. During the building illuisible during d be used in e what is on night. There ar gain if this ont facade is transparent g disappear er buildings.

arded cladght to diffuse private and e ďŹ rst parlor. well with the l cladding is appening on dding is less a facade that e site. If the he resulting stronger imwould illumibe exposed sections that and to add de is not lost.


PathĂŠ Multiplex cinema

Rotterdam,Holland This 2700 seven screen complex by Koen Van Velsen uses transparency very cleverly to help minimise the size of the structure. The main volume of the theatre is clad in a translucent material that separates it from the ground plain at all times. The space beneath the translucent element is ďŹ lled with glass. This gap between the large mass and the ground makes the building oat and seam less dominating on the space. The ability to enter the building through this lightweight void beneath the structure also reduces the impact of the building as you can see past the wall and into the cinema. If i wanted the theatre to be less impacting on the site i could implement this tactic to reduce its mass.

The translucent surface is also very interesting. The combination of this and its supporting framework helps to create an interesting skin to the building that allows light to diffuse through gently creating a soft glow in to the surrounding area. This could be a possible way to light the theatre with out the light being over powering.


Shoji Screens

Translucent, S

Japanese Shoji Screens are as much a part of Japanese culture as sushi and sumo. They are used in traditional buildings as well as more modern structures and provide a very cost effective and practical solution to walls and doors.

The translucent nature of the Shoji screens are very interesting to look at as a basis for an architectural solution for a theatre. The screens are often used in traditional Japanese theatres and have very good light qualities. The regular pattern of the wooden supporting structure could easily be adopted for a facade and the translucent screen could easily be used to ďŹ ll the facade. The screens show silhouette very well when a light source is behind which could create a very nice effect for people passing the theatre at night. Another interesting effect might be if a coloured light was used so the screens change colour. The semi Transparent area could be placed behind the stage so that passing people get a glimpse of ever changing shadows and become curious of what is happening within.


Japan

Silhouette

t y e .

e e e d w d e e a g s .


The Point

Bus Depot

In many respects The Point theatre is very similar to the one being proposed at weymouth. The theatre is very close to Eastleigh’s main train station and is situated next to the bus depot. The theatre can hold a maximum of 312 people but when the orchestra pit is in use this number drops to 260. For its small size the theatre has a relatively large stage at 12.5 x 10 metres. The stage has a 6 meter working height and the proscenium is 10.4 metres. The Point has two dressing rooms that include illuminated mirrors and makeup counters, en-suite shower and toilet facilities.

The look and feel of The Point is very homely yet modern. This is due to the fact that the theatre is set in an old brick building with a modern interior that spills out onto the street with the modern steel and glass entrance. The theatre is now boasting a new 375sq metre dance studio extension that on the outside ties into the existing brick yet stands out with a more modern shape. The interior of this space will be radically modern to the rest of the theatre and will bring the dance facilities up to better standards. The point also includes a cafe and a small bar that can cater for the small audiences it holds. However on a sold out performance night, the bar area can be very cramped as it is along the main corridor into the auditorium.

ENTRANCE/EXIT Q

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

P

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

N

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

M

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

L

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

J

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

H

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

G

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

F

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

E

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

D

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

C

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

B

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

A

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

ACCESS DOOR

The Point, TheatreandDanceStudio Eastleigh, Hampshire

Train Station

STAGE


The Lighthou Poole, Dorset


use,Theatre/Studio

The Lighthouse is a large multifunctional Arts centre in Poole. The building houses a 669 seater theatre, a 1017 seater concert hall (2000 standing), a 103 seater cinema, a 130 seater studio theatre and 2 conference rooms. The Lighthouse also has a number of large bars and a cafe. Focusing on the Studio theatre we can see that there is a stage that is level with the floor which has no proscenium. The seating has the ability to fold back so the space can be used for a dance studio. The lighting rig is fixed and needs to be reached by a tallescope. The seating is uncomfortable for long performances as it is setout in an informal bench style. The walls have an interesting angular surface that helps the acoustics of the space. The main theatre is much larger and has a stage with a proscenium and a fixed orchestra pit. The stage has a fly tower that houses scenery and the lighting grid. The seating appears as one solid block to the performer and makes this large space seem more intimate. The seating is very comfortable and the leg room is good. The seating is on a slight arc so the all point towards the centre of the stage. The stage is very big and the wings are also reasonably sized. The overall feel of this space is very subdued as the lighting and colours are muted. This creates a calm atmosphere for the audience members when they wait for the performance to start and when the performance is going provides a neutral backdrop that does not distract from what is happening on the stage. The concert hall is a very large light space. It has a large balcony that holds over 400 seats of the overall seating. The walls are textured with angled reconstituted Portland stone that help to improve the acoustics. The ceiling is also shaped to help the acoustic performance of the space. The auditorium is naturally ventilated by large chimneys on the side of the building. These chimneys also act as a sculptural piece to the side of the building. The public space including the bars is very generous in size. However, the spaces could have been designed better as the overall feel is very disjointed. The ceiling has a cleverly painted MDF perforated screen to help with the acoustics when the space is full. The public spaces are also naturally ventilated.


The Place,Dan Duke’sRoad, Lo The Place is a centre for contemporary dance in London. The Place also holds a 292 seater auditorium a small bar and a cafe. The auditorium is 15m wall to wall so is a very good precedent to what is possible on our site in Weymouth. There is 9m from the seating to the end of the stage and the seating rake allows people anywhere to see the oor as this if vital for dance. The seats are very small, yet they are surprisingly roomy. There are two very small half balconies on each side that help to bring the performer, audience and audience triangle that is key for a dynamic feel. The Place is set inside an old army barracks and the auditorium is the old drill hall. The Place has also added some modern interventions such as the back stage entrance and some of the dance studios. The internal aesthetic of the Place is very industrial because of the tight space which has left the services exposed.


nce Studio ondon

The one down side to the performing side of the Place is that the backstage storage area is very small and the dressing rooms are very cramped. Each one can only hold around 10-12 people at a squeeze. Bearing in mind that some performances can have up to 50 performers.


The Lighthou Smithfeild,Dublin 4 Screens, 600 seats, 1 cafe/bar The Lighthouse cinema is one of the great examples of public architecture that interests and delights. The use of material, light and colour works so well and the auditorium spaces are a breath of fresh air against standard cinemas across the country. The use of brightly coloured seating and panels create delight and the heavy contrasts between the colours and materials make everything seem well thought out. The spaces such as the bars and lobbies encourage social gathering and the dynamic shapes make people want to inhabit them. The white walls contrast heavily with the dark ceilings and the metallic surfaces contrast with the wooden oor. If the walls are plain the furniture is colourful and if the furniture is colourful the walls are plain. The contrasts are endless. I feel the contrast between high and low spaces work well. The corridors are extremely tall and the ceiling soon shrinks down to inhabit the cafe

a if

T th d T c

T s s

D in is m p g


use Cinema

area, which feels slightly more habitable than f you had this tall space towering above you.

The wooden flooring of the corridors contrast with he dark black rubber flooring of the cafe/bar to define the seating area from the walking area. This subtle detail helps to stop crowding on the corridor and walking through the seating area.

The building as a whole is light very well. Every space has the right feel of light, whether it is more subtle and calming or whether it is bright and airy.

Despite being for film rather than theatre the seatng in the auditorium can be looked at. The seating s fixed so the gaps between need to be wider. This makes the seats more comfortable and gives the person siting mre leg room. The seats are not staggered so theroe might be an issue with sight lines.


Graphic Design Museum Breda,Netherlands Despite this building not being a theatre (it does have a small auditorium) the front facade has some of the qualities that i think the King Street theatre should have. Firstly the front facade is between two existing buildings. The one on the left is part of the museum but a distinctive separation has been kept by a glass gap. The building on the right is a more modern building that wraps behind the site. What strikes me about the facade is the link between transparency and solidness. The bottom half is completely transparent and the lit interior draws you in the darker hours. The top half is semi-transparent to give you a avour of what is happening inside. On this semi-transparent facade there is then space to advertise the name of the museum with its logo.

The interior ďŹ nishing of the museum is done very well. The reception is made from a dark material so it contrasts and stands out against the with walls of the rest of the building. The desk is made from a semi-transparent purple material that is lit from inside to make the reception desk stand out even more. Small details like this can make buildings seem more interesting and dynamic. Colour and lighting is a very important factor to consider in my theatre as it can make a space seem very different and feel a better place to be. The cafe in the museum is very light and airy and the tables have been set at an angle to make the space seem different to the regimented aisles in the museum. The counter is also linked to the reception desk by being a darker colour to stand out from the white walls.


Kiosk Graphics byPam&Jenny CentralPark,Luxemburg The reasoning behind the colouration on the kiosk is that “The pavillon was build in concrete, they were afraid it would look too cold or rough, so I choose for those green and orange colors. I worked on the lines and meeting points of the structure to enhance and distort the shape of the building.� (Pam&Jenny). The reason that I have researched into this kiosk is because my theatre is using a lot of concrete. from the statement above i have thought that if this small structure looks cold or fough my large amount could also look this way. Because of this i thought it would be a good idea to bare colour and shape in mind so that if it need painting a graphically orientated design could be produced. This design could also help to add interest to the large walls that line the large coridor down one side of my building.

The use of greens and whie works very well and the internal colour of orange and white contrasts with the green. This contrast is vital for the colours to work on the transition from the outside to the inside. If the inside was green too, the colour would dominate the architecture. There also needs to be pieces of the concrete exposed so that the architecture is not hidden. The material needs to be expressed by the paint helps to add intrest and life to the large surfaces. Inspite of this the colour might not be needed as the large expance of concrete could be very powerful.


Model 01 sketc Form,Transparency

The basis behind this sketch mo to give an initial insight to the v theatre taking up its maximum would have. The model also expl the theatre would look as a larg looking object with a small tran facade. The model also shows theatre would look like at nigh range of colours lighting up the

From looking at the pictures model I feel that the theatre in would work well. The heavy stru


and

ch model cy Light

odel was volume a m volume lores how ge heavy nsparent what the ht with a e facade.

and the this form ucture ďŹ ts

in with the site; complimenting the bus depot behind and showing strength and standing out among the busy street. The lighting also adds another dimension that I found to exist when researching lighting. A nice touch might be for the theatre to have gaps along the side walls as this would give the heavy box some interest during the dark hours. This idea does depend on how visible the sides of the building would be at night.


Model 02 sketc Form,Transparency

This Sketch model represents my ideas of how I wanted the theatr work. To start off I built a mock u what the theatre seating would look After I did this I noticed it made a un shape to walk through. I thought it w make a novel way to enter the the as you would experience the jou through the underside of the s ing to reach the auditorium. I then the idea to have the triangular sea glowing different colours to entice ple to go through and to represen


and

ch model cy Light

y ďŹ rst re to up of k like. nique would eater urney seatn had ating peont the

performance that is happening with in. The main problem with this idea is how to stop noise and light from entering the auditorium as there is no way to block it off. This model also has too small a space for the backstage. This space can easily be take from the front of house space.


and

Model 03 sketchmodel Form,Transparency Light In this model I looked more into designing the front of house. Firstly I decided to make sure the walkway under the seating went all the way through the building to create a path the landscaped area outside. I then turned the front area into a two level area to utilise the space. To get to this space you use a lift and stairs that stick off of the side of the building. From there you walk along a raised oor to the balcony. This oor then makes the space below seem dark and narrow. The result

of this is that the light from the glowing triangular area seem more prominent. I have also decided that to enter the auditorium you move to the second level and enter from the top of the stairs. This is because when you enter you get the view of the whole auditorium space and of the stage. This is rather than entering from the front with your back to the stage.


Model 04 sketc Form,Transparency

This sketch model is inuenc from visiting the New Vic. space of the New Vic I like ho level approach created a sen ume yet the space seemed also like the outside balcony a passers by a taste of the a within. The balcony also give space to go on a nice day. I added a box ofďŹ ce on the gr on the entrance as this is the most visitors go so it needs to view.


and

ch model cy Light

ced slightly In the bar ow the two nse of vold as one. I as this gave atmosphere es people a I have also round oor e ďŹ rst place o be within

I have started to create a corridor down the side of the theatre to allow for a smooth access from the front of house to the auditorium to the back stage area. This model has also kept the idea of entering the auditorium from the top and has also kept the idea of the triangular cut to the outside. A new idea has been the industrialisation of the back facade as this links with the bus depot behind.


and

Model 05 sketchm Form,Transparency L

The basis behind this model is th ploration of the long corridor dow side of the theatre. The idea be this corridor is to connect all the s es with a direct link to help the o the building. The tall space also drama to the building and links it the tall space in the bar area. Th area now has a stair case which ics the seating triangular space. is because you have to walk unde triangle of the stairs to enter the


model

Light

he exwn the ehind spacow of adds t with he bar mim. This er the e bar.

As the auditorium has to be entered from the top you have to enter the bar area to access it. This is good for the theater as most of the revenue comes from drinks sales. The backstage area is still yet to be decided and the toilets and bar store are located under the balcony between the bar and the lit triangular space. The box ofďŹ ce is now located at the other end of the lit triangle and is taking the form of a literal ‘box’


Model 06 sketc Form,Transparency

In this model the theatre has c dramatically. The long corridor n es at the back with a full width st This leads to toilets and admin offices. The dressing rooms are in a basement with a plant room store room. The box office has with a cloak room and has ta front space under the balcon box office has till taken the ‘box which can be painted a solid bold to stand out and to tie it in.


and

ch model y Light

changed now ristaircase. nistration located m and a merged aken the ny. The x’ shape d colour

The atrium space has gotten taller with a mimicked y tower added on the top. This structure provides a way to access the roof space and also adds another level of seating. I feel this tall space will create a dramatic feel that will go hand in had with the experience of the theatre. I have still kept the cantilevered front that acts aa a porch to the entrance. this overhangs the pavement so it can draw people in off of the street as it dominates their path.


and

Model 07 sketchmodel Form,Transparency Light In this model I have made removed the fly tower bar. Instead I have made it look and feel part of the structure. To retain the fly tower element there is a large glass window in the roof that is the same dimensions as the real fly tower. The long corridor wall is now the whole length of the entire corridor and incorporates the balustrade for the stairs which is made from the cast concrete. When standing down one end of the corridor you can see the three levels which are framed very well with a long section on the top.

The corridor is lit from above by long windows that bring in light from the roof space. The roof space is now completely habitable and there is a low wall running around the edge for public safety. The fly tower can now be used to project films or light to add atmosphere or event to the space. This can clearly be seen from the upstairs bar and will add interest and encourage people to use the space.


Model 08 1:1 Form,Transparen

The 1:100 design model is created to help vis alise the overall form of the building designe The model helps to give a clearer picture tha drawings and renders as you can explore from any angle. This is made easier by th larger scale as you are able to get camera into the model and see slightly more deta The model can also be used to predict lig and sound paths. Using scale ďŹ gures, a grea er sense of volume and space can bee see


sued. an e it he as ail. ght aten.

and

100 Design Model ncy Light The making of the model also helps to resolve any issues that you may have with the construction as when you go to make it you soon know if there are any structural and or design problems. I feel that this model has helped me to communicate a few key issues to my design. The ďŹ rst is the structural signiďŹ cance of the mullions in the windows. The model also shows the transparency of the long corridor as you can easily see the whole way down. The corridor is also very well lit by natural daylight which I thought might have been a problem.


and

Model 08 1:20 StructuralModel Form,Transparency Light The 1:20 structural model is designed to help understand the structural hierarchy of the construction. When you are forced to actually construct the building you notice places where insulation doesn’t lie, or where sizes are not quite right. This model then allows you to correct these issues in your design and construction drawings. This model helped me to figure out the levels so that the windows sat in flush to the walls and floors. It also helped me to see if there was any cold bridging with the insulation.

The MDF in this model represents the reinforced concrete, the ply represents the concrete render and screed and the grey plastic represents the rigid polyurethane insulation. This model also helps to communicate the structural importance of the reinforced concrete mullions in the windows. This is because in the drawings they can be easily seen as normal window mullions.


Survey: Whatd TheatreNeed:Performers


and

does a Audience 1. From a Performers point of view, what are the most important features a theater should include? 2. From an audience members point of view what do you think are the most important features a theater should include? 3. What do you think makes a Theater adaptable / Suitable for many different types of performance? 4. What is your favorite theater that you have visited and why? Male Actor 1. A stage of adequate size for the performance needs. A decent amount of seats, in which an audience member from any angle or distance can still see the performance. Good acoustics. Easy access for audience. 2. Good seats with a decent view from any angle. Good acoustics. Well lit. Enough space between seats to be comfortable. Easy access both in and out, to toilets etc. Not too hot or cold. 3. A large performance space, with potential for SFX, different backdrops, good acoustics and view for the audience. Backstage access for things to be brought in eg props, equipment, scenery, instruments, materials etc. 4. The Roundhouse in Camden, London. Lots of seats, most with a good view (aside from in some the view is obscured by pillars). Large round stage, very open space. Spaces above the stage for musicians to perform in view. Good acoustics. Adaptable. Saw a multicultural “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” there.

3. Sprung floor/changeable flooring, lots of rigging for different lighting, a high quality pa system, un-fixed seating. 4. Either the roundhouse (perfect size for intimate performance and great atmosphere) or royal Albert hall (know where else like it! Fantastic sound system/ acoustics and the shape) - I think I like round buildings!

Dancer 1. Clean dressing/changing rooms. With appropriate temperature settings. Most dressing rooms smell like guff and when it gets hot... the smell gets worse. 2. Seats with good leg room. 3. A simple layout 4. Brighton Dome. Good location, good size, good times. Dancer 1. for dancers - great atmosphere control - air con heating etc and sprung floor or stage, clean dressing room with shower and toilet facilities - sweaty dancers yum 2. Comfy seats and area to chat in interval 3. A simple layout 4. I’m bit old school I like the theatres that have old feel about them crazy chandeliers, red seats, binoculars etc Audience Member 1. Curtains.. Really big, cool looking curtains. I can imagine it’s easier to hide behind something that looks really nice and grand, rather then something scruffy and claustrophobic.

Female Actor 1. Sufficient space (on stage and off) good technical equipment, plenty of get in/get out/rehearsal time, good facilities (eg dressing rooms), good box office

2. Balcony’s. They just look really cool. Also a damn good PA system.

2. Good box office, helpful staff, clean and plentiful facilities (toilets, bars (multiple and value for money, staff), easily accessible (near train/bus stop, enough car parking)

4. Oxford Apollo, It has a nice arrangement, where the seats raise up from front to the back. It’s cool because the people in front aren’t in the way of the view.

3. A sort of rounded area, semi circle type place for where the audience is.

From Reading the peoples responces to the theatre survey I have concluded that a theatre needs adequate spca backstage for the performers to get ready and to wait. The layout also has to be simple and have adequate ventilation. From of the stage the theatre needs to have a good leg room as noboy likes to watch a performance cramped. The aduitorium also needs to have a degree of adaptability and provide good acousitcs.


and

Acoustics Rob Surface,Volume For a drama theatre we need a reverberation time of around 1 second. To achieve this we need 5 metres cubed of volume per seat in the auditorium space. So for an auditorium of 300 seats I will need 1500 metres cubed of volume. My ďŹ nal auditorium space is 1392 metres cubed. This gives me a total of 4.64 metres cubed per seat. This is close enough to what is needed and the difference is hardly noticeable. If the space is going to be multifunction I can look at adding a variable absorption system to change the reverberation time in the room. This can be achieved with the use of opening panels or screen that can be raided and lowered. Personally I feel there is a draw back to this method as the aesthetics can be compromised. Also these systems can be laborious to change resulting in them not being used, which wastes money and compromises the quality of the performance. If we wanted less reverberation we could use an expensive electronic system. This sounds good in theory but the costs could out weigh the beneďŹ t. For a clarity of sound we need sound reďŹ&#x201A;ections with a path difference of <12 meters for speech and < than 15 meters for music. As drama utilises both of these elements we can settle for a path difference in the middle of the two. For drama the auditorium must adhere to a few important requirements. Firstly the furthest seat must not be more than 20 metres from the centre of the stage. This is so that people can easily read the expressions on the face of the actors. Secondly the actor must have a 135 degree command angle of the stage. Thirdly the stage must have very good sight lines as all the audience members must see the stage clearly. The walls of the auditorium need to be made of a hard heavy material but the back wall needs to be made of an absorbing material to stop the sound of the actor from bouncing back. The seats also need to have the same absorption rates as average people. This is so if there are lots of empty seats the sound quality will be retained. This is also good for sound check. However we do not want to much absorption as this can reduce the reverberation times.


Harris

Material

We also need to control echoes in the auditorium. Concave surfaces are very bad as they focus sound. Parallel surfaces are also dangerous as ďŹ&#x201A;utter echoes can be created. If the walls are parallel a rough surface texture or angled bricks can break up the echoes. Also sound absorption panels can be used. To stop echoes off of the back wall the surface must be covered in a sound absorption material. The glass in the window of the control room must also be angled so that it does not reďŹ&#x201A;ect any sound. All auditorium spaces need sound diffusing elements. However, you need some, but not to much. This is so the sound can be controlled but not killed off. Another factor we need to take into account is noise. In dramas there are often periods of silence. The main sources of noise are: people in the auditorium, automated lighting systems, outside noise (such as trafďŹ c) and cooling systems. To overcome these problems the theatre needs to be well insulated from the outside. As my theatre is made from concrete this should not be a problem. The theatre will not have any automated lighting systems and the cooling ducts will be wide enough to be undetectable. The plant room will be in the basement and heavily insulated so no fans or generators will be heard. The lifts are also a long way from the auditorium so the will not be heard. There also needs to be sound and light lobbies at all routine entrances so that if people leave during a performance or people are waiting outside there are no disturbances.


Lighting, keytoaperformance

Flood,Profile, PC’s, PARcan, Fresnel In theatre there are many different types of lighting. The mains ones are: Floods, Fresnel, Pebble Convex (PC’s), Profiles and PARcan’s.

Flood The flood is the simplest type of lantern consiting of a lamp and a reflector in a box. There is no lens which menas the light is not focused so it ‘floods’ out to light a large area. There are two types of flood. A symmetrical reflector and an Asymmetrical reflector. The difference between the two is that the newer Asymmetrical reflector produces a more even spread of light accross the reflector to provide a better dispersion of light. Fresnel Named after the French designer Augstin-Jean Fresnel the lamp is used as a soft edge spotlight with more control over the beam than the floods. The lamp has an adjustable bulb that can be moved closer or further from the reflector to produce a different sized beam. The beam can then be shapped by the four barndoors that can be attached to the lamp. PC The PC is one of the older styles of lamps and was widley used in the early days of lit theatre. The lamp uses a special modified plano-convex lens with a pebble effect on the plano (flat) side. The pebble effect gives the beam its characterstic soft edge. Again like the Fresnel there is the ability to focus the lens. Profile Profile lanterns produce clearly defined spots of light and are extreemly focussable and versatile. they can have one ore two lenses a lamp and a reflector. They also have shutters and a gate. The name profile comes from their ability to project the ‘profile’ of anything placed in between the gate and the lens. These images may be placed on the shutters or be cut into thin metal placed directly onto the lantern. PARcan This lantern came around in the 1970’s with the rock and roll industry. They are favoured due to the low cost and simpliscity (ease of focus and low weight) of the lantern. The name comes from the PAR (Parabolic Aliminised Reflector) lamp that is situated inside a simple can. The beam is very intence wich makes it good for colour with the use of gels and filters. However the lamp is so intense, strong colours can fade quickly.

FLOOD F

Section:

S

Symbol:

S

Image:

I

Light Pattern:

L


FRESNEL Section:

PCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Section:

PROFILE PARCAN Section:

Section:

Symbol:

Symbol:

Symbol:

Symbol:

Image:

Image:

Image:

Image:

Light Pattern:

Light Pattern:

Light Pattern:

Light Pattern:


and

Material Finish Surface,Texture

The main material used in the construction of the theatre is concrete. I want the theatre to be different in the use of concrete and want it to have a good materialistic quality. The concrete I have chosen is self compacting concrete and the shuttering will be orientated strand board. The resulting surface texture (shown below) will have the negative impression of the OSB. OSB will also be used throughout the theatre to bring out the connection. The flooring in the theatre will be a light to dark grey concrete for all of the walking areas. This is because it ties in with the wall texture and is hard wearing. The seating areas will have the same concrete but will have a black gloss paint finish to make the areas stand out as a different space. The flooring in the auditorium will be coated in a black rubber. This will soften the acous-


Quality tics and provide a darker surface for a performance. The back wall to the auditorium will be covered in an acoustic absorption panel made from a perforated mesh. This will also be used in the ceilings of the auditorium spaces. The walls in the corridor (Such as the box ofďŹ ce) will be painted matt or gloss bold colours so that attention is drawn to them. The stairs can also be painted to make them a feature. Lighting is also important. Because of this a light channel will wrap around the ďŹ&#x201A;oor and ceiling. This will create a feature and links the theme of the classic dressing room mirror lights associated with the theatre. The material ďŹ nish in the toilets will ne a gloss black concrete and glass to add a special quality. The bars will also be coated in coloured gloss glass which is back lit to add emphasis.


Material Finish CONCRETE, The most important element in my building is the ďŹ nish of the concrete. As the ďŹ nish is the board marking of Orientated Strand Board shuttering I need a self compacting concrete to produce the best results. Mega-Flow Omega is an additive that increases the plasticity of concrete so such a degree it is used in lots of self compacting concrete mixes. I also need the concrete to look clean and new for as long as possible. To achieve this I can use photocatalytic additives which use the suns destructive qualities to destroy dirt and residue on the concretes surface. However the titanium dioxide additive makes the concrete pure white. For the theatre in king street i want the concrete to be grey. A possible way around this is to add further colouring additives to achieve the grey colour I want. This method does add more cost and require lots of time and planning so it might not be viable.


AQUAFIN®-1K Aggregate State: Powder Color: Gray or White

! For Concrete, Brick & Masonry ! Polymer modified ! Meets NSF/ANSI Standard 61 ! Gray or White Color standard !Provides a smooth cementitious finish

Product Description

"1K" does not contain any ingredients which could negatively affect reinforcement or concrete. After mixing with water it cures to a hard membrane. In zones posed to cracking or movement AQUAFIN®-2K/M is recommended.

" "

RESULTS

METHOD

Compressive Strength: Gray White Flexural Strength: Gray White Bond/Adhesion: Shrinkage: Shore ‘D’ Hardness: Vapor Permeability: U.S. perms Potable water certification: Microbiological growth: VOC content: Permeability: Sample 1/10" (2.5 mm) thickness

3000 psi (20.7 MPa) at 28d 2400 psi (16.6 MPa) at 28d 440 psi (3.0 MPa) at 28d 400 psi (2.8 MPa) at 28d >220 psi (>1.5 MPa) 0.014% at 28 days D/66/1 8 (untreated control = 10) approval (see www.wqa.org) not supported 0% (0 g/L) No water ingress with 234 ft.=100 psi (0.7 MPa) hydrostatic pressure.

EN 196/1 (ASTM C-109 modif.)

Especially suited for waterproofing of x Masonry + brick substrates x Basements x Potable + open wastewater tanks # Fish ponds # Swimming pools # Elevator pits # Foundations # Retaining walls.

" Resists strong hydrostatic pressure " Applied to the positive or negative

water

pressure side of a structure " Improves watertightness of water tanks " Easy to use - needs only to be mixed with water prior to application x Can be colored " Not a vapor barrier - lets concrete "breathe" " Excellent freeze/thaw resistance " Withstands foot traffic " Applied to moist concrete/substrate x Non flammable - no odor - non toxic.

(ASTM C-321) (ASTM C-596) (ASTM D-2240 : 05) (ASTM E-96) NSF/ANSI-61 DVGW-W270 Germany

8. Application thickness per coat 20 - 50 mils (0.5 - 1.2 mm).

DIN 1048 Positive water pressure tested

2. 3.

4. 5.

7.

sandblasting. Pay particular attention to sufficiently roughen slab substrates. Steel troweled or any smooth surfaces must be mechanically roughened prior to application to provide mechanical bond. Repair static cracks, honeycombs, unsound concrete and weak mortar joints using MORTAR-LN or MORTAR-40. Alternatively seal static and dynamic cracks and joints using AQUAFIN JOINT SEALING TAPE-2000, embedded in AQUAFIN-2K/M. Stop and seal active water leakage with PLUG-IC fast setting water stop. Pre-patch and level uneven substrates, such as brick, natural stone, etc. using MORTAR-LN. Form coves 1.5” x 1.5” (38 x 38 mm) at floor - wall joints using MORTAR-LN. Pre-water the substrate well with clean water. Pay particular attention to substrates with excessive suction such as CMU-block walls and any substrate during hot climatic conditions.

Mixing

(Spray application up to 2.1 gal (7.7 L).) Add the "1K" powder to water and mix for at least 3 minutes with a mechanical mixer to a creamy slurry consistency for brush or broom and to a pumpable consistency for spray applications. Prepare only as much material as can be applied in 60 minutes for gray and 45 minutes for white slurry. Stir the "1K" slurry frequently to maintain workability. Do not add more water. (If workability cannot be restored by stirring, discard.)

Application 1. Do not apply "1K" at temperatures below 40oF (5oC) or to a frozen substrate. 2. At high temperatures, i.e. 86oF (30 oC) and above, protect application from direct sun and wind to prevent premature surface drying and shrinkage cracks. Apply material in 2 (two) coats minimum. 3. Pre-treat (level) uneven substrates and sharp edges such as brick, natural stone, etc. with MORTAR-LN, to prevent minor thickness spots in the “1K”, which can lead to leakage. 4. Protect and seal alkali sensitive metal substrates such as copper, aluminum, galvanized or zinc treated metal first with a primer (i.e. KRYLON Primer, or equal) prior to applying (over-coating) “2K/M”.

Approximate mixing ratio (by volume) is: { 5 parts powder to 2 parts water { or: 50 lb powder to 1.6 - 1.8 gal water (22.7 kg to 6.1 - 6.9 L)

Preparation of Substrate The substrate to be sealed must be firm and relatively even, and its surface fine-pored to provide mechanical bond (surface adhesion), free from voids, gaping cracks, or ridges. Active leakages must be stopped before application of "1K".

1.

Remove all cement laitance, curing agents, surface coatings, loose particles, bitumen, oil, grease, etc. by suitable mechanical means, i.e. waterblasting, wet or dry

7. Quantities are dependent on the amount of protection desired. Apply in two or multiple coats at the rate determined on the Consumption Chart.

EN 196/1 (ASTM C-348 modif.)

All data are averages of several tests under laboratory conditions. In practice, climatic variations such as temperature, humidity and porosity of substrate may affect these values.

6.

Advantages

6. "1K" may be applied with a masonry brush, broom or appropriate compressed-air spray equipment such as Inomat-M8, Quikspray or similar.

Consumption & Yield of 50 lb (22.7 kg) bag Water sealing condition

Total Coating thickness (wet film) mils (mm)

Application rate (dry powder) lb/y2 (kg/m2)

Appx. Yield per bag (m2) ft2

Dampproofing

60

( 1.5 )

4.6

( 2.5 )

98

( 9.1 )

Waterproofing

100

( 2.5 )

7.4

( 4.0 )

60

( 5.6 )

All above values theoretical. Variations may apply due to substrate conditions. Thickness per application or lift, up to 50 mils (1.2 mm).

Data Sheet: check for latest issue (revision) online at www.aquafin.net. It is subject to change without notice.

07 16 13 POLYMER MODIFIED CEMENT WATERPROOFING

"

Setting Time: approx. 2 to 4 hours at 68 F (20 C)

DIV. 07

Horizontal or vertical applications to concrete, masonry, brick and parging (render) by brushing, troweling or spraying. Waterproof coating of new or old structures, above or below grade, positive or negative water pressure side. Base coat for AQUAFIN-2K/M in negative side applications. Sealing static hairline cracks in concrete structures not subject to movement.

o

TEST

Typical Applications "

o

February 2009

AQUAFIN®-1K (in short “1K”) is a cementitious, ready-mixed powder, which is mixed with water to form a dense, waterproof, rigid surface barrier. It consists of Portland cement, well graded quartz sand and polymer enhanced special chemical ingredients.

Bulk Density: 88 lb/ft3 (1.4 kg/L) dry; 116 lb/ft3 (1.85 kg/L) wet mix

AQUAFIN, Inc.

The final main element my concrete needs is to be waterproof. To achieve this AQUAFIN®-1K powder can be mixed with water to give a fully waterproof render. This material does not need reenforcing and can support its self off of the existing concrete that it adheres to. The down side to this is that it is not aesthetically pleasing and does not meet the finish that my building requires. A solution for this is to apply the render onto the concrete surfaces that are not exposed. E.g. under ground and between the structural wall and the exterior cladding. The main benefits of this render is that it can be used below ground level and on either side of the water pressure. The vital application of this render will be on the subterranean walls and to provide a complete waterproof seal on the roof terrace.

5. "1K" must be applied onto a damp, but not wet, substrate (SSD). Free surface water can inhibit bonding and weaken the coating.

Physical & Technical Data

Cementitious Waterproofing & Protective Coating

9. Apply the second coat as soon as the first coat has set, but still "green". (Normally 2 - 4 hours.) If this is not possible then the first layer must be roughened and dampened prior to applying the second coat. 10. "1K" can be left as a brushed finish, or it can be troweled up by a skilled plasterer to a relatively smooth cementitious finish. EXPOSURE*) OF APPLICATION TO: ! rain, vertical surfaces, after approx. 3 hrs ! rain, horizontal surfaces, minimum 6 hrs ! foot traffic after approx. 1 day ! hydrostatic pressure after approx. 7 days ! back filling after approx. 3 days *) at 68O F( 20O C) and 60% humidity.

Curing:

" " "

" "

Protect "1K" from frost, wind, direct sun, rain, etc. Self curing in cool areas. Provide air circulation for 24 hrs. following the “1K” treatment in poorly ventilated areas and deep pits. Stagnant air will prolong the setting time. Keep moist for at least 3 days. During winter time, do not use un-controlled direct air blowing gas or oil heaters to keep air warm.

Clean-up: Clean tools and equipment with water immediately after use. Cured material can only be removed mechanically.

Decoration & Tiling: "1K" is waterproof and vapor permeable. The surface should be cleaned with a stiff, dry brush prior to painting or coating. ! Vapor permeable, alkali resistant paints can be applied after 3 days provided that the AQUAFIN treatment is dry. ! Tile mortars can be applied after 3 days. ! A bonding agent may have to be applied prior to plastering, rendering or tiling.

Maintenance: Mechanically damaged "1K" can be easily repaired by roughening the affected substrate with a wire brush or equal, and after cleaning the substrate by reapplying a new coat "1K".

Packaging: "1K" (gray or white) is supplied in 50 lbs. (22.7 kg) bags or plastic pails.

Storage & Shelf Life: "1K" must be stored in a dry enclosed area off the ground. Shelf life in unopened, undamaged bags is 12 months.

Note: Installer is responsible for proper product application. Site visits by Aquafin personnel or representatives are solely for the purpose of making technical recommensdations, not for providing supervision or quality control.

Safety: Refer to MSDS. This product contains Portland cement and sand (crystalline silica) and is highly alkaline (irritant) in contact with water. Avoid breathing dust. May cause delayed lung injury (silicosis). The use of rubber gloves and goggles during mixing and application is recommended. Avoid contact with skin and eyes. After contact with skin, wash with plenty of water. In case of eye contact, rinse immediately with plenty of water and seek medical advice. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. Proposition 65: This product contains material listed by the state of California as known to cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive harm.

LIMITED WARRANTY: AQUAFIN, INC. warrants its products to be manufactured free of defects and to be consistent with its standard high quality. We will replace or, at our election, refund the purchase price of, any product which is proven to be defective, provided that the product was properly applied. Our product recommendations are based on Industry Standards and testing procedures. We assume no warranties either written, expressed or implied as to any specific methods of application or use of the product. AQUAFIN, INC. MAKES NO WARRANTY AS TO MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND THIS WARRANTY IS IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. AQUAFIN, INC. shall not be liable for damages of any sort including remote or consequential damages, down time, or delay.

AQUAFIN

Building Product Systems

AQUAFIN, Inc.

1.1.1

505 Blue Ball Rd., #160 Elkton, MD 21921 Phone (410) 392 - 2300 Fax (410) 392 - 2324 TOLL FREE 1 - 866 - AQUAFIN (1-866-278-2346)

DISTRIBUTED BY:

E-mail: info@aquafin.net http://www.aquafin.net Check website for latest up-dates

1.1.1

(AQ up-date 02/10/09)

Additives

AQUAFIN®-1K


Material Finish Insulation, Rigid P Rigid Polyurethane Foam has the highest U-value of any material readily available. This thermal insulation is also very strong and have a high load bearing capacity. This makes it especially good in foundations. The high U-values mean that it is possible to have thinner walls and floor slabs to make the buildings design as sleek as possible. Where wall thickness is not an issue the polyurethane can help improve the insulation properties dramatically and make the building very energy efficient. The polyurethane can be used in the cores of entry doors and can help inhibit sound. This will be a good material to use (along will soundproofing membranes) in the doors of the auditorium. Another benefit is that the insulation is moisture resistant and has a low vapour transmission. This makes the insulation good for use underground and in cavities as their is a very low chance of the material degrading. Even more so if proper DPC’s and DPM’s are used. The Rigid insulation is also self supporting and strong enough to have external cladding fixed through it. This means it doesn’t have to be fixed in place, which saves time and money. The qualities of rigid polyurethane foam reduce energy transfer, resist moisture, maintain dimensional stability, remain airtight and often support a structural role. Polyurethane foams also function in temperature extremes, do not deform or distort, and are not subject to damage by the moisture that may result from condensation. It is stable over a wide temperature range (-100°F to +250°F) and can be used as a component in hot- asphalt roofing systems.


Polyurethane The mechanical strength of these foams is remarkable. High compressive and shear strengths allow low-density insulating cores to be faced with relatively thin steel or aluminum, yet span long distances unsupported. For example, the foam can hold together many of the components in a refrigerator or hot-water heater while it continues to perform as thermal insulation. This unique combination of properties allows rigid polyurethane foams to be used in many diverse applications. The environmental benefits of rigid polyurethane foam are significant, and include increased energy efficiency and reductions in energy-efficient construction costs, reduced project weight and savings of all the construction components that the material replaces. Better insulation typically results in lower energy use. In some cases, mechanical heating and cooling equipment can be downsized, further increasing space utilization. Less complicated and lighterweight products are usually produced using fewer manufacturing steps, less energy in manufacturing, and less energy in transportation. By increasing the thickness of a polyurethane foam roof insulation by 1” or more above the required thickness in commercial buildings, it reduces CO2 emissions by thousands of pounds, SO2 emissions by thousands of grams, and NOx emissions by thousands of grams per year and the energy conservation achieved by insulating and sealing the building effectively helps reduce CO2 emissions associated with the burning of fossil fuels.

The Graph above shows the specific R-values for different materials at 50mm. As you can see Polyurethatne is by far the better insulation.

Internal Corner

Rigid polyurethane foams contribute to society and culture by conserving resources. Their ideal properties exceed those of any comparable material in strength-to-weight ratio, U-value and durability, while their versatility enables builders to use them for dozens of different applications, each yielding high performance and exceptional energy efficiency.

External Corner


Lit Concrete, TheNationalTh When night comes around I want my theatre to come alive. By day the concrete on the exterior and interior is a fixed grey. By night all the surfaces can transform into a variety of colours. The fly tower will be the main light source, which will be illuminated different colours depending on the mood or the performance that is happening within. The National Theatre is a good example of this as it shows how well and precisely the concrete surfaces can be lit. The individual elements seem to be almost painted. The fly tower is also a good way to advertise performances by projecting text onto the concrete canvas. For the illusion to work all of the lights need to be hidden from view so that they do not over power your eyes.


colour at night heatre,London I would also like the interior concrete to be lit as this could produce some drama and colour to the inside corridor. All the ceilings will have a light gap around the edge which constantly illuminates and separates the join. Small coloured lights can be ďŹ tted into this light gaps so that when switched on they can illuminate the corridor walls numerous colours. With the internal walls the movement of people can create interesting shadows and almost interact with the light on the walls.


king



street



king



street



k theatre



projecttheatr reet



king



street



king



st ojecttheatre



projectt king



street



king



street



k theatre



projecttheatr reet



king



street



king



str ojecttheatre



projectth


Weymouth Theatre