Issuu on Google+

J AY S C H A I R B AU M Architecture Portfolio 2017


schairjd@mail.uc.edu (937) 902-8465

002


JAY S C HAI RBAU M J AY S C H A I R B AU M

schairjd@mail.uc.edu (937) 902-8465 issuu.com/jayschairbaum

EDUCATION

UNIVERSTIY OF CINCINNATI College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning | DAAP Bachelor of Science in Architecture Class of 2018 GPA: 3.743 Dean’s List | Fall 2014 - Present

August 2014 - Present

August 2010 - May 2014

TIPPECANOE HIGH SCHOOL Tipp City, OH Class of 2014 GPA: 4.011 Graduated with Honors

EXPERIENCE

BOHLIN CYWINSKI JACKSON San Francisco, CA Arcitecture Intern

August 2016 - December 2016

Involved in a variety of projects in schematic design, design development, and construction

documentation phases. Worked with team on a tenant improvement project in San Francisco from

concept design through schematic design proposal, responsible for visualization material. Primarily used Autocad, Rhino, Illustrator, and Photoshop.

January 2016 - April 2016

ADRIAN SMITH + GORDON GILL ARCHITECTURE Chicago, IL Architecture Intern

Worked major competitive project with team of top designers. Participated in initial design concept through submittal of final proposal. Responsibilities included collaboration with consultants and producing final presentation material. Primarily used Rhino, Illustrator, and Photoshop.

Summer 2012 - Summer 2015

LANDSCAPING Tipp City, OH

Worked in both high-end residential and rural environments maintaining lawns and flower beds.

SKILLS

DIGITAL

HONORS

Cincinnatus Founders Scholarship | Wright Patterson Air Force Base Educational Scholarship Reed Gallery “Inside Outside” Show Participant | “Athenaeum” exhibited at DAAP fall show

Rhinoceros AutoCAD Revit InDesign Photoshop Illustrator

Grasshopper V-Ray Maya Microsoft OS Mac OS Microsoft Office

MANUAL

Woodworking Model Making Drafting Sketching Photography

MACHINE

3D Printing Laser Cutting

Weston Gallery “Foundation” Show Participant | National Honors Society

INVOLVEMENT

American Institute of Architecture Students | Member UC Running Club | Member Keep Cincinnati Beautiful Troy Food Pantry

Tippecanoe High School Cross Country | Team Captain, All Ohio

003


PROJECTS

004


01

04

pg. 006

pg. 032

02

05

pg. 020

pg. 038

03

06

pg. 026

pg. 044

B OAT H O U S E

RO W H O U S E

I N S E RT I O N

7 WA L L S

PAV IL IO N

AT H ENA EUM

005


006


01

B OATHO U SE

Summer 2016

The Cincinnati Junior Rowing Club Boat House is a storage and training facility in Newport Kentucky in General James Taylor Park along the banks of the Licking River. An exercise in site analysis and tectonic exploration, the project’s origins were in a study that involved investigation of different methods of making at a variety of building scales. Each of these explored solutions to different challenges that were introduced by the site. The park is at the convergence of the Ohio and Licking Rivers within a very active flood plane. To combat this issue there is an existing levee offset 200’ from the river’s edge, creating challenges with navigating the site. Considering these circumstances, the Boat House is constructed on the waterside of the levee lifted above the 50-year flood plane. Its lower levels act as a plinth housing auxiliary boat storage that is able to be flooded, and is built of a rugged concrete that will patina with the constantly changing water level. The majority of the building’s program then lies within a wood louvered shell that sets above the flood plane. Primary boat storage and field house facilities are wrapped in a framework emblematic of rowing shells. The wood slats respond to solar orientation and views while assuming a form that is diagrammatic of the way that a boat moves through the water.

007


S

Paper Folding This exploration of paper folding revealed the affect of planer material as a building envelope. In this instance, the folding technique is limited to a torqueing motion. Its intricacies introduced an opportunity to study light interaction and expression as a building façade.

Bay model at 1/4”=1’-0” Scale

M

Milling The operation of milling is subtractive by nature and inclined itself to become a study of cutting into the ground. At the medium scale it addresses the issue of navigating the steep terrain that leads to the water. A cut and fill tactic reveals affective results and introduces a strategy of carving pedestrian pathways that tie into the surrounding park. Section model at 1/16”=1’-0” Scale

008


L

Concrete Cast Casting is form driven in its method and became a strategy in developing a massing for the boathouse. Arriving at a process that involved vacuum forming pegboard at different heights, the results were organic forms representative of fluidity. Rationalizing these shapes that had been created from the gridded peg-board became a later strategy in developing the building to fit around the structural bay required to house the rowing shells.

X

Site Study

Massing model at 1/32”=1’-0” Scale

L

The initial study of the site revealed a larger, flat piece of land at a bend in the Licking River that still had views to downtown Cincinnati. A site section showed that at 30’ tall the levee would pose too many issues in site navigation to build on the side away from the water. Also investigated was the changing water levels and the influence they had when building so close to the water. Site model at 1/64”=1’-0” Scale

009


S I TE RE S PO N S E

30’

2016

Average Water Height

At the Ohio River’s average level the Boat House operates at full functionality with both docks in the water and the lower boat storage at full capacity.

45’

2014

Springtime High

At this level the path that runs adjacent to the river becomes a waterfront promenade for pedestrians and cyclists while both docks remain completely functional.

60’

2015

15 Year Flood Plane

Though the lower storage of the boat house is submerged its concrete materiality is resilient against damages and the upper storage is able to house boats that would typically be kept on the lower levels.

80’

1937

100 Year Flood Plane

The stark reality of the site is its susceptibility to flooding. While building beyond the levee provides protection from rising waters it inhibits the fonctionality of the building.

011


012


013


LO W E R LE VE L

L E VE L 2

014

L EVEL 1

R OOF


Entry and Boat Storage

Site Circulation and Louvered Facade 015


016


017


Lower Boat Storage and Water Access 018


West Elevation

Road Access and Boat Storage

Plan View of Site

Louvered Facade and Openings for Views 019


020


02

R O W HO U SE

Spring 2017

The property at 219 Riverside Drive in Covington, KY is a 135’ by 25’ lot that overlooks the Ohio River and downtown Cincinnati. The client is a musician and his family with the program calling for a 3-bedroom house with a space for recording music and giving lessons. Organized on the site, the living space is prioritized to the north with views across the river. The recording studio and garage are pulled away from the busy street with vehicular access via a back alley. These two volumes are expressed in concrete for the private living spaces and wood paneling for the recording studio. Connecting the two is an enclosed, glass walkway and a stepped courtyard ideal for recitals and other events. The site is within the Ohio River flood plane and the home’s main living floors are lifted above the 65’ major flood stage. With prime views and immediate accessibility to the city, the house challenges some of the typical difficulties in the row house typology. While bordered to the east by an existing town house, to the west is a pedestrian alley and a 6-story multifamily apartment complex. Therefore, along the west façade are slit windows that allow light into the living spaces but prevents a violation of privacy. Circulation is along the east side of the house under a light well that illuminates a hallway on each level.

021


Section Along Circulation Corridor

Front Terracing and View Framing

West Elevation

022

West Facing Slit Windows

Courtyard and Atrium


R O O FTO P

L EV EL 3

L EV EL 2

L EV EL 1

BA SEMENT

023


024


025


026


03

IN SE RTIO N

Spring 2015

This project presented the challenge of designing within the context of an existing structure. Through documentation of the building, a diagrammatical analysis was conducted. The study included a look into the building’s site, circulation, light, massing, approach, threshold, and promenade. Dieterle Vocal Arts Center is a traditional building built in-line with the adjacent stadium. It follows a ravine that runs 24.5º east of north rather than the orthogonal grid of the city and surrounding campus. The position of the building at a skewed angle is a peculiarity and the basis on which my insertion was designed. I sought to realign Dieterle Vocal Arts Center with the city grid, while addressing the voided interior of the space. The result was a split in the building at 24.5º that twisted back into the axis of the building. Juxtaposition to the existing structure, it manipulated light entering the space as well as the circulation of people through the space. The vertical fins interact with a pair of existing benches creating nooks that become intimate, private spaces of study. Both an interior and exterior manipulation of the building, the insertion demonstrates a visual interruption that modifies an existing building.

027


LE V E L 1

LO W ER LE VE L

Site Plan

WEST S ECTI ON SO U T H S E CTI O N


DO C U M ENTATIO N + P R O C E SS

1. EXTERNAL MASSING Dieterle Vocal Arts Center has a traditional exterior massing scheme with a gabled roofline.

2. INTERUPTION AT 24.5º The slice interrupts the building at 24.5º following an east west axis that aligns with the surrounding streets.

3. SPLIT EXTERNAL MASSING Splitting the building’s external massing alters its traditional language and creates an interactive juxtapostion.

4. SPLIT INTERNAL MASSING Like the exterior, the interior volume is introduced to a new element.

5. TWIST TO REALIGN DATUM Twisting the insertion creates a direct relation between the axis of the city and the axis of the building.


Light Interaction

Plan of Inserted Element

Light and Shadow

Elevation of Inserted Element

030


Entry Looking to the East

031


032


04

7 WA LLS

Fall 2015

Addressing current voids that exist in urban fabric, this project involved a

hypothetical site in downtown Cincinnati that was 50’ in width 50’ in height, and 100’ in depth. Along the longer sides of the site are existing structures that fill a similar volume. To the front is a busy street and to the rear is a pedestrian exclusive park. The program of the project was to have four distinct spaces:

entry, aggregation, study, and overlook. Defining these spaces were seven

structural elements or walls each serving a different purpose: light, information, demarcation, storage, occupation, energy, and boundary. When developing

a form for the project, I looked to the context of Cincinnati and developed a shape based on the city’s topography. Letting the form greatly influence the circulation and sequence of the space, I ensured that each of the seven elements

was expressed and served its designated purpose. The result of such a process

produced a structure that is clearly presented in plan and elevation and is able to perform a variety of tasks.

033


LIGHT

Wrapping the exterior of the building, this wall interacts with light by diffusing it through a series of clerestory windows.

I N F O R M AT I O N

The tallest element in the structure informs the function of the space and becomes the buildings circulation core.

D E M A R C AT I O N

Acting as a subtle barrier, this piece denotes a transition between inside and outside spaces.

STORAGE

This wall carries most of the structural weight of the building and represents a contrasting datum.

O C C U PAT I O N

As this wall envelopes the three levels of the space it defines occupupied regions in which the program of the space can be fulfilled.

E N E R GY

The dynamic nature of this wall parallels the building reaching from the street to the park.

BOUNDARY

This wall, made permeable by is apertures, marks the street edge and the main entry into the building.

034


035


Roof Condition

Terracing Balconies

036


Side Elevation

Street Facing Elevation

Park Faceing Elevation 037


038


05

PAVILIO N

Spring 2015

The Pavilion was an exercise in building at the human scale. In teams of six, students were asked to design and build a structure that occupied a 4’ x 4’ x 8’ space and addressed human proportion. Final structures were constructed from pine and MDF and occupied Schneider Quadrangle in a grid formation for a little over a week. As the team’s lead designer I was responsible for developing an aesthetically interesting design that addressed the project’s parameters and would be able to be constructed with the given materials. Our group experimented with materiality and found that the MDF, a perceivably dense material, could be twisted 45º across the 8’ height of the Pavilion by anchoring it in angled notches. This directed us toward creating a space that could be occupied and experienced from within while admired equally from its exterior. We also ensured that elements directly applicable to users like the benches and the entryway were built tectonically and to the proper scale. The final construction succeeded in its manipulation of light, materiality and axis while exemplifying an interaction between people and the built environment.

039


S ITE N

Schneider Quadrangle 040


Iteration 1

041

Iteration 2

Iteration 3

PRO C ES S

041


CON ST R U CT I ON

E X PER I ENCE

042


Completed Pavilion

Interior

Occupied Space

The pavilion remained on Schneider Quad for a week durring the spring semester. As the student body grew used to the cluster of foreign objects on campus they began to use them as we had envisioned. In their most ideal state, students would relax and study in the temporary structures.

043


044


06

ATHE N A E U M

Fall 2015

Given a site in Cincinnati’s Over the Rhine, this project’s objective was to construct a cultural center that served to activate the local community. The site in question was 80’ x 120’ and near the intersection of Court and Race Street. The building’s dense program requirements which included two galleries, a library, an auditorium, and office work space led to creative studies in massing and facade expression. Beginning with an iterative massing study exploring the program requirements and pedestrian interaction, I soon arrived at a form derived from immediate site conditions. The building’s undulalating shape adjusts to align with neighboring rooflines while its enterance threshold responds to pedestrian and vehicular activity. This undulation is a datum that moves linearly through the building, becoming its ultimate expression. It also denotes change in the building’s different functional spaces, defining public and private realms while maintaining a consistant language. The only interuption of these slices occurs at points that are intended to capture vistas or to mark entry portals into the building. Ultimately, the building serves the function of the community and seeks engagement with its surroundings.

045


Cincinnati

Site model looking north

046

Site model looking west


Iteration 1

Iteration 2

Iteration 3

Iteration 4

SI T E

A R R AY

E XTR U D E

LI F T

Near the intersection of Court and Race Street

Array to fill site area

Extrude to achieve program area

Lift in response to adjacent building

CA RV E

R E SPO N D

THR E S HO LD

VI STA

Carve to align with adjacent structures

Respond to nearby street corner

Create entry thresholds

Frame prominant vistas from the site 047


048


LO W E R LE V E L 0’

20’

L EVEL 3 0’

L EVEL 4

LE V E L 1 0’

20’

0’

LE V E L 2 0’

20’

20’

20’

L EVEL 5 0’

20’

049


Gallery 050

Library and Atrium


Inersection of Court and Race Street

051


Vertical Circulation

Entry from the Back 052


Section Through Atrium

Ceramonial Stair and Atrium

Front Elevation 053


schairjd@mail.uc.edu (937) 902-8465


Architecture Portfolio