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Graduate Studio Thesis Studio Work Experience/Student competition Undergraduate Studio Graphic Design/Visual Studies

Jason Kim Portfolio columbia university | MSAAD (May 2011) university of southern california | B.Arch (May 2010) 714.308.8631 jasn.h.kim@gmail.com


Table of Contents Graduate Studio 1. Pocket Blackouts (Shohei Shigematsu/Christy Cheng) 2. Eastern Cape Fynbos Research Institute (Lindy Roy) 3. New City Island (Dan Wood/ Sam Dufaux)

2 30 44

Thesis Studio 4. Intermodal Urbanizm (Doris Sung)

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Work Experience/Student competition 5. Tran Residence (Studio Shift) 6. Lilypad/Lily Court (Jason Kim/Zoltan Neville) 7. Retreat House (Stan Wolf)

78 84 88

Undergraduate Studio 8. GMT Observatory (Paul Lubowicki/ Susan Lanier) 9. Art Monastery (Frank Clementi/Jennifer Cosgrove) 10. Re-Saintes (Selwyn Ting/Geral Knowles)

96 108 118

Graphic Design/Visual Studies 11. Rethinking BIM 12. The (Blank) House 13. Urban Market Space Definition

130 132 134


Jason Kim Education

2005-2010 Fall 2008

2010-2011

Work Experience

Summer 2009

Spring 2009 Fall 2007 2008

Skills

Awards

40 W. 127th St. #21 new york, ny, 10027

University of Southern California: Bachelor of Architecture Centre d’Etudes d’Architecture et d’Urbanisme: Selected Study Abroad Program Columbia University: Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation MS Advance Architectural Design

mobile: 714.308.8631 email: jasn.h.kim@gmail.com

Los Angeles, CA , USA

Saintes, France New York, NY , USA

Stan Wolf Hoboken, NJ, USA Role: Sole Designer Worked and developed a retreat home prototype with Stan Wolf // Research and development. // Developed Physical Models. // AutoCAD and Rhino. // Studio Shift Culver City, CA, USA Role: Employee/Designer Worked and developed on the Tran Residence // Developed Physical Models. // AutoCAD and Rhino. // Leavy Library Los Angeles, CA, USA Role: Librarian Operated the circulation desk at the Leavy Library on the USC campus. // Assisted customers with inquisitions. // Answered phone calls and assisted with customer service. // Checked in and out items to the customers. Autodesk 3d studiomax // Revit // AutoCAD Microsoft Power Point // Word // Excel Adobe Creative Suite Illustrator // Photoshop // Indesign // Acrobat Prfessional // After Effects // Premier

McNeel Rhinoceros // Flamingo // Bongo // Grasshopper ESRI ArcMap // ArcScene // GPS tracking device ASGVIS (GIS) ArcMap // ArcScene // GPS tracking device

Scholarships Verle Annis Memorial Scholarship // Franz Herding Scholarship Study Abroad Selected to participate in USC study abroad in Europe for the fall semester of 2008.


Exhibit + Publications Spring 2010

Spring 2010 Spring 2011

Misc

ID WRK 2010 Art Monastery was selected to represent fourth year topic studio in USC’s archive ID WRK 2010. (Critic: Frank Clementi and Jennifer Cosgrove). Undergrad Thesis Exhibition Thesis Project selected to participate in Undergrad Thesis Exhibition at the USC graduation exhibit. (Critic: Doris Sung). ID WRK 2011 Thesis and GMT project both selected to represent respective studios for the 2011 ID WRK. (Critics: Doris Sung-Thesis and Paul Lubowicki and Susan Lanier-Observatory Studio). Language English // Korean // Spanish (conversational)


Graduate Studio 1. Pocket Blackouts (Shohei Shigematsu/Christy Cheng) 2. Eastern Cape Fynbos Research Institute (Lindy Roy) 3. New City Island (Dan Wood/ Sam Dufaux)

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Pocket Blackouts Critic: Shohei Shigematsu / Christy Cheng GSAPP Spring Semester 2011 Size: 7,534,737 ft2 (700,000 m2) Site: San Souci, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic Currently, the Dominican Republic maintains one of the highest GDP among the Carribean Islands. Therefore, it has come far in its development compared to other developing countries. However, it is not yet completely immunes to some of the symptoms that are exhibited in some of these countries. The studio analyzes Post-Crisis Urbanism; paralleling the reasearch of post-crisis invention, conditions and cutlure which arise or respond to the crisis. One of the major crisis that is experienced in the Dominican Republic is the energy crisis. Although the energy crisis is something that affects developed countries as well as the developing countries, the Dominican Republic faces a specific type of energy crisis that is local to their environment--rolling blackouts. As peak production for all fossil fuel are approaching, these typical energy sources are being replaced with sustainable energy harvesting. However, this tactic remains a difficult means as sustainable technology is expensive. This led to the research of how blackouts are an alternative means of manmade sustainable energy source. During these moments of blackouts there would be a urban social transformation in the urban experience via pocket blackouts and pocket parks.

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Research

Electricity net production

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Electricity net consumption 14

Electricity after distribution losses

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Billion kWh

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1994

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2006 2007

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Generation Plant Laesa 1.2%

Distribution Private 86% Public 14%

Monte Rio 2.9%

50% Distribution Loss Uni贸n Fenosa

Itabo 18.6%

EdeSur EdeNorte

Transcontinental Capital Corp 3.4%

Transmission

IPP 15.2%

Fondo Patrimonial de las Empresas

CEPP 2.3%

(FONPER).

Hydroelectric

In the Dominican Republic, there are three distribution companies. The government owns two of them, EdeNorte and EdeSur, through the CDEEE (50%) and the Fondo Patrimonial de las Empresas (FONPER). It also maintains a 50% ownership of the third one, EdeEste, (the additional 50% is owned by the Trust Company of the West (TCW)which is operated by AES Corporation, its original buyer.

Metaldom 1.2% AES 16.4%

Haina 19%

86% of generation capacity is privately owned (excluding selfgeneration), and 14% is publicly owned.

The transmission system, which is under the full responsibility of the state-owned company ETED (Electricity Transmission Company), consists of 940 km of 138kV single-line circuit lines.

Theft

Consumers

$$$ Alternative Power Self Generator Power

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Although the reason for blackouts in the Dominican Republic is difficult to pinpoint, they are often attributed to poor infrastructure, low bill collection and energy theft. One that is most easily scene is the energy loss that occurs during transmission due to the aged infrastructure. These deficits are often subsidized by self power generators.


Unexpected Blackout Case Studies Lebanon 1975 Lebanon experiences daily blackouts. They occur daily for about three hours a day and even longer as one goes further from Beirut. The Lebanese respond to this crisis by often subscribing to local private generators that charge by the watt. The Blackouts sprung a new niche market.

Britain 1939

Britain during World War II experienced evening blackouts to avoid enemy bombing. These incidents left a high amount of pedestrian casualties. However the same phenomena boosted the cinema attendance as it was the only evening program available.

Expected Blackout Case Studies New York 1977 While the 1977 blackout in NYC is marked by riots and looting, this blackout spawned thousands of local DJ’s who also looted their first turn-table.

Northeastern 2003 The Northeastern blackout is most notably marked by the social transformative aspects it carried: people flooding the streets; restaurants giving out beers for free; and hyperextended use of public spaces.

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“Before the Blackout we got only 4 or 5 legitimate deejay crews… It was a huge contribution to the Hip Hop culture.”

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Power Plant

Fossil Fuels

+

Solar

VS Blackout

Wind

Hydro Sustainable Technology

Strategic blackouts is a form of sustainability that does not depend on the input of climate, but the participation of the urban population.

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Power Plant

Fossil Fuels

+

Pocket Blackouts/ Enough Power!

Switching Off Programs

Scheduled Blackouts

Blackouts are a form of sustainble electrical consumption that is not dependant on external forces rathertechthe However, sustainble urban population participation. It is a nology is dependent on man-made sustainability method which weather conditions and can spur social transformation, as well as provideweather enough electricity with the regional climates current generating capacity. satisfy the conditions to

effectively use sustainable technology.

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Blackouts are Sustainable!


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Generation 14.58 Billion kWh 52.8 % 7.70 Billion kWh

47.2 % Loss 6.88 Billion kWh Lost

Consumption 12.87 Billion kWh Self Generated

Electrical DeďŹ ciency 6.88 Billion kWh (6880 MWh) 6,880,000 MWh / 5500 MW (Generator Capacity) = 1251 hours 1251 hours

8766 hours

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8766 hours

1251 hours every year

Jan

Feb

March

April

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

104 hours every month

Jan

Feb

March

4

Jan

8766 hours

April

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

24 hours every week

0

Dec

Dec

Jan

8766 hours

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3.5 hours every day 0

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Through calculating how much energy is produced and lost through various transactions, we were able to discover that the amount of blackout hours required to maintain sufficient quantity of usable electricity amounts to 1251 hours a year-- or a daily 3.5 hours of blackout a day!

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Blackouts are Feasible!


kWh/m2 Per Region kWh/m2 kWh/m2 150

0 East Asia and the Pacific

300

119.44 159.25

Europe and Central Asia Food service Latin America and the Caribbean Health care

Light Refrige Misc Other Cookin Coolin Ventila Ofce Heatin

163.55

OfceNorth Buildings Middle East and Africa Lodging

162.48

South Asia Residentail

195.83

Retail and service Sub-saharan Education

116.21

United States

0

247.48

100 %

Food Service

Food service

Health Care

Ofce Buildings

Light Refrigeration Misc Other Cooking Cooling Ventilation Ofce equipment Heating

Health care Lodging

Ofce

Residentail Retail and service

Lodging

Education 0

Residential Retail and Service

100 %

Food Service Health Care

Education

Ofce

0

Lodging

100

200

300

Residential

Electricity Consumption per Square Meter (kWh) Retail and Service Education

400

500

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Blackout Program Schedule

Parking 250,000 m²

Residential 300,000 m²

Office 120,000 m2 Commercial 130,000 m2

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3.5 hours every day = Scheduling blackouts will allow for the general public to plan around these events as wells as create a scheduled activation for various public programs.

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Blackouts are Manageable!


Proposal

Commercial (11%) Floor Area = 130,000 m2 E. Consumption = 21,190,000 kWh

OfďŹ ce (10%) Floor Area = 120,000 m2 E. Consumption = 19,560,000 kWh Communal Space (9%) Floor Area = 100,000m2 E. Consumption = 16,300,000 kWh

Parking (28%) Floor Area = 250,000 m2 E. Consumption = 27,166,666 kWh

Housing (42%) Floor Area = 300,000 m2 E. Consumption = 48,900,000 hkWh

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Consolidated Configuration

Consolidated Configuration

Consolidated Configuration

Consolidated Configuration

Office Space Blackout Commercial Blackout Residential Blackout

By creating programmatic zones would me to also zone the blackouts.

Even Distribuation Configuration

Even Distribuation Configuration

Residential Blackout

Even Distribuation Configuration

Commercial Blackout

Even Distribuation Configuration

Office Space Blackout

Bye equally distributin the programmatic pixels, creates a non-hierarchical urban experience as well as mitigating the blackouts so other activated programs and public spaces are easily accessible. 15


Concept Current Normal Operating City.

Blacked out city, leads people to leave building and occupy street scapes as public space.

By “cutting� up the building into definitive pixels allows for easier calculations on electrical consumption.

Pushing/Shearing the pixels.

Public Space! On the ground floor and roofscape. 16


Exhibition Node E-consumption space:

Residential: 1350 m2 (220,050 kWh) Retail: 700 m2 (114,100 kWh) Office: 400 (65,200 kWh) Parking: 750 m2 (122,250 kWh) Communal Space: Indoor Gallery: 750 m2 (122,250 kWh) TOTAL: 4600 m2 (626,600 kWh) 0-consumption space: Outdoor Gallery Space Sculpture Garden Green Roof

Beach Node

E-consumption space:

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Performance Node E-consumption space:

Residential: 1375 m2 (224,125 kWh) Retail: 575 m2 (93,725 kWh) Office: 850 (138,550 kWh) Parking: 1400 m2 (105,000kWh) Communal Space: Ballroom : 400 m2 (65,200 kWh) TOTAL: 4600 m2 (626,600 kWh) 0-consumption space: Dance Floors Perfomance Stages Rooftop Dance Floors Rooftop Performance

Recreation Node E-consumption space:

Residential: 1800 m2 (293,400 kWh) Retail: 600 m2 (97,800 kWh) Office: 400 (65,200 kWh) Parking: 1400 m2 (105,000kWh) Communal Space: Theatre and Bar: 400 m2 (65200 kWh)

Residential: 1475 m2 (240,425 kWh) Retail: 725 m2 (118,175 kWh) Office: 400 (65,200 kWh) Parking: 1400 m2 (105,000kWh) Communal Space: Indoor Gym : 600 m2 (97800 kWh)

TOTAL: 4600 m2 (626,600 kWh)

TOTAL: 4600 m2 (626,600 kWh)

0-consumption space: Tanning Deck Artificial Beach Green Space Roof Beach

0-consumption space: Basket Ball Group Exercise Space Tennis Court(yard)


Plans/Sections

Beach Node

Recreation Node

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Performance Node

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Exhibition Node


Masterplan Similar to how the programs are equally distributed in the site, elements of the site (especially the beach component) get redistributed so the nodes which are more inland can experience a similar nautical setting as those on the edge condition.

Exhibition Node Performance Node Recreation Node Beach Node

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Concept


Renderings

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Models

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Eastern Cape Fynbos Research Institute Critic: Lindy Roy GSAPP Fall Semester 2010 Size: 900,000 ft2 (84,000 m2) Site: Hankey, Eastern Cape, South Africa The Eastern Cape Fynbos Research Institute is located in Hankey, South Africa, which is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site. The point of entry for the project was found in researching the plasticity of the site and it is formed by the environment that has created specific climates and conditions. The project realized how the environment is catalogued in fossils, plants and S. Africa’s environment. One specific artifact are these species of plants (Fynbos) have adapted to all climatic regions and have evolved through their plastic relationship with the environment to become the world’s MOST diversified plant species of the world. They have continued to accelerate in evolution because people have been actively lighting them on fire, as they are serotinous and reproduce through fire. The architectural proposal is an institute that not only studies these plants but also catalogues and stores in seed banks since some are about to be extinct; as well as temporary lab spaces that open and close according to when the flowers are in bloom and so the institute changes seasonally and annually (the coverings are Kevlar which are a fire-proof material). I studied the micro-climates and placed each plant according to their specific environmental constraints.

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Research Cape Floristic Region

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Of the world’s six floral kingdoms, this is the smallest and richest per area unit. The diversity of fynbos plants is extremely high, with over 9000 species of plants occurring in the area, around 6200 of which are endemic.

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0 11

Fynbos – which grows in a 100-to-200-kmwide coastal belt stretching from Clanwilliam on the West coast to Port Elizabeth on the Southeast coast – forms part of the Cape floral kingdom, where it accounts for half of the surface area and 80% of the plant varieties.

90

The Cape Floristic Region is located in South Africa. The Region covers the Mediterranean climate region of South Africa in the Western Cape in the southwestern corner of the country, and extends eastward into the Eastern Cape, a transitional zone between the winterrainfall region to the west and the summerrainfall region to the east in KwaZulu-Natal.

0 ft 125 250

750

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Concept A solar study was conducted on the site in order to understand patterns and microclimates of the site in which the various families of fynbos may ďŹ nd their niche. The study is done on a one year cycle of morning noon and night.

Existing site Condition is split by the national road

Project lays perpendicular to the road to stitch to halves of the site and create maximum exposure to northern sunlight

The heat map of the lowest sun position is projected on to the site in order to provide sun light all year round.

The heat map deforms the project, and creates a accelerated geomorphed terrain for the ideal growing environment for the Fynbos species.

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Solar Studies on Site

7 am Morning Microclimates

March

April

May

March

April

May

Feb

12 pm Noon Microclimates

Jan

Hotspots on Site

Feb

Jan

A solar study was conducted on the site in order to understand patterns and microclimates of the site in which the various families of fynbos may ďŹ nd their niche. The study is done on a one year cycle of morning noon and night.

5 pm Evening Microclimates


June

July

Aug

Sept

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June

July

Aug

Sept

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Nov

Dec


Proposal Plasticity: Temporary Labs

1. When the Fynbos flowers are not in bloom, the temporary lab structure is collapsed.

By using the previously conducted solar and seasonal study of the Fynbos species, these temporary lab spaces activate and deactivate according to the fynbos flowers and microclimates. 2. For a short period of time, the flowers are studied in the natural outdoor environment.

3. Then lab structure is stretched of the bloomed fynbos.

4. Finally enclosed inside cevlar, a fire-proof material.

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Permanent Program More permanent programs such as permanent lab space, parking, seed bank and administration is found buried below the international road.

PermanentLabs Labs Permanent SeedBank Bank Seed Permanent Labs Administration Administration Parking Parking Seed Bank Administration Parking Equipment/ Equipment/ Vehicle Storage Vehicular Equipment Equipment/ Vehicular Equipment Baartman Education Baartman Center Center Education 37

Baartman Education Center


Plan Plan

The project acts as a stitch that mends together the existing onium Capitatum greenspace on the east and west hills. (The West hill is curhemoides Monilifera rently the Baartman grave site).

CapensisDimorphtheca

Pelargonium Capitatum Cysanthemoides Monilifera Elegia CapensisDimorphtheca Pluvialis

Lobelia Anceps Berzelia Galpini Freylinia Helmi Agathosma Glabrata Gladiolus Carneus Carpobrotus Edulis Erica Bauer

s

Protea Cynaroides Virgilia Divarcata

The plan of the

Anceps Fynbos research

institute would change

seasonally. As each a Galpini

species of the fynbos flowers, the temporary a Helmi research lab expands for the duration of the flower’s lifespan until sma Glabrata it is treated with heat. The permanent lab spaces have fynbos us Carneus that require diffused light below and need rotus Edulislight above on intense the all-year round exauerpanded Surface. Each of the fynbos species is location specific according to the solar Cynaroides studies.

Divarcata


January Protea Cynaroides Erica Baurei Chrysanthemoides Agathosma Glabrata

April Protea Cynaroides Elegia Capensis Dimortheca Pluvialis Carpobrotus Edulis Gladiolus Carneus Agathosma Glabrata Freylinia Helmei Pelargonium Capitatum Virgilia Divarcata Berzelia Galpinii


Sections

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Renderings View from Baartman Grave

View inside Temporary Lab


View inside Permanent Lab


New City Island Critic: Dan Wood / Sam Dufaux GSAPP Summer Semester 2010 Size: 750 Acres (304 Hectares) Site: City Island, New York, New York, USA New City Island is a critical review of the architectural utopian ideas that were explored during the mid 20th century and cross referencing them with the island’s historic utopian tendencies. Today, most of these islands are left as bird sanctuary, or activated with introverted programs that make these islands inhabitable to the general public—the dystopian island. The proposal is to observe some of the key niches that City Island maintains and utilize these characteristics to offer an “alternative Manhattan” rather than a “Rival Manhattan” Palmer originally seeked. If Manhattan is head quarters of Capitalism, City Island is the head quarters of seafood restaurants and nautical events and spaces. With water levels rising and the challenge of re-establishing a higher population density, promoting growth within City Island’s current footprint will be constrictive. So the proposal is to define a new urban front that uses the sea as its newly allotted space. Here, programs will cater to the people who will occupy the new urban front as well as the boating culture itself. Some of the issues that the proposal should be mindful of are the chaotic infrastructures that define the yachts on the perimeter of City Island’s water. Furthermore, the fish population in the Long Island sounds are in the process of re-growing their population, therefore the settlement as well as the boats should look to alternate carbon-neutral energy sources.

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Research History: Palmer’s Vision City Island map of 1761, Palmer proposed a super imposed grid of blocks. each block was 375’ x 200’ and within each block were homes that were 25’x100’. City Island has a rich history that predisposes itself to become a self sustaining utopian society via its nautical lifestyle. When comparing its timeline, one can understand the economic trajectory I was bound for once under the authority of Benjamin Palmer. Using its control over its local sea, Palmer sought to control and mediate trade between the import and export trade ships. However, after the revolutionary war, the City Island was unable to maintain its “manhattan” course due to its war debts. After exchanging multiple ownerships, City Island is developed, but profoundly different than its original “city” course it was once bound for. Today, City Island is best defined by their single family homes, sea food and their love of the nautical life.

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Residential

Commercial

1:500

0

0.005

0.01

Miles 0.02

1:2500

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0.025

0.05

Miles 0.1

1:10,000

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0.1

0.2

Miles 0.4

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Miles 0.6

1:35,000

0

0.35

0.7

Miles 1.4

Green Space

Site Analysis

The project challenges the polemical suburban attitude that defines City Island today. Termed City Island by Benjamin Palmer, it was projected to be the next island that was to rival Manhattan; however, today it is overtaken by single family homes and a few shops along its main avenue: City Island Avenue. Commercial programs are located along its main avenue and the green spaces are dispersed near existing port areas. Miles

1:110,000

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1:125,000

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1:500,000

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10

Miles 20

2

4

Miles

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Proposal

New City Limits Due to the current land use, City Island has developed into a town that resembles a small fishing village rather than a metropolitan hub. Although Benjamin Palmer had a set course, prior to the Revolutionary War, for an island that was suppose to rival manhattan, it ultimately settled as a suburban utopia. Today, one of City Island’s key niche, the nautical life, will be used as a device to redevelop the island as a new settlement that will create it as a major metropolitan seaport. Current use of City Island’s sea settlement, via yachts, reach about a quarter of a mile outside the island’s perimeter.

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Phasing

New City Isla nd

Existing Yacht Club can be established as potential public spaces.

Lim it

smaller streets can start to be converted into waterways in order to establish the city’s grid.

Other yacht clubs can be proposed on the east side of the island inorder to fully utualize existing ports.

The street infrastructure would be converted to water ways. The first water way can be proposed on City Island’s main avenue.

Multi-Family Elevator Buildings Mixed Residential & Commercial Buildings City Hubs Public Facilities & Institutions

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Main streets can expand east and west out to the New City Limit that current yachts are occupying

Open Space & Outdoor Recreation


City Island Yacht Club Epicenters

Beacon Yacht Club Traffic overseer/office

Lagoon Yacht Club Swimming/Recreation

City Island Yacht Club (est. 1905) Public Garden

Harlem Yacht Club (est. 1888) Boat Museum

Morris Yacht and Beach Club (est. 1937) Aquarium

Edcuation Yacht Club School

Stuyvesant Yacht Club (est. 1890) Fishery

Shop Yacht Club Commercial

Engineering Yacht Club Yacht Maintenance

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Block Study While developing the Urban masterplan scale and the major epicenters of New City Island, the Palmer Block was adjusted to create a water equivalent/alternative to the Manhattan block.

Typical Block

Adjusted Block

Water Block

Typical block maintains conventional characteristics that are found in the Manhattan block.

The adjusted block accomodates headspace for the typical City Island Yacht.

Diagonal water circulation path creates a new type of courtyard space for the yachts and nautical fanatics.


Plan


Renderings

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Renderings


Model


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Thesis Studio 4. Intermodal Urbanizm (Doris Sung)

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Intermodal Urbanization Critic: Doris Sung USC School of Arch Spring 2010 Size: Scaleless Site: Los Angeles, California, USA Current travel modes in Los Angeles are dominated by automobiles and so the infrastructure is highly serviced to them. Automobiles are Los Angeles’ leading carbon emitters, and have stripped away the opportunity to engage the city from other vantage points—pedestrians, metro users and cyclists. Architecture should react to this culture and create an environment in which the city can be engaged through an inter-modal experience, perception at various speeds of travel, rather than solely depending on its carbon-emissive and fast-paced automotive component. In doing so, the intermodal urbanization leads way to a richer experience of the city as well as paving way for a future that can potentially produce, or at least neutralize, travel related energy. Therefore, current road typologies were studied and redefined using a new language that directly relates to the roads’ and bike rails’ speed limit—a kit of parts. Every so often the roads and rails would form program to house amenities for cyclists which serve as the local hub. The proposal maintains a new type of streetscape that helps progress a sustainable mode of travel, promotes localization, and offer a new lens to which people may engage the city—the intermodal urbanization.

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Research

Strong and Fearless Less than 2 percent of Americans comprise a group of bicyclists who are ‘Strong & Fearless’. These bicyclists typically ride anywhere on any roadway regardless of roadway conditions or weather. These bicyclists can ride faster than other user types, prefer direct routes and will typically choose roadway connections – even if shared with vehicles – over separate bicycle facilities such as bicycle

Case Study of Cycling Cities LA has a potential to gather large communities of cyclists. However, the automotive take over since its industrialization has stunted the cycle communities growth. In order to cultivate enough interest a new infrastructure must be placed in main streets to help create a safer travel alternative via bicycles. Case studies around the world was observed in order to digest how other countries have adapted to a growing cycle community in the midst of technological advancements in automobiles.

No Way No Way The final 25-30 percent of Americans fall under the category of “No Way No How”. Some are physically unable to ride a bicycle. However, the majority of this group perceive severe safety issues with riding in traffic. Some people in this group may eventually give bicycling a second look and may progress to one of the user types above. A significant portion of these people will never ride a bicycle under any circumstances.

Enthusiastic and Confident Another 10 to 13 percent fall under the category of ‘Enthused and Confident’ bicyclists who are confident and mostly comfortable riding on all types of bicycle facilities but will usually prefer low traffic streets or multi-use pathways when available. These bicyclists may deviate from a more direct route in favor of a preferred facility type. This group includes all kinds of bicyclists including commuters, recreationalists, racers, and utilitarian bicyclists.

Interested but concerned 50-60 percent of the population can be categorized as ‘Interested but Concerned’ and represents bicyclists who typically only ride a bicycle on low traffic streets or bicycle paths under favorable conditions and weather. These infrequent or potential bicyclists perceive significant barriers towards increased use of bicycling with regards to traffic and safety. These bicyclists may become more regular riders with encouragement, education and experience.

LA - 2683796 drivers

Amsterdam - 337460 cyclists Coppenhagen - 264140 cyclists Coppenhagen - 185460 drivers Coppenhagen - 112400 public trans - 33% CoppenhagenCoppenhagen - 20% public trans Coppenhagen - 47% Amsterdam - 34% Amsterdam - 47% Amsterdam - 16% public trans Davis - 23004 cyclists Davis - 17% LA - 70% Amsterdam - 114800public trans - .6% LA - 7% public trans LA - 23004LA cyclists

Beijing - 256100 cyclists

Beijing - 45% Beijing - 19.7% Beijing - 22%

Amsterdam - 244120 drivers

LA - 268379 public trans

Beijing - 286000 drivers

Beijing - 585000 public trans

Gross Bikers Bikers Per Capita Gross Automobile Commuter Car Commuters Per Capita Gross Metro Commuters Metro Commuters Per Capita

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Bike Path Bike Lane Bike Friendly Streets

Existing Bicycle Infrastructure Current bike paths, lanes and friendly roads are scattered and do not oer a high potential to cultivate a higher volume of cyclists.

Bike Path Bike Lane Bike Friendly Streets LADOT Bike Plan

LADOT Plans The LADOT plans to harvest a the potential cyclists who are ‘enthused and condent’ and ‘interested but conscerned’ by implementing n infrastructure in the neighborhood areas.

Back Bone Plan The LA bike workgroup has implemented a ‘back bone’ plan for the ‘strong and fearless’ in order to take over some of the major streets that maintain high volume of automobile traffic. 65


Proposal

Slow Rail

Medium Rail

Fast Rail

The slow rail dips down to offer opportunities for dismounting the rail and merging closer to the ground level. 0-5mph

The medium rail bumps up to offer points to merge with other rails or the fast rail. The speed is between 5-10mph

The fast rail is flat, so as to maintain an uninterruppted journey. The speed is between 10-25mph

w Lo

k Bi

ffi ra eT

cD

sit en

y

ep-h-CS2BM2S3 This is an epicenter hub with high dense traffic. 2 slow lanes for cars, 2 medium rails and 3 slow lanes.

Slo wC ar T raffi c

Slo wB ike Tra ffic

gh Hi

ity ns De

Slow lane

Fast Lane

Space

The slow lane rises up to act like a speed bump. It also dips down to allow automobiles to access below grade parking. 0-25 mph.

The fast lane is flat, so as to maintain an uninterruppted journey. The speed is between 35-45 pmh

Space is created by using the up and down undulated roads to create pockets in section.

De

it ns

y


The project takes the Back Bone Plan and designs how Western, a street that extends from southern LA to Northern LA can cultivate all types of cyclists through implementing newer infrastructure. The infrastructure is compsed of a kit of parts that caters to pedestrians, cars and cyclists. They take into consideration the density of one type of traffic versus the other, as well as the speed of one specific traffic typology versus the other.


Axon

Floating Cyclist

Admin/Info Center

Street Level/Automobile Circu-

Public Amenities

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Sections


Steel Chanel 6”x12”, 3” opening

Steel Tube sleeves O = 1’

Magnetic Wing

Structural Steel Tube O = 1’

Structural joint

Cables


Renderings


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Models


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Work Experience/Student competition 5. Tran Residence (Studio Shift) 6. Lilypad/Lily Court (Jason Kim/Zoltan Neville) 7. Retreat House (Stan Wolf)

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78 84 88


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Tran Residence Studio Shift Principal: Mario Cipresso // Chris Warren (no longer with Studio Shift) Spring 2009 Size: 12,000 ft2 (1,115 m2) Responsibilites: Responsibilites for the Tran Residence on my part included working on the project mainly through schematic design doing. This was Primarily done through 3D modeling software (rhino), working on the plan in 2D (autoCAD) and working on a physical model which we used to present to the client. Project Team: Mario Cipresso, Jessica Chang, Yuan-Yu Chang, Garrett Helm, Jason Kim, Zoltan Neville, Tanya Retherford, Chris Warren

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Plans

C

D

B

A

9

E

1

2

10

8

8

7

1

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6 4

3

2

1 OUTDOOR LIVING SPACE 2 INDOOR LIVING SPACE 3 KITCHEN 4 GARAGE 5 GUEST ROOM 6 WORKSPACE 7 SWIMMING POOL 8 BEDROOM 9 MASTER BEDROOM 10 MASTER DECK 11 GREEN ROOF

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Sections


Renderings

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83


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Lilypad/Lilycourt Jason Kim/ Zoltan Neville Size: 9,000 ft2 (840 m2) Fall 2009 The Lilypad/Lilycourt was a student competition to design a rooftop bar and courtyard space for a newly built phoenix apartment complex. The project uses prefabricated umbrellas that establishes various types of spaces on the roof and courtyard space. the roof top is composed of a bar, shallow water compenent and a snaking bench that circulates around the prefabricated umbrellas. The courtyard is composed of similar elements but maintains more of a enclosed intimate atmosphere that is conducive to group meetings and studying.

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Concept

Pre-fab elements

Seating

Bar

Water Element

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Lily[pad]

Refresh: drinks_talk_laugh_dance_lounge_soothe Relaxation: sunbathe_read_converse_nap_sunset

Recreation: billiards_putting_cards_chess_play

N ROOF PLAN scale: 1’-0” = 1/4”

shading

seating/path

bar

waterscape

Lily[court] Meeting: discussion_business_casual_productive

Study Area: quiet_calm_focused_casual

Eating: food_talk_lunch_coffee_meet

N COURTYARD PLAN scale: 1’-0” = 1/4”

BY: ZOLTAN NEVILLE + JASON KIM

ZNEVILLE@USC.EDU +JASONHKI@USC.EDU USC 2010


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Retreat Home Principal: Stan Wolf Summer 2009 Size: 3,500 ft2 (325 m2) The retreat home was a project commissioned to Stan Wolf. During the project started the previous summer of 2008 and I continued to develope the retreat home for the summer of 2009. The work load consisted researching precedent research for lighting condition and design strategies. The house is bound by two utility walls that consists of storage space, water closests and other living amenities. The living spaces are floating platforms that are lofted on top of series of beams that tie the two utility walls together. Due to the small scale nature of the project, the models were developed between 1/4� scale and 1/2� scale.

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Undergraduate Studio 8. GMT Observatory (Paul Lubowicki/ Susan Lanier) 9. Art Monastery (Frank Clementi/Jennifer Cosgrove) 10. Re-Saintes (Selwyn Ting/Geral Knowles)

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96 108 118


GMT Spine Critic: Paul Lubowicki/ Susan Lanier USC Fall Semester 2009 Size: 100,000 ft2 (84,000 m2) Site: Las Campanas, Chile The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is the product of more than a century of astronomical research and telescope-building by some of the world’s leading research institutions. Scheduled for completion around 2018, the GMT will have the resolving power of a 24.5-meter (80 foot) primary mirror—far larger than any other telescope ever built. It will answer many of the ques-tions at the forefront of astrophysics today and will pose new and unanticipated riddles for future generations of astronomers. A number of facility buildings will exist on the summit in addition to the enclosure. the overall design goal is to keep heat-producing equipment and activities not directly related to nighttime observing operation separate from the enclosure.

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Site

The final design is a culmination of all the semesters work into one cohesive project. To introduce the premise of the GMT spine, the auxiliary program and lens operations were studied. This observation informed the overall parti. The concept initially began as a primary spine that plugged into the GMT infrastructure while having secondary spines that plugged into it. The concept then evolved into a series of splines that splayed across the site and was conforming to the landscape, the horizontal nature and the GMT the vertical nature. The auxiliary spine is the primary spine and all the other programs echo of this main spine.

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Circulation

Diagrams

Auxiliary Residence Control Admin Sustainability

Shading Devices

Structure

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Visitor Center


Ground Level Plan

Program Although the program largely revolves around the auxiliary, control and admin space, other amenities were considered in order to consider tourist attractions to the project itself. 100


Sections/Renderings

101


Models


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Art Monastery Critic: Frank Clementi/Jennifer Cosgrove USC Spring Semester 2009 Size: 14,000 ft2 (1,300 m2) Site: Los Angeles, California, USA The project tries to copy other subsidized artist residency such as the L.A. brewery or Les Frigos in France, as well as providing a specific design that is intended for the artist user group. On many levels it exhibits a “layered” aspect that is often exhibited in graffiti tagging itself. It collapses the gold line, the project and view to down town; the structure skin and glass forms another layer; and the units themselves are a matrix of walls that are layered in plan. The project plays a dual role in mediating a facility, or infrastructure that tries to legitimizes the illegitimate art, while maintaining a “gallery” space that is elevated near the metro gold line with an outer skin, the architects’ graffiti over the interior gallery, that is unpaintable. Furthermore, the gallery plays a polemical role in attracting, questioning the user group and visitors by presenting a showcase for an illegitimate art, in which case graffiti can be exhibited in the units themselves.

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Site The Site is located in Los Angeles, North of the downtown area. It is directly south of the gold line and maintains a view to the Los Angeles skyline. The Project tries to mediate the view, via the floating gallery, between the gold line and the downtown skyline. The site also has many cultural elements that merge here. To the south of the site, there is olvera street, the historic district rich with spanish culture. Furthermore, Chinatown lborders the west side.

West Elevation


Site


Plan

Exhibition Space Program consists of the floating exhibition space; the artist living cells, the admin and living amenities for the artists.

Elevated Outdoor Space Program consists of the floating exhibition space; the artist living cells, the admin and living amenities for the artists.

Living Cells Program consists of the floating exhibition space; the artist living cells, the admin and living amenities for the artists.

Admin/Visitor Center Program consists of the floating exhibition space; the artist living cells, the admin and living amenities for the artists. 112


Diagrams Program Distribution Program consists of the floating exhibition space; the artist living cells, the admin and living amenities for the artists.

Circulation The Circulation exists on the landscape piece that is the roof of the lower level programs which take you to the elevated outdoor area.

Structure The structure in the lower level consists of concrete bearing walls whilee the floating gallery space is made up of two trusses that are stitched with beams.

Air Circulation and Heating Heating and cooling in the floating gallery space is resoved by the plynums of the floors on the side. Each of the living units below have radiated floors.

Ventilation Each unit is a box that can be fully opened on either ends to create a cross ventilated passive system. 113


Renderings


Models


Re-Saintes Critic: Selwyn Ting/ Gerald Knowles USC Spring Semester 2009 Size: 100, 000 ft2 (84,000 m2) Site: Los Angeles, California, USA Re-Saintes creates a downtown that serves the local activities and a place for economy and trade while offering discovery and knowledge of the city’s history/ culture. Therefore, reclaiming this part of downtown to become a focal point of residential housing, economic trade, social activities, a stage for tourist—creating a city center for people. This will then relink the city center to the rest of Saintes. Also to create a green/sustainable space. Goals will be achieved by bringing in various programs on the site: housing, commerce and social and cultural programs to activate the site. The design will implement green design and cater to tourist activities.

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Site Site Saintes is located on the banks of the Charente River, between La Rochelle and Bordeaux. The town is known for being one of France’s major epicenter for history as it was once a Roman site as the perimeters are marked with archs from that time period. The site is near the old amphitheatre and maintains a elevated location that makes it virtually visible from anywhere in the town. To the North lies commercial areas and to the south Residential homes in which can have an interesting potential for when it meets on the site.


Plan


Axon/Section Concept The main concept of the project hinges on a layered system which exists on a grid. the commercial areas are the first layers which act as a landscape piece that travels the site while the residential blocks site on top.


Renderings

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Models


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Graphic Design/Visual Studies 11. Rethinking BIM 12. The (Blank) House 13. Urban Market Space Definition

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Rethinking BIM (Revit) Critic: Mark Green Spring 2011 The TruTec Building maintains an illusion of a parameterized facade by using a pattern based system that only uses two types of curtain wall panels, flipping them and populating the vertical surface. The investigation of Rethinking the TruTec Building starts by only using one type of curtain wall panel and making responsive to a specific set of rules so no one pattern is the same as the next. This will use a single curtain wall pattern that responds to an input parameter, to create the same diverse effect that is generated from the orginal surface of the TruTec project.

P Width = 2.7

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Offs

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The (Blank) House Critic: Michael Young Fall 2010 The (Blank) House studies Diller + Scofidio’s Slow house and parameterizes each component that defines the house as a formal object that is geared to a specific movement, site, orientation and set of rules. The Slow House is derived from a series of diagrams and parameters that Diller+Scofidio formulated. They created a drafting table to produce their drawings. However, by digitizing these paramters, the house can morph into a series of studies that emulate various other types of houses. The pace of the frame adjustst the speed of the house; the distance of the two circles define the forms of the wall and view corridors, and order of the frames establish a certain hierarchy.

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Fast House The Fast house adjusts the pacing of the key frames to create a collapsed view corridor.

Align House The diameter of the two circles control the curvature of the two walls

Slower House By spreading out the frames, the slow house becomes even slower.

Reverse House By moving the two circles center point closer to each other, the house flips in on itself.

Shuffle House Reordering the frames, will alter the hierarchy of the specific views in the house. 133

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations and sections in same

ghosted operations and sections in same

ghosted operations and sections in same

operating agent

operating agent

operating agent

current section

current section

current section

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations and sections in same

ghosted operations and sections in same

ghosted operations and sections in same

operating agent

operating agent

operating agent

current section

current section

current section

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations and sections in same

ghosted operations and sections in same

ghosted operations and sections in same

operating agent

operating agent

operating agent

current section

current section

current section

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations and sections in same

ghosted operations and sections in same

ghosted operations and sections in same

operating agent

operating agent

operating agent

current section

current section

current section

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations in different series

ghosted operations and sections in same

ghosted operations and sections in same

ghosted operations and sections in same

operating agent

operating agent

operating agent

current section

current section

current section


Urban Market Space Definition (GIS) Critic: Brian Brush Fall 2010 125th street maintains a high density of street vendors who vie for the attention of tourists and people who are looking to buy various items for really cheap. However, due to the items’ similarity, the competitions for these vendors are typically not driven by the demand for their goods but rather their location, convenience and things for really cheap. This being said, there are “pockets” of these vendors who aggregate along a 125th’s own street edge along major landmarks, restaurants and high density foot traffic. These vendors start to form and reform the urban spatia experience along the edge condition of 125th street. These conditions can be categorized into four main components that work harmoniously in defining 125th street’s edge condition: the activated dead facade; retail plug out; plaza; and land mark vendors. These maps will illustrate how the vendor points between Lenox (5th Ave and Morningside) work with one another; along with the existing urban fabric and infrastructure.

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Portfolio of Works 2011  

Portfolio of Undergrad, Grad and Professional projects.

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