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THAT NOTED CORYPHAEUS OF WEDDINGS

Cover Brides

THE WEDDING MENU OF CHRISTINE NUNAG

[CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT]

CAMILLE NARCISO GINA JOY HOWELL VANESSA SAGMIT

PICTURE PERFECT FROM PAOLO FELICIANO

MARYLAINE MALLARI

COURTSHIP RITUALS: COURT & SPARK

CRYSTAL JOICE HERRERA

BEYOND THE SACRAMENT

Get Wed in Pampanga

PRE-NUPTIAL AGREEMENTS: I DO OR I DON’T

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thumb mb nails CE JANICENTERFOLD: MANAL ILI

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The Wedding di M Menu off Christine Nunag

2 GLOBAL GATEWAY LOGISTICS CITY 4 SAN MIGUEL BEER 6 LEWIS GRAND HOTEL 7 ISLAND GRILL 8 PAGCOR CASINO FILIPINO 9 HIGH SOCIETY 12 NEST & NOBLES 13 EVENTOLOGY: AN ADWORKS EVENTS GROUP 29 MASAYA PAMPANGA 30 YES TO MABALACAT CITY 31 ANGELES CITY OF ENTERTAINMENT 32 MONTEVISTA VILLAS 33 PHILLIES SPORTS GRILL & BAR 33 BLACK ANGUS STEAK & RIB HOUSE 39 KANDI REALTY 40 WILD ORCHID GROUP T 40 ELLA BEAUTY SALON & BODY MASSAGE 41 PASHA GROUP ‘FIVE STAR ENTERTAINMENT’ 41 THE FABULOUS CHAMPAGNE GROUP 43 GOLDEN NILE NIGHTCLUB 44 CASINO WIDUS & HOTEL VIDA 47 NOUVEAU RESIDENCES & FIESTA COMMUNITIES 48 TOURISM INFRASTRUCTURE

Picture Perfect P f from Paolo Feliciano

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COVER BRIDES: BRIDES Vanessa, Gina, Camille, Marylaine and Crystal

Courtship hi Rituals: Ri l Court & Spark

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Kasal Traditions: Beyond the Sacrament

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Pre-nuptial P re nupti tiall Agreements: I do or I don’t

& ENTERPRISE ZONE AUTHORITY

PAULOFELICIANO WEBMASTER

BORJMENESES

PHOTO & GRAPHICS EDITOR

JAFPUNZALAN

CREATIVE DIRECTOR & EDITOR

PETERALAGOS

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

JEANMCTAVISH-MANDAP

MARKETING DIRECTOR

BINGSANGIL PRESIDENT & CEO

ALEXCAUGUIRAN

CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD

Published by PAMP PEP with business address at 372 McArthur Highway, Barangay Salapungan, Angeles City. For editorial and advertising concerns, please call or send SMS to 0917.510.6976 (BING) and 0920.951.2050 (JEAN). ©2011PAMPPEP. All rights reserved.

www.pampangapep.com

FALLING IN LOVE— and eventually, tying the knot— following a night of debauchery just like Cameron Diaz and Ashton Kutcher’s whirlwind romance in the 2008 film “What Happens in Vegas” is, most assuredly, not your typical bride’s wedding fantasy. Likewise, any groom wouldn’t want to end up like Stu Price, the character played by American actor Ed Helms in the 2009 box office hit “The Hangover,” who, after a stag party gone wild, woke up in Vegas with a missing front tooth and married to single mom who happens to be gorgeous, dropdead stripper. I daresay forget Las Vegas! And get married in Pampanga. In this month’s issue, Pampanga PEP gives our dear readers, most particularly soon-tobe brides and grooms, a walkthrough of the many ways to get married in this romantic province. Let’s start off with Alex Castro’s wedding traditions and courtship rituals of the “notso-distant past” and see whether his first person account of “making ligaw” still applies in the age of SMS and the Internet. In case the spirits of future brides and grooms are dampened by the rigors and stress of wedding preparations, worry not because I’m happy to tell you the story of “That noted coryphaeus of weddings,” Voltaire Zalamea, who is the best person to consult if and when the word “wedding” crops up. Our very own Paolo Feliciano, is likewise, glad to share his tips on the best locations to hold “pre-nup” photo shoots and where to find the most romantic and memorable churches to get married in Pampanga. Christine Nunag, on the other hand, also shares her insights on what types of food to serve guests at the reception with her scrumptious wedding menu. Speaking of pre-nups, Pampanga PEP’s resident lawyer, Nino Angeles, shares his views on the legalities one should be comprehensively knowledgeable with when “tying” (or “untying”) the knot. Better safe than sorry or to put it in another way, it’s our manner of retelling the moral of one of Aesop’s fables: “look before you leap.” Deinz Serrano, meanwhile, gets a first-hand beauty tutorial from famed Kapampangan make-up artists Poklong Guina, Francois Roxas, Dey Caisip, Dan Jose, and Bok Cayanan. Also, learn to doll-up on your most memorable day courtesy of fashion gurus Jemi Nicdao, Frederick Policarpio, and Stephen Victoriano. On the much lighter side of things, we get slightly naughty but downright straightforward with our models— Crystal Joice Herrera, Gina Joy Howell, Camille Narcisso, Marylaine Mallari, Vanessa Sagmit, and Janice Manalili— on love, marriage, virginity and everything in between. — PETER C. ALAGOS

editor’s note

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V l i Zalamea: Voltaire Z l That noted coryphaeus of weddings

Forget Vegas


PROFILE WORDS: PETER C. ALAGOS PHOTOGRAPHY: BORJ MENESES

SO SAYS WIKIPEDIA: “In Attic drama, the

coryphaeus was the leader of the chorus. Hence, the term (sometimes in an Anglicized form ‘coryphe’) is used for the chief or leader of any company or movement.” And that was what I found out while skimming several online dictionaries as I desperately tried to find something that would best describe Voltaire Zalamea, who, for a longtime, has become a household name when the word “wedding” pops up.

VOLTAIRE ZALAMEA

One might ask why the coryphaeus? As it is defined, “The coryphaeus spoke for all the rest…The term has passed into a general name for the chief or principal of any company, corporation, sect, opinion, etc.” And so as far as weddings are concerned Voltaire Zalamea “spoke for all the rest.” Voltaire’s testament to this description is best exemplified in his most recent project— “Wedding Destination: Pampanga.” Held from July 8 to 10 at the Event Centre of SM City Clark in Angeles City, “Wedding Destination: Pampanga” is this year’s largest gathering of wedding suppliers in one grand affair. “This event is a product of the close friendships I have forged with my suppliers. But most importantly, I have organized this annual event because of my concern for the wedding industry in Pampanga and the Central Luzon region,” Voltaire said, adding that the event is running on its third year. According to Voltaire, the event is his way of pushing all stakeholders in the wedding industry “to the forefront of public perception.” It also gives would-be couples a wide variety of choices as to which supplier could help make this once in a

That noted coryphaeus of weddings

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PROFILE lifetime event an unforgettable moment in their lives. “I love all my suppliers, which is why I have organized Wedding Destinations to give them the chance to showcase their expertise to the consuming public.” HUMBLE BEGINNINGS

Voltaire’s love affair with the arts was what catapulted him to the success he has earned today. At the San Beda College productions, Voltaire was active in dance and theater. It was in one of these productions that he was discovered by choreographer Ogee Atos, who invited Voltaire to be part of his stable of assistant fashion directors. Voltaire’s training with Ogee soon paid off after years of working with Metro Manila’s fashion icons and artists. In 1999, Voltaire put his skills to the test and organized Manhunt International— a first in Pampanga. The success of Manhunt International was followed by another event—“Tela’t Malan,” which gathered the province’s top Kapampangan fashion designers. Voltaire’s follow-up for Tela’t Malan was the Mutya Ning Angeles 1999, another resounding feat, which he launched with the help of top Kapampangan stylist Francois Roxas. Also in 1999, Voltaire shared his expertise in the field of theater by helping the Angeles City Government produce the reenactment of the declaration of Philippine independence at the old Pamintuan Mansion, which now houses the Central Bank. The government was again thankful to

Voltaire when he hosted the countdown for the New Millennium, a national and simultaneous event launched by the Angeles City Tourism Office. Voltaire took a respite from the hustle and bustle of events management to work for a pharmaceutical company for several years. But his calling was different. In 2003, Voltaire established “Events and Concepts by Voltaire Zalamea”— a collaborative stint with Bernard Dalusung of Country Blossoms and image stylist Francois Roxas touted as the only member of the PAWP in Central Luzon. The rest, as they say, is history. Among the successful events organized by Voltaire by way of his new company were Eat Bulaga’s Silver Anniversary Special at the Expo Pilipino, which won a silver award at an international entertainment competition; and the “Tigtigan Terakan Keng Dalan” and even the Sisig Festival in Angeles City. But it is in weddings, debuts, and events management where Voltaire truly shines. He says that perhaps it is because he puts a lot of research and studies each event he organizes. “The hard work I pour in every event I’m involved with is my way of anticipating the client’s needs and making their dreams come true,” he said. What started as a plain and simple gig for his classmates and friends is now a radiant and successful business venture that has developed a strong following which stretches from as far as North America, Dubai, Singapore, and the United Kingdom. In the local scene, Events and Concepts by Voltaire Zalamea has also gone as far as down south in Davao and up north in Cabanatuan City. PEP

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A LO N G C L A R O . M . R E C TO H I G H W AY ( N E A R F O N TA N A R E S O R T ), C L A R K F R E E P O R T Z O N E , PA M PA N G A , P H I L I P P I N E S

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FEATURE

The Wedding Menu How to make the best out of your life’s most romantic meal. WORDS: CHRISTINE NUNAG | PHOTOGRAPHY: PAOLO FELICIANO

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N ANY FILIPINO occasion, food is always the main event. At Pinoy weddings, guest attendance is visibly higher at the dining reception than at the church ceremony. When the meal is over, or just when the host concludes the program and announces the dance party, majority of the guests start leaving. Meanwhile, in our land of picky eaters, Kapampangans will remember your life’s most important event by how great (or bad) the food was. So it’s just as important to keep your guests as happy and satisfied. When planning your wedding menu, consider these key factors:

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Christine Nunag CHRISTINE NUNAG is a Doreen Fernandez Food Writing Awardee whose works have appeared in local and international publications. A BS Tourism graduate of UP Diliman, this former fivestar hotel frontliner provides food-focused custom services from copywriting, workshops, gastronomic tour events, to culinary travel planning. Visit her websites at 100poundfoodie.com and christinenunag.com. (Author’s photo by Neal Oshima.)

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1. BUDGET The variety and breadth of menu choices will depend on how much you can afford vis-a-vis how many guests you plan to invite at the reception. Your budget will also determine if you should get a professional caterer, or opt for family or friends to cook for you. 2. VENUE If you fancy a Hawaiian luau or barbecue that smokes on the spot, a garden setting or a similar open air venue is best. A royal wedding menu will require a matching venue, a private enclosed area that will keep you safe from sudden rains. 3. THEME Assuming you are hiring a professional caterer, sticking to a concept will make it easy for you and your food service provider to create an appropriate menu. Will it be modern Kapampangan, with a barrio fiesta theme complete with banderitas and a marching band? I have heard of a wealthy Malaysian couple in Kuala Lumpur who went all out with a three-day reception where a buffet lunch international stalls concept fed over 700 guests on the first day. 4. TIME Dinner or lunch? What time is the wedding reception? When to serve food? I want my guests to enjoy my wedding and not go hungry. A food blogger once wrote me to share his wedding horror story. He, his wife who was nursing an ulcer, together with many other guests were not served dinner until the program was over. After 2-3 hours, the buffet food had turned cold, some guests nearly passed out and a number took the French leave to grab a meal at the nearest fastfood restaurant. I found out that the wedding couple wanted to have all the pictures taken before the buffet lines started. There are two solutions to this case: One is a sit-down dinner. Guests get to eat while


FEATURE you get to go around having your pictures taken from one table to the next. Another option is to serve cocktails. Instead of being presented buffet style, have servers pass around these light, pre-dinner bites so that guests do not hoard and overeat, losing their appetite for the dinner ahead. Chef Froilan Cruz cites an example: “A wedding mass that starts at 6:00 p.m. normally ends at 7:00 p.m., plus a photo session of 30 minutes and in some cases travel time of 20-30 minutes. By the time the wedding reception starts, it is 8:00-8:30 p.m. Guests would be so hungry by then especially ladies who had salon appointments in the afternoon. So if a program starts before dinner, dinner would be around 8:309:00 p.m.” 5. SERVICE Sit down or buffet? Personally I prefer to have my guests served at the tables like VIP’s and not have to walk and wait in line at the buffet table. I have also observed that although Filipinos love to eat, a lot seem embarrassed to be seen going back for second helpings. 6. MENU Your wedding menu reflects your personal taste as a couple. But keep in mind what also suits your guests. Are there vegetarians or vegans? Non-pork eating Muslim guests? Some foreign entourage? Most kids will enjoy friendly food more than unfamiliar gourmet entrees. Maximize your guest experience with balanced flavors and choices, e.g. a clear soup to complement a rich main dish will avoid umay, or overwhelming your guests’ sense of taste. 7. BEVERAGE If you wish to serve wine, make sure your choices complement your menu. Ask your caterer about corkage. Non-alcoholic beverage such as iced tea is liked by young and old alike. 8. PARTY FOOD My own wedding will highlight two things: Delicious food and lots of dancing and singing! If you plan to party like there’s no tomorrow, it’s a good idea to have an adequate supply of beverage and light snacks for your guests. PEP

The Menu Inspired by Kapampangan chefs Froilan Cruz and Howard Dizon and Swiss-Italian chef Chris Locher. COCKTAILS

• Salmon panizza rollettes • Tokwa’t baboy on stick • Mushroom, shrimp, cheese, spinach vol au vent • Lumpiang okoy kapaya in balsamichoney vinaigrette • Iced tea and wine DINNER [STARTERS] • Mixed green salad with assorted condiments and dressing • Pumpkin bisque or Bulalo soup DINNER [MAIN]

Below are a few more tips

on how to make the most out of your life’s most romantic meal, plus a sample of what my own wedding menu might look like ;) MAKE IT SPECIAL

“Do not be limited with the menu that is offered in a package. As client, a specialized menu can be done specifically for you. Example: A non-Filipino client wanted an all-Spanish menu with cochinillo or lechon de leche per table. It was not part of any of our packages but since the client wanted it and we knew could do it, we did it for them.” —FROILAN CRUZ, Chef de Cuisine of Grand Palazzo Royale

SWITCH MENU ITEMS

“Ask your caterer if you could take a couple of items from another menu package that is within your budget range. Service providers usually allow menu switching (e.g. replace a chicken dish with another chicken dish) provided they are on the same package level or package cost and the same product.” —LYN CHING BALDWIN, on her sit down wedding dinner at Makati Shangri-la Hotel

• Ox tongue asado with castanas • Hickory barbecue ribs • Pan roasted fish with supreme sauce a la Veronique • Tofu with wild mushrooms and vegetables in Mongolian sauce • Lechon kawali • Sisig Kapampangan • Kimchi • Atsara • Iced tea and wine DESSERT

• Salted chocolate caramel cake • Apple bread pudding with Jack Daniels sauce • Turon with pastillas fondue • Filipino medium roast Arabica coffee or Japanese green tea PARTY SNACK

BE GENUINELY NICE!

Generally, requests which do not really cost much such as corkage items can be waived. Who knows you might even get discounts on extended hours and special requests, or receive extra services as well as tips on where to get the most discounts on the best wedding suppliers. Kindness always goes a long way! —CHRISTINE NUNAG

• Wedding cake (whose icing we all can eat e.g. Brazo de Mercedes Cheesecake) • Sandwiches (or fresh batch from cocktails) • Peanuts and chips • Iced tea, iced water and wines SEPTEMBER2011|PAMPANGAPEP|11


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COVER BRIDES CAMILLENARCISO20

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Beginner’s luck

O YOU BELIEVE in beginner’s luck? Well, we do. So far, all of the gorgeous sirens we’ve featured here in PAMPANGA PEP have gotten positive boosts to their respective modeling careers simply for gracing our cover pages. Truth to tell, and modesty aside, we feel such serendipitous turn in their careers will similarly befall Camille’s. Literally pulled out of her comfort zone, Camille was the group’s novice during our grand photoshoot. And since it was her first time to work with other models, Camille said the experience was nerve-wracking and flattering at the same time. Although her beauty and looks were previously the only things she needed to bag the crown in her school beauty pageant, Camille said she would feel more confident in pursuing a modeling career if she could get further training in order to fit the needs of industry.

“Siguro ‘pag na-train na ako sa pag-project, pagsmile, at sa posture, saka ko na ipo-pursue ang modeling.” So what’s keeping her busy these days? Camille is setting her sights on passing the nursing board examinations this coming December. ON SEX AND MARRIAGE

It seems Camille’s views on marriage tend to be a little old fashioned (which is good, actually). She believes in longer pre-marital relationships before couples decide to take the plunge…err, exchange vows. “In order for a marriage to work dapat tumagal muna ng years yung relationship bago magpakasal,” she says. If there’s anything that makes Camille proud and happy it is being able to keep her promise to her mom: “NBBG, no boyfriend before graduation.” So wait in line boys. Wait in line. PEP

ABOUTFRANCOISROXAS

Crossover artist T

HIRTY SOMETHING FRANCOIS Roxas is not your typical, traditional makeup artist. His art is evolving. He is self-taught, hence, an adventurous personality that is reflected in his art. When working on the face of a human canvass, he does not leave any room for error— only perfection. Francois’ road to perfection started in 1991 and involved a lot of reading and the collection of books, magazines, and similar literature on cosmetics and the art of makeup. According to him, his style in applying makeup was influenced mainly by international makeup artists— the likes of Kevin Aucoin, Pat McGrath and Robert Jones. “Before applying a new style of makeup on a client, I apply it on myself first and then onto a model to see how it looks,” says Francois, describing how meticulous he is with his work. Francois describes himself as an adventurous artist when it comes to makeup. “There are no rules for me. Every face is unique which is why I become creative.” Currently, Francois is the third person in Pampanga to make a crossover from the traditional way of putting makeup to the unconventional, yet, sophisticated approach to enhancing beauty— the art and science of airbrush makeup. For the past two years, Francois has been using the airbrush to doll-up his clients. But unlike before, Francois has taken up formal schooling to learn how to apply makeup using unconventional tools like the airbrush. According to Francois, his bachelor’s degree in Psychology has nothing to do with his current profession. But it somewhat comes in handy when he interviews a client before deciding which makeup suits her. “I find out first what kind of personality she has; what are her likes and dislikes.” “Profiling helps me create a distinct style for my clients. To achieve that distinct quality that is descriptive of my work, I combine 50 percent of my art with 50% of the client’s personality,” Francois explained further. Francois’ trademark in the cosmetics scene is synonymous to beautiful eyes. “My forte is doing beautiful eyes. I am able to enhance the bride’s eyes and make them more attractive.” He adds: “I would ask my clients ‘Why me?’ and they would tell me that when they checked my portfolio and profile they liked what I had accomplished with the bride’s eyes.” In 2004, Francois Roxas decided to formally pursue a career in cosmetics. He owns a makeup studio located inside The Enclave along the Circumferential Road near the Clark Freeport. PEP 14|PAMPANGAPEP|SEPTEMBER2011


COVER BRIDES

WORDS: PETER ALAGOS & DEINZ SERRANO PHOTOGRAPHY: BORJ MENESES STYLE & MAKE-UP: FRANCOIS ROXAS BRIDAL GOWN: GLENN CANLAS BAGS: SIEGFRIED CATALAN OF REDVOLTZ BY SSC DESIGNS BOUQUETS: PANCHO PANTIG OF PLUMERIA SEPTEMBER2011|PAMPANGAPEP|15


COVER BRIDES

WORDS: PETER ALAGOS & DEINZ SERRANO PHOTOGRAPHY: BORJ MENESES STYLE & MAKE-UP: POKLONG GUINA BRIDAL GOWN: FREDERICK POLICARPIO BAGS: SIEGFRIED CATALAN OF REDVOLTZ BY SSC DESIGNS BOUQUETS: PANCHO PANTIG OF PLUMERIA 16|PAMPANGAPEP|SEPTEMBER2011


COVER BRIDES

GINAJOYHOWELL19

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The reluctant beauty

HE’S A TOWERING beauty who has modeled for Pampanga’s top designers and makeup artists while at the same time spikes, blocks, and scores in her school’s volleyball varsity team. But make no mistake in asking what Gina plans to do after graduating from college. Definitely there are no beauty pageants to join or any sports dream to pursue. Gina sheepishly tells (a flabbergasted) Pampanga PEP that she (or at least her personality) isn’t cut out for beauty pageants. Imagine at 5’9” she could stand out from among the other contestants on stage, not to mention her classic Filipina-Spanish beauty would easily win the hearts of the judges. But Gina stresses that she’s a shy person: “I don’t think I’m made for it [because] I’m shy.” Bashful and timid is how she sees herself, which is why she would rather trade places with a flight attendant. Instead of feeling the pressure of those million dollar questions thrown at her

during a pageant, Gina would rather answer with confidence any query from airline passengers, which she dreams of doing after earning her college degree. ON SEX AND MARRIAGE

Though Gina is reluctant to strut across the narrow catwalk or take glamorous strides on stage, she is more than willing to walk down the aisle donning her well-deserved white wedding gown. “I think sex after marriage is better, so you deserve to wear the white gown.” Again, make no mistake in thinking that she could be easily pressured to having sex with her boyfriend. Gina says she’d drop the guy like a hot potato no matter how much she loves him. “Hindi naman pwedeng ako lang ang nagmamahal sa kanya. Dapat mas malaki yung pagmamahal niya sa akin.” PEP

ABOUTPOKLONGGUINA

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Ballet of brushes

OKLONG GUINA IS one of Pampanga’s most sought after makeup artists. But like many of those who have excelled in their chosen fields, Poklong had his share of humble beginnings. As an A.B. Mass Communications student, his first “clients” were a handful of close friends and classmates, who requested his expertise during special occasions like debuts and weddings. “Eventually,” Poklong narrates, “these friends of mine, among them model Marilen Maristela and Christy Anne De Jesus, became my brides. It was a privilege to be part of one of the most important days of their lives by doing their makeup during their respective weddings.” Perhaps many people don’t know that Poklong was actually ‘forced’ to learn how to apply makeup being a member of his school’s performing arts group in his college days. “I was forced to do makeup because I was a performer back in the early 1990s,” says Poklong. “From there I experimented on the more adventurous types of makeup because of the roles I played during my dance performances,” he added. But of course the brides whose faces went under Poklong’s brushes did not walk the aisle looking like and what they say about you and the style you use one of the characters he played during dance performances or when applying makeup.” something that had come out of a 1950s B-Movie. While the kind of makeup would also depend on They were, of course, stunning, radiant, and beautiful as the motif of the wedding, Poklong would usually a bride should be on her wedding day— trademark that has recommend something fresh to the bride regardless made Poklong a cut above the rest. of the motif “because, in the first place, the weather “The most common compliment I get from my brides or [in the Philippines] is usually warm.” their family and friends is that malinis daw ako magtrabaho. “But of course, I would still follow what the bride So that’s how I describe my art and its effect on my clients— wants. I am only there to recommend. However, if clean, fresh, and radiant.” I believe that the makeup style she wants doesn’t “What is also important in my job is that I always make sure suit her, I would recommend something else so we that my client looks clean, fresh, and beautiful rather than an could meet halfway.” object of ridicule during one of the most important occasions Poklong Guina is a freelance makeup artist and in her life.” a representative of Toni&Guy in Manila. He can be Asked how he sets himself apart from other MUAs, Poklong reached at +63906-292-9238; +6345-887-3896; or says “All makeup artists have their own techniques but you email poklong.guina@gmail.com PEP become distinct from the rest of them through your customers SEPTEMBER2011|PAMPANGAPEP|17


COVER BRIDES VANESSASAGMIT20

Nothing but the truth U

NDER PAIN OF being cited in contempt of the court of public opinion, we swear to tell the truth and nothing but the truth. And that truth is: Vanessa will be one of the country’s prettiest lawyers in the not so distant future. Vanessa is so eye-catching you could just imagine how difficult it would be taking the stand as the accused while this former beauty titlist does a cross examination. The verdict wouldn’t be in doubt? Guilty as charged! Well, guilty in the sense that no man, accused or not, would find it hard to fall in love with her. And that is a fact, your honor. Another fact is that Vanessa is the current Ms. University in her school. In her coastal hometown of Macabebe, Vanessa followed the footsteps of her mom, who was the town’s beauty queen during her time. Though she has joined numerous beauty pageants, this was her first photoshoot for a magazine. ON SEX AND MARRIAGE

“Marriage is a blessing from God. Without it, hindi mo matatanggap yung gift ni God sa inyo. And the most precious gift na mabibigay mo sa future husband mo is yung purity mo.” PEP

ABOUTBOKCAYANAN

International class B

OK CAYANAN WAS based in Los Angeles, California (starting sometime in 1983) and worked as a foreclosure officer. But the lifestyle of his friends, most of whom, worked for beauty salons in the United States, convinced him to make a drastic change in career. “I loved and longed for the lifestyle of my friends. They are always relaxed when they worked in the salons. And they travel a lot, too. I love meeting a lot of people, which is why this profession suits me well,” reveals Bok. Of all the makeup artists featured in this issue, only Bok owns a degree in cosmetology, which he completed in 1995 also in Los Angeles. Two years ago, Bok earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing just in case he needed a “fallback.” Bok is an award-winning artist. In 2001, he was given the “master award” for winning both the classic and fantasy categories in the International Cosmetology Exposition held in Los Angeles. In 1997, Bok gave his kababayans a taste his award-winning skills when he established Coiffeur Hair Design. Coiffeur, which is French for male hair stylist, showcases a line of hair and makeup staff that carries Bok’s professional standards. “What I could guarantee to my clients is that my staff are all professional people. And also, all of the products I use in my salon are imported from the United States,” Bok stressed. Bok added that he attends yearly hair and makeup conventions to update his skills. “Studying is important to me so I won’t be left out,” he said. For the Filipina bride, Bok recommends only a light application of makeup. “It is not ideal to put heavy makeup because of the weather. So the role of the makeup artist is only to enhance the beauty of the bride.” Bok Cayanan owns Coiffeur Hair Design along MacArthur Highway in front of Marisol Subdivision 3rd Gate, Barangay Ninoy Aquino, Angeles City. PEP

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COVER BRIDES

WORDS: PETER ALAGOS & DEINZ SERRANO PHOTOGRAPHY: BORJ MENESES STYLE & MAKE-UP: BOK CAYANAN BRIDAL GOWN: FREDERICK POLICARPIO BAGS: SIEGFRIED CATALAN OF REDVOLTZ BY SSC DESIGNS BOUQUETS: PANCHO PANTIG OF PLUMERIA

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COVER BRIDES

WORDS: PETER ALAGOS & DEINZ SERRANO PHOTOGRAPHY: BORJ MENESES STYLE & MAKE-UP: DAN JOSE BRIDAL GOWN: STEPHEN VICTORIANO BAGS: SIEGFRIED CATALAN OF REDVOLTZ BY SSC DESIGNS BOUQUETS: JANNETTE GARBES OF THE FLOWER GARDEN

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COVER BRIDES MARYLAINEMALLARI19

Totally yours, Mary T

OTUS TUUS— THAT memorable apostolic motto of the late Pope, now Blessed John Paul II, which in Latin means “totally yours.” And totally yours, indeed, is Marylaine, who professes her staunch belief in keeping one’s virginity until she is married to the right man. Seemingly religious and old fashioned, Marylaine also believes in long courtships, which would give couples the opportunity to discover whether they are meant for each other or not. “Hindi naman basta-basta yun pagpapakasal. Dapat kikilalanin mo muna yung pakakasalan mo. Mas importante pa rin yung ikasal kayo sa harap ni God. Bago ikasal ang babae yung virginity niya ang best gift na pwede niyang ibigay sa magiging husband niya.” But it isn’t just her pristine views on marriage that qualifies Marylaine for this month’s cover. Simply put, Marylaine has the beauty that is sought after by the province’s top fashion designers and makeup artists. This asset has brought her to many beauty pageants, primarily in school competitions and as far as regional contests. Right now Marylaine wants to focus on her studies but plans to join Mutya ning Kapampangan and Bb. Pilipinas after finishing college. PEP

ABOUTDANJOSE

D

Passion for makeup

AN JOSE WAS based in Metro Manila when he started in the salon industry 15 years ago. But after spending only two years there, Dan returned to Pampanga to make a name for himself. Determined to make it on his own steam, Dan followed the steps of his mentor, Glen Pablo, who was a stylist and hair designer. Glen, who is now based in Dubai as a fashion designer, also encouraged Dan to learn makeup as well. “I never thought that I would excel in makeup not until other people said that I was good with what I was doing,” said 38-year old Dan, a self-confessed addict of makeup. Aside from Glen Pablo, Dan said he also worked as an apprentice for the late Mae C. Diaz, who taught him further in the art of makeup. He added that he also got his big break when he was invited “to join forces” with Jojo Macapinlac. “We divided his boutique and I occupied the other half and made the area a beauty salon. I stayed with Jojo for about a year and later established my own shop along Henson Street just right in front of his boutique.” “I do makeup and more but makeup became my passion,” reveals Dan. He added that he borrows or invents his own styles which he picks up from magazines and television shows. “I am innovative and I love to push the limits. I am also fond of mixing colors. I never get tired of makeup. I am an addict for makeup,” says Dan. For weddings, Dan recommends a bridal makeup that is clean, simple, and natural-looking. “A bride must stand out and the job of the makeup artist is to enhance the beauty of the bride.” Dan owns a shop along MacArthur Highway near Angeles University Foundation. PEP

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COVER BRIDES

WORDS: PETER ALAGOS & DEINZ SERRANO PHOTOGRAPHY: BORJ MENESES STYLE & MAKE-UP: DEY CAISIP HAIR: DIANNE MERCIDO BRIDAL GOWN: GLENN CANLAS BAGS: SIEGFRIED CATALAN OF REDVOLTZ BY SSC DESIGNS BOUQUETS: JANNETTE GARBES OF THE FLOWER GARDEN 22|PAMPANGAPEP|SEPTEMBER2011


COVER BRIDES CRYSTALJOICEHERRERAI9

Clear as crystal C

ON SEX AND MARRIAGE

RYSTAL IS NO stranger to the camera and the bright golden lights of the stage. Since she was 14, she has heard her name called out countless times as the “fairest of them all,” making her the most experienced in joining pageants from among the models featured in this issue. According to Crystal, she has joined numerous competitions and bagged many a crown in beauty pageants on and off campus. Among the beauties who joined Crystal in Pampanga PEP’s bridal photo shoot, she also has the most experience in ramp modeling for local designers as well as familiar brands such as Walker. Her ultimate dream, aside from what she has already accomplished so far, is to be a well-known actress. Crystal has already starred in an indie film produced by a local movie maker.

Pampanga PEP was curious to know Crystal’s thoughts on settling down, not to mention what she thinks is the best time to get to know “the birds and the bees.” So she said marriage is a sacred thing: “Mas maganda pa rin yung kasal kayo kasi yung day na nag-bind kayo is the day that you are [starting a new life] together.” She maintains that it is still best for young couples to wait for their honeymoon, believing that a guy would respect [her decision] to wait until they get married. “May mga kilala pa naman ako na ganun kasi I’m a Christian.” PEP

T

HE STORY OF Dey Caisip could be culled from a “Maalaala mo kaya” episode. He was an orphan at the young age of 15. Though he had two other siblings, he was forced to look after himself and only managed to finish the sixth grade in elementary school. But unlike most teledrama episodes, Dey’s story has a happy ending. Today, 27-year old Dey is among a select few – a handful of sought after makeup artists preferred not only in the Pampanga fashion scene but also in Metro Manila. Last year, Dey was asked to do the makeup of ABS-CBN talents like Angel Aquino, who played Vera in the telenovela “Magkaribal.” But before stepping into the limelight, Dey had his attention on a salon he owned for a few years but had to sell it to focus on makeup. Dey started in the salon business in 2000 under his mentor, Claudia. Under Claudia’s wing, he mostly prepped up the clients by washing, rinsing, or shampooing their hair. One day, Claudia encouraged Dey to try other skills in the salon industry and not just be content with the “shampoo routine.” He then trained under Claudia for two years learning how to apply makeup and the art of haircutting. Also, Claudia challenged Dey to compete against him in a Ricky Reyes regional hair and makeup competition in 2002 where Dey eventually won. Asked how Claudia felt about it, Dey said his achievement had made his mentor all the more proud of him considering that it was his first time to join a hair and makeup competition. His winning streak in hair and makeup competitions was phenomenal. He’s been winning every contest since 2002. “In reality, when I join hair and makeup competitions I’m not actually there to compete. I just want to prove to myself how far I have improved in my craft.” Dey said it didn’t occur to him that he could excel in this line of work. “My forte or masterpiece is doing bridal makeup. Di makapal ang makeup, natural looking, nag-goglow lang,” said Dey, describing his work. He added that the “fresh look” is his signature. He also describes himself as a perfectionist: “As an artist I’m some sort of obsessive compulsive. I consider myself

ABOUTDEYCAISIP

Risen from the ranks

like that because when I work on a client I want everything to be perfect.” “Know your work. Love your work. That will set you apart from other makeup artists. You can’t please everyone, which is why I leave it up to potential clients to choose their own makeup artist, someone who they feel comfortable with.” Dey Caisip’s formula to assuring quality work is treating his clients as friends. PEP

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CENTERFOLD 24|PAMPANGAPEP|SEPTEMBER2011


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PAMPANGA

w w w. p a m p a n g a p e p . c o m

pep

PHOTOGRAPHY: BORJ MENESES STYLE: JEMI NICDAO MAKE-UP: DEY CAISIP BOUQUETS: PANCHO PANTIG & JANNETTE GARBES

JANICE MANALILI SEPTEMBER 2011


CENTERFOLD

JANICEMANALILI22

A beauty and geek I

WORDS: DEINZ SERRANO | PHOTOGRAPHY: BORJ MENESES STYLIST: JEMI NICDAO | MAKE-UP: DEY CAISIP

F ALL GEEKS are as pretty and sexy as Janice, then…they wouldn’t be geeks at all! This willowy bombshell has joined the ranks of other beauties in her school’s Ms. IT (Information Technology) beauty pageant and a Bikini Open contest. Janice has been modeling for two years now and, hmmm… would you like to hear something that’s totally not geeky? Janice says: “Sex is okay as long as you love the person.” PEP

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pep

I

WORDS: DEINZ SERRANO | PHOTOGRAPHY: BORJ MENESES

F DOCTORS HAVE nurses, fashion designers have stylists. Dictionary.com defines stylist as “a designer or consultant in a field subject to changes in style, especially hairdressing, clothing, or interior decoration.” But for stylist Jemi Nicdao, his job description goes way beyond a mere dictionary definition. From conceptualizing pre-nup shoots to helping brides dress up for the big day, Jemi’s job is not as easy as everyone thinks. As a stylist, he even goes shopping in and around the city, the province, the metro, or elsewhere to help the bride decide which shoes to wear, accessories to put on, and other necessities that would best complement the wedding dress at hand. After earning his Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy degree from the Saint Louis University in Baguio City, Jemi decided to pursue his dream of being a stylist; he completed a certificate program in Fashion Styling at the School of Fashion and Arts in Makati and then pursued a slew of apprentice work. He got his big break when eventologist Tim Yap asked him to style for his column in The Philippine Star. After working with Yap, more projects came in— these include being the official stylist of soul siren Nina, TV guestings on GMA Channel 7’s Unang Hirit where he shares a variety of styling tips, and most importantly, being the most sought after pre-nup stylist in Pampanga. Jemi says his steady rise to success and fame isn’t just blood, sweat, and tears— it’s actually more than that. It is diligence, coupled with hard work and patience. His commitment to perfection is what makes his work the best asset he can boast of to any client. The photo shoot at the Omni Aviation inside the Clark Freeport is a classic example that best describes Jemi’s dedication to being perfect. What he wanted for the Omni Aviation shoot was a snapshot of the model with her wardrobe blowing majestically with the wind while an airplane lands in the background. Jemi said it took several takes before they got the perfect shot, considering that they sometimes waited for hours until another plane landed on the runway. At 21, Jemi is one of the youngest stylists in the industry. He is planning to establish his own styling studio in Pampanga next year where soon-to-be brides and grooms can rent costumes or accessories for their respective pre-nup sessions. For those who, this early, are anxious to know more about what Jemi has up his sleeves, follow him on twitter at @jeminicdao. PEP

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SEPTEMBER2011|PAMPANGAPEP|27 SEPTEMBER 2011 | PAMPANGA PEP | 27


DESIGNERS WORDS: PETER ALAGOS & DEINZ SERRANO PHOTOGRAPHY: BORJ MENESES & PAOLO FELICIANO

ABOUTFREDERICKPOLICARPIO

Elegance in simplicity E

VEN AS A COLLEGE student, Frederick Policarpio already had a flare for designing clothes. His classmates in the College of Education were the first to patronize his skill as a designer. “I still have fond memories of my classmates asking me to design their suits or gowns for various occasions like graduation balls or even beauty pageants,” says Frederick, who believes in the elegance of being simple. “Since I was a kid, I would spend time sketching designs.” While it only started as a habit, Frederick’s efforts paid off while working as a visual merchandiser for companies such as Benetton, Cinderella, Tweeds and Esprit Philippines. After learning the “tricks of the trade,” Frederick decided to create his own clothing line by putting up a shop in Angeles City. Despite having only one sewing machine and a dressmaker, Frederick was not deterred to pursue his dream. From mere school uniforms, he later created an impressive line of wedding gowns and other formal apparel. “I now take pride in being given the opportunity to ‘dress up’ big names in politics and in the fashion and movie industry, who believed in my ability to be their official designer.” For this issue, Frederick says his inspiration for the gown he created for Pampanga PEP’s wedding theme is the “celebration of a woman.” The style was 1920s inspired “tastefully done in classic and modern style.” According to Frederick, he is planning to go abroad and take a crash course in designing. “I hope to discover and learn more that’s why I want to study. I want to improve my craft in order to create more opportunities,” he said. To get in touch with Frederick Policarpio visit his shop at Unit 2 13-10 Papin’s Building, Marlim Avenue, Diamond Subdivision, Balibago, Angeles City or call +6345-624-0024. PEP

ABOUTSTEPHENVICTORIANO

Follow your passion S

TEPHEN VICTORIANO IS not afraid to pursue his dreams. His faith in what he can accomplish is grounded in the saying “Just do your best and God will do the rest.” While his passion is in designing, Stephen was obedient enough to grant the request of his folks and what they wanted for him— veterinary medicine. But after earning a degree in Animal Husbandry, Stephen pursued his love for fashion. Stephen’s humble beginnings trace back to his apprenticeship days at Mancio Suarez’s shop and later mustered enough determination to establish himself as a talented designer. Some of his first works include those from Lala Paras’ wedding gown and the gowns and suits for the wedding entourage of the owner of HP Philippines. For Pampanga PEP’s issue this month, Stephen’s theme revolved around “modern fashion,” which is a mixture of fabric organdy, plain organza and Mikado with some Swarovski crystals for accent. “My advice to budding designers is to just keep on trying until you succeed. Also, they have to be realistic with the designs they create. While it’s possible to draw them on paper, the design must also be executable when using fabric. And in whatever you do, always put God first.” Stephen has a shop at Building A, 1st Floor, JMS Building, MacArthur Highway, Angeles City. He can also be reached at +639175007023. PEP 28|PAMPANGAPEP|SEPTEMBER2011


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GRAND PALLAZIO ROYALE CHAPEL (ANGELES CITY)



picture perfect

 ST. JAMES THE APOSTLE PARISH CHURCH (BETIS, GUAGUA)

WORDS & PHOTOGRAPHY: PAOLO FELICIANO

pERHAPS ONE OF THE BEST THINGS to being a photographer is witnessing a

variety of special occasions. Not only that but most especially, the camera gives a shutterbug like me the opportunity to capture those precious, once in a lifetime moments in the lives of friends and loved ones or…even complete strangers.

A suitable example for the point I am trying to drive at is photographing weddings. Aside from precise timing to immortalize that proverbial “Kodak moment,” aesthetics also plays a major role in the making of a perfect photograph. In my case, aesthetics refers to simple, yet, essential things like the variety of flowers to use, which wedding cake to buy, or the ideal wedding location that could guarantee a lovely and lasting memory for the couple-to-be. SEPTEMBER2011|PAMPANGAPEP|35


 ARZOBISPADO DE PAMPANGA (CHANCERY) Hence, having done countless weddings here and abroad, I have prepared a directory of sorts of the best wedding churches, including ideal locations for pre-nuptial photo shoots, that future couples would find in Pampanga. First on my list of wedding churches is Holy Rosary Parish in Angeles City. Included in its rich history is its reputation of being used as a barracks by Japanese imperial forces; it even sustained massive damage from a plane crash after a dog fight between American and Japanese pilots during the Second World War. Its classic look makes it a photographer’s favorite. Likewise, its spacious altar gives the photography and videography team more room to do their work. The abundance of bright ambient light inside Holy Rosary Parish church also assures the bride an unforgettable picture perfect moment as she walks along the church’s long aisle. For brides who have dreamed of saying their “I dos” in the Sistine Chapel, my next recommendation is at the Saint James Parish,

 IMMACULATE CONCEPTION PARISH CHURCH more commonly known as the Betis Church in Betis town. This church is mostly made up of wood giving it a nostalgic feel and look. Of course, like the Sistine Chapel, Betis Church also boasts of its own paintings on its wooden ceiling painted by Kapampangan artisans of long ago. How ambient light falls on its Spanish architecture provides dramatic lighting for photographers who want to capture the bride’s once in a lifetime walk down the church’s long aisle. Lastly, Betis Church has a spacious area that provides the documenting team lots of space to move around. The third church that comes highly recommended is the Clark Freeport’s very own Chapel 2. This church is fully airconditioned, which makes it ideal for couples who want to tie the knot during the warm months of the summer season. Also, Chapel 2’s policies and regulations are not as strict as other churches— thus, giving photographers more room and opportunity to express their artistic creativity.

 HOLY ROSARY PARISH CHURCH

36|PAMPANGAPEP|SEPTEMBER2011




LORD’S TRANSFIGURATION PARISH CHURCH (L&S) In terms of proximity, Chapel 2 is only a stone’s throw away from most of the Clark Freeport’s wedding reception venues. Fourth on my list is the Chancery in the City of San Fernando, which is ideal for couples who prefer a wedding with a modern touch. Not only that it is air-conditioned but the Chancery, most importantly, is regarded as the seat of the Archbishop of San Fernando. The next three churches are advisable for couples who want to maximize on the proximity of the many wedding reception venues in Angeles City. First is the chapel of the Grand Palazzo Royale. The chapel is not air-conditioned but its design is very photogenic and is surrounded by luscious gardens giving it a breezy look and feel. The tiffany chairs found inside add to the appeal of the chapel and are very good alternatives to regular church pews. At the heart of the Balibago business district in Angeles City lies the Immaculate Conception Parish. It is air-conditioned and



PLAZA OF OUR LADY PARISH CHURCH [CHAPEL 2] boasts of a long aisle and large stained glass windows on almost every wall. Lastly, the Chapel of the Transfiguration in L&S Subdivision at the southernmost edge of Angeles City is also an air-conditioned church that has a large space that is flexible enough to be converted to a beautiful reception venue. Pre-nup locations Of course, beautiful wedding albums won’t be complete without the perfect “pre-nup” photo shoot. For couples who are adventurous and outgoing, a trip to the Lakeshore in Mexico town is highly recommended. Couples can do various activities like biking, boating or fishing at the Lakeshore’s man-made lake. It also has its own lighthouse, mini island, and an impressive boardwalk. But there’s a catch, the management requires a permit and fee if Lakeshore is not your reception area after the wedding. Grand Palazzo Royale along the boundaries of Angeles City and Porac town

SEPTEMBER2011|PAMPANGAPEP|37


is another ideal pre-nup venue and is perfect for couples who want a classic feel for their photo shoots. Its spacious gardens are peppered with many renaissance-themed statues which can be used as props or background. But like the Lakeshore, GPR also requires a permit and fee. Inside the Clark Freeport, Clearwater is an ideal venue for a photo shoot since couples can pose using props for biking, boating, and fishing. Clearwater also has a man-made lake and a handsome boardwalk. It has an amphitheater and is a superb place for couples who want the outdoors or nature to be the central theme of the photo shoot. But mind you, these amenities also require a permit and fee. Now if you’re revolving around a tight budget, you can still have a lovely pre-nup session sans the fees and permits. With just the simple consent of the owner, couples can hold their photo shoots inside restaurants, bars, or cafes. Each venue has its own character that can help accentuate the theme of the photo shoot. The liquor or bottle displays can help add texture to the photos; even the furniture can be used to make interesting props or background. And since restaurants come with their own interior design, lighting is not usually a problem but rather a plus for the photographer and videography team’s artistic concepts. Also, venues like these maximize space using a lot of mirrors – an ideal prop for reflection shots and for fashion or lifestyle-oriented themes. If you still want an outdoor-type theme for your prenup photo shoot, the lahar areas in Porac town and nearby Sapang Bato in Angeles City or even as far as Mount Pinatubo serve as scenic venues. Though it’s a little tough being photographed in the middle of nowhere, hey, it’s the best place to find lots of sun, tall grass, and of course, lahar for couples who want a grunge-type pre-nup photo shoot. And it’s absolutely free. PEP

Each venue has its own character that can help accentuate the theme of the photo shoot. 38|PAMPANGAPEP|SEPTEMBER2011


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FEATURE

COURTSHIP RITUALS

COURT & SPARK WORDS: ALEX CASTRO

W

HEN A KAPAMPANGAN swain found a possible object of his affection, he had to follow a certain modus operandi to win her heart, in a way that was acceptable to the mores of the times. Indeed, if our baintau (lad) wished to keep his good standing in society and win approval, then he had to follow and meet the standards of “pamaglolo” (courtship) rituals. To signify his intentions, our young man would often use a go-between, maybe an acquaintance of the girl, to pave the way for an introduction and then some. If our dalaga (lass) showed a positive response, our baintau went ahead to set up a meeting. As it was unthinkable for a girl to contrive to meet elsewhere lest she incurs parental wrath, Sunday church visits as well as community events such as fiestas, were legitimate occasions to meet and greet. Our young man sat himself a few pews away from the girl, within her eyesight, so she could cast furtive glances at him. After the service, he would linger around the girl, behaving much like a rooster in the presence of a hen. In fact, the verb “tandic” which describes this behavior, applied also to men “who is about to fall in love and is beginning to court and woo a lady.” Our young man could also decide to be more formal and go“mamanikan,” in which an appointment is made with the girl for a home visit. Even then, the girl was always provided with a chaperone who lurked nearby so she could eavesdrop on their conversations. To throw a nosy chaperone off, however, our dalaga would use her fan to send messages to a love-struck visitor. If she held a dangling fan with her right hand, it meant she already had a suitor. If she fanned herself furiously, it means that the young man held no meaning for her. An open fan meant, “I love you like a friend”, while a closed fan indicated WHEN BOY MEETS GIRL. Lovey-dovey couple poses sincere love. for a romantic souvenir photo. This must have been a postSimilarly, our young man could profess his wedding snapshot (circa 1920s). Photo courtesy of Alex Castro. heart’s wishes through the language of flowers. If he presented the girl with red adelfas, it meant that he has serious romantic designs. Yellow azucenas signified greatness of love. White jasmine reflected his inner goodness, while white rosals, the purity of his love. There were other ways to woo a young woman. He could serenade her or engage the services of his friends to make “arana,” melting her heart with lyrical kundiman songs. When enough trust was built, the couple could be allowed to go dating with

42|PAMPANGAPEP|SEPTEMBER2011

the consent of parents. When they went out, it was more likely to be a group date, with several chaperones in tow. Dating became popular among the middle class during the American occupation, with the rise of leisure centers such as bowling alleys, soda parlors and movie theaters which became favorite hangouts of young people. During the courtship period, a man was required to render manula services to the family of the girl— like chopping wood, filling water drums or cleaning the backyard. When he is finally given the go-signal to marry the young woman, his parents must make repairs to the house of the bride-to-be, a practice called “sulambe.” It was also customary for the suitor’s parents to ask formally for the hand of the girl by visiting her family in the home (pamamalayai). Preliminary wedding plans are discussed in this meeting. The profession of love through courtship rituals can be elaborate, long and tedious, but the lovelorn Kapampangan does not seem to mind. When struck with Cupid’s arrow, he could even transform himself into a poet. Just read this “kilig-to-the-bones” love letter written by my late father to my mother, dated 21 March 1949, just weeks after meeting her in a botica where my mother worked as a sales attendant: “I unflinchingly adored you in utmost secrecy and silence until I realized but lately how much it would distress and embitter me if I won’t confide to you through concealed emotions which had long beat hard and clamored for an honest confession. I had tried to subdue every bit of my deep passions until finally, I had to yield to the dictates of my heart. Can you possibly forgive this soul seeking consolation through truthful revelation?” Now did his overly dramatic outpourings— possibly copied from a “How to Write Love Letters” book, work? Apparently they did. My mother and father got married just a month and a half later. See what love can do. PEP


SEPTEMBER2011|PAMPANGAPEP|43


“CASH WIDUS” GRAND RAFFLE PROMO FROM CASINO WIDUS

P3.5M for lucky winners! CASINO WIDUS recently launched “Cash Widus,” the biggest-ever cash raffle promo inside Clark Freeport Zone with a total of P3.5 million at stake for twelve lucky winners. Agnes ‘Neki’ Liwanag, the casino’s marketing and business development manager, said one lucky “Cash Widus” raffle winner every month from March to December this year will each get P100,000 in cash prize culminating in the grand raffle draws during the gaming facility’s anniversary on December 18, 2011. “As part of our anniversary celebrations on December 18, a not-so-minor prize of Php500,000 in cold cash will be given away to one lucky winner. For the grand raffle prize, Casino Widus will actually give away Php2 million in cash to one very, very lucky

44|PAMPANGAPEP|SEPTEMBER2011

winner!” Neki Liwanag said. According to her, any guest or patron at the US$20 million hotel and casino complex can get a chance to win in Casino Widus’ “Cash Widus” promo. “All they have to do iss play in any of Casino Widus’ participating tables (where terms ms and conditions apply),” Neki Liwanag explained. The huge cash raffle draws are but some of the latest promo offerings of Casino o Widus to further entertain its growing list of foreign reign and local players. Last year, Casino Widus us and Hotel Vida successfully launched the “Stay, Play and Drive” promo wherein a brand and new Toyota Altis was given away. For inquiries regarding the promo, romo, interested parties may call Casino sino Widus at 045-499-9999 and ask the Customer Service Department nt for assistance. Casino Widus and d Hotel Vida are part of the busyy hotel and casino strip of Clark Freeport Zone found along its main thoroughfare, the M. A. Roxas Highway.


FEATURE

KASAL TRADITIONS

BEYOND THE SACRAMENT WORDS: ALEX CASTRO

I

STILL HAVE the tattered album of my parents’ 1949 wedding, containing remnants of the invitation, a newspaper announcement-clipping, and a half-a-dozen or so “proof-only” photos of the event (Yes, they couldn’t afford the real pictures so they kept the “proof” copies instead!). A picture of their wedding cake also made it to the national paper— a small three-tiered chiffon creation with a bride and groom doll topper. The rites were held at the San Miguel Cathedral and a breakfast reception followed after at the popular Riviera, four pesos a plate. What’s left of the bridal trousseau— satin gown, tulle veil, headdress and all— are now framed under glass, preserved for posterity, a visual reminder of my parents’ budget wedding. Pre-Christian weddings in the Philippines were surprisingly more elaborate and more expensive. Dowries (bigaykaya) had to be paid, gifts had to be sent out to in-laws in exchange for the bride. Pinatubo Negritos, for instance, were mandated to pay dearly for their brides, offering their “bandi,” or material property, often in the form of bolos, bows and arrows. Celebrations would last for days, sometimes weeks, with the whole community invited to the extended feasting. Just as colorful were the courtship (pamaglolo) rituals. Girls as young as fifteen were allowed to have gentleman callers, provided an older person— like a koya (big brother) or a spinster aunt— was present to keep a sharp watch on them. Kapampangan baintau (lad) were expected to observe a respectable distance from the objects of their affection. As such, they would only get that opportunity on their way to church or perhaps, in some religious events like Flores de Mayo. When it was time to go out, only group dating was allowed, always with a “tsaperon.” Love letters were also exchanged, written with flowery words, using a template from a how-to book. It was to the advantage of someone going “mamanikan” to bring an inexpensive gift for a girl and her family, like food stuffs, when he goes a-calling. To prove the swain’s sincere intent and ability to support a family, a period of pamagsilbi is arranged, where free service is rendered by the man to the family— from keeping the water

tapayan (clay water jugs) full, chopping kindling for firewood, to running errands. Around the turn of the century, a Filipina had to follow certain prescriptions to ensure she would bag the perfect man. She had to be pure and chaste, clean in body, too. Using cosmetics, smoking cigars and chewing betel nuts were a no-no. She had to be dainty, good in domestic and the fine arts and must know some basic nursing skills. Above all, she must be God-fearing. For a successful marriage, lovers must also be aware of certain beliefs and superstitions. One who sang before a stove, for instance, was risking marriage to a widow or widower. When scheduling weddings, the last quarter moon should be avoided lest life was cut short for the husband or wife. Siblings should also not marry within one year (sukub), or one would die. A simple explanation for this belief is that two weddings in one year could drain family incomes which were often derived from two major annual harvests. As the wedding day approaches, the bride must endeavor to stay indoors as she would be prone to accidents. She must not fit her wedding dress or the wedding would not materialize. To avoid a sorrowful married life, pearls must not be worn as these mimic the shape of tears. Kasalan during the Spanish times were relatively austere affairs, usually held in the early mornings. There were no bridesmaids, flower girls, no march from the church door to the altar. Food was prepared at the boy’s house then transported to the girl’s house. Even with the coming of Americans, old traditions endured, including the practice of Filipina brides of carrying orange blossoms (azahar) in their bouquets. Orange buds were also worn as crowns over their veils as the orange plant was a symbol of fertility. Grooms carried not his bride, but a sack of rice across the threshold. In the more prosperous 1920s and 1930s, weddings became more westernized and larger I DO! I DO! A souvenir wedding picture of Ramona Fernandez y Layug and Agapito de Miranda, the great-great in scale. Kapampangans, with their love for show grandson of Don Angel Pantaleon de Miranda and Rosalia and sass, took to the new lavish practice, with en de Jesus, founders of Angeles. Dated 22 July 1915. Photo courtesy of Alex Castro. grande weddings becoming the order of the day. Weddings involving sons and daughters of wealthy Kapampangan families were even documented in books such as the exclusive Pampanga Social Register of 1936. Even in these hard times, it is not uncommon to see Kapampangan weddings with 10 sets of sponsors, a coterie of bridesmaids with their matching ushers, a Maid (or Matron) of Honor and her Best Man, a Bible bearer, Ring Bearer, Candle Bearer, Flower Girls and a host of Secondary Sponsors. For many a love-struck Kapampangan out to impress, a wedding is more than just a sacrament, it’s an extravaganza! PEP

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PERSPECTIVE

A PRIMER ON PRE-NUPTIAL AGREEMENTS

I DO OR I DON’T D

WORDS: ATTY. NIÑO ANGELES

SLRs OR DIGITAL single-lens reflex cameras, like cell phones and netbooks, are among the must-haves nowadays. From graduation rites, birthday parties, meetings, weddings, to simple get-togethers, you’d see photography enthusiasts panning from different angles and clicking on different subjects. Unlike most amateur photographers, a colleague in the legal profession, who fell in love with photography, is now making a fortune doing prenups; not prenuptial agreements but prenuptial photo shoots of soon to-be-wed couples. Inasmuch as future spouses are meticulous in choosing their photographers for their prenups, or prenuptial photo shoots, should they bother considering whether or not to have the other “prenup,” that is, the prenuptial agreement? What is a Prenuptial Agreement? A Prenuptial Agreement or antenuptial agreement is a contract between the prospective spouses entered into before the marriage, fixing the property regime that will govern their present and future properties during their marriage. In simple terms, it is an agreement between the future spouses entered into before the marriage ceremony stating the mode of rule or management that will govern their present and future properties during their marriage. The future spouses may in the prenuptial agreement choose either of the regimes of Absolute Community Property, Conjugal Partnership of Gains, Complete Separation of Property, a combination of the said regimes, or any other regime which is not contrary to laws, morals, good customs, or public policy. If the future spouses choose the regime of Absolute Community of Property, their respective properties are converted into common properties upon the celebration of the marriage except those excluded by Article 92 of the Family Code. Those acquired by either or both spouses during the marriage shall also be considered common properties of the spouses. Should the future spouses choose the regime of Conjugal Partnership of Gains, only the proceeds, products, fruits, and income of the separate properties of the future spouses shall become common except those excluded by Article 109 of the Family Code. Each spouse retains ownership of his or her respective property. For example, one of the parties has a farm with fruit bearing trees. He does not lose ownership of the farm, as well as the trees, upon the celebration of the marriage but only the fruits of the trees become conjugal properties. If the future spouses choose the regime of Separation of Property, neither the respective properties of the future spouses nor

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the proceeds, products, fruits, and income become the common property. A prenuptial agreement to be valid, must be 1) in writing, 2) signed by the parties and 3) executed before the marriage. If either or both of the future spouses need a parental consent to the marriage, the parent or guardian giving the consent must be made a party to the agreement. Moreover, to affect third persons, it must be in a public instrument, meaning it must be notarized, registered with the local civil registry where the marriage contract is registered, and must be registered with the proper registry of properties. What if the prenuptial agreement is declared void later on or no property regime was chosen by the parties? Then automatically, what shall govern the property relations of the spouses shall be the Absolute Community. Meaning to say, all their properties shall be owned in common including the fruits or income thereof. Now, back to whether a prenuptial agreement is a must for couples before they trade “I dos.” Consider the following, among others: • One of the future spouses has significant amount of debts and the other does not want to be liable to the creditors of the former. They may provide the pertinent stipulation in the prenuptial agreement. Note that it must be registered in the appropriate local civil registry and registry of properties to bind the creditors. • Either of the future spouses has an heirloom which is intended to be preserved or passed on to the family of that future spouse only, then a prenuptial agreement may provide a stipulation to this effect. • One of the partners agreed to quit his or her employment either to take care of the future children or manage the household but wants a guaranteed amount of support during the marriage. This may be ensured by a prenuptial agreement. Hence, it is not necessary that couples be a Kate MiddletonPrince William fairy tale to consider drawing up a prenuptial agreement before uttering the life-altering…err, sometimes lifethreatening words “I do.” The author is a partner at Flores Guarin Angeles Law Firm, a full service law firm in Angeles City with extensive experience in civil, corporate, criminal, immigration, real estate, and intellectual property law. His practice areas include family, corporate and criminal law. He is married to Chie Mayrina-Angeles— owner of Happy HEADStart Play School, Villa Dolores, Angeles City. atty_angeles@yahoo.com PEP


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Pampanga PEP - September 2011