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Segment II Portfolio Submission - January 2012 Boston Architectural College

Jason G. Boone, M.Arch Candidate


only include those phases of the design and construction processes in which I personally participated. The personal projects are less structured but communicate my participation in campus life at the BAC as well as my recent travel experiences to Italy.

Each individual academic project is presented developmentally from concept and analysis through schematic design to design development. Professional projects are presented developmentally but

Each project in the portfolio is articulated graphically and with an associated narrative beginning with an overview and concluding with learning that has occurred.

Jason G. Boone Segment II Portfolio Submission - January 2012

This portfolio documents my growth and progress through Segment II. It is organized into three components: Academic Work, Practice Projects, and Personal Explorations. The projects in each component are presented chronologically.

Introduction

photo by: Bonica Ayala


Resume

Allston Square Academy - Allston, Ma

AC-49

Library - Boston, Ma

PR-3

Burgess ES - Sturbridge, Ma

PR-17

CEFPI International Conference - 2009

PR-27

DPW Roofing & Masonry Restoration

PR-39

Putnam High School Feasibility Study - Putnam, CT

PR-53

P-1

BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE

PRACTICE

Wayland Community Pool - Wayland, Ma

Atelier - Boston Architectural College

AT E L I E R

P-2

Italy - 2011

P-12

Conclusion

PERSONAL

AC-23

ACADEMIC

Hotel Artistique - Cambridge, Ma

AC-1


Jason G. Boone Segment II Portfolio Submission - January 2012

Table of Contents


Objective

Advance innovative educational learning environments

Education 2007 – Present

Boston Architectural College, Boston, Massachusetts Masters of Architecture GPA 3.30/4.0

1995-1998

Indiana State University, Terre Haute, Indiana Bachelor of Science, Secondary Mathematics Education, May 1998 GPA 3.1/4.0.

1993-1995

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute, Indiana Mechanical Engineering Major

Work Experience 2008 – Present

Drummey Rosane Anderson, Newton, Massachusetts Educational Planner, Designer • Write responses to RFQs, RFSs, and RFPs • Engage MSBA, BSF and other state and local agencies • Space Programming & Facilitation • School Facility Planning and Design

2006 – 2007

Frank Locker, Incorporated, Boston, Massachusetts Planner • Facilitate educational visioning • Create conceptual illustrations • Conduct educational facility planning • Perform complex data analysis • Draft educational specifications • Perform research • Communicate with clients and partners

2005 – 2006

W.T. Boone Enterprises, Inc., Franklin, Indiana General Manager • Manage customer relations, human resources, purchase materials and tooling, , create and maintained production line schedule • Set-up, program and operate CNC Machinery • Perform cycle time and labor analysis • Coordinate environmental research, site clean-up, and office renovation

2001- 2005

DeJong & Associates, Inc., Dublin, Ohio Project Coordinator • Facilitate educational visioning workshops • Create conceptual illustrations • Conduct educational facility planning workshops • Perform complex data analysis • Draft educational specifications • Develop enrollment projections • Perform research


1999-2001

Franklin Community High School, Franklin, Indiana Teacher/Coach

Computer Skills

AutoCAD 2010, Revit 2011, Google Sketch-up, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe In-Design, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Access, Microsoft Visio.

Scholarships and Awards

• • • •

Rose-Hulman Honors Scholarship – 1993 Senior Choice Most Influential Educator – 2001 David W Anderson Traveling Fellowship – 2008 Boston Architectural College Alumni Scholarship – 2009

Presentations

School Transformation Development Map – CEFPI International Conference, 2007 & 2008 Learning Modalities and Space – CEFPI International Conference, 2009 The Social Spaces – CEFPI Northeast Regional Conference. 2011

• •

Boards and Committees

Learning Modalities and Space – Educational Facility Planner, Volume 44 Issue 2 & 3 • • • • •

Atelier Board, President – Boston Architectural College, 2011-present Board of Trustees, Ex-officio member, Boston Architectural College, 2011-present Atelier Board, Student Representative – Boston Architectural College, 2010-11 Curriculum Committee, Voting Student Representative – Boston Architectural College, 2010-11 Educational Policies Committee, Voting Student Representative – Boston Architectural College, 2010-11

Outside Interests

Golf Travel Drawing Photography

Volleyball Learning Theory Painting

References

Dr. Frank Locker, AIA, REFP fl@franklocker.com (former employer) Cindy Ruble Superintendent, Lakeview Public Schools cruble@lakeviewspartans.org (client) Jeffrey LeClair jleclair@gmail.com (Graduate School Instructor)

Resume

Publications

Jason G. Boone Segment II Portfolio Submission - January 2012

Work Experience (Cont)


C-2: Boutique Hotel in Central Square David Eccleston, Fall 2009

Hotel Artistique - Cambridge, MA


Exisiting Use


Project Overview The proposal locates a new boutique hotel at the corner of Massachusetts Avenue and Pleasant Street in the heart of Central Square. The project was grounded in reality as developers had recently begun construction on a similar scale and building type in Harvard Square just a few weeks earlier. As such, it was necessary to perform all the relevant zoning research including any special district regulations. The existing site is occupied by a single story wood-framed structure housing a 7-Eleven convenient store,

a used bookstore, the Cantab Lounge, ABC Pizza and a local dry cleaner. The neighboring plots are occupied by the Cambridge Post Office, Cambridge City Hall, and several multi-story, mixed use buildings that are not only at a much different scale than the building on the proposed site, but are also of significantly different materials. The ultimate goal of the project was to reinvigorate this high profile site that had long been under utilized.


Site Analysis 1 3

4 2

The proposed site is located in the heart of Central Square Cambridge, Massachusetts, an urban neighborhood rich with diverse demographics, building types, and architecture. As a site on the western end of its block, it has tremendous potential to anchor two prominent corners at the intersections of Massachusetts Avenue and Pleasant Street as well as Pleasant Street and Green Street. The existing structures are singlestory wood frame retail business and expected to be demolished. Based on the zoning requirements, the setback requirement is twenty feet from the adjacent residential units, which begin at an elevation 10 feet above grade. Additionally, the buildable floor area is based on Floor Area Ratio (F.A.R) of 2.5 - 3.0 with a variance. The resulting buildable area is approximately 55,000 total gross square feet.

As a compromise for procuring the public parking lot at the rear of the site, the eventual program must provide replacement parking - most likely in a below-grade parking structure located beneath the development. Among the early elements studied were the architectural context, street scape and edge conditions, and the coexistence of the proposed hotel with enough retail to maintain and attract pedestrian traffic to the site.

1 3

4

2


Several distinct edge conditions exist adjacent to and inclose proximity to the proposed site. In general sidewalks are wide with occasional fauna. Trees, awnings and overhangs all serve to reduce the scale of the street scape. When only one of these elements exist, the scale becomes more intimidating but still manageable. When both elements are missing, the scale is overpowering and harsh. Similarly, most sidewalks possess a variety of fixed and flexible seating zones. These areas not only encourage pedestrians to linger

Sidewalks Proposed Site Built Environment

in front of retail and restaurant businesses, but also transition the verticality of the building facades into the horizontally of the road bed. Without these seating areas, the sidewalk feels overly expansive. And, the transition from vertical to horizontal is especially abrupt. The most pleasing edge conditions are where the tree canopy intrudes on the space occupied by the awnings and overhangs and where seating further softens the transition to the street.


Concept Vehicular Circulation

Pedestrian Circulation


“...develop a variety of strategies to reinvigorate the street edge and to drive pedestrians ‘around the corner.� Although the proposed site is easily accessible via public transportation, the target demographic is likely to arrive via taxi, limousine, or rental car. Additionally, a hotel of this size requires sizable deliveries, which ideally would occur on site rather than in the street. The sketches immediately to the far left are conceptual footprint diagrams and sections articulating vehicular site access and sidewalk edge conditions. Instinctively, Pleasant Street seemed the most appropriate as it effectively separated the reception functions and conferencing center functions and occurred along the longest site dimension. The fourth iteration with the approach along Green Street, however, better manages the

path of travel from River Street not requiring vehicles to navigate the no left turn onto Mass Ave from Western Ave. It manages a potential conflict between pedestrians and vehicles along Pleasant Street. Additionally, it grants the eventual building form more access to Southern daylight. As a result of the existing edges study, it was important to explore strategies to manage the scale and overall experience of the sidewalk. Although seemingly detailed in scope, the images on this page represent the first conceptual goal of the project, to develop a variety of strategies to reinvigorate the street edge and to drive pedestrians around the corner.


Concept - Program


Guest rooms should be based on a standard structural bay, be easily adapted to a variety of room types, and serve the needs of the target clientèle.

Boutique hotels often serve a highly specific market. The target market for this project is based on its proximity to MIT and Harvard, the large biotechnology industry in Cambridge, and the frequent tourists. This clientele may require programmatic elements in addition to a well appointed guest room. Similarly, the interest in activating the street edge serves as the driver for the final programmatic elements. target market • business traveler • visiting university professor/ speaker • visiting parents of university students

basic program core elements • services (laundry, engineering, • housekeeping) • registration • concierge • administrative offices • tenant spaces • retail • hospitality • art gallery/lobby • restaurant & bar • fitness room • ball room • conference • meeting rooms • technology center • occupant spaces • bedrooms (36-40) • suites (8-10) • luxury suites (1-2)


Schematic Design

Research & Investigation Research and interviews with architects specializing in hotel design suggested that hotels are studies in efficiency. They must attract clientele but accommodate as many patrons as possible. As such, it was a critical early step to leverage the guest room studies against potential internal circulation patterns in the site context. The sketches on this and the facing page represent eleven iterations of that study. The final iteration represents a circulation pattern that accomplished several goals and mitigated several liabilities better than the previous ten. First, by orienting the main corridor along a diagonal of the site, the longest dimension for

guest rooms was achieved with the fewest corners. Next, this orientation was largely influenced by the solar orientation of the site as this nearly East-West diagonal provides the greatest potential for natural light into interior spaces. This circulation pattern also mitigates both the twenty-foot setback requirement along the adjacent residential units, but also mitigates the views to and from these units into the guest rooms. Finally, this orientation guarantees the appropriate site coverage as dictated by the F.A.R., sets up a strong architectural dialogue with the facing City Hall, provides an opportunity to establish two public plazas and maximize the street edge for retail and storefronts.


Schematic Design


The guest rooms of a hotel are the often the most critical programmatic element. This is especially true in boutique hotels where the room counts tend to be low. Appointments need not be overly lavish to be successful and room sizes must not be overly large in an effort maximize the number of guests at any one time. The image at the far left from the Bulgari hotel was the precedent chosen to represent the size and basic character of the guest rooms in this design: enough space to accommodate a full-size bath room,

modest storage space, a king or two queen sized beds, a largeformat flat screen television and a well appointed workstation. The additional images were precedents representing similar finishes and a range of sizing possibilities. The enlarged plan at above represents a typical guest room in the final hotel design. It serves as the basis from which the other rooms were derived and meets the criteria described above.


Schematic Design

Translation Each of the site plan iterations was based on the following concepts: • Maximize the “edge” - provide the greatest number of store fronts accessible to pedestrian traffic • Activate the “edge” develop the pre-existing concept of using the sidewalk as an occupied and functional space for more than circulation. • Own the corners - establish an architectural feature at the street intersections to create interest and anchor the city block. • Around the corner - set-up a site circulation pattern that encourages pedestrian traffic to • round the corner and continue down Pleasant Street to Green Street. The earliest site sketches expressed the desire to maximize the physical edge of the hotel at

the sidewalk. This strategy was intended to not only create energy by maximizing views into retail spaces, but also by creating alcoves where outdoor seating could occur. As the site strategy developed, the objectives remained the same, but the complexity of physical edge was simplified, emphasis was placed on owning the corners with structure rather than plaza to better respond to the urban quality of the site. Materials The schematic elevation studies, conducted concurrently with the siting strategies, were intended to explore the artistic and eclectic qualities present in Central Square. They are based on the colored glass awnings and bus stop shelters. The attempt was to express a contemporary facade that would reinforce the concepts of reinvigorating the street edge and attracting pedestrians around the corner.


Schematic Design

Ground Floor

Middle Floors

“...create an experience of partial enclosure at the pedestrian arcade and a threshold through which one must pass to enter the main plaza.” As schematic design progressed and transitioned into design development, the concept of ‘around the corner’ was expressed in plan and in the experience of the the building form as a series of accute angles with a pedestrian arcade separating the main body of the hotel and that portion that actually occupies the corner of the parcel. Once determined, it was critical to verify that the arrangement of hotel rooms, the size and location of the conference functions, and circulation patterns all worked within this form. The three plan sketches on this page demonstrate how the programme was initially arranged within the building form. The two sectional sketches on this page illustrate two design

strategies leveraged for driving pedestrians around the corner: (1) Create penetrations in the connective space between the two ends of the main body of the hotel to allow light to penetrate the structure from the South into communal spaces and ultimately into the main plaza, (2) position a building mass in the form of a bridge to create an experience of partial enclosure at the pedestrian arcade and a threshold through which one must pass to enter the main plaza. The acute angle form became a repeated architectural element expressing the around the corner concept and was most often leveraged to establish special spaces and furnishings.

Upper Floors


There was an effort made to design holistically for as long as possible, meaning that the exterior building form, the interior arrangement of spaces and their volumes, and the programmatic square footages were all considered malleable enough to react to one another as the design progressed.

“...to allow light to penetrate the structure from the South into communal spaces and ultimately into the main plaza,...�

As a result, roof heights and locations were driven by a desire for sunlight is specific locations, floor openings were designed to improve the experience at the interior lobby, and main architectural stairs were designed to wrap around the elevator core to simulate the experience of traveling around the corner. The illustrations and diagrams on this page communicate the developmental and design intent for

a single interior space, the main lobby/art gallery space. In addition to the experience of moving around the corner, the design idea expressed in these images is that the architectural stair should function as an occupiable element in the room. A portion of the stair is available for sitting. Another portion is dedicated to a guest services technology work station.


Design Development

before

after


Retail

Retail

Retail Arcade

First Floor

Second Floor

Pub

Kitchen

Rcptn.

Lobby/ Gallery

Main Plaza

Elev.

Third Floor

Fourth Floor

Kitchen Servers

Dining Room

Fifth Floor

Sixth Floor


Proposal New Learning This project resulted in a significant level of learning. First, this project represented my first effort to recognize a social condition as a component of the analysis. The importance of the street edge and particularly the effect created by sidewalk seating and the introduction of trees proved to be a valuable lesson for not only this project but others to follow. Next, I learned the lesson that architecture when it meets the ground has the ability to influence behavior on the street. In this case, an angled facade and a opening in the building on the

ground create a sense of destination and an invitation for pedestrians to round the corner where they would not before. Finally, this project taught me something about the need for balance between design desire and practical restraint. In this case, it was important to observe balance between the amenities included in the programme and maximizing the number of guests served. It is a lesson that should serve useful in architectural practice as realworld projects must live within the constraints of the project budget, zoning and code redstrictions among others.


C-2: Mediation and Transition David Eccleston, Spring 2010

Allston Square Academy - North Allston, MA


Exisiting Use •

Existing Land Use

FOR HARVARD

Accommodating Preservation and Change •

Preserve the essential character of North Allston’s residential areas already threatened by regional economic pressures. Expand the affordable options for potential homebuyers and renters, relieving the pressure on the local housing market, and ensuring no new development in traditional neighborhoods. Guide growth to areas in which change is viewed as desirable and in ways that support new community amenities, such as a walkable Main Street, and promote increased economic opportunity for residents and businesses.

At first, the community viewed Harvard’s expansion orth Allston’s residential • Accommodate the University’s teaching and research as a threat that would exacerbate longstanding economic pressures. mission by providing long-term campus-growth concerns: increased demand for scarce housing, loss of traditional jobs, competition for open space, increased potential opportunity.

• •

A m o E c C n h E a

FOR THE COMMUNITY

FOR HARVARD traffic congestion, and disruption of the area’s highly the pressure on the •• Preserve Enhance quality of campus to attract the Harvard the essentialthe character of North Allston’s residential •life Accommodate the University’s teaching and res valued traditional neighborhoods. areas already threatened by regional economic pressures. mission by providing long-term campus-growth g no new development community to live, work, and study in North Allston. • Expand the affordable options for potential opportunity. Harvard’s expanded presence soon came to be seen as and relieving thea pressure on the • Enhance the quality of campus life to attract the • homebuyers Create arenters, residential campus to meet Harvard’s housing local housing market, and ensuring no new development community to live, work, and study in North Al dating Preservation and Changepositive catalyst to address these issues. The community, opportunity here in traditional neighborhoods. • Create a residential campus to meet Harvard’s h ange is viewed needs, including Harvard, and the City worked together to establish a the University-wide goal to provide to be part of it.” • Guide growth to areas in which change is viewed needs, including the University-wide goal to pro ommunity viewed Harvard’s expansion series of mutually interdependent goals to ensure that as desirable and in ways that support new community housing for 50% of its graduate students. chair of the North Allston rt would new community housing for 50% of its graduate students. hat exacerbate , in an interview with longstanding amenities, such as a walkable Main Street, and promote • Enhance access to North Allston from the Camb planning to accommodate Harvard’s strategy would William Marchione increased economic access opportunity for residents and Allston from and Longwood Area campuses and else Street, and promote creased demand for scarce housing, loss • Enhance to North the Medical Cambridge unlock the ability to address a number of critical issues: Amon The stability of North Allston’s residential areas is represented by its wellbusinesses. jobs, competition for open space, increased maintained streets and by much of its housing stock. residents and and Longwood Medical Area campuses and elsewhere. initiat

stion, and Project disruption of the area’s highly Overview

The proposal locates a new ional Factors neighborhoods. affecting affordability

in North Allston elementary school (Allston Square Academy) on the site vailing of industrial commercial uses, particularly in the east the current W. Smith Field, • presence Between soon 1996 came and 2000, rents in North Allston increased by over 55%, panded be only seenon as a a parcel which liestonot with the median single-family home price rising to $330,000. the boundary between Harvard (Allston Landing North) and central (Brighton Mills/ lyst to address these issues. The community, University’s South campus and • As of residential 2002, median household (MHI) was $64,313 the neighborhood ofin the d Holton the City worked together to establish a income Street) sub-areas (beige existing land use North but also between (vs. the Allston, Boston MHI of $74,200). tually interdependent goals to ensure that the Charles River and Western diagram), continued planning and analysis will be Avenue.

implementation steps(see the last chapter). To illustrate how the goals and aspirations of all major stakeholders might be translated into physical terms,

accommodate strategy would • NearlyHarvard’s half of households in North Allston earn less than 120% of the Boston Area Median Income (AMI). mix of uses on each required to ensure the appropriate Although the scope of the project bility to address a number of critical issues:

Mayor Menino presented a conceptual portrait of a new

is entirely pragmatic, the design Less than 40% of households earning the AMIAreas.) can afford site.• (See pages 21-22 regarding the80-120% SpecialofStudy

is the new Spangler Center at Western Avenue. North Allston, first to initiatives the North Allston Planning Group

from the owner’s point-of-view

The stability of North Allston’s residential areas is represented by its wellmaintained streets and by much of its housing stock.

solution mediates home in the neighborhood; less than the medianintentionally price of a single-family between the approaching 20% can afford the typical rentand for a new two-bedroom apartment. Harvard University campus

n North Allston the residential neighborhood This common vision served as the basis for a set of

and gracefully transitions the orth Allston increased by over disparate scales and55%, densities of GuidingthePrinciples that are detailed urban entities. e price rising totwo $330,000.

beginning on page 16.

Among the Harvard Business School’s most recent campus devel

in June 2003, and then to the public the following

September. This portrait – captured on pages 8 and 9 – The W

Camb

expresses the priorities discovered during the planning

These principles are designed to inform future initiatives

process, and illustrates what could occur in North Allston

in housing, public realm improvements, transportation

over the next 20 years. Rather than precluding other

me (MHI) was $64,313

Allston earn less than 120% of the

Source: Allston Strategic Framework for Planning, Boston Redevelopment Authority, May 2005

and mobility plans, economic and workforce development

design options, the images represent one possible


Site Analysis

Source: Allston Strategic Framework for Planning, Boston Redevelopment Authority, May 2005

Site Analysis Characteristics of the site provide several exciting design opportunities and challenges. Although no pedestrian connection currently exists, there is potential to use the site to connect the residential neighborhood to the Charles River. The site touches a vehicular node that has the potential to become an urban hub and pedestrian square similar to Harvard Square. The adjacent parcels each have a different use. Each edge must be articulated carefully to successfully mediate between the disparate conditions. The site is sufficiently large to accommodate the educational programme as well as continuing to

serve as a public open space. The solar orientation provides the potential for ample natural daylight. The adjacent structures and surrounding neighborhood buildings are composed a wide variety of exterior materials. Most structures associated with Harvard University are composed of masonry (most often red brick) and/or concrete. Most residential buildings are composed of horizontal wood clapboards. Along Western Avenue there are few trees to provide shade from the summer sun or to soften the harshness of the vehicular corridor. The only substantial trees are on the site but behind an existing stone wall rendering them ineffective for pedestrians on the sidewalk.


SYMBOLS LEGEND Residential Boundary Street Presence University Boundary Pedestrian Connection

Vehicular Circulation

Activity Node

Solar Path

PM

AM

NOON


Concept The Allston Elementary School project will transform the existing Smith Field site from an under utilized open green space into not only a site that will better manage the relationship of the North Allston neighborhood and the encroaching development currently being developed by Harvard University, but also into publicly accessible green space physically connecting citizens to the Charles River. To accomplish this, first the project will leverage a new 450-student approximately 75,000 SF elementary school to establish a neighborhood presence at this critical location that will position the neighborhood to define North Allston Square for itself. Second, the project will leverage piazzas and boardwalks, open grass and formal play areas to improve the pedestrian-friendly quality of the site, set-up an identifiable threshold between North Allston and Harvard, as well as provide a physical connection for the local citizens to the Charles River.

Future State The design proposal for the site encompasses development of the entire parcel including a new pedestrian boardwalk, a new 450 student K-5 elementary school, public comfort station containing storage and restrooms, and public piazza. In conjunction with this work, the town of Allston will be making improvements to the sidewalks at Western Avenue and coordinating work on a new green pedestrian bridge connecting the Northern boundary of the site with the Charles River Park.

Existing State The existing site is currently utilized as an open space containing several softball diamonds, a public roller hockey rink, two tennis courts, and children’s playground equipment. All existing structures are to be demolished. All existing trees are to be removed by a professional arborist and stored for reinstallation on the site. The existing playground equipment is to be disassembled and stored for reinstallation. Refer to figure #2 and referenced photos for further information.

 K-5 Playground – Reinstalled from the existing site in a new location with a stone wall around its perimeter

Site Amenities  Public Piazza at the Southeast corner of the parcel – hardscape of pervious concrete pavers, fountain, lighting, and landscaping  Public Boardwalk along the Eastern and Northern boundaries of the parcel – hardscape of pervious pavers bounded by a stone wall, relocated trees, and lighting

 Parking – pervious concrete and granite curbs, approximately 50 vehicles, and lighting  Public Dual Season Rink (roller skates and ice skates) – sealed concrete with protective boards similar to existing in new location

EXISTING STATE


FUTURE STATE

Playground Section

Boardwalk Section


Schematic Design PROGRAMME Target Student Enrollment: 450 Students per Classroom: 25+/Semi-public Spaces Gymnasium Library Cafeteria PTA Room Private Spaces Instructional Studios DaVinci Studio Music Room Kitchen TOTAL GROSS SF

PRIVATE

1 1 1 1

18 3 1 1

@ 6,000 SF @ 2,700 SF @ 5,000 SF* @ 200 SF @ 800 SF ea. @ 1,200 SF ea. @ 1,200 SF @ 1,750 SF

73,125 SF**

* This square footage includes a staff dining area and a performance platform. ** This total is based on the current Massachusetts School Building Authority guidelines for elementary schools with this target enrollment (August 2008)

PUBLIC


FIRST FLOOR

LEARNING COMMUNITY CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

FOURTH FLOOR

The schematic design articulates a planning solution to the educational programme. The solution first sets up a relationship between the public and private elements. It was important the planning and ultimately the architecture invite members of the general public to utilize the building rather than simply observe it from afar. The challenge was to establish this relationship without compromising the safety and security of the students. This was accomplished by creating a ‘front door/back door’ approach to circulation with thresholds between them that can be easily managed by school staff. Next, the schematic design articulates the school’s organizational model of small learning communities by

grouping sets of three classrooms together around a series of break out spaces. A second level of organization is expressed by grouping these learning communities in pairs on either side of several shared spaces. The educational intent was for three teachers to coordinate their instruction on a daily basis and for six teachers to coordinate at longer intervals but have the flexibilty to determine the frequency and extent of colaboration for themselves. To accomplish this, it was imperitive that traffic from one learning community to shared functions like the Library not pass through another learning community.


Schematic Design

“...function as an educational institution.” “...a strategy for grounding and protecting the North Allston community...” “...evoke a sense of architectural pride...”


FIGURE 1

FIGURE 4

FIGURE 2

The educational paradigm is one of collaborative teaching and differentiated instruction. In layman’s terms, teachers are expected to work together rather than in isolation and learning activities are specialized to individual learning modalities. The schematic design expression this paradigm by connecting instructional areas with both man and overhead garage doors, by leveraging interior glazing to create vision connections, by articulating furnishings intended to be reconfigured at a moment’s notice, and by establishing break out spaces immediately adjacent to instructional spaces (see figure 4) The schematic design reflects the desire to clearly establish the school as being ‘of the neighborhood’ rather than ‘of the university’. Figures 1, 2, and 3 are initial attempts at incorporating horizontal clapboards as surface materials while maintaining a contemporary aesthetic. The views depicted are of the Gymnasium end of the building, a component that must

FIGURE 3

balance scale - large enough to define the piazza but small enough to encourage public use functionality and street presence. The ultimate goal of the design is to first function as an educational institution grating the users the agility to change their educational paradigm over time without the building interfering. A secondary goal of the design is for it to serve as a strategy for grounding and protecting the North Allston community (namely its residents) from the encroaching Harvard University and other Boston Redevelopment Authority development. Finally, a tertiary goal of the design is to evoke a sense of architectural pride in a building associated with the neighborhood, one to which future development must respond.


Schematic Design The overall massing is based on the barbell typology. The public and private components of the programme are expressed as higher massing elements with the Library and Cafeteria (semi-public spaces) serving as the connective tissue. The long-axis of the barbell has been oriented parallel to the East West axis to take advantage of Southern exposure for daylighting purposes. Similarly, the connective tissue elements are stepped to allow North-facing spaces to benefit from Southern exposure. The roof planes have been articulated as inverted gables to first honor the gabled roofs of the residential neighborhood buildings and second to harvest solar energy and rain water for school use, both as resources and as learning tools. The flat roof sections at the academic (Western) portion of the building are designed as inhabitable vegetated roofs. While the connective tissue roofs will possess a white reflective roofing material intended to reduce cooling costs. North-facing spaces, specifically the Cafeteria and Music Room will

SOUTH ELEVATION

benefit from significant curtain walls to take advantage of the pleasant views to the green space and the Charles River beyond.

The Library, the intellectual heart of the school, is centrally located, accessible to all learning communities and the general public. Despite not possessing an exterior edge, natural daylight is streamed into the library through carefully placed clerestory window and storefront for borrowed light. Although not finalized at the schematic design phase, the materiality is intended to reflect being ‘of the neighborhood’ rather than ‘of the university’. Oversized horizontal wood clapboards will accentuate the academic and Gymnasium portions of the building while occupiable windows and storefront on the lower levels establish a retail-like street presence for pedestrians. To create balance and a more aesthetically pleasing street edge, the connective tissue spaces are curvilinear and locate administrative functions at the apex of the curve for easy way-finding to the front door.


BASEMENT FLOOR NORTHWEST ELEVATION MASSING

FIRST FLOOR

NORTHEAST ELEVATION MASSING

SECOND FLOOR

SOUTH ELEVATION MASSING THIRD FLOOR

FOURTH FLOOR NORTH ELEVATION MASSING

ROOF PLAN


Design Development The design development phase was largely concerned with the technical process of making the schematic design real. Bubble diagrams were articulated as complete building systems including structural steel, castin-place concrete floor slabs, windows and glazing, and all finish materials.

The design is supported by a combination structural steel frame and cast-in-place reinforced concrete. For the typical wall section, the design referenced the neighborhood through the use of 24” wide horizontal wood clapboards, wood trimmed widows and window grilles, and natural stone veneer similar to the existing stone wall along Western Avenue. Floor to floor heights in the academic portion of the building were finalized at 16’-0” to allow for below floor wiring and

mechanical systems. The intent was to deliver hot air to rooms above and cooled air to the rooms below using this plemum, all while allowing the greatest agility to move furnishings and equipment without being limited by electrical and mechanical device locations.

The vegetated roof-top gardens are accessible to all learning communities just as the Library is for educational purposes. Each garden has been designed for a slightly different experience. The South-facing garden will receive direct sunlight, will feel exposed and bright even in winter months, and will be suitable to certain plant types. The North-facing garden will always been sheltered and in the shade of the building. It will feel quiet, protected, benefit from a view of the green and the water beyond, and will be suitable for a different variety of plants.

A

A DEEP SOIL VEGITATED ROOF

A

B

C

B

B

C

B

B

C

B

D

D

D

B INSTRUCTIONAL STUDIO C DA VINCI STUDIO D MECHANICAL F LIBRARY

SECTION 2


2 1

FIRST FLOOR

SECTION DETAIL 4 SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

SECTION DETAIL 3

FOURTH FLOOR D

F

SECTION 1

TYPICAL WALL SECTION

SECTION DETAIL 1


Design Development

Every instructional studio is an art room in disguise. They are intended to embody the educational paradigm of differentiated learning, an instructional approach that relies on a high degree of hands-on and project-based learning. As such, each room has ample natural daylight (controlled by sun-shading devices so that blinds are not required and heat gain managed).

Specialized furnishings reflect recent learning research suggesting that visual and kinesthetic learners require more horizontal surface than traditional furnishings offer. Rather than 18” square tablet arm-chairs, students are half of 60”x24” mobile table. Similarly, custom curvilinear breakout tables have been designed to SUMMER SOLSTICE

encourage both group work and private study based on learning research.

Although room sizes are not overly generous, floor to floor heights have been extended to provide more volume, inviting freedom of movement and the sense of larger space. There are no formal teacher desks in each room as they are intended to function as a suite rather than isolated classrooms. Three instructors and any aides are expected to flow between the three spaces and out into the corridor for instructional activities. Finally, each room possesses vertical pin-up surfaces intended to aid visual learners by improving their ability to see multiple materials simultaneously and to aid auditory learnings by damping sound which otherwise might be reflected off hard surcaces.

INSTRUCTIONAL STUDIO

WINTER SOLSTICE


SUMMER SOLSTICE

WINTER SOLSTICE

KINDERGARTEN PIAZZA

Each learning community is designated with a different color for ease of wayfinding. A focal area in the piazza serves as a break-out space sized to accommodate all the children in the learning community at once for a presentation or special activity. Because circulation has been carefully articulated, a strong sense of identity is established for each community. No other children or staff need pass through another community to reach shared spaces such as the Library, Cafeteria, or Gymnasium.

The result is the ability to operate with a high degree of permeability to each instructional studio. The center studio possess a glass sectional overhead door that gives the sense of openness when instructors deem this appropriate. Water and storage is available in each piazza for food-related projects and to soften the institutional feel of the school. The edge of the piazza has been designed to create ad-hoc campfire and cave spaces for children to define for themselves without the worry of being unsupervised.


Design Development Three critical spaces that determine the effectiveness of the public/private relationship within the school are the Cafeteria, the Cafe’, and the Gymnasium. To make the relationship a successful one, the general public must have access the school building during the school day and in much the same manner that they might access a retail establishment. To this end, a for lease restaurant occupies a space along Western Avenue, but immediately adjacent to the main entrance of the school and its central administration. Patrons may dine at their leisure throughout the day, but may not cross a threshold which leads to the student cafeteria. Similarly, the Gymnasium is a space that can be occupied by the general public before, during

and after the school day, but only when not occupied by students. The circulation patterned has been carefully articulated so that students have ‘back-door’ access through their Cafeteria and the community has access through the East end of the Gymnasium at the piazza. Again, members of the community are not invited to cross a threshold leading to the student Cafeteria. Even if, by accident, someone does wander into the Cafeteria, they must pass by the Central Administration area to gain access directly to students. Aesthetically, the student Cafeteria is designed to take advantage of Northfacing curtain wall with spectacular views of an exterior patio and the green space beyond. Tables have been chosen to keep conversation distances short and noise levels down.

PRIVATE

CAFETERIA

KITCHEN & SERVERY ADMIN CAFE’

KITCHEN

PUBLIC


Design Development


The Library serves as the intellectual hub of the school and as the symbol for the free flow of knowledge and learning. As such, it is located at the crossroads of all circulation paths, easily accessible from anywhere in the school. The design is open and airy with carefully articulated access to natural daylight and views to the open green space. The proximity to the cafeteria and the open balcony of the Library on the second floor communicate the relationship between study and food. This libary is designed to encourage food and study, collaboration and controlled noise.

Quiet areas and noisy areas are separated by the monumental stair connecting the two floors. This stair links the circulation desk, a technology counter, and an upholstered bench to establish an architectural focal point at the center of the room.


Proposal


The Allston Square Academy manages the relationship between the encroaching Harvard University development and the residential neighborhood of North Allston. Its siting, massing and scale establish a dialogue of coexistence while clearly defining a threshold between the two entities. In total the project not only satisfies a public need for a new elementary school in the neighborhood, but also for architecture that is a source of pride and ownership for the residents of North Allston. These objectives have been accomplished by carefully considering the separation of public and private usage, material selection and placement, and the development of the site to enhance public use. Spaces within the school have been provided for public, daytime use of the building including a restaurant and access to the Library. After-hours access has also been accommodated in specific areas without jeopardizing the security of the remainder of the facility. Care has been taken to create points of access control so

that the building remains safe without the need to isolate itself from the public. The materials are sensitive to and directly reference the local vernacular without mimicking their precise usage. Cast stone and wood siding veneers bring warmth to the site. Oversized window openings serve to welcome students and light into instructional spaces thoughtfully. In anticipation of future development, several site amenities have been provided to enhance the experience. A moderately sized public piazza establishes a breathing space between Harvard and the neighborhood where public events such as farmer’s markets, street theater, and art exhibitions may occur. A formalized boardwalk and retaining wall define a newly created path to the Charles River and a vantage point from which to observe outdoor activities taking place on the tennis courts, baseball diamond or in the improved open green space.


Proposal “...a good designer should never rely on a single graphic or single narrative to communicate an idea, but should communicate in both media to maximize the probability of success.” FIRST FLOOR

“...now believe the most compelling images are those that layer both strategies over one another.”

“As a result of this realization, my design process has evolved to consider both the macro and micro scales at all phases of design.”

SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

FOURTH FLOOR


NEW LEARNING With a long personal association with schools, educational facility planning and education in general I had not expected to learn as many new things as I did over the course of this studio or grow as much as a designer as I did. Early in the process, it was necessary to communicate my design intent to my partner at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Although I knew that concepts need to be communicated clearly, I improved my understanding of what types of information are most readily understood by other professionals, specifically those in other disciplines. I now believe that a good designer should never rely on a single graphic or single narrative to communicate an idea, but should communicate in both media to maximize the probability of success. Although I had previously experienced Revit as a communication and documentation tool, this studio allowed me to grow my experience to a level where I am now confident enough to take advantage of the software in a professional setting.

A conscious effort was made when preparing this portfolio to extend my ability to communicate graphically. Because of the capabilities of Revit, I was able to generate more compelling base images. Manipulating these images and assembling several of them together has proved to be a successful strategy for communicating graphic information. That said, I feel validated in my original assertion that the ability to generate handcrafted images is valuable a tool in the designer’s tool box as the ability to generate computer-based graphics. In fact, I now believe the most compelling images are those that layer both strategies over one another. Finally, there was a real synergy between this academic project and my professional work at the time. For each, I was responsible for developing details for wall/ floor connections and other various construction details. This is critical information for designers as without it constructability is much diminished. As a result of this realization, my design process has evolved to consider both the macro and micro scales at all phases of design.


C-1: Artifacts Studio Kelly Ard, Spring 2011

Library - Boston, MA


Analysis


CAMBRIDGE - CENTRAL SQUARE BOSTON - BACK BAY

I love that the wear pattern here serves as a instruction manual. There is no doubt that you grasp the hand as if shaking someone’s hand and depress the thumb lever. No other parts of the hardware are worn. If you look closely, this motion has produced wear at the top connection point of the pull handle. We can conclude from this evidence that nearly everyone who interacts with this lockset uses their right hand and that they stretch their index fingers like a hook.

CAMBRIDGE - HARVARD SQUARE

Mechanical/Materiality This lockset mechanically operates in a manner very similar to the first lockset. The working parts are contained in a cylinder. The significant difference is how the hand interacts with the hardware. The latch assembly is retracted by pressing down with the thumb.

CAMBRIDGE - SOUTHEND CAMBRIDGE - HARVARD SQUARE

Threshold It is difficult to know what the experience of the threshold because the opposite side is hidden. But, this threshold, like so many on New England, is raised and uncovered. It places the visitor in the position of needing to elevate themselves to the level of the tenant before entering. It also exaggerates the experience of coming out of the weather and into shelter.

Artifact As an artifact, this lockset is a mass-produced and relatively inexpensive product. Its size gives the “knob” more presence and the front door and is somehow more formidable than a round knob. Social In other words, its a little clunky. It might suggest that the owner values sturdiness over sexiness. Scale What is most interesting about the scale of this lockset is the ergonomics of the pull handle relative to the thumb lever. The pull handle is bulged to fit precisely in the palm of the hand. The bulge, however is located near the curve, forcing the pinkie finger down and thereby extending the thumb over the thumb lever.

Project Overview The intent of this project was to study building artifacts, specifically threshold conditions, in an effort to understand how thresholds communicate what might be beyond or how they may behave as linkages between the indoors and out. The analysis on this page represents an exploration of Boston neighborhood door knobs. The objective was to locate several door knobs, each from a different

neighborhood, and evaluate them through the lenses of threshold, mechanical/materiality, as an artifact, its social implications, and its scale. The knob depicted in the large image on the facing page from the Chinatown neighborhood was selected as the artifact that served as the initial inspiration and point of departure for the project.


Analysis Analysis


Boston Public Library

100 FEET

10 FEET

100 • • • •

FEET Wayfinding Moment of Capture Establish Expectations Clearly Illustrate Path

1 FOOT

10 FEET • Identify Portal • Visual Message • Emotional Response • Elevation Change 1 FOOT • Tactile Response • Event Threshold CROSSING THE THRESHOLD • Compression & Release • Light as Threshold

Approaching the Threshold Moving the analysis out away from the door knob, we next examined the approach to the threshold. The thumbnail images on the facing page represent the wide variety of architectural thresholds explored. The intent of the analysis was to identify design qualities present at

three scales: 100 feet, 10 feet, 1 foot and as crossing the threshold itself. The eventual program for this project was a library. Therefore, the analysis from the Boston Public Library threshold has been communicated in the diagrams and bulleted list on this page.


Translation

compression & release

light as threshold


sectional model of compression & release

threshold without gradually narrowing volume

threshold with gradually narrowing volume, light at threshold and light beyond

threshold with gradually narrowing volume, no light beyond

threshold with gradually narrowing volume, light beyond

Although the project had not yet been revealed to us yet, the next stage of development was to translate the concepts derived from the threshold analysis into architectural primitives. The drawings, illustrations and physical models on this page represent an exploration of compression and release as well as light as threshold. The study of these architectural primitives explores slight differences in gradual versus abrupt spatial compression in both plan and section. The lessons learned from this exploration include:

•

• •

a gradually narrowing volume in plan and/or section invites users to move from outside to inside a gradual darkening of the space with no light at the threshold intimidates users Placement of light at or beyond the threshold invites users to move toward and across the threshold into the space beyond.

Each of these tactics would later be employed in the library planning and design.


Analysis

An underdeveloped portion of the South End neighborhood was selected for us as the site for a series of buildings with differing programs, one designed by each member of our studio. The analysis on the facing page reveals that: • • •

Building density is greatly diminished in the area of study Existing traffic patterns make it challenging to get to this area of the South End A socioeconomic threshold exists at East Berkley Street - North of this line are the ‘have nots’ represented by

the largely Asian population and the low-income housing development - South of this line are the ‘haves’ as represented by the gentrified brownstones. Three significant thresholds into and out of the area in question exist - one entry and one exit from the North from and into Chinatown, and one entry threshold to the South the intersection of Washington Street and East Berkley Street.

The threshold at Washington Street and East Berkley is significant in that is was literally a gateway to Boston as the only terra firma connecting the isthmus occupied by the original Boston landmass and the mainland.


land use

parking

green space

roads

buildings


Concept/program

PROGRAMMATIC INSPIRATION - TO READ It was not until students completed the artifact, threshold, and site analysis that each was given an action verb on which to base their program. Reading is a personal experience and occurs is a variety of settings. In the context of this project, TO READ implies that the architectural translation is a library. As a civil structure, libraries are intellectual watering holes. They bring community members together. Although the precise act of reading is most often a solitary one, observations suggest that reading in a location where others are reading is preferred to reading in complete isolation. With this understanding, the following basic program has been developed: • • • • •

CHILDREN’s LIBRARY GENERAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARY SOUTH END ARCHIVE LIBRARY WISDOM LIBRARY SHELTERED INTERIOR COURTYARD

library interior/landscape plan diagram The programmatic premise is that these different user groups appreciate some level of separation, but that the circulation pattern and siting strategy should unite them. The U-shaped massing is representative and expressive of the original door hardware, but more importantly, it sets up opportunities for several key thresholds: to a sheltered courtyard from the street, into the libraries themselves from the street, and between the library interior and the exterior landscape. The concepts of COMPRESSION & RELEASE and LIGHT as THRESHOLD are expressed in the gaps between the libraries on the ground floor. The geometry is intended to be inviting and is derived from the initial sketches and models. Images of other projects have been included to suggest what the solid/ void ratio, exterior materiality, and lighting conditions may be. The expectation was to further refine concepts as the design process continued.

library interior/landscape section diagram


Although not yet expressed, the intent was to repeat - or more accurately devise - expressions of these concepts at each main entry. The CHILDREN’s LIBRARY will face the residential building to the East. Families reside in these units and should have easy access to literary entertainment and education. The expectation is that this component of the library will be two stories and approximately 12,000 square feet. Its internal composition will consist of a welcoming entry and circulation desk, new arrivals, kids friendly technology, stacks, whimsical furnishings and interior architecture, family reading rooms, hands-on learning spaces, and direct access to the outdoors. The GENERAL COLLECTIONS will be the largest of the multi-component complex and is expected to be three stories and approximately 45,000 square feet. This portion of the library will not only house the general collections in stacks, but will house a variety of meeting spaces, lounges, food services, and literary retail. The vision for this library is that it is a public living room with resources - well stocked, well staffed, comfortable, and food and drink is encouraged. The SOUTH END ARCHIVE is intended to communicate ownership of this library by the local citizens. It will be a resource to honor the past and present of the neighborhood including published works of literature, music, and art by or about South End residents. It will be a tool for researchers, students, teachers, and citizens interested in the history of their neighborhood. The archive is expected to be two stories but with a small performance venue upstairs for book readings, signings, and other small scale literary performances. As programmed, the archives will be two stories and approximately 10,000 square feet. The WISDOM LIBRARY is intended to honor the senior citizens in the community. It will house collections that may have a special interest to seniors. It will double as a mixed use facility serving light foods, offering career retraining, arts and other education programs. With stacks, lounge reading areas, and food service, the wisdom library is expected to be two stories and approximately 12000 square feet. The SHELTERED COURTYARD is envisioned as an extension of the interior library environments

conceptual site plan

francis-jones morehen throp

with access to direct sunlight, grass, shade, and a warm summer breeze. The landscape architecture in the courtyard will provide users with choice and comfort in a variety of materials and seating. The expectation is that it will serve as a place to give away used books, to host literary and art fairs, and just to hang out and sip tea with your friends. Other developmental plans include extending this green space North to the edge of neighborhood with an array of additional

amenities. The expectation is to articulate this end of that green space in harmony with the other functions to create a central unifying public space at the heart of the neighborhood. The imagery on this board is intended to communicate a conceptual-level understanding of the project. The intent is to redevelop the indicated parcel without exceeding the existing scale.


Schematic Design bus stop

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thresholds to courtyard

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table reading, ones and twos

table reading, two to four

upholstered reading, ones

upholstered reading, two to four

fixed technology use

private conference, two to ten

semi-private conference, two to ten

exterior seating

stacks

children’s

archive

As the project moved from concept & programming into schematic design, three key design decisions were made: general

wisdom

1. Connect the sheltered courtyard with the neighborhood and separate major programmatic elements with expressed thresholds on the grounds level characteristic of the threshold analysis 2. Leverage the U-shape of the original door knob artifact as the primitive form for each building mass as well as the overall siting composition 3. Identify a variety of reading environments necessary to serve the program.

The illustrations on this and the facing page communicate the schematic siting strategy, the placement of the major programmatic elements, and the nine critical internal reading environments as thumbnail sketches. Finally, it was during schematic design that the decision was made to focus only on the general collections library component during design development.


Schematic Design

threshold to courtyard perspective from east berkeley street In addition to the three key design decisions discussed in the previous spread, the thresholds from the neighborhood to the sheltered courtyard and the interior programmatic planning for the general collections library were explored. The two images on this page communicate how the concepts of compression and release as well as light as threshold might be employed at these thresholds. Unfortunately, the design process for these locations was limited to these experiential sketches and selection of a basic materials palette. The planning sketches on the facing page communicate the

architectural expressions described in the concept/program phase. The expression of the artifact established a solid void relationship with the void facing the sheltered courtyard and dictated where light and dark areas would exist. These constraints allowed for the logical placement of the nine reading environments previously identified - readers get access to natural daylight; technology and stack areas utilize darker areas. Finally, an organizing axis was created with a relationship connecting the intersection of Washington Street and East Berkley Street with the sheltered courtyard which established the location of the front and back doors.

threshold to courtyard section


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first floor planning sketch, general collections library

second floor

third floor


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Design Development

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1 - 100 ft

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Design Development courtyard

patio

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conference

lobby 2

circ. desk

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new arrivals & merchandise

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- boundary between library interior and landscape, light as threshold

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image location compression

release

surface material - 1 surface material - 2 exposed rock

2-

moment of release


Design Development open to below

B

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large group

technology area tlt

open to below

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technology area

open to below

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second floor plan

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section A-A

section B-B

1- one/two person tables, upholstered furniture

The first floor houses the main circulation desk, the library administrative spaces, and the retail component of the library, but was articulated to serve as a flexible reading area with a number of seating options. The second floor, as it is both darker and more private than the first floor, houses the main stacks, two technology areas, a help desk, and several more reading environment options. The sections depicted on this page demonstrate how the three floors are connected vertically creating a full height view of the sheltered

courtyard. This articulation was an effort to express the concept discussed earlier of blurring the boundary between interior and exterior. The sizable clerestory glazing shone was established to allow light in from above thereby expressing the concept of light as threshold. Finally, strategic floor openings allow this light from above to be experienced as the moment of release as users cross the entry thresholds as described in the concept/program phase.


Design Development

large group.

reference

open to below

tlt

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open to below small group reference periodicals

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st

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large group.

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open to below

elev.


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- two/four person tables

The third floor has been programmed and architecturally articulated to serve serious research. It possesses all the seating environments established during the schematic design phase, the closed stacks area in the darkest part of the library, and a small reference section.

As the reading ares still require access to natural daylight, the floor to floor height was increased to allow additional clerestory glazing on the southern-facing facades. The image on this page depicts one of the table areas for two to four users and looking North toward the sheltered courtyard.


Proposal This project proposes to locate a library on a parcel between Washington Street and Shawmut Avenue along North side of East Berkley Street in the South End of Boston. Fundamentally, the project attempts to articulate the thresholds from the neighborhood to a new sheltered courtyard and from the exterior to the interior of the library itself by employing two conceptual strategies: • •

the experience of compression and release light as threshold

Furthermore, the project recognizes the need to provide a wide range of reading environments to satisfy the diverse group of anticipated users. These environments include: • • • • • •

Table seating for one and two users Table seating for two to four users Private conference spaces Semi-private conference spaces Upholstered seating for single users Upholstered seating for two to four users

• • •

Fixed technology areas Stacks areas Exterior seating

New Learning A great deal was learned as a result of completing this project. First, my understanding of the needs of libraries was improved. Next, it was my first opportunity to leverage Revit as a communication tool for a project not related to the Revit course. It proved to be an invaluable tool for quickly and accurately generating multiple views and baseline rendered imagery. Finally, I was able to improve my graphic skills. As an example, I was able to create a number of composite images created by layering a baseline rendering from Revit overlaid with entourage from Photoshop for the first time. Finally, I learned something about where I fall personally into design theory. I find it increasingly difficult to focus on a single conceptual idea. I believe buildings of this size to be complex and to require more than one conceptual expression. In the case of this project, I found it necessary to leverage one set of concepts for the thresholds and another for the program.

threshold concepts

compression at main entry

exterior seating at courtyard

light as threshold


exterior seating table seating ones and twos

table seating two to four

upholstered for single user

semi-private conference

upholstered for two to four

stacks private conference

first floor thresholds & reading environments diagram


PRACTICE

PRACTICE In the two plus years since successfully completing the Segment I portfolio submission, I have taken on more responsibility in practice and have learned a great deal. Much of the learning from practice has informed my academic work in terms of constructability and completeness. The projects assembled for this section of the portfolio do not represent every project in which I have participated since my Segment I submission, but rather are representative of the range, variety and scope of those projects. The projects are arranged in roughly chronological order as many of them overlapped. As my firm’s work tends to focus on K-12 educational facilities,

several projects presented are schools, but each project selected represents a unique school type and varied responsibilities for me. Together with the other building type projects to which I have contributed, I believe they represent a broad understanding of the design and construction processes as well as a readiness for thesis. Among the more critical learning from practice over this time frame is a better understanding of details, the need to clearly and consistently communicate with consultants and contractors, and an improved appreciation for the impact early decisions have on the successful completion of a project.


Image Credit: Paul Moore, DRA Architects

Carl Franceschi, Principal-in-Charge - Spring 2010 Paul Brown, Project Manager Jason Boone, Designer

Wayland Community Pool - Wayland, MA


Exisiting Condition

Project Overview The scope of this project was to renovate and place a new 10-lane pool addition on the existing Wayland Community Pool site. The existing pool was undersized for both the high school and competitive private swim programs that operate out of the facility. Budget constraints prohibited the complete demolition and reconstruction of the facility. As a result, the

bulk of the budget was leveraged to demolish the existing pool and replace it with an addition housing an expanded pool. Existing locker room and changing facilities were renovated in place. As a final cost savings measure and to permit the pool to serve members of the public in the summer months, a design decision was made to enclose the pool addition with an inflatable fabric structure.

Personal Role & Responsibilities I served as team leader for the schematic design, design development and contract document phases of this project. It was my responsibility to coordinate the documentation of the existing conditions, the production of the various graphic documents, and participate in drafting the documents. Specific responsibilities are detailed within the narrative for each of the various phases.


Existing Condition


As-built Documentation A critical first step in a renovation/ addition project is to verify the existing conditions. In this specific case, the owner provided a partial set of original construction documents. Using these documents as a point of departure, it was my responsibility to visit the site and physically measure the existing facility to the greatest extent possible. The process involved verifying overall dimensions first and establishing an origin. From that point, locations of interior partitions, doors and windows were documented. It is not uncommon for buildings of any vintage, but especially true for buildings of any significant age, to have been altered significantly since their original construction. All items that varied from the owner-provided documents were identified and translated into a set of base drawings.

As was in this case, original documents are often missing sheets and it was necessary to document roof conditions from scratch. Finally, it was also critical to photo document all of the existing conditions. It is impossible to communicate any 3D object in a single drawing. Likewise, it is impossible to capture every existing condition in a single field drawing. Photos serve to fill this gap in information. The images on this and the facing page are artifacts from one of the field verification visits. The image at the left documented the interior conditions. The photos captured a portion of the exterior fenestration and roof overhangs. The field sketch above documented the existing roof to remain, which was not available in the owner-provided documents.


Schematic Design


Construction Methodology The owner continued to be concerned about the budget as we entered the schematic design phase. In an effort to satisfy due diligence on behalf of the owner, two conceptual solutions were pursued concurrently: all new construction of a pre-engineered metal building and renovation/addition to the existing steel frame and load-bearing masonry building. Each solution path presented its own challenges. The pre-engineered metal building had to be researched for cost-effectiveness, corrosion resistance, and lead time. It offered the opportunity to satisfy all the end user requirements and provided a greater level of flexibility for the design. The renovation/addition scheme was likely to be more cost-effective, but placed greater constraints on the design.

The images on these pages communicate part of the explorations associated with each path of travel. The large sketch on the facing page is a planning diagram associated with reconfiguring the existing toilet and locker rooms. The large sketch at the top of this page is a planning diagram of the pre-engineered metal building solution. The other sketches on this page are an exploration of an egress condition out of the existing basement. They explore the materiality and enclosure of egress stairs. Ultimately the renovation/addition scheme won out for its costeffectiveness and its ability to serve as a warm-weather outdoor swim facility for the general public.


Design Development 1

2

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DEMOLISH EXISTING VARIABLE-DEPTH CONCRETE TOPPING. DEMOLISH EXISTING DOOR AND FRAME. DEMOLISH EXISTING DOOR. PROTECT EXISTING FRAME TO REMAIN.

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DEMOLISH EXISTING WINDOW, FRAME, & WOOD BLOCKING.

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DEMOLISH EXISTING PLUMBING FIXTURES. SEE ALSO PLUMBING DRAWINGS.

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DEMOLISH EXISTING LOBBY AND OFFICES IN THEIR ENTIRETY, INCLUDING WOOD FRAMING, STOREFRONT SYSTEM, ROOFING, WALLS, FLOORS AND FOUNDATIONS. SEE ALSO STRUCTURAL AND MEP DRAWINGS.

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SCOPE OF WORK NOTES DEMOLISH EXISTING POOL AND DECK IN ITS ENTIRETY, INCLUDING STEEL FRAMING, ROOFING, WALLS, FLOORS AND FOUNDATIONS. REMOVE EXISTING CEDAR ROOF DECKING AND GLUE LAMINATED BEAMS. CONTRACTOR HAS RIGHTS TO SALVAGED AND RE-USABLE MATERIAL. SEE ALSO CIVIL, STRUCTURAL, AND MEP DRAWINGS.

WAYLAND COMMUNITY POOL

SAW CUT NEW MASONRY OPENING.

Wayland, Massachusetts

DEMOLISH EXISTING FLOORING, PROTECT CONCRETE BELOW TO REMAIN. EXTENT OF ASBESTOS CONTAINING MATERIALS IS UNKNOWN AT THE DATE OF THIS DRAWING.

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WITHIN THE BASE SCOPE, INCLUDE THE COST TO REPLACE DAMAGED CEDAR SIDING, WOOD SHEATHING AND INSULATION NOT TO EXCEED $15,000 MATERIALS AND LABOR.

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DEMOLISH EXISTING METAL ENCLOSURE.

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DEMOLISH EXISTING TOILET PARTITIONS AND TOILET PAPER DISPENSERS.

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DEMOLISH CMU WALL

GMP DRAWINGS REVISED: 3/3/10 REVISED: 3/30/10 REVISED: 4/7/10

GENERAL NOTES: 1.

REMOVE LOOSE PAINT USING APPROPRIATE PRECAUTIONS FOR POTENTIAL LEAD-CONTAINING PAINT.

2.

EXTENT OF POSSIBLE ASBESTOS-CONTAINING MATERIALS IS UNKNOWN AS OF THE DATE OF THIS DRAWING.

3.

NO INFORMATION ON ANY OTHER POTENTIAL HAZARDOUS MATERIALS HAS BEEN MADE KNOWN TO THE DESIGNERS AS OF THE DATE OF THIS DRAWING.

4.

COMPLY WITH ALL LOCAL, STATE, AND FEDERAL REGULATIONS, LAWS, AND ORDINANCES REGARDING KNOW OR SUSPECTED HAZARDOUS MATERIALS DURING EXCAVATION AND DEMOLITION WORK.

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DEMOLITION BASEMENT PLAN SCALE: 1/8" = 1'-0

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DEMOLITION FIRST FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 1/8" = 1'-0

AD-1-1


WAYLAND COMMUNITY POOL

Wayland, Wayland, Massachusetts Massachusetts

GMP DRAWINGS

4 4 4

REVISED: REVISED: 3/3/10 3/3/10 REVISED: 3/30/10 3/30/10 REVISED: REVISED: 4/7/10 4/7/10 REVISED:

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GENERAL NOTES: NOTES: GENERAL 1. SEE SEE SHEET SHEET AD-1-1 AD-1-1 FOR FOR 1. GENERAL NOTES NOTES ABOUT ABOUT GENERAL HAZARDOUS MATERIALS. MATERIALS. HAZARDOUS

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Construction Documents The drafting tasks were divided among the three designers assigned to the project. My primary responsibility was related to demolition. It was critical to communicate to the contractors what materials were present and how the various components were connected.

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The various images on this page are all related to that demolition effort. Floor plans to the left, building sections and selective elevations above, and demolition section details communicate my understanding of

and my ability to identify and appropriately separate the scope of work for each trade. The photographs represent the real condition in the field communicated by each of the demolition details. In each location, demolition intersected with existing building to remain. Of course, design development and contract documents are interative in nature and revisions had to be made prior to construction as evidenced by the revision clouds.

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Design Development Consultant Coordination Another critical component of design development is the continued coordination of the design disciplines. In this project, it was my responsibility to coordinate unresolved issues with mechanical, electrical, plumbing, structural, and pool consultants. Collaborative efforts resulted in design solutions that satisfied the requirements of all those involved. On this page, potential solutions to tight tolerances in the ceiling spaces are proposed. The graphics were produced by overlaying scaled hand-drawn duct work onto building section base drawings. In this specific project, the mechanical engineer

was having difficulty visualizing his duct work in three dimensions as he was accustomed to designing only in plan view. To reduce the possibility for confusion, his duct work was highlighted in vibrant green and the drawings were annotated with dimensional information, questions still to be resolved and location identification labels. Section Sketch #2 was a particularly challenging location as the duct work had to maneuver through an existing wall to remain, below proposed structure, and back into the ceiling void. Without this type of collaboration and communication, this conflict would have likely gone unresolved until the construction phase and a costly change order.


As Built Condition

DD Illustration

The hand drawn sketches on this page were the result of coordination efforts with the structural engineer and pool consultant. It was necessary to create a surge tank for the proposed pool that was accessible by a maintenance worker. The structural engineer needed to know the specific dimensions of the pipe tunnel. The pool consultant needed to be reassured that his piping would not be impacted by an access panel. Although loosely drawn by hand, the illustration accompanied by dimensional information and annotation was enough to allow each consultant to move the project forward. The axonometric drawing above was a supplemental illustration created

to communicate how several trades and materials were to be coordinated. The structural engineer did not originally identify this as a unique condition in his details, but it was critical that the arched steel die into a footing below the concrete surface of the finished pool deck. It was also critical that the plate atop this steel arch precisely align with a cast in place trench necessary for proper installation of the inflatable fabric membrane. Although more information was required to resolve this particular issue, modeling the condition and communicating the issues to the various consultants allowed construction to proceed at this critical location without delay.


Construction Construction Administration My final responsibility for this project was to serve as the project manager’s back-up for the construction process: preparing Architect’s Supplemental Information when the contract documents were silent on a specific issue or when an unknown condition was revealed and attending weekly construction meetings in his absence. The images on this page are of the construction process beginning with the demolition of the existing pool. The images on the facing page are a series of illustrations prepared for a condition which was overlooked in the contract documents.

The joint where the existing building intersects the new construction was not detailed. By the time the oversight was detected, construction had progressed to the point where all adjacent surfaces were substantially complete, but the joint was left open. These illustrations represent what was communicated to the contractor. It is important to note that conventional views and a colored axonometric were crafted to clearly communicate the design intent. The photograph at the top of the facing page is of the finished condition just prior to the metal roof edge and facia extensions were installed.


New Learning There was a great deal of technical learning on this project. Prior to the project, I knew nothing about how a pool was constructed, little about curved structural framing, or about the iterative process after bidding is concluded. There was also a great deal of learning related to the coordination process, managing information, and communicating with a variety of design and construction participants. I learned that gunite, the material used to construct the pool itself, is a cementitous product sprayed on forms and reinforcing material. Pools of this size require large piping and tanks. It is important to not only think about the rooms where these items reside, but also about the opening through which they must fit in order to be installed. It sounds like common sense now, but the arched steel must be custom-fabricated. Although the responsibility of the architect is to provide the fabricator with enough

information to manufacture the component, it is important for the architect to review shop drawings carefully to ensure that what is manufactured will marry with neighboring components and accomplish the design intent. As for managing information and the communication relationships with the various design participants, I learned that the architect need not know everything about every specialty. Although I wrote in a practice report a few semesters ago that a competent architect should not rely on the knowledge of others, I now understand that statement does not imply that an architect must be a master of all disciplines, but that when he receives new information, a competent architect will verify it with a trusted resource and add the information to his toolkit.


Image Credit: Courtney Ufnal, DRA Architects

Carl Franceschi, Principal-in-Charge - Spring 2010 Cal Olsin, Project Manager Jason Boone, Designer

Burgess Elementary School - Sturbridge, MA


Existing Condition

Project Overview The scope of this project was to renovate and place an addition on an existing elementary school. Because of a significant grade change, the addition would add a lower level, connect to an existing middle level, and add an upper level to serve the proposed program. The new addition housed academic classrooms, a new gymnasium, lobby and administrative offices.

Personal Role & Responsibilities I joined this project team late in the contract document phase. One of my responsibilities was to review the drawings and specifications for inconsistencies, duplicated or missing information, and clarity. My other responsibility was to design and document the library circulation desk, the main reception counter, and wood panels all based on other team members established concepts.


Wood Paneling


Materials & Structures Decorative wood paneling is something often seen but rarely given much conscious thought. Similar to the circulation desk, the qualitative design decisions were made by others. It was my responsibility to translate those qualitative characteristics into constructible objects. In the practical sense, that meant developing all the necessary profiles, reveals, and geometries for the various components. It also meant,

of course, producing the necessary contract drawings. Illustrated on the facing page are three sample drawings produced for this effort. Section Detail 2 illustrated the typical wall panel series to be installed as directed on the interior elevations. Illustrations 3 and 3a are drawings related to one another communicating a special series of panels, chair rails and bases at pilaster locations in the Library.

In addition to the details, it was also necessary to schedule each of the various panels in the building. Prior to this project, I had little experience with schedules other than door and window schedules. It was an important realization that a panel schedule, too, must communicate all the dimensional and material information that there is not room for in the interior elevations.


Circulation Desk


The Library Circulation Desk was developed in cooperation with the school Library, the interior design department and several manufacturers. It was to serve as the point of control and contact for all the Library users including students, teachers, parents and visitors. The Librarian established the basic programme for the desk: occupied at all times by two staff members (one seated at a permanent computer workstation and one standing at a computerized checkout station), under-counter storage in the form of loose furnishings and open-fixed shelving, and a books-onreserve set of shelving located at the moment of arrival to the circulation desk. All of these requirements were in addition to ADA regulations. The nearly circular shape was established by the Principal-InCharge and the interior design department as it was consistent with an architectural vocabulary consistent with other elements in the room. It was my responsibility to articulate these design intentions incorporating the programme and

develop the appropriate contract documents. Only a selected sample of those documents are presented here. Materials Selection The interior design department established the basic material palette, again to maintain consistency, but it was my responsibility to leverage these materials into a complete design. As a result, the honey maple veneer was used for much of the body of the desk to create warmth and a sense of permanence in the room. The American Black Walnut was used as a trim element to give the desk some depth, range of color, and contrast. The choice to use the skeletal leaves embedded in the epoxy resin panels gave the desk life. In the poetic sense, by setting the surface of the panels off the desk, they allowed the desk to breath rather than sit stagnant on the floor. By using natural materials exposed in this way, they also served as a teaching tool for students and teachers.


Reception Desk


The reception desk on this page was another design assignment I was responsible for in this project. The photos were taken during construction by Courtney Ufnal, the project manager. New Learning Much of the work I contributed to this project was related to materials selection and detailing of casework. Both tasks were new experiences

for me. Unlike building details, case work details tend to be objects that people interact with on a physical level. In this case, each item was custom designed and had to not only express a consistent language with the remainder of the building, but had to perform for the end user as an effective workstation.


Jim Barrett, Principal-in-Charge - Spring 2010 Jason Boone, Designer

CEFPI International Conference 2009


Learning Modalities

auditory

kinesthetic

visual


Project Overview This project was borne out of a recognition that there is often a disconnect between the science of learning and the design of educational spaces. With a team composed of Jim Barrett, a principal at DRA and two administrators who had been clients, Amy Wheeler and Heidi Black, a proposal was drafted and accepted by CEFPI (the Council of Educational Facility Planners International) as one of their 3 hour training workshops for the REFP (Recognized Educational Facility Planner) credential. The workshop was crafted to model the principle message of the workshop, that architectural design strategies must be cognizant of and aligned with the science of learning modalities if they are to be most effective. As, such, participants were invited to participate in auditory, kinesthetic, and visual learning activities each of which had different spatial requirements.

The activities focused on understanding the perceptual and mental processes associated with each modality and the design strategies that might be most appropriate for each. Personal Role & Responsibilities As the initiator of the proposal, my role was as the developer of content, primary speaker, and coordinator of the workshop. It was my responsibility to gather and incorporate input from the administrators on the team into the workshop, develop the presentation materials and graphics, and design the activities necessary to communicate the message. As a result of the success of the workshop, I was invited to prepare a formal article on the topic which was later published in the professional organization’s quarterly magazine.


Auditory “...process information primarily through sound. Although this characteristic implies only listening, auditory learners tend to subvocalize.”

LEARNERstrategies AUDITORY • • • • • • • • • •

Tapes Reading aloud Oral instructions Lectures Using rhythmic sounds Poems, rhymes Word associations Group discussions Music, lyrics TV


individual study

small group

large group

The first stage in the workshop was to familiarize attendees with the behavior characteristics of each individual learning modality and highlight architectural design strategies that may be appropriate for each. Auditory learners process information primarily through sound. Although this characteristic implies only listening, auditory learners tend to sub-vocalize. They talk to themselves and can not wait to talk to others. As such appropriate design strategies include acoustical considerations at all levels of instruction: individual study, small group, and large group.

Other appropriate strategies include providing ad hoc seating areas with mobile acoustical barriers that promote small group conversation but help to isolate sound locally. Finally, for intense auditory focus, it is appropriate to provide private individual study areas where headphones allow learners to block out background noise, but to prevent others from hearing their sub-vocalizations.


Kinesthetic LEARNERstrategies KINESTHETIC • • • • • • • •

Experiments/labs Plays, acting, role play Games Problem-solving Field-trips Writing notes Making lists Props, physical examples


individual study

small group Kinesthetic learners process information primarily through their sense of touch and by interacting physically with information and/ or objects. They are known to fidget and have difficulty sitting still for long periods of time. It is not uncommon for these types of learners to appreciate a neat and tidy appearance, but tend to become wrinkled quickly. Programmatically, these learners require open floor space, hands-on and project-based learning activities, and appreciate standing learning. large group


Visual LEARNERstrategies VISUAL • • • • • • • • • •

Guided imagery Demonstrations Copying notes Highlighting in text Flash cards Diagrams Photos Video Mind maps TV


individual study

small group Visual learners, as might be expected, process information primarily through their sense of sight. The mechanics of learning involves the creation of mental images. As such, these learners require imagery, graphics, and other ocular stimulation. Programmatically, these learners benefit greatly from technology displays, substantial horizontal surface to view several images at once, and extensive vertical surface to present and view imagery. large group


parabolic projection and display surface

small group with vertical surface

small group with horizontal surface

large group

extensive open floor space

individual study production area


sensory regions of the brain small group activity

experimental (science) configuration

Program and Use The presentation concluded with a theoretical example capable of accommodating all three learning modalities and the principles of large group, small group, and individual study. Just as the human brain has different but not completely separate sensory regions, the example mimics that strategy.

exhibition configuration

New Learning Although this was an opportunity to speak to colleges about an already familiar topic, it was also an opportunity to research and develop concepts to a greater level. It was also a learning experience in making

another speaker comfortable with content that was new to him. What was really interesting at the workshop was how the participants reacted to the format. By modeling the format after the strategies and principles being discussed, participants not only took ownership of the content, but communicated real and genuine appreciation for the opportunity to move, to build and to talk. My hope is that those feelings have an impact on their design work and specifically how they think about the students for whom they are designing.


Ken Best, Principal-in-Charge - Spring 2010 Jason Boone, Designer and Project Manager

DPW Roofing and Masonry Restoration


Exisiting Conditions east elevation

north elevation

Project Overview The town commissioned DRA to replace two roof areas on the DPW vehicle maintenance garage that had exceeded their useful lives. The garage was originally constructed in the early 1900s as the local gas light company, a manufacturing plant for natural gas and the source for the town’s lighting. Although the project was relatively small in scope, the fact that the building was on the national historic register brought the challenges and learning opportunities associated with historic preservation. The scope was to remove and replace

approximately 6500 square feet of roof area and restore both the clay masonry and cast stone associated with the parapet walls at these locations.

south elevation

Personal Role & Responsibilities Ken Best was the Principal-in-charge on this project, but I was responsible for every component of this project from start to finish including existing conditions, schematic drawings, cost estimates, design development and construction documents, specifications, bidding and contract negotiation, construction administration, and project closeout. west elevation


Exisiting Conditions


flashing repairs

separated cast stone cap

damaged terra cotta

The existing roof and parapet walls were in extremely poor condition. The photos on these pages communicate numerous patched and caulked conditions, deteriorated cast stone caps, damaged terra cotta caps, and stones that were in danger of falling off.

roofing layers

The investigation process included some destructive testing of the roofing materials for asbestos. In this case, the existing roofs were

composed of several layers of roofing material, all of which were contaminated. The investigation also revealed that cast stone parapet caps had been installed directly on top of through-wall flashing with no dowels or anchors. They were relying strictly on their weight to keep them in place. All of these conditions were addressed in the roof design.


Construction

The scale of this project made it difficult to justify an independent general contractor to manage the construction process. As such, the decision was made to have the roofing contractor serve as the general contractor. It was critical that I manage the construction administration carefully as the project manager from the roofing contractor was not as experienced with the submittal and approval process, the general conditions

sections of the specifications, or the coordination of trades as an independent general contractor might be. To successfully accomplish this, I attended workshops for each trade including a training session at the International Masonry Institute’s training facility in Boston. The partial work in this image was unsatisfactory due to the partially filled mortar joints.


Construction

The image to the right documents an unforeseen condition uncovered during the demolition work. At some point in the past, the load-bearing masonry building was reinforced with laced steel columns buried in brick piers. The condition prevented the installation of the through-wall flashing as designed. As such, the discovery resulted in a structural

consult and ultimately a small change order. Steel workers were hired to cut back the column below the level of the parapet wall but above the horizontal c-channels supporting the roof deck. It was my responsibility to inform the owner of the discovery, seek out the structural consultant for advice, and negotiate costs for this additional scope of work.


Construction

This image communicates the typical installation condition for the cast stone parapet caps. As a project on the national historic registry, it was critical to match the existing materials and profiles as closely as possible.

cast product for approval. Although not weathered and eroded like the existing stones that remained, the end product was successful. The only comment from the historic commission representative was, “can you make it dirtier?�

To achieve a desirable match, I took field measurements of all the existing stones and specified that the mason submit samples of the sand, portland cement, and the

The image also communicates the design strategy to have the throughwall flashing pass under the cast stone and terminate at the face of the exterior wall.


Construction

New Learning This project was an incredible learning experience as I had complete, albeit not completely unsupervised, responsibility for every aspect of the project. I can identify three critical areas of new learning that warrant special mention. First, there is most definitely a human relations component to being a successful and competent architect. One must be able to get the most from the contractor, manage the expectations of the owner, and communicate clearly in every conceivable medium. Although I believe I behaved professionally and appropriately at all times, I learned that my tone and decision-making however appropriate can alter the relationship. It will be critical in the future to develop a set of communication skills that permit the use of the right tool for the personality. Next, there was a tremendous amount of learning related to the manner in which materials are installed in the field. Even with only two trades on this small project, I learned how craftsmen

secure masonry above the roof line, demolish built-up roofing, where the flaws in membrane roofing installation can occur, and how patches and fixes are leveraged when mistakes are made. There was not enough learning to expect that I could perform this work on my own, but was enough to understand the critical meaning of every line and every note in a set of drawings. Finally, there was a subtle lesson learned about the role of the architect in the field. As I mentioned on earlier pages, a roofing contractor served as the general contractor on this particular project. It was necessary for me to play a more significant role in the on-site management of the construction process than might have otherwise been necessary or even appropriate. I learned that the architect must be careful not to interject him/herself too far into the construction process for a variety of reasons. First s/ he may not have the complete expertise to do so. Next s/he may unintentionally take on more liability than necessary and put the firm at unnecessary risk. Finally, interjecting too far can strain the relationship between the workers in the field and the architect.


Jim Barrett, Principal-in-Charge - Summer 2011 Paul Brown, Project Manager Jason Boone, Educational Planner

Putnam High School - Putnam, CT


Exisiting Conditions


Project Overview Putnam Public Schools hired my firm to conduct a feasibility study for Putnam High School. The scope of work tested the feasibility of right-sizing a 1950s vintage building for a target enrollment of three hundred sixty students when its original design capacity was for more than five hundred students. Excess space may not initially appear to be a challenge, but the Bureau of School Facilities, the regulating body for school capital projects in Connecticut, has very specific funding formulas that significantly impact designs that are out of alignment with their enrollments. Personal Role & Responsibilities I served as educational planner and programmer on this project. My responsibilities included not

only documenting the existing program, but working with faculty, staff, and the leadership team to develop the proposed program. Once developed, it was my responsibility to translate the agreed upon program into a series of test fit options. It is this series of options that are shared in the following pages. The images on the facing page represent the existing conditions. The building was in need of new mechanical, electrical, and plumbing infrastructure as well as new roofing, hazardous materials abatement and accessibility upgrades. Most importantly, although oversized the building was not meeting several educational objectives.


Planning & Programming Even faculty member in the small high school was interviewed to establish an existing program and educational delivery model. Later interviews with the Principal, Assistant Principal, and Superintendent established a need to reorganize instructional space and identified the following program objectives: • • • • • • •

educational appropriateness improve appearance of building systems upgrades right-size building & spaces learning communities separation of public and private community use spaces

Development of Alternatives Eight different alternatives were developed to align with these objectives. The alternatives were organized into five categories: Do nothing - Reactive approach Do nothing - Selective approach Renovate as New Renovate as New - Additions New Construction Option A depicted on the facing page reacts to systems failures as they occur and makes no effort to address systems nearing the end of their useful life before they fail.


90,118 AIA GSF* 87,000 BSF GSF**

$10.6 M - $11.8 M local share

N/A renovated as new

N/A new construction

N/A demolished


Alternative B depicted on the facing page adopts a selective approach and assumes addressing aging systems before they fail. Some cost savings are achieved by bundling several of these projects together. Neither Alternative A or B achieved any of the educational objectives for the project, but merely addressed the infrastructure concerns.


90,118 AIA GSF* 87,000 BSF GSF**

$7.6 M - $8.4 M local share

N/A renovated as new

N/A new construction

N/A demolished


Alternative C.1 depicted on the facing page adopts a renovate as new approach. The alternative would produce a building that meets all current building codes, and updates all architectural and engineering systems to a level equivalent to those present in new construction. It does not, however, address any of the educational objectives of the project.


90,118 AIA GSF* 87,000 BSF GSF**

$13.6 M - $15.0 M local share

N/A renovated as new

N/A new construction

N/A demolished


Alternative C.2 depicted on the facing page adopts a renovate as new approach. The alternative reorganizes the existing building into identifiable learning communities with breakout spaces. It also relocates the cafeteria and kitchen to the center of the building making the former cafeteria and kitchen available for community use.


79,900 AIA GSF* 77,500 BSF GSF**

$10.2 M - $11.3 M local share

N/A renovated as new

N/A new construction

N/A demolished


Alternative C.3 depicted on the facing page adopts a renovate as new approach. Like Alternative C.2, the resulting building is organized into learning communities but takes the additional step of allocating additional square footage to dedicated community use in an effort to right-size the building for the projected enrollment.


71,820 AIA GSF* 69,670 BSF GSF**

$7.4 M - $8.4 M local share

N/A renovated as new

N/A new construction

N/A demolished


Alternative D.1 depicted on the facing page adopts a renovate as new approach, but also places a gymnasium addition in the location of the existing library. This move allows a clear separation of public and private functions, one of the educational objectives not met by any of the previous alternatives.


73,600 AIA GSF* 71,390 BSF GSF**

$8.8 M - $9.8 M local share

N/A renovated as new

N/A new construction

N/A demolished


Alternative D.2 depicted on the facing page adopts a renovate as new approach, but recognizes that to right-size both the building and the majority of instructional spaces, a more aggressive approach is necessary. This alternative retains only the large volume spaces and places connective additions housing the remaining educational program.


73,370 AIA GSF* 71,170 BSF GSF**

$10.6 M - $11.7 M local share

N/A renovated as new

N/A new construction

N/A demolished


Alternative E depicted on the facing page adopts an all new construction approach and represents a conceptual ideal program arrangement. Selection of this alternative, according to the District, would occur on a new site leaving the entire existing facility for alternative uses. New Learning The members of this particular community struggle with appreciating the value of a high quality education. It was the first time in my career where it was necessary to defend having a public high school in the town at all. Some members of the public, in recognition that the school building was oversized for the projected

enrollment and in need of a great deal of financial investment to extend its life were willing to simply send their children to the high school in the neighboring town. In community and Board of Education meetings, it became clear that it was necessary to highlight that several strategies were available to not only right-size the existing building, but also to create dedicated community use spaces was critical to the success of this project.


75,330 AIA GSF* 73,070 BSF GSF**

$11.2 M - $12.4 M local share


As president, I serve as an exofficio but voting member of the Boston Architectural College Board of Trustees and its Executive Committee. It is in this capacity that I serve the student body as their voice to the administration. The 2011-12 Atelier Board is to be commended for their service. We have fulfilled several goals including: • • • • •

production of a strategic budget revision our by-laws preparation of a student organization handbook improvements to the student lecture series enhancements to food for finals

When reflecting on the experience to date, I have also come to learn that a good leader listens to his or her peers and must balance placing the desires of the group ahead of his or her own with an ability to provide vision and direction. This is a set of skills that will continue to develop throughout my career, but exercising these skills in Atelier has been invaluable. A final bit of learning has occurred relative to the complexities of professional and personal relationships. I have learned that the dynamics between groups can be multi-layered and complex. Care must be taken appreciate and recognize these complexities. I feel as if I have, for the first time, learned to recognize when complexities exist, but will need to continue to work to be able to manage and navigate these complexities successfully.

Jason G. Boone Segment II Portfolio Submission - January 2012

Personal Roles & Responsibilities As a student representative, I served on several Boston Architectural College Board of Trustees committees including the Educational Policies Committee and the Curriculum Sub-committee where I acted as the student voice in the review and recommendation of new degree programs and coursework.

New Learning Taking on a responsibility of this magnitude comes with significant time commitments. More than ever before I learned to manage my time and my priorities. I also learned that communication is critical to successful relationships, is an area where I have learned a great deal, and is an area where I recognize a need for continued improvement.

Personal Projects - Atelier

In 2010, I was elected student representative to Atelier, the student government at Boston Architectural College. In 2011, I was elected president.


Jason G. Boone Segment II Portfolio Submission - January 2012

Personal Projects - Italy 2011

Piazza San Marco - Venice, Italy I took this photograph from the top of the San Marco bell tower. For me it depicted the framing of outdoor space. The shops along the perimeter are set back beyond an arcade. This technique allows the piazza to be experienced from within a sheltered condition, but also allows the piazza to breathe. Solid walls at the ground would make the piazza feel more claustrophobic and inhospitable.


Canals - Venice, Italy I took this photograph from one of the many pedestrian bridges overlooking one of the narrow canals. For me, Venice and particularly the narrower canals, represent a wonderful architectural scale. Buildings rarely reach above five stories and both canals and pedestrian streets are nearly always narrower than the buildings are tall. It is a scale I find to be relatable and embracing for the human inhabitant. Although it makes way-finding difficult, it also celebrates those moments in the fabric of the city with larger expanses and taller buildings.


Duomo - Florence, Italy I took this photograph ascending the steps of the Duomo. This particular moment in our ascension caught my interest for the juxtaposition of materiality, tightness, and quality of light. This space is very confined. The materials are cold, harsh and rough. The light, however, emanating from a small window opening directs your view around the corner and creates a lightness head that propels the visitor upward.


Pallazzo Vechio - Florence, Italy I took this photograph looking skyward from within the entry court. What struck me about this moment was the blurring of the boundaries between inside and outside. The visitor experiences a clear threshold of arrival upon entering this space but has not yet gone indoors.


Heidi Boone - Rome, Italy I took this series of pictures of my wife, Heidi, outside Castello San Angelo in Rome. It was near the end of our honeymoon and I had asked her if she was sad about all the buildings we had seen. She said she was, but the series of photos shows how much she really was enjoying experiencing all

these great architectural places with me. I include them here in this portfolio because it is evidence that well designed and inspired architecture can and does appeal to the designer and the lay person. It is our responsibility as design professionals to pursue this ideal in all that we do.


Conclusion First, let me just thank the reviewer for taking the time to volunteer at the BAC. I am well aware of the dedicated volunteers necessary to make the Boston Architectural College a successful design institution. Next, I want to conclude this portfolio with some self-reflection on the entire process, the synergy that exists between academics and practice, and some commentary about where I need the most growth as a designer. Reflections on Segment II Although the academic projects contained within this portfolio are exclusively design studio, several other courses made a significant contribution to my design education. Environmental Psychology taught by Dr. Nora Rubenstein was a course that taught me to think about the user from an experiential and psychological perspective. Many of the readings related to perception, cognition, scale and materiality, proxemics, and the human condition. It is a course I would recommend to any design student and my Segment II projects are better as a result. Structures III taught by Amir Mesgar was also a course that proved to be highly valuable. I recognize that as architects we will not be required to design structures but now feel more comfortable collaborating with consultants to develop expressive, efficient, and safe structural systems. Graduate research and writing was the final course in Segment II worth highlighting. The course taught by Elizabeth Stuhlsatz reinvigorated my interest in schools and improved my thought process and writing ability. The course positioned me well to enter

into the thesis sequence. Next, I want to recognize the efforts made by Ms. Stuhlsatz and Mr. Davis in developing the instructional strategies for the course. As a trained teacher, I appreciated the efforts to leverage visual learning strategies and to allow students to teach one another. Synergies Between Academics and Practice It can be difficult to predict how transferable academic skills are to practice and vice versa. Building types, professional responsibilities, and academic coursework do not always align. I felt I was fortunate over the course of Segment II to be able to benefit from some alignment. Providing Construction Administration services both in the office and in the field improved my understanding of construct means and methods, an understanding that improved my ability to articulate the various building systems in my academic work including structural systems, wall and flooring systems, curtain wall and store front systems, among others. One of my design studio projects was a school and my practice work largely focuses on this building type. As a result of this synergy, I was able to explore some design concepts in my academic work that I have not yet had the opportunity to incorporate into a practice project. Finally, one area where I feel synergy is lacking is in the area of building systems assessment. My responsibilities in practice have included the assessment of architectural systems relative to their expected life span. Even through Segment II I have yet to experience any academic coursework that addresses this skill. Growth Areas as a Designer In preparation for this portfolio

submission I took the time to flip through my Segment I portfolio. A comparison of the two reveals that a tremendous about of growth has occurred. My understanding of architectural systems is significantly deeper than before. My ability to communicate space and design intent is greatly improved. My baseline knowledge design in general is greatly expanded. With all that said, there are several areas where I recognize a need for continued improvement. First, I have become aware of the need to identify and rigorously explore a single unifying design concept. At this point in my development I feel that my designs are thoughtful, rigorous, and constructable but lack this conceptual unifying quality. In my upcoming design workshop and thesis seminar, I will endeavor to improve this portion of my design process. Next, I recognize that the design industry places premium value on graphic representation of design decisions. Although I believe I am capable of communicating my design process, I recognize the need to improve my ability to produce diagrams, drawings, and illustrations that communicate in this way.



BAC Segment II Portfolio