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INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

JASMINE MANGONA

PORTFOLIO

WOODBURY UNIVERSITY 2017


TABLE OF CONTENTS

DESIGN COMMUNICATION I DESIGN STUDIO I HAND-DRAFTING PROJECT 01

DESIGN COMMUNICATION II

PRIMARY ELEMENTS OF SPACE PRIMARY ELEMENTS

DESIGN STUDIO II

3-D MODELING CUBE VARIATIONS

DESIGN STUDIO III

CASE STUDIES VILLA SAVOYE

PROJECT 02

BODY MOVEMENT IN SPACE

SPHERE VARIATIONS

PRADA STORE

PROJECT 03

PHENOMENAL REALMS

CURVE VARIATIONS

EAMES HOUSE

SPACE PLANNING

STRUCTURE & FORM HIGHLAND PARK OCCIDENTAL COLLEGE

ERGONOMICS PRIVATE/PUBLIC DESIGN DEFINING SPACE CODE ANALYSIS

FORM GENERATIONS

PROTOTYPICALS

INTRICATE INTERIOR SPACE

UNIVERSAL CLIENT

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MATERIALS & FURNISHINGS DESIGN COMMUNICATION III INTERIOR ELEMENTS CONVEX HEXAGONAL TESSELLATION

DESIGN STUDIO IV

BUILDING SYSTEMS & CODES

BRANDING & IDENTITY BRAND HISTORY

MAYA MASSING

BEGINNING DRAWING

COLOR THEORY & INTERACTION

CODE REGULATIONS LINE, SHAPE, FORM PROGRAM ANALYSIS & EXITING ABSTRACT ART

3D PRINTS

BRAND BIBLE & TALISMAN

STRUCTURES

CROSS CONTOUR

COLOR WHEEL

LIGHTING & PATTERN

MARS CAPSULE DESIGN

INTERIORS

PERSPECTIVE

COLOR STUDIES

FIGURE DEFORMATIONS

CLAUSTROPHOBIA

WOODY’S CAFE RE-DESIGN

LIGHT & SHADOW

INTERACTION OF COLOR

VALUE

COLOR INVENTORY

MOOD PODS

PAINTING ANALYSIS

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WELLNESS CENTER

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COLOR ANALYSIS VALUE STUDY


01 DESIGN COMMUNICATION I Woodbury University Fall 2015 Nina Briggs

The objective of this course was to begin researching and archiving representational precedents, analyzing and interpreting spatial relationships, proportions, and volumes, and to understand one-point linear perspective.


PROJECT I OBJECTIVE Universal hand sketching was taught to understand spatial composition, varying scales, dimensioning, and hierarchy of line quality and weight. Scaled parametric drawings were practiced due to field measuring of as-built spaces. Graphic composition and layout methods, physical model-making, and formal and informal oral communication for presentations were also exercised. Perspective- Design Center Studio

Perspective- Room

Plan-Stairs

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Perspective-Design Center Studio

Circulation Diagram-Design Center

Spatial Diagram- Design Center Studio

Plan- Stairs

Plan- Stairs

To further understand the spatial, structural, and circulation aspects that play a major role when designing a space, diagrams were drawn to show these features in the Design Center. Space planning was briefly analyzed through the circulation diagram because it focused on the way occupants circulate throughout the space. Designated spaces throughout the Design Center such as classrooms and studio spaces were highlighted through the spatial diagram. Structural systems such as walls and beams were depicted to show the separation of spaces through the structural diagram.

Structure Diagram- Design Center

Section- Design Center

Axonometric- Stairs 2


Perspective- Design Center Studio

Circulation Diagram

Spatial Diagram

Structure Diagram

Floor Plan- Design Center Studio

After analyzing and measuring the stairs in the Design Center, hand sketches were drawn to fully gain the knowledge of different scales, line weights, and architectural drawings. By creating an axonometric, the exterior structural system of the stair was better understood due to the

Section- Stairs

3-dimensionality of the drawing. Sections of the stairs helped analyze the required measurements of stairs in compliance to code. Axonometric- Stairs 3

Stairs at First Floor

Stairs at Second Floor


PROJECT II OBJECTIVE This project helped further strengthen free-hand drawing methods through the use of drafting precision, technique, and control of spatial parts. One key objective was to interpret physical model spatial relationships and transform them into floor plans, sections, exploded axonometric, and perspective. To analyze artifacts, threedimensional collages of perspectives were drawn which focused on color, materiality, scale, and interiority.

Exploded Axonometric- Design Studio I Model

Exploded Axonometric- Design Studio I Model

Sectional Perspective- Design Studio I Model

Sectional Perspective- Design Studio I Model 4


The exploded axonometric was drawn to highlight a key area of the model that contained a portion of the main circulation of the space. The assigned activity for this model was changing clothes therefore, each floor had a different purpose such as putting on shoes on the third floor or looking for clothes in a closet on the second floor. Shadows of light were also practiced through this drawing to add dimension and composition.

Exploded Axonometric- Design Studio I Model

Ground Floor Plan- Design Studio I Model 5

Second Floor Plan- Design Studio I Model

Sectional Perspective- Design Studio I Model

Third Floor Plan- Design Studio I Model

Fourth Floor Plan- Design Studio I Model


PROJECT III

OBJECTIVE By examining the residential space of the Design Studio I model, a sectional perspective was drawn in relation to how the space looks through the human eye. A variety of mixed media was used including museum board, chipboard, and foam board. Graphic composition and layout methods via digital portfolio building was practiced.

Sectional Perspective Model- Design Studio I Model

Sectional Perspective- Design Studio I Model 6


02 DESIGN STUDIO I Woodbury University Fall 2015 Annie Chu

The objective of this course was to understand and practice the primary elements of space, various concepts of interior architecture, acquire skills for design thinking and communication, identify the parameters that inform the design response, and practice design processes.


PRIMARY ELEMENTS OBJECTIVE The primary elements of space which include point, line, and plane were exercised throughout this project in response to an analysis of a painting. After analyzing the program of the painting, handdrawings were drawn to further represent the hierarchy of the various elements of space. Interior enclosures were defined by solids and voids, spatial enclosures, interplay of elements, and spatial, compositional organization which further defined the elements of space.

Perspective- Design Center Powell Gallery

PAINTING My assigned image portrayed a dark, eerie aura which was represented by the chosen colors. The main focus is the number twenty-eight written in black because it stood out the most from the rest of the image. The composition of the lines of the image were crisp and sharp, while some were curved or oval. The image was a flat, two-dimensional picture with blocks of lines overlapping each other. There was also a repetition of squares, ovals, and triangles. 7


DIAGRAM I- HIERARCHY OF POINTS

DIAGRAM II- HIERARCHY OF LINES

DIAGRAM III- HIERARCHY OF POINTS AND LINES

DIAGRAM IV- HIERARCHY OF PLANES

This diagram illustrated a combination of both points and lines from the first iterations. The lines and points were more defined and helped lead into the final diagram.

This final diagram was drawn and colored in response to the hierarchy of points and lines analyzed in the previous diagrams. The colors used were similar to the ones used in the original painting.

This diagram illustrated a hierarchy of points from the painting which ranged from the bigger points that took up most of the space to the smaller points which took up less space.

This diagram illustrated a hierarchy of lines from the painting which was presented through various shapes, lineweights, and value scales.

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Plan- Plane Model

Plan- Wood Model

Section- Plane Model

Section- Wood Model


Based on the painting and diagrams, two models of chipboard and wood were created to represent the abstraction and spatial design of the final diagram. The plane model was designed to show different hierarchies of planes and their relation to each other while still maintaining the abstractness of the painting. The wood model was built with the same hierarchy of points and lines, but was used with a different material and depicted the shapes found within the painting. Creating both models along with the hand-drawings, allowed me to define solids and voids, interplay of elements, and compositional organization.

Plane Model

Wood Model 10


BODY MOVEMENT SPACE OBJECTIVE To better understand spatial organization and human scale within different spaces, an activity was assigned to design a space based off of the combination of the hand-drawings of the plans and sections of both models. Overlaying the plan of the wood model on top of the plan of the plane model, I was able to integrate both plans into the final design. Each space that was created used the orthogonal geometry of the drawings to accommodate the required program of the space. Through this process of designing a space for a specific activity, I was able to learn to identify abstract visual relationships and gain an understanding of the elements of design, structure, and function. The integrations of various ideas of spatial design transcribed into a model that depicted perspective techniques and volumetric elements.

Section- Body Space

Section- Body Space 11


Section- Body Space

Plan- Body Space

CONCEPT The activity that this project was based around was the act of getting dressed and each space was designed specifically to each component of getting dressed. There was a chronological order of completing each task which allowed the occupant to begin at the top floor and work their way down to the ground floor. The spaces included were putting on a top, putting on bottoms, looking through a closet, and putting on shoes. The programmatic requirements were interesting to intertwine within the creation of a new plan and section due to the abstract angles and orientation of spaces. The interplay

Section- Body Space

of various activities allowed me to practice space planning techniques, observe human behavior in different situations, and understand proportion and scale in a new environment. 12


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Ground Floor Plan- Design Studio I Model

Second Floor Plan- Design Studio I Model

Third Floor Plan- Design Studio I Model

Fourth Floor Plan- Design Studio I Model


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PHENOMENAL REALMS SITE VISITS This project began with visiting various sites in Los Angeles such as the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Cathedral of Our Lady of Los Angeles, and the Disney Concert Hall and analyzing circulation, structures, forms, materials, and programs of each space. At MOCA, different forms of art pieces were analyzed to understand light, shape, function, and the experiential aspects of each piece and the effect it has on the observer.

Kaari Upson- Internal Pocket Sketch- Cathedral of Our Lady of Los Angeles

OBJECTIVE & SCULPTURE At MOCA, one piece was focused on and was hand-drawn to show an analysis of detail in regards to shape, light, and material. The objective of this project was to understand point, line, mass, and volume in a different realm which was centered around the art piece photographed above. Collages, orthographic projection, perspectives, photo and color renderings, and models were constructed to illustrate the artwork in a new light, form, and program. Sketch- Kaari Upson-Internal Pocket This project was created in partnership with Bennet Cariaga 15


CONCEPT - PHOTO COLLAGE I The design strategy behind this photo collage was to create a repetitive pattern with different mediums of the grayscale that derived from the art piece. The criss-cross pattern that was made illustrated a varying pattern that created an analog composition that flowed throughout the collage. There was a play on light and dark spaces within this collage due to the way that each piece intertwined with one another.

Photo Collage- Kaari Upson-Internal Pocket

CONCEPT - PHOTO COLLAGE II Taking pieces from the first iteration photo collage, another photo collage was created to demonstrate a new form and order of the art piece. The methodology behind this collage was to create a repetitious pattern that showed the relationship between different sized pieces of the collage. The main focus of this collage is the dark central area on each piece which created an interplay of light and dark forms combining together into one single form.

Photo Collage- Kaari Upson-Internal Pocket

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FORM & STRUCTURE Using the first photo collage pattern, a model was designed to demonstrate varying ways of circulation, the connection between light and dark spaces, and the experiential aspect it has on the occupant as they walk through the different areas. The tectonic geometry used on both the collage and structure helped illustrate the way each curve connected with one another. Scale and proportion played a key role when designing this model because it showed the relationship between body and space and its connection to the interior. The ways in which certain curves cave into spaces helps the viewer understand the spatial organization and proxemics of the design.

Plan

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Reflected Ceiling Plan


COLOR PHOTO RENDERING I To better understand the spatial aspects of this project, interior photos were taken and shaded in various mediums such as charcoal and oil pastels. The interior photos

Model Photo I

Color Photo Rendering I

Charcoal Shading Photo Rendering I

were taken in the areas with the most geometric forms to fully demonstrate the curvatures of the model. The use of charcoal and oil pastels illustrates the play of light and dark tones and spaces within the model to further portray the concept. Each iteration of the interior photo allowed me to analyze the interiorirty of the space at a different perspective and helped me immerse myself into the design.

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COLOR PHOTO RENDERING II This interior rendering was photographed in the central portion of the model to depict how the occupant feels within the enclosed space. There are reflective walls to make the occupant feel as though they are in a larger area, yet they remain in the same confined space. The caving in of the walls and ceiling make the user experience feel closed in, but as they move throughout the different spaces the areas getting bigger and smaller. The interaction between the form and the user is interesting because the user is unaware of the next space as they move throughout each area.

Model Photo II

Charcoal Shading Photo Rendering II 19

Color Photo Rendering II


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03 DESIGN COMMUNICATION II Woodbury University Spring 2016 Gregory Van Grunsven

The objective of this course was to focus on essential modes of architectural representation through plan, elevation, section, isometric, and perspective views. The use of the 3D modeling programs, AutoCad and Rhinoceros, introduced orthogonal drawings through built-in renderings and 3-dimensional oblique drawings.


CUBE VARIATIONS OBJECTIVE This was an introduction to Rhinoceros 3D by learning the modeling basics such as interface spatial concepts, modeling concepts, work flow, and inputs/outputs. A few key objectives that were taught included modeling with precision, the ability to generate 2D drawings, and careful attention to effective line weights.

Original Cube

Modified Planes

Offset Surfaces

Modified Planes- Multiple

Split Planes

Make Hole

Rebuild Surfaces- Degree I

Rebuild Surfaces- Degree III

Twist Cube

Extruded Contours

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Tapered Cube

Twist Cube- Wireframe

Tapered Cube- Contours

Rebuild Surfaces- Second Variation

Extruded Wireframe


SPHERE VARIATIONS

OBJECTIVE

Original Sphere

Modified Sphere

Revolved Form I

Revolved Form II

Contour- Horizontal

Contour- Piped

Planar Surfaces- Offset

Planar Surfaces- Split Sphere

Planar Surfaces

Planar Surfaces- Split Cylinder

Boolean Two Objects

Boolean Difference I

Boolean Difference II

Boolean Intersection

To further strengthen my skills in Rhinoceros 3D, manipulations of a sphere were made to understand different commands such as revolve, contour, planar surfaces, and boolean difference and intersection. By learning these skills, I was able to apply them to future 3D models to help illustrate my concepts better.

Contour- Vertical

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CURVE VARIATIONS OBJECTIVE Different iterations of a single cube were made for this project which further helped gain an understanding of the multiple commands of Rhinoceros 3D. Learning to reshape, circle field, loft, and rebuild surfaces was very helpful to create different styles and designs of one object.

Surface made from reshaped curves

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Cube Boundary and Curves

Surface made from edge curves

Reshaped curves

Rebuilt Surface- Degree III

Extruded Horizontal Contour

Offset Surface

Lofted and Extruded Vertical Contours

Circle Field

Pipe Circles

Extruded Circles

Rebuilt Surface- Degree I

Horizontal Contour

Vertical Contours

Circle Field applied to surface


FORM GENERATIONS OBJECTIVE

Step I: Solid Sphere

Step II: Split Sphere Horizontally

Plan

Front Elevation

Step III: Rebuild Sphere

Side Elevation

Step IV: Extract Wireframe and Pipe Sphere

This project was created to show the skills that were learned through Rhinoceros 3D such as creating solids and surfaces from curves, generating and manipulating forms, rebuilding, adding, and subtracting surfaces, and creating complex forms through the interaction of other forms. The objective of this project was to build forms and represent them in plan, elevations, and isometric views and depict the process through a series of diagrams.

Isometric View- Southwest

Final Form 24


INTRICATE INTERIOR SPACE

OBJECTIVE This project was to further show the skills gained from the previous assignments by creating a volume within a set of contained measurements and building an interior volume with a high intricacy of detail. Various factors had to be taken account of to develop the space such as surface thickness, materiality, height changes, openings and closings, and a consistent formal system.

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Plan

Front Elevation

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Right Elevation

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Roof Plan

Left Elevation

Back Elevation


Section A

Section I

Section B

Section II

Section III

Section IV

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INTRICATE INTERIOR SPACE- INTERIOR & EXTERIOR RENDERS

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CONCEPT Inspiration for the design concept and material choices was taken from Neil Denari’s Endeavor Screening Room due to its simplicity of the curves expressed from the ceiling to the floor and the sleek, transparent atmosphere the room gave off. Frosted blue glass was used to give off a clean, crisp feeling when occupants walked in while the exterior was made from tinted blue and gray laqueer to maintain the simplicity of the building. This building can be seen as a tourist attraction or a retreat area for people to come to when they want to have privacy or be immersed in their own thoughts without interruption.

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04 DESIGN STUDIO II Woodbury University Spring 2016 Robert Kerr

The objective of this course was to study and analyze various landmark structures that have transformed ideas of design throughout history. Through these analysis’, new methods of design and methodology were practiced when asked to develop an interior proposal within an existing building.


VILLA SAVOYE SITE Le Corbusier’s most famous architectural home was the Villa Savoye which he built in 1931 located in Poissy, France. Pierre and Emilie Savoye asked Le Corbusier to design a country home where Le Corbusier had no design restrictions besides his own architectural limits. This villa has a modernist, international style that represents a modern take on a French country home. He wanted to build ramps between the lower level and the rooftop gardens so that it required the individual to stop and take in the experience of the movement between spaces. This movement would evoke and enhance new senses to the visitor that Le Corbusier wanted them to experience as they walked throughout his piece of work. He also separated the private spaces and public spaces by a sliding glass wall which is

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different from other architects who typically want the living spaces to be closed off and secluded.

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Son’s Bedroom Room 3

Madame’s Bedroom

Washroom

Boudoir

Room 2 Bathroom Room 1

Bathroom

Garage Terrace

Guest Room

Terrace Main Entrance

Kitchen Salon

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

Ground Floor Plan

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Second Floor Plan

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Roof Access

Third Floor Plan

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Section

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5 POINTS OF ARCHITECTURE Le Corbusier established the Five Points of Architecture, which includes pilotis, flat roof terraces, an open plan, ribbon windows, and a free facade; which Le Corbusier made sure to portray throughout the Villa Savoye. The pilotis aspect can be seen by the stilts that the house stands upon which helps use the land efficiently and

Northeast Elevation

separates it from the Earth. The flat roof terraces include roof gardens that serve as a protective covering to the concrete roof. Le Corbusier used an open plan to remove the supporting walls which prevented the house from limitations regarding its internal usage. He decided to install ribbon windows to provide good lighting and also portray a sense of openness to areas around the house. The free facade was used to relieve the building from its structural limitations.

Northwest Elevation

Southeast Elevation

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Southwest Elevation


Ground Floor

Section

First Floor

Roof

Ground Floor

First Floor

Roof

SHELL AND CORE DIAGRAMS

CIRCULATION DIAGRAMS

The shell and core diagrams were created to identify the different spaces on each floor and their relation to each other. The shell of the building is surrounded by nature and landscape. The core is encompassed by the shell of the exterior. The roof garden’s main attractions include the angled ramp and the spiral staircase which are various ways of circulation paths. By examining the site, environment, and layout, I was able to gain an insight into Corbusier’s programmatic design and his grasp on human interaction with the built environment.

The objective of these circulation diagrams was to understand the spatial organization of rooms, fixtures, and furnishings. Understanding how circulation works around each room in a building is crucial to the design process because it determines how various occupants circulate throughout a space and it makes sure that everything is ADA compliant. By diagramming the path of travel on each floor, I was able to analyze the programmatic solution.

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PROCESS RENDERS Re-creating the Villa Savoye through Rhinoceros 3D allowed me to practice the techniques learned through Design Communication II. Human scale, material, texture, light, and structure were essential aspects that affected the way I modeled the building. Rendering through Maxwell allowed me to practice with lighting and its effect on the building as well as its effect on human behavior. The presence of colors and degrees of transparency between spaces allowed me to understand the relationship between each space and Corbuseir’s design intent.

Exterior Render

Interior Render

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Interior Render


Exterior Render

Interior Render 34


PRADA EPICENTER LOS ANGELES SITE The infamous Prada epicenter store in California is located on Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills, with 25,000 square feet of land, the building contains a basement and three upper levels. The project was started in 2002 and was completed in 2004 by architect designers, Rem Koolhaas and Ole Sheeran.This store’s main objectives included challenging how a commercial and retail space could be integrated into the streets of Beverly Hills, creating a virtual experience with in-store technological projects, and developing a sense of exclusivity while emphasizing the diverse atmosphere of the brand. It was also designed for specialized personal care and service to the customer to add to their experience as they walked

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throughout the store.

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DESIGN INTENT The main structural aspect of the Prada store is the connection between two floors which is shown in the New York store with floor waves moving downward towards the basement and in the Los Angeles store with the same wooden folds moving upward and creating a symmetrical hill. A key architectural design of this store is the facade which is nonexistent because it contains no storefront or glass enclosures, so the entire entrance opens up to the street and merges commercial and public space together. The air circulation used in the building is with the use of an air-curtain which is eco-friendly because it uses the natural weather, wind, and speed to provide the air ventilation throughout the store. There are also large display cones installed in the ground to show merchandise without obstructing the open store front. The stairs are another main attraction because it is laminated glass which fades from translucent to transparent which can either shrink or enlarge the

Ground Floor Plan

store’s size based on where the customer is standing. The aluminum box that is supported by the stairs is

Second Floor Plan

made with a sponge-like material specifically made for Prada. The dressing rooms are the most innovative features of the building because they are equipped with “magic mirrors� which allows customers to see themselves from the front and back, doors that are made of privalite glass so that the customer can switch from transparent to translucent to control their privacy, and radio frequency identity antennas which help the customer build their own personal history of garments. Third Floor Plan 0

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Elevation

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SKETCHES

PROCESS DIAGRAMS Various diagrams of activities, views, and public and private areas were created to gain an understanding of different programs that are involved in the Prada store. Creating each diagram for each floor illustrated the connection from one floor to the next and also represented a hierarchy of spaces within one larger space. I was able to analyze sensory perceptions and illustrate the varying programs through the use of color, shape, and geometry. 38


DIAGRAM OF VIEWS CONCEPT The design concept behind these diagrams for each floor was to illustrate the relationship between artificial light and natural light and its effect on the space. There were certain areas in the Prada store that highlighted the main attractions of the store through the use of natural light. The open facade brings in the majority of natural light which helps illuminate the products as well as create an inviting ambiance in the store as customers walk inside. The design solution for these diagrams was to first locate the areas of light, understand the direction of circulation and areas of light, determine the quantity of light coming into the space, and depicting the final outcome through the use of gradation of color.

Artificial Light Natural Light

Ground Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan 39


DIAGRAM OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SPACES CONCEPT

Public Space Private Space

Ground Floor Plan

Through this diagram of public and private spaces I was able to study how a building can integrate multiple systems under one roof while maintaining a spatial organization. From this diagram, the public areas were the path of circulation that customers go through when in the space, while the private areas were mainly dressing rooms and more intimate areas where customers tried on shoes or purses in their own space. Many of the public areas intertwined with the private areas in creating a unified public, private space making these areas known as the transition zones from one space to another. Through the use of shapes, color, and hierarchy, I was able to illustrate these areas to gain a better understanding of space planning, social and cultural context, and human behavior within a built environment.

Second Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan 40


DIAGRAM OF ACTIVITIES CONCEPT The objective behind these diagrams was to identify the different activities and items sold within the Prada store. Understanding where each product is sold or tried on is crucial to the program of a retail store because it has a great effect on the circulation of the store and the order in which customers view and purchase various items. There was a chronological system in which customers circulate throughout the store to get to their designated area. The areas highlighted in green in each diagram is the path of travel and it also demonstrates the relationship between the circulation and activities.

Clothing & Dressing Accessories Shoes

Ground Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

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SECTION DIAGRAMS & 3D MODEL DIAGRAMS DIAGRAM OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SPACES

Public Space Private Space

DIAGRAM OF VIEWS

Artificial Light Natural Light

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Exterior Render

Second Floor Interior Render 43

Third Floor Interior Render


DESIGN OUTCOME After developing various diagrams through activities, areas of light, and public and private areas, I was able to understand spatial and structural organization and define areas in the Prada store that added to the experiential aspects of the infamous store. This precedent study allowed me to analyze the architectural design of a retail store in a new light and helped me develop skills of diagramming in various ways to better portray my ideas. The Prada Epicenter in Los Angeles has redefined the shopping experience for customers while also enhancing the brand name.

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EAMES HOUSE SITE The architecturally beautiful home and studio that Charles and Ray Eames designed was known as the “Case Study House #8” in the Study House Program which was sponsored by the Arts & Architecture magazine. Their innovative design and use of materials made the home act as inspiration for other architects and designers around the world; in fact, the Eames House is said to be one of the most renowned postwar residences. In addition to the meadow and ocean view that the home overlooks, it involves two adjacent buildings, which includes a living and working space, studio area, and a small patio outdoors. The house is designed around the use of box-like structures that reflect the Eame’s prominent industrial design and bold,monochromatic graphics. The materials that Charles and Ray used for this building included steel frames and panels made of various plaster, wood, and glass and some which appeared to be translucent, transparent, and opaque. The Eames decided to use a neutral color palette of black, gray, and beige with pops of bright, primary colors such as blues, reds, and yellows. R9

RAY & CHARLES EAMES

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Ray and Charles Eames are architects and painters that have been known around the world for their outstanding pieces of architecture, furniture design, industrial design and manufacturing, textile design, and photography. Charles Eames had a background with engineering and architecture, started his own architecture business in 1930, and extended his design ideas beyond architecture and became the head of the design department at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan. Ray Eames had a similar design path as Charles because she assisted Charles and Eero Saarinen in preparing designs for the Museum of Modern Art’s Organic Furniture Competition, which promoted functional, yet affordable options for customers who wanted modern domestic surroundings.


HOUSE OF CARD

DESIGN CONCEPT

House of Cards Model

The design solution for the new interiors of the Eames House was situated around a main design concept. The process began with organizing the House of Cards deck of cards into an organizational system that would eventually be evident through the final design. Study models, Inspiration images, collages, and analog media diagrams were developed to conceptually express the design concept. A client was chosen to design the interior for, my client being a novelist, as well as a list of the clients’ needs. Production of 2D and 3D documentation was created to fully express the design concept as well as depict aspects from the Villa Savoye and the Prada Epicenter. 46


COLOR, SHAPE, & STRUCTURE DIAGRAMS COLOR DIAGRAM

STRUCTURE DIAGRAM

Photo

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Analog Media

Digital Technique

Digital Technique

These techniques were done in response to the chosen photo to illustrate the form of color from the House of Cards model. The way I organized the color in my model ranged from dark to light shades with transition colors in between them. 47

The structure of stacked cubes ontop of one another was the structural formation I expressed through my model. I wanted to create a sense of unison from each card and have the colors and details on them be the main focus.


SHAPE DIAGRAM

From the House of Cards model, I organized the shapes on each card based on the geometry I found within them. Some shapes had more angles, while others were more curved and round. Based on the photo, I collaged my analog media in a formation that went from the circle pieces to the square pieces with transitional pieces in between them. The digital media that was conducted allowed me to explore another media from a different perspective. Each diagram that was created was a direct reflection of the House of Cards model that was first built and paved the direction for the final project.

Photo

Analog Media

Digital Technique

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CONCEPTUAL MODELS

To begin to formulate a design concept for the new interior of the Eames House, conceptual models were made in response to the diagrams. The two models above represent the idea that color plays a key role in the way a space makes an occupant feel. Vibrant, exaggerated colors make a space feel congested, while lighter colors make a space feel more open. 49

The models above are another variation of the idea that transitioning from a light-colored area to a darker-colored area has a dramatic effect on how the viewer sees the size of the space. I used different patterns in this model to illustrate the effect from going to a neutral-toned room to a vibrant-toned room while passing through a transition zone area that is the blue floral pattern.

The objective of the final set of conceptual models was to create pieces of furniture that expressed my conceptual idea of transitions. With both of these models, I wanted to create pockets of spacious areas mixed with closed off, dense areas. These two models allowed me to use more geometry and portray my concept in a different form.


Various study models were completed to further represent the idea of transitioning from one space to another while having the colors and structure effect the viewer’s emotions and experience within the space. Creating each model helped me understand spatial differences, anthropometrics, and proxemics in relation to my conceptual idea. Each model was different and allowed me to explore multiple environments that each have a different effect on the human social and cultural behavior.

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To further incorporate the concept idea into the Eames House, larger scale models were created and used ideas from the smaller conceptual models. The idea of transitions was still practiced when creating these models by the use of different colored material of chipboard, foam core, and clear plastic. Each iteration of my concept helped me explore different interiors to the human scale and proportion while also maintaining the program of the building.

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ORIGINAL DRAWINGS

Dark Room

Utility Room

Studio

Kitchen Courtyard Living Room

Ground Floor Plan

Transverse Section

Longitudinal Section

North Elevation

East Elevation

West Elevation

South Elevation

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CONCEPT- GROUND FLOOR PLAN The client for this project was a novelist writer who uses both floors to gain inspiration for his novels and showcase his work to others. The ground floor is designated as the “public, open� area which includes the showcase area, living room, kitchen, and restrooms. The materials used on this floor are more organic and relate to nature to maintain the openess the space gives off. This floor also includes the transition area where the public area meets the private area.

Ground Floor Plan

Halter Cube Unit Designed by Brayden Studio

Goodland Armchair in Leather, Walnut Legs Designed by Milo Baughman

Unison Square Coffee Table Designed by Terence Woodgate

Krusin Side Table with Glass Tabletop Designed by Marc Krusin for Knoll

Nelson Thin Edge Double Dresser Designed by George Nelson

CONCEPT- SECOND FLOOR PLAN The second floor was designed more towards the novelist himself to where he had a section of the house to himself. He has his bedroom, master restroom, library, and office. Each space is specifically designed for him, giving him a place to retreat to when he needs to write by himself or collect his thoughts. The second floor also includes natural light and coming into the office space to keep him motivated and inspire him to write more. The materials used on this floor include darker tones and transitional pieces which are the laminated glass used in the Prada store. 53

Nelson Thin Edge Bed, Tapered Legs Designed by George Nelson

Second Floor Plan


TRANSITION ZONES- PRIVALITE GLASS Inspiration for this laminated glass came from the Prada store due to its ability to switch from translucent glass to transparent glass. This glass is used in the areas where the congested spaces meet the open spaces. This will allow the novelist to close off or open a certain area up depending on their mood. This glass is represented by the angled walls in the sections to the left. The angle either encloses an occupant in or makes the space feel larger.

Transverse Section I

Transverse Section II

0

15

5

R11

10

54


Longitudinal Section I

Longitudinal Section II

Longitudinal Section III 0

55

5

10

15


TRANSITION OF SPACE DIAGRAMS

Ground Floor Plan

Section

Open Space Transition Space Closed Space

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PROGRESS OF 3D MODEL

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CONCEPT

Exterior Render

Interior Render- Second Floor

My final design concept was to differentiate spatial areas by creating transition zones between each room through the use of materials, furniture, and structures. Each space was designed to create different areas for a novelist to live/work that will influence how and what he writes about. The switchable laminated glass from the Prada Store acted as the transition areas between the open and closed off spaces and also allow for the room to enlarge or shrink. The open floor plan from the Villa Savoye expanded the space and provided the novelist a more free, open atmosphere to work in. The more open areas were furnished with lighter colored furniture and material while the smaller, closed off areas were furnished with darker colored furniture and material due to the effect each of the color ranges give off.

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Interior Render- First Floor

59

Interior Render- Second Floor


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05 DESIGN STUDIO III Woodbury University Fall 2016 Gregory Van Grunsven

The objective of this course was to focus on color, light, furniture, materiality, and behavioral and social factors of a space. Applying theories of human behavior and ergonomic data, synthesizing multiple design concepts, and analyzing spatial organization helped contribute to design resolutions.


HIGHLAND PARK HISTORY From record stores and cafes to vintage boutiques and tattoo parlors, the cultural city of Highland Park in Northeast Los Angeles is home to independent businesses, bohemian art, and historic architecture. The authentic quality that this city possess through its artwork and food make it a one of a kind area to have a bite to eat or walk-through the streets. Each building is unique by its choice of material which ranges from brick to steel metal. Some buildings are accompanied by pieces of original artwork which adds to the rustic, industrial atmosphere this city gives off. Highland Park’s authentic, bohemian lifestyle comes from the artwork that is spread throughout the city and the various types of refined materials that is used to create its historic businesses.

Each store in Highland Park was unique and different from each other. The ways in which they placed merchandise on display or the way they arranged the seating in restaurants reflected how they wanted the customer to feel throughout the space. A local donut shop called Donut Friend was a fairly small shop, so to maximize their space they attached the tables to the wall so that there was enough space for customers to move about. Also, in Namaste Highland Park there was a wooden, glass divider in between the art gallery and the merchandise area to show two spaces connected by a single barrier. 61


Meridan St.

The Hermosillo N. Ave. 52

The Refugee

N. Ave. 51

N. Ave. 50

Meridan St.

York Blvd.

N. Ave. 52

N. Ave. 51

N. Ave. 50

York Blvd.

Lincoln Ave. Lincoln Ave.

Recess Eatery

Permanent Records Street

Highland Park Cafe

Exterior Circulation

Highland Park Cafe

Interior Circulation

Donut Fiend

Interior Circulation

62


NEIGHBORHOOD STUDY- HIGHLAND PARK STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS Each restaurant, retail store, and music store has their own aesthetic that they want the customer to feel as they walked in. Some stores such as Highland Park Cafe, used an exposed roof to show the pipes, wooden beams, and plumbing fixtures to add to their rustic refined feel while also using steel and wooden furniture pieces. Many of the more older stores used this same technique to maintain the originality of the city.The stores that used wooden beams either intended to make it visible to the customer or they tried to cover it up with dry wall plaster. Various stores also used white or colored dry wall to help support the roof to add a more modern look.

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Wombleton

Permanent Records

House of Intuition

Highland Park Cafe


MATERIALS A majority of the stores in Highland Park aimed to

The York

Future Music

Highland Brewery

Cafe de Leche

maintain the originality and refined look of the city; therefore wood, steel, dry wall, and brick were the materials that were commonly used. Some stores, such as Highland Cafe and The York used a combination of materials which made the space look appealing to the customers. These materials were expressed throughout a variety of forms such as doors, walls, entrances, ceilings, and furniture. In addition to these materials, different styles of glass were used as windows and different ways to allow light to come in. House of Intuition used block glass tiles on a portion of its wall to allow rays of light to come into the store, however the customers and workers would not be able to see completely through the glass. Each material used throughout Highland Park either made the space feel urban or modern, but together they all had small details that had kept the originality of the city.

64


BUILDING STUDY- 4751 YORK BLVD.

BACKGROUND The stores on 4751 York Boulevard once were a variety of shops that attracted many customers from all over Highland Park. The once busy building is now completely vacant with exposed walls and ceilings, leftover furniture pieces, and remains of past advertisements from years ago. Many of the windows are among the few pieces of the building that is still in tact. There were many parts of the building that are clearly more run down than others, however there are parts that have been added to the property or renovated. This building’s industrial, refined spaces are what make it a unique site to study and analyze.

65


CHANGES IN LEVEL Most of the changes in level occurred through the openings and passageways that led from room to room because many of the openings were not originally there when the building was first made hence why there is a small change in level. A few doorways also had a small change in level due to the change in flooring between the interior and exterior. The changes in levels from each space were very subtle, however they still had an impact on the transition between the rooms.

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PRECEDENCE STUDY- STUDIO ART HALL ARCHITECTS The Studio Art Hall at Pomona College was designed by wHY architects, founder and creative director Kulapat Yantrasast and managing director Misa Lund. Yantrasast values humanist design, focusing on the way architecture relates to the rest of the environment and human behavior. The architecture firm has a diverse portfolio, with most of their work focusing on the relationship of public spaces to the city. Grand Rapids Art Museum R12

Speed Museum R13

Casa Wakasa R14

Pomona College R15

Studio Art Hall R16

Studio Art Hall R17

CLIENT Pomona College is a private university in Claremont, California that was established in 1887. It is the founding member for the other Claremont Colleges in the surrounding area. Pomona College believes that studio arts is an important aspect of the college which is why the 35,000 square foot Studio Art Hall brings art making, art appreciation, and art interaction together under one roof.

67


FUNCTION The Studio Art Hall is a multi-functional space that intertwines studios together from disciplines ranging from painting to multimedia to even sculpture and digital arts and is also open to any non-art disciplines. The studio environment gives students a chance to collaborate with others in different majors while sharing the same space. The Studio Art Hall is used as an open studio space for both students from Pomona college and also other Claremont Colleges. R18

R19

R19

PROGRAM Part of the Studio Art Hall’s program involved the architects from wHY IDEAs and the Pomona College team agreeing upon the decision that the space would become a more public, open campus setting rather than being exclusive. The decision for the studio hall to become more open to the rest of the campus helped merge studio activities with more of the campus life and other campus art buildings. wHY IDEAS created semipublic collaborative spaces (”grey-spaces”) to be used for exchanging new ideas. R15

R15

R15 68


CIRCULATION DIAGRAMS

Only using 1 entry and 1 exit- Amusement Park

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Curved Geometry

Diagonals- Bedroom

Minimal Changes- Museum Exhibit

Pathway leading to the right side- Concession Stand

Interlocking Spaces- Deli Line

4751 YORK BLVD. EXISTING PLAN


Separation of spaces- Musician Stage & Bar

Linear Pathway- Train Station

Orthogonal Geometry- Maze Garden

Centralized Gathering Area- Church

Separation of served and server space- Bookstore & Cafe

OBJECTIVE By creating various circulation diagrams which are based around different scenarios, I was able to identify different paths of wayfinding and the effects it has on human behavior. The floor plan of 4751 York Blvd. was used as the site layout which further helped me become familiar with the structure of the building. These precedent study diagrams were helpful because it allowed me to analyze various programs of circulation in scenarios such as how people circulate around a fashion runaway, concession stand, and museum exhibit.

70


CIRCULATION MODELS CONCEPT The scenario this model represented was a museum gallery. The angeled white pieces acted as the artwork and the red wire was the circulation path one may go through when inside the space.

Curved Geometry

CONCEPT This model demonstrated the relationship between a bookstore (black) and a cafe (red) and how they intertwine and work with each other in the middle where the red and silver wires cross.

Separation of spaces

CONCEPT The scenario this model symbolized was a concession stand at a game. The pointed aluminum foil pieces represent the area of circulation going towards the concession stand which is the brown and white area at the end.

Pathway leading to the right side 71


CONCEPT This model was a more refined piece of the previous model depicting a museum gallery. In this model, abstract fabric was used to fully describe the different pieces of artwork seen throughout the gallery and its effects on human behavior.

Curved Geometry

CONCEPT This model was a continuation of the previous model symbolizing the connection between a cafe and a bookstore. The technique of weaving allowed me to represent the intermingle of spaces in a new form.

Separation of spaces

CONCEPT This model was based off of the previous model depicting a cafe and bookstore however; this model used textured fabric and foam paper to better represent the scenario and relationship between the two spaces.

Separation of spaces 72


Separation of spaces

CONCEPT The objective behind this model was discovering new ways to enhance the human experience within a space by creating a sense of order for an activity. In this model, the scenario was a school building where the circulation begins in the classrooms and proceeds into a lecture hall. The classrooms are represented by the white area and the lecture hall is shown through the wood area. This sense of chronological order is shown through the pipe cleaners guiding the occupants throughout the space acting as a wayfinder. 73


BLOW UP- MODEL

OBJECTIVE Creating a blow-up model of the final circulation diagram based on a separation of spaces allowed me to explore human scale and proportion in a new manner while also maintain the program of the space. The concept behind this model was the idea of traveling from an enclosed, congested space to an open, free environment. Through the use of colored material, I was able to portray the feeling of being trapped with the black fabric and the feeling of being free with the white fabric. Through this model, I learned that human behavior varies from space to space depending on the program, form, and material. 74


OCCIDENTAL COLLEGE

Theaters Classrooms

Labs

Bathroom

Art Supply Store

Bathroom

Community Art Classes

Studio Spaces Bathroom Galleries Labs

Classrooms

Occidental Art Space Commercial Lease Space

Organizational Diagram

Theaters

Labs

Classrooms

Bathroom

Art Supply Store

Bathroom

Community Art Classes

Entry Immediate Adjacency Close & Convenient Minor Relationship Daylight or View Acoustic Privacy

Studio Spaces Bathroom

Labs

Classrooms

Galleries

Adjacency Diagram

OBJECTIVE

PROGRAM DIAGRAMS

Occidental College offers a diverse range of disciplines from Chemistry

To create a multi-functional space operated by Occidental College which included

to Geology and from Art to Religious Studies. When re-designing the

both commercial lease space and an Oxy Arts space, an organizational diagram

vacant building on 4751 York Boulevard, my design concept included

and an adjacency diagram were drawn to illustrate how the building would be

creating commercial space that is used as an art supply store while in

divided up and to establish a programmatic design strategy based on the required

collaboration with a community art class space, and creating the OxyArts

spaces. Acoustic privacy, daylight views, and adjacency factors were exercised

space that intertwined multiple disciplines in one single space creating an

through these diagrams to understand the program of the building.

interdisciplinary studio. 75


C

A

Art Supply Store

Community Art Classes

B

Gallery Studio Spaces

Armadale York Blvd.

Floor Plan 0

5

10

15

Armadale York Blvd.

Reflected Ceiling 0

5

10

15

ANALYSIS The way I designed the OxyArts space was based around modular pods that did not include any doors, but rather was an open floor plan allowing students, faculty, and visitors to walk freely from each studio space and provide open collaboration within the various disciplines. I chose to incorporate a community art class space to bring in the community into not only the art department of Occidental College, but rather add to the artistic originality of Highland Park. 76


South Elevation

Longitudinal Section A

Transverse Section B

Transverse Section C

FURNITURE

Fine Mod

Modway Ernie

Loon Peak

Convenience Con-

The furniture pieces chosen were to add to the calming, studious environment of the Oxy Arts space. The white furnishings with hints of different textures of wood help create a more inviting atmosphere and further present the program and concept of the building.

West Elevation 0

77

5

10

15


MATERIALS

Dark Oak- Facade

Dark Oak- Facade

White Concrete- Facade

Light Oak- Art Supply Store

Light Oak- Studio Spaces

Light Oak- Gallery

MATERIALS The materials I had chosen to use were a mixture dark oak and cement panels for the design on the facade to create a contemporary piece of architecture within a refined city. The interior includes the mixture of light wood for the flooring and cement for the walls and ceiling to add to the contemporary, yet rustic feel of the building. The polycarbonate movable walls that are used in the studio and gallery space will provide flexibility for pin-up space or group projects. With this re-design of this historic piece of Highland Park, I hope to weave the community, Occidental College, and students from a wide range of disciplines into one common space that allows for free collaboration as well as a studio spaces for the community and Occidental College students. 78


Exterior Render

OXY Arts Studio Space 79


Gallery

Art Supply Store 80


06 SPACE PLANNING Woodbury University Fall 2016 Kristin King

The objective of this course was to understand the basic principles of space planning, behavioral and social aspects of space, applicable codes, and the effects of furniture and fixtures. Spatial ordering diagrams, ergonomics, and programming were studied to develop a ground plan for the final project.


PRIVATE & PUBLIC DESIGN

SERENITY GAZEBO LOCATION: Central Park, Manhattan, New York. Under cluster of trees to provide shade and a cool breeze. DIMENSIONS: 10’ x 10’ PURPOSE: To create a private space, in the public, for a single person to have a quiet, tranquil area to relax and be able to lay down and enjoy the scenery. This space can also hold 4 more people. DESIGN: Square gazebo with white drappery along each side that provides a cool breeze while also maintaining the privacy for a single occupant. The minimalistic furniture and neutral tones expressed throughout the space give off a bohemian, serene vibe. The mixture of natural light and lantern string lights help support the neutral, calm ambiance of the space. The occupants should use this space as a way to escape the realities of the world while still being connected through the openness that this gazebo presents.

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R20


4

ITEM #

ITEM NAME

QUANTITY

DIMENSIONS

NOTES

WICKER LOUNGE L-SHAPED SOFA

1

5’2” x 4’

Tan, cushioned, sofa with wicker detail that is able to fit at least 4 people.

2

WOODEN SIDE TABLE

2

1’ x 1’

Rustic, refined wooden side table with open storage on top and below.

3

CUSHIONED OTTOMAN

1

3’ x 1’5”

Tan, cushioned ottoman used as a seat and storage for blankets, pillows etc.

1

4

BRAIDED FICUS TREE

4

3’5” x 1’

Tall ficus tree with braided detail holder that adds color to the space and creates a more nature environment.

4

1

2

3

2

4

4

1: L-Shaped Sofa

Plan

2: Wooden Side Tables 5

10’ x 10’

LANTERN STRING LIGHTS

4

6

BRAIDED RUG

1

5’5” x 5’5”

Tan and white braided rug that provides a soft base for people to walk on.

7

CHIFFON CURTAINS

4

10’ x 10’

Cream, draped chiffon curtains that hang from each side of the space to create an open, yet closed environment.

8

ASH WOOD

8

5’ x 5’

Ash wood that is used for the ceiling and flooring.

Yellow tint lights that string across the ceiling to create a calm ambience in the space.

3: Cushioned Ottoman 4: Wooden posts to support ceiling

FF & E Chart 82


DEFINING SPACE THROUGH HUMAN MEASUREMENTS

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Position: Outreach- 45 Degree Angle Location: West Annex

Position: Stairs- Mid-walk Location: Design Center

NOTES This particular stance was very different than the other positions I was in because I felt smaller than usual when I stood right next to the whiteboard. From far away, the whiteboard does not look that large, however once I stood right in front of the whiteboard my perception of it changed greatly and it was an interesting observation I noticed.

NOTES This position was not anything out of the ordinary because I walk down these stairs daily, however I have never stopped and took a look at the distance my body had in relation to the steps and railing. It was very interesting to learn about how small or big your body is compared to everyday steps.


Position: Push- Door Location: Design Center

NOTES This position was very familiar to me because I am always walking in and out of doorways everyday, however I have never took the time to observe how exactly I open a door and my distance that I have between the door and myself while I reach for the handle.

Position: Low Reach- Plug Location: Design Center

NOTES I enjoyed learning about the different ways myself and other people do simple tasks such as plugging your charger into an outlet. Some people bend their knees more than others while others barely bend their knees and will use their back to bend down more. I also noticed how some people get very close to the outlet while others will keep their distance from it. 84


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Position: Sitting- Outside Steps Location: Design Center

Position: Pull- Door Location: Design Center

NOTES I enjoyed doing a comparison sitting position indoors in a chair and outdoors on steps because every detail was different from the height of my feet from the ground to the position of my hands. I was able to examine how different areas and furniture can affect the way people sit.

NOTES This position was very familiar to me because I am always walking in and out of doorways everyday, however I have never took the time to observe how exactly I open a door and my distance that I have between the door and myself while I reach for the handle.


Position: Kneel- Grabbing Pencil LOCATION: Design Center

Position: Mid-reach Location: Design Center

NOTES The action of kneeling and grabbing a pencil is something that a lot of people do not really think about, but just continue on with the action because it is a second nature. As I was grabbing the pencil, I was seeing where I positioned my hands and the distance between my legs and floor and was surprised at how I never took the time to notice these small things.

NOTES This position was very familiar to me because I am always walking in and out of doorways everyday, however I have never took the time to observe how exactly I open a door and my distance that I have between the door and myself while I reach for the handle. 86


COMMERCIAL CODE ANALYSIS & ACCESSIBILITY DEMOGRAPHICS

OBJECTIVE This project was created to orally and physically teach the different codes that are taken into consideration everyday when a new structure has to be built. Ergonomics was heavily studied because it determines the design of certain spaces to provide efficiency, comfortability, safety, and minimize the risk of injury to occupants. This project helped further explain ergonomics in a workplace design, space planing processes, usability in design, accessibility and compliance with ADA, and universal design principals.

LOCATION: Stairs in front of School of Business

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Name: Bennet Cariaga Age:19 Height: 5’4� Male

LOCATION: School of Business


ANALYSIS With the use of a cane and a wheelchair, my partner and I went around Woodbury University accessing different doorways, ramps, rooms, and bathrooms to measure the dimensions of each space to analyze if it met the public safety and welfare requirements. This experience was different for the both of us because we do not typically think of the challenges that disabled occupants experience when circulating around everyday structural systems. It was very challenging at times to move through doorways and also push the wheelchair or how nervous it is to not know where the next riser is on the stairs when using a cane.

LOCATION: Adjacent to the Pool House

LOCATION: Design Center

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PROTOTYPICAL DIAGRAMS OBJECTIVE Creating a residential space for a client with a disability, was very insightful because furniture, material, fixtures, color, and the adjacency of rooms had to be taken into consideration to adhere to the client’s needs. Through the use of bubble diagrams, adjacency diagrams, criteria matrices, and prototypical diagrams, designing a space with specific requirements made the project adhere more towards being compliant with certain restrictions.

LOBBY Domestic Space- Dormitory NOTES -Saturday, September 17 -1:00pm-1:30pm -FURNITURE -2 High Tables -8 Chairs -1 “U” Shaped Sofa -Tv & Tv stand table -1 Coffee Table -DEMOGRAPHICS -1 Female -Age Range: 19 -ACTIVITIES -Working on laptop and with paper and pen -Standing because there were no chairs at the table she was at. -Relaxed, calm state -Periodically checked cellphone

ITEM NAME 1 High Table

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QUANTITY 1

DIMENSIONS 3’x 3’x 3’

NOTES Dark brown wooden high table used for students to work on homework, eat food, or talk with friends.

3’4” 8’4”

2’6”

7’3”

1’10”

1 3’

3’

3’6”


KITCHEN Domestic Space- Dormitory

10’4” 3’

1

2’6”

1’7” 4

2’6”

5 1”

3’6”

11’6”

1’9”

9”

8’5”

3

8’6”

2’3”

1’10” 2’4” 1’10” 2

1’2”

NOTES -Sunday, September 18 -3:00pm-3:30pm -FURNITURE -Fridge/Freezer -Microwave -Electric Stovetop(2 Burners) -Sink -Storage/Cabinets/Drawers -Filtered Water Station -DOORWAYS -1 Entry/Exit to hallway -ACTIVITIES -1 Female -Age Range: 19 -Washing utensils and then left the kitchen -Relaxed, calm state -No other person had come in after her

3’

ITEM NAME 1 Fridge & Freezer 2 Water Station

QUANTITY 1

DIMENSIONS 5’4”x 2’6”x 3’

NOTES Fridge on the lower half and freezer on upper half.

1

1’5”x 1’2”x 1’10”

Filtered water station.

3 Sink

1

1’10”x 2’3”

Stainless steel sink.

4 Microwave

1

1’3”x 2’6”

Cream colored microwave built above the electric stovetop.

5 Stovetop

1

1’9”x 1’

Electric stovetop with 2 burners.

90


URBAN OUTFITTERS Public Space- Retail Store

3

20”

4’

NOTES -Friday, September 23 -6:00pm-6:30pm -FURNITURE -10 Sales Clothing Racks -3 Sales Tables (Waist Height) -2 Shelving Units -Wooden Wall Divider -DEMOGRAPHICS -2 Female and 1 Male -Age Range: 19-23 -Young adult clothing, accessory, and shoe store. -ACTIVITIES -1 female was looking at the shorts on a clothing rack. -Other female was looking at the sweaters on another clothing rack. -Both females browse clothes fairly quickly and move onto next clothing rack. -Male worker was fixing the items on display on the sale table.

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3

1’9”

4’1” 2

1

1

4’1”

1

1 1

1’5”

2’

1 5’3”

1 2’9”

2 3’

5’2”

1

2

1

1

ITEM NAME 1 Clothing Rack

QUANTITY 10

DIMENSIONS

2 Display Table

3

4’1”x 4’1”

3 Shelving Units

2

5’5”x 4’x 1’9”

5’3”x 2’

NOTES Yellow, meal clothing rack used for display of larger clothing items. Smaller wooden display tables for delicate pieces of clothing or accessories. Wooden shelving units used to display clothing.


LIBRARY Public Space- Woodbury University NOTES

1

-Thursday, September 22 -6:00pm-6:30pm

1

7’3”

-Age Range: 19-24 -Minimal students in library -Most students were working at desks -8 students were at book shelves -2 students checking out books at front desk

1

1’

-Very quiet, hush voices throughout library

3’1”

2’ 1”

1

1

5’ 1”

ITEM NAME 1 Wooden Bookcase

QUANTITY 5

4’1”

DIMENSIONS 2’1” x 5’1”, 7’3”

NOTES Dark brown wooden bookcase, 7 shelves

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RESIDENTIAL SPACE PLAN- UNIVERSAL CLIENT OBJECTIVE Creating a residential space for a client with a disability, was very insightful because furniture, material, fixtures, color, and the adjacency of rooms had to be taken into consideration to adhere to the client’s needs. Through the use of bubble diagrams, adjacency diagrams, criteria matrices, and prototypical diagrams, designing a space with specific requirements made the project adhere more towards being compliant with certain restrictions. Criteria Matrix Client: 28 Year Old Female with Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Sq. Ft Needed

1. Bedroom

Adjacencies

Public Access

Daylight And/or Views

Privacy

Plumbing

Special Equipment

Special Considerations

Sustainable Factors

2, 8

L

N

H

N

N

Neutral color tones with subtle pops of color to keep the room feeling comfortable, yet contemporary. Acoustic privacy.

Use light colored surfaces to reflect daylight. Add plants to help clean the indoor air.

1, 8

M

N

H

Y

N

Use light colored surfaces to reflect daylight. Add plants to help clean the indoor air.

4, 5

M

Y

H

Y

N

Use light colored surfaces to reflect daylight. Add plants to help clean the indoor air.

Central

H

Y

L

N

N

6, 3

M

Y

L

Y

N

220’5”

2. Client’s Bathroom 71’6”

3. Guest Bathroom 71’6”

4. Living Room

Traffic Hub/Convenient for everyone.

200’9”

5. Kitchen

Use light colored surfaces to reflect daylight. Add plants to help clean the indoor air.

Energy Star Refrigerator. Use light colored surfaces to reflect daylight. Add plants to help clean the indoor air.

241’1”

X: Indicates major adjacency

6. Dining Room

256’

7. Laundry Room

5, 4

M

Y

L

N

N

Remote

L

Y

L

Y

N

1, 2

L

Y

H

N

N

Transition light switch from dim to bright, white light.

Use light colored surfaces to reflect daylight. Add plants to help clean the indoor air.

150’

H: High M: Medium

128’1”

8. Safe Room/Office

importance

Client’s safe area when anxiety starts to occur. Simple, minimal furniture. Acoustic privacy.

Use light colored surfaces to reflect daylight. Add plants to help clean the indoor air.

L: Low Y: Yes N: No

CLIENT The client was a 28 year old female who has been suffering from Generalized Anxiety Disorder since she was 16 years old. She experiences anxiety attacks, has difficulty breathing at times, and becomes very anxious when she begins to worry about her family. The spaces in this building were designed to put her at ease and provide her a safe, open environment. The safe room is specifically intended to act as an area where she can go to when she has an anxiety attack or begins to feel anxious and needs to collect her thoughts by either laying down on the sofa or painting at the desk. 93


FLOOR PLAN

UP

Total Rooms: 8 Total Square Footage: 1,332’ 5” System: Linear and Grid Compartmentalized layout due to separation between public and private space. - North Section: Public, guest space - South Section: Private, client’s space Client has her own space towards the back of building with her own bedroom and bathroom. -Safe Zone/Office: Client’s area where she can go to when she feels anxious to calm herself down. This space also acts as an office for everyday tasks.

Laundry Room 121’8”sq.ft. UP

Living Room 220’ 9”sq.ft.

Guest Bathroom 71’6” sq.ft.

Kitchen 241’1” sq.ft. Dining Room 256’ sq.ft. 2'

0

4'

N 10'

6'

8'

14'

12'

16'

Client’s Bathroom 71’6” sq.ft.

BUBBLE DIAGRAM N 2'

Safe Zone/ Office 150’ sq.ft.

0

Bedroom 220’ 5”sq.ft.

10'

6'

14'

Entry Immediate Adjacency Close & Convenient Minor Relationship Daylight or View Acoustic Privacy 4'

8'

12'

16'

94


RESIDENTIAL PROTOTYPICALS MASTER BEDROOM

MASTER BATHROOM

Total Square Footage: 220’5”

Total Square Footage: 71’6”

7’9”

10’7” 3

18”

5’7”

3

4 21”

2

32” 43”

5”

20”

3’

20”

3’ 8” 4’5”

1

4’ 3’

5

10’9”

29”

22’ 5”

2

18”

18” 6’3”

33”

1’

2

5 2’

33”

1

5 5’

4

95

2’6”

ITEM NAME 1 Bed

QUANTITY 1

2 Nightstand

2

3 Dresser with Mirror

1

4 Closet 5 TV with table

1 1

DIMENSIONS

NOTES 54”x 75”, Headboard: 60”x 80” White and pastel blue comforter with chestnut wood headboard. Chestnut wood finish with 1 drawer and open 29”x 36”x 20” storage space below. 36”x 69”x 18”, Mirror: 35”x 50” White dresser with 7 drawers. Mirro right above dresser. 6’9”x 5’x 30” Built in closet in wall with wooden rod. 25”x 36”x 8”, Table: 36”x 48” TV mounted to wall with small white table below. Table has 5 drawers.

ITEM NAME 1 Shower

QUANTITY 1

DIMENSIONS

2 Toliet

1

3 Counter, Sink. Mirror

1

4 Medicine Cabinet 5 Window

1 2

26”x 29”x 18” Counter: 20”x 43”x 20” Sink: 5”x 19” Mirror: 24”x 32”x 1” 24”x 21”x 5” 2’x 4’x 1’

14”x 33”x 33”

NOTES Porcelain tile with waterfall showerhead with 2 spaces in the wall for products. White porcelain toliet. Porcelain countertop with sink and mirror mounted on wall above it. Metal cabinet with 4 shelves. Small, standard size windows to allow light into the room.


SAFE ZONE

LIVING ROOM

Total Square Footage: 150’

Total Square Footage: 200’9”

20’ 8’

4’7”

4

3’11” 3 2’6”

1’11”

2

10’9”

2’9”

2’5”

1

3’1”

5

2’

4 2’

3

1’11”

2’9”

5 3’11”

2’9”

1’9”

1

4 2’

1’11”

11”

3’1”

2’

1’9”

4

3 2’9”

4’

” 1’11

18”

3’

2

8”

6’

ITEM NAME 1 Sofa

QUANTITY 1

DIMENSIONS

2 Coffee Table

1

3 Bookcase 4 Desk & Chair

1 1

1’4”x 3”11”x 1’11” 3’11”x 2’6”x 11”

5 Seat

1

2’9”x 6’x 3’1”

Desk: 2’5”x 4’7”x 2’5” Chair: 3’4”x 1’9”x 1’11” 2’8”x 2’6”x 1’9”

NOTES Gray cushioned sofa with pastel blue and white accent pillows. Chestnut wood finish. Chestnut wood finish with 3 shelves. Tempered glass finish with accents of steel metal. Chair is white polymer. Gray cushioned seat with white blanket for client to feel comfortable and calm.

ITEM NAME 1 Sofa

QUANTITY 1

DIMENSIONS

2 TV with Table

1

TV: 25”x 36”x 8” Table: 36”x 48”x 18”

3 Single Cushioned Seat

2

1’7”x 2’9”x 2’9”

4 Side Table

2

1’7”x 2’x 2’

5 Coffee Table

1

1’4”x 3’11”x 1’11”

2’9”x 3’1”x 8’

NOTES Pastel blue sofa with white accent throw pillows. TV mounted to wall with small white table below. Table has 5 drawers. White cushioned single seats with pastel blue and gray accent pillows. Chestnut wood finish with 1 drawer and open storage below. Chestnut wood finish with open storage below.

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COMMERCIAL OFFICE WITH MIX-USE SPACE PLAN OBJECTIVE The Steelcase design competition provided a closer look into the design process of creating a workspace for a global company and also the different programming that goes into the building. Throughout this process, I was able to determine how spaces are used, what objects are needed in those spaces, and what organizations work best in those areas. By creating criteria matrices, bubble diagrams, adjacency diagrams, floor plans, sections, elevations, and renderings, this project helped me better understand space allocation, ergonomics, and human interaction within a more professional environment. CLIENT The current Steelcase office floor plan was used as the basis for NEXT’s , a global architecture and interior design firm, newly designed office space which included private offices, individual work areas, quiet rooms and mother’s rooms, various workshops, and a work cafe. NEXT thrives on designing spaces that adhere to corporate, government, healthcare, retail, education, retail, and hospitality. This growing company plans to maximize real estate through multi-functional spaces, increase the well-being and productivity of workers, enhance collaboration and transparency of information among clients, and continue to innovate functional and inspiring designs. CONCEPT The concept for this commercial office is to create an open environment, while providing private and transparent zones through fixtures and furnishings within the space. The more public areas will have immediate adjacency to the retreat spaces. A sense of transparency from the materials used between the open and closed off areas will add to the openness of the office environment. The variations of volume spaces provides the occupants a different scenery when entering a new area. The interlocking of spaces allows for open communication, integration of varying systems, and allows for different activities in the work areas to take place. Private Offices Render 97


INSPIRATION PHOTOS To gain inspiration for the new office design of NEXT, I researched and analyzed multiple office spaces, work cafes, and office quiet rooms to begin to strategize how I wanted each area to look like. The social and cultural aspects of office spaces and work cafes is different depending on the type of office work that is done however; I believe that work cafes are a good design solution to increase the communication and human interaction among the workers. The function of a work cafe is to act as a retreat zone for workers and clients to go to when they are feeling stressed or want to have lunch with a client. R21

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CRITERIA MATRIX This criteria matrix was created to visually organize information of a variety of factors, identify program requirements in a concise form, and understand the importance of square footage figures. Another important factor of the criteria matrix is to recognize any special equipment needed for certain spaces and also identify any sustainable factors that will be used for each space. Creating the criteria matrix allowed me to understand spatial awareness and the relationship between each space and how their functions compare and contrast with one another.

SQUARE FOOTAGE

ADJACENCIES PUBLIC ACCESS

DAYLIGHT/ VIEW PRIVACY

PLUMBING

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

SUSTAINABLE FACTORS

1. RECEPTION

230’

12, 4

H

Y

L

N

Adjustable Desk and Seating

Energy Efficient. Natural and Fluorescent lighting.

2. DESIGN LIBRARY

300’

7, 5, 10

H

Y

L

N

Hospitality Surface

Energy Efficient. LED and Retail Lighting.

3. LARGE CONFERENCE ROOM

500’

7, 11, 13

M

Y

M

N

Whiteboards, pin-up space, hospitality surface, HDVC telepresence technology

Energy Efficient. Natural and Fluorescent lighting.

4. TRAINING ROOM

240’

1, 5, 7

M

Y

M

N

Adjustable Desk and Seating. BIM programmed computers, Virtual Reality

Energy Efficient. Natural and Fluorescent lighting.

5. MEDIUM CONFERENCE ROOM

250’

2, 4

M

Y

M

N

Whiteboards, pin-up space, hospitality surface, HDVC telepresence technology

Energy Efficient. Natural and Fluorescent lighting.

6. SMALL CONFERENCE ROOM

140’

3, 7, 13

M

Y

M

N

Whiteboards, pin-up space, hospitality surface, HDVC telepresence technology

Energy Efficient. Natural and Fluorescent lighting.

7. QUIET ROOMS (6)

45’ per room

3, 4, 6, 9

L

Y

H

N

Audio and visual privacy

Energy Efficient. Natural and Fluorescent lighting.

8. MOTHER’S ROOMS (2)

140' per room

9, 10

L

Y

H

N

Audio and visual privacy, multi-purpose

Energy Efficient. Natural and Fluorescent lighting.

9. PRIVATE OFFICES (8)

140’ per room

7, 8, 10

L

Y

H

N

Adjustable Desk and Seating

Energy Efficient. Natural and Fluorescent lighting.

10. INDIVIDUAL WORK AREAS (27)

48’ per room

2, 7, 8

H

Y

M

N

Adjustable Desk and Seating

Energy Efficient. Natural and Fluorescent lighting.

11. PIN-UP & IDEATION ZONE

640’

3, 12

H

Y

M

N

Analog and digital displays. Whiteboards, pin-up space, hospitality surface.

Energy Efficient. Natural and Fluorescent lighting.

Criteria Matrix NEXT Studio

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X: Indicates major adjacency importance

12. WORK CAFE

900’

1, 13

H

Y

L

N

Kitchen appliances

Energy Efficient. Natural and Fluorescent lighting.

13. RESOURCE CENTER

240'

3, 6, 12

H

Y

M

N

Scale plotter, copier/printer, desk top printer, mail trays, counter space

Energy Efficient. Natural and Fluorescent lighting.

M: Medium

14. MAKER SPACE & MODEL SHOP

250’

5, 6, 13

H

Y

M

Y

3D printer, belt sander, laser cutter, table saw, and various hand tools. Counter space and display space.

Energy Efficient. Natural and Fluorescent lighting.

Y: Yes

H: High L: Low N: No


Small Conference Room Quiet Rooms (4)

Individual Work Areas (27)

Reception

Resource Center

Medium Conference Room

Large Conference Room

Design Library

Public Space Semi-Private Space

Mother’s Rooms (2)

Quiet Rooms (4)

Private Space Transition Zone

Model Shop

Pin-up & Ideation Zone Work Cafe

Entry Immediate Adjacency Close & Convenient Minor Relationship Daylight or View Acoustic Privacy

Private Offices (8) Training Room

Program Diagram

Quiet Rooms (4) Small Conf. Room 45’sq.ft. per room 140’sq.ft. per room

Large Conf. Room 500’sq.ft. per room

Pin-up & Ideation Zone 640’ sq.ft.

Model Shop 250’sq.ft. Individual Work Areas (27) 48’ sq.ft. per Work Area

Resource Center 240’sq.ft.

Work Cafe 900’sq.ft.

Medium Conf. Room 250’sq.ft.

Reception 230’sq.ft.

Training Room 240’sq.ft.

Design Library 300’sq.ft.

Quiet Rooms (4) 45’sq.ft. per room

Mother’s Rooms (2) 64’sq.ft. per room

Private Offices (8) 140’ sq.ft. per Work Area

Public Space Semi-Private Space Private Space Transition Zone

Blocking Diagram

JASMINE MANGONA

PROGRAM ANALYSIS By creating a program diagram, I was able to identify spatial relationships and which rooms required acoustic privacy and which required natural daylight views. I was also able to determine where the different spaces go according to my concept and the relationship between those spaces and the transition zones which separate the different areas. I designed the office to have the different spaces equally spread out and have the private zones act as a retreat space when - NEXT Client October 24, 2016 clients needASSIGNMENT to take a 3break. 100


C Quiet Rooms

Small Conference Room

Model Shop Medium Conference Room

Large Conference Room

Work Areas

Mother’s Rooms Resource Center Work Cafe

Reception

Training Rooms

Quiet Rooms

Private Offices

Pin-Up & Ideation Zone

Floor Plan 0

5

10

15

Transverse Section A 101


C1

Reflected Ceiling Plan Track Lighting LED Recessed Downlight

Transverse Section B

Transverse Section C 102


B C

F9

F8

FL2

MODEL SHOP QUIET ROOMS

SMALL CONFERENCE ROOM

F11

F6

LARGE CONFERENCE ROOM

RESOURCE CENTER

INDIVIDUAL WORK AREAS

DESIGN LIBRARY

MEDIUM CONFERENCE ROOM

F7

MOTHER’S ROOMS

F8

F7

F9

F7

TRAINING ROOMS

PIN-UP & IDEATION ZONE

WORK CAFE

RECEPTION

QUIET ROOMS

PRIVATE OFFICES

FL1

A

F11

F6

F1

F1

F6

F1

F2

F5

F4

F7

F11

F5

F7

F11

F6

F6

F7

F10

F5

F7

F7

F11

F3

Furniture Plan

FURNITURE My furniture concept for the NEXT Client includes creating a comfortable work environment which makes workers feel excited to go to work or leaves them feeling stress free. A big role in how workers emotionally, physically, and mentally feel at work relies heavily on the furniture they are sitting on throughout the day. That being said, the furniture I have chosen to use involve chairs that are ergonomic, provide multiple adjustable programs, and also help maintain the sleek, modern atmosphere the spaces gives off. 103

F1- TAVA

F4- FRAMEFOUR

F7- CURRENCY

F10- LAGUNITAS

FL1- MANNINGTON

F2- JENNY

F5- LEAP

F8- CURRENCY

F11- VERB

FL2- MANNINGTON

F3- SERIES

F6- LEAP

F9- COALESSE

W1-INHABIT LIVING

C1-JUNO


MATERIALS

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS Minor Blue

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS They Call it Mellow

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS Olympus White

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS Liquid Blue

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS La Luna Amarilla

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS Gray Screen

Color Scheme

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS Bluebell

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS Sunny Veranda

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS Evening Shadow

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS Cloudless

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS Honey Bees

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS Monorail Silver

My material concept for the NEXT Client includes creating a comfortable and aesthetically pleasing atmosphere that will affect the way client’s feel throughout the space. That being said, the color scheme I have chosen to use is a mixture of grays, pastel yellows, and pastel blues due to the calming and open vibe. By using 3-dimensional wall paneling, it created a sense of texture to the office space and made the space feel more open to the workers. The variation of flooring distinguished work stations from lounge stations to help occupants understand the designated areas from one another.

LIGHTING The track lighting fixture acted as a piece of wayfinding within the office to help occupants find their way around each space. The recessed lighting systems were designed in the areas where static circulation was taking place and to create a relaxing ambient lighting. The different forms of lighting were designed to help the circulation within the office move fluidly and provide a clear pathway to each area.

Reception

Resource Center Render

Work Cafe Render 104


1


07 MATERIALS & FURNISHINGS Woodbury University Fall 2016 Thomas Stallman

The objective of this course was to analyze various finishes and specifications for interior elements, furniture, fixtures, and textiles. Visiting and studying renovated offices, contemporary furniture and textile show rooms helped identify different components of an interior project and product information. 1


CONVEX HEXAGON TESSELLATION OBJECTIVE The objective of this project was to create a hexagonal board using various materials focused around one color value. Each material had to be the exact size and shape of the diagram and arranged by color value and from darkest to light.

Group Tessellation

105


MATERIALS The materials used in this project were recycled pieces of everyday materials and textures. Each material used was deformed, twisted, or cut up in a different way to give the illusion of a new material. The gradiation from orange to yellow helped illustrate the change of value from one color to the next color.

Layered Shower Loofah Sock

Kitchen Sponge

Cut Up Pieces of a Lei Construction Paper Rolled Pieces of Felt

Orange Tessellation

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1


08 DESIGN COMMUNICATION III Woodbury University Spring 2017 Bailey Shugart

The objective of this course was to understand the drawing, modeling, and rendering tools of Maya to generate HDR Studio Style Object Oriented Renderings. By applying texture, geometry, and deformations to various objects, helped promote new innovations of designs. 1


MASSING OBJECTIVE This was the beginning of learning the basic modeling and rendering tools of Maya by learning how to apply various materials and textures onto objects, transform and configure new figures, and apply geometry by bending, twisting, meshing, and interlocking multiple surfaces together. The basis for each 3D model, render, and 3D prints were figurines of a zebra, penguin, and Mickey Mouse.

Zebra

Front Elevation

Back Elevation

Left Elevation

Right Elevation

Right Elevation

Bottom

Top

Penguin

Front Elevation

Back Elevation

Left Elevation

Front Elevation

Back Elevation

Left Elevation

Bottom

Top

Bottom

Top

Mickey Mouse

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Right Elevation


3D PRINTS

Zebra

Mickey Mouse

3D PRINTED MODELS After finalizing the Maya models and making sure there were no naked edges or holes within each figure, they were then 3D printed in plastic. Each model printed well, there were some support pieces built on areas of the models to hold up the structure. It was very interesting to see the creations that were first 3D models in Maya to physically holding them. The process of 3D printed was very helpful because it helped me understand the process better and will be useful for future Penguin

projects. 108


LIGHTING, PATTERN, & SHADOW OBJECTIVE By applying the techniques learned in Maya, lighting, pattern, and shadow were practiced through this project. Variations of direct light, point light, and sun light were applied to different scenarios to see the effect it had on the figurine. Materials such as blinn and lambert were also applied onto each object to gain a more realistic render. Pattern and color were the most interesting to apply because I chose patterns and colors that represented each figure and the emotion they each gave off. True Color of Object with White Background

Zebra

Penguin

Mickey Mouse

109

Various Shades of White Background

Various Color and Pattern


True Color of Object with White Background

Various Color and Pattern

Camouflage

Zebra

Penguin

Mickey Mouse

OBJECTIVE More detailed lighting, pattern, and shadow renders were completed to further express my knowledge of the techniques learned in Maya. The camouflage objective was to apply the same texture onto the figure and background and give off the illusion that the figure is part of the background. 110


FIGURE DEFORMATION OBJECTIVE The final project was to combine all three figurines and distort, contort, bend, twist, and apply specific forces such as internal and external pressures yet maintain each object in a way that makes them still recognizable as to what they were originally. Each idea behind each render was to either mold all three models into the shape of one another or layer each model on top of each other to visually illustrate the relationship between the three figures.

Process Renders I

Process Renders II

Process Renders III

111


True Color of Object with White Background

Various Shades of White Background

Various Color and Pattern

Camouflage

112


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09 DESIGN STUDIO IV Woodbury University Spring 2017 Todd Erlandson & Lara Hoad

The objective of this course was to understand the basics of branding, identifying a brand’s attributes and ethics to translate it into various designs of interiors and exteriors of aerospace. Visually illustrating a brand’s objectives through conceptual imagery helped formulate a program and design strategy for the final wellness center project.

1


BRAND HISTORY OBJECTIVE The start of the Mars Capsule Project began with researching a specific brand that specializes in space exploration and analyzing how, why, and when they expect to take people up into space. The main focus on each project was to reflect the brand and design around their image.

MISSION STATEMENT

TARGET AUDIENCE

To develop technologies to enable private human access to space with the goal to dramatically lower cost and increase reliability. The company aims to build colonies, amusement parks, and space

Blue Origin provides spaceflight services with a target of lowering costs. One of their many goals is to take tourists to space by 2018. They are also under contract with the United Launch Alliance to create a new large engine for the rockets.

hotels for over 3 million people to live in space.

CORE VALUES Dramatically lower costs Increase reliability Maintain the use of sustainable fuel throughout the products. Create reusable rockets to reduce the cost of space exploration.

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BRAND HERITAGE

Blue Origin is a privately owned spaceflight service company that was founded by Jeff Bezos in 2000 in Washington. They create sub-orbital spaceflight and rocket engines through their aerospace manufacturer. The name derived from the blue planet, Earth, as our point of origin. Blue Origin’s greatest achievement is the creation of their main rocket, “New Shepard”, which lands vertically after KEY INSIGHTS Reusable Rocket: Blue Origin had reused the same it reaches the edge of space. The New Shepard travels 62 miles from Earth. Tourists will see the rocket 3 different times. curvature of the planet and the endless distance of Life in Space: Working hard to make people live space through the largest windows in spaceflight and work in space. Affordable & Reliable: Making the cost of spaceflight history. inexpensive and improving their technology each time.

R24

R25


BRAND BIBLE & TALISMAN TALISMAN This talisman project represents Blue Origin, a company that focuses on re-usability, low cost travel to space, and enhancing the tourist experience in space. The main focus of this Talisman was the mason jar due to its’ reusable value. The mason jar is a multi-functional item that can be customized to any use and also reduces the cost of purchasing new items that the mason jar is already able to do.

BRAND BIBLE To further express the core values, mission statement, brand heritage, and target audience of Blue Origin, a brand bible was created using reusable materials to further represent the company. Each information card provided an inside look into the company and what it stands for while also having a graphic layout of their window on their rocket that looks out into the endless sky of space. 114


MARS LUXURY CAPSULE DESIGN INSPIRATION PHOTOS Before designing the Mars luxury cabin, research was conducted to gain an understanding of different materials, layout, lighting, and fixtures that would best represent the image of Blue Origin. By looking at different compact houses, it became easy to determine that low saturation colors, glass, and light wood would best compliment Blue Origin.

MATERIALS The accents of blue transparent glass and sofa pillows complimented the dark oak flooring and tan laqueer well. I took inspiration from the combination of these materials because Blue Origin is represented by accents of their signature blue color with a mixture of lighter-colored materials.

Mercury High Speed Train

R26

DESIGN The concept behind compact homes is very interesting because it allows for every space in the room to be occupied, so no area is wasted. It also allows the room to have various purposes and activities held within it creating a sense of spatial community within one single area.

Zoku 115

R27

Zoku

R27


CONCEPT 3

8

8

3

Blue Origin’s mission is to dramatically lower the cost of space exploration and increase the space tourism experience. The New Shepard is a fully sustainable rocket that has been reused over 3 times, each time making more improvements to increase the reliability and technology of space travel. By coming aboard the newly designed Blue Origin space capsule, tourists would experience an unforgettable trip to the unexplored grounds of Mars. Tourists will be able to take in breathtaking views through Blue Origin’s 3.5’ windows which are

3

8 9

1

1

7

3

3

4

8

3

4

8

4

2

5

5

Transverse Section B

5

Transverse Section A

3 2 1. Sleeping Capsule 2. Restroom 3. Kitchen 4. Work Station 5. Survival Kit 6. Medicine Bar 7. Gym 8. Entertainment 9. Clothing Storage 10. Hydroponic System & Radiation Shields

3

7

the largest windows in spaceflight history. This space capsule was designed to make your journey to the outer realms of space not only enjoyable, but also a remarkable experience.

1 9 B 4

Plan

9

A

Cutaway 116


BLUE ORIGIN SPACE CAPSULE

CONCEPT, DESIGN, & MATERIALS Taking inspiration from compact homes, this Mars luxury cabin included various cabinets that held items such as kitchen appliances, entertainment equipment, and survival kits behind Privalite Laminated Glass that acted as a “curtain� barrier for the occupant to hide their belongings. The movable glass is adjustable for the occupant to easily access their necessary items. The main window is in the shape of the Blue Origin infamous rocket window which is surrounded by the hydroponic system that provides not only greenery, but vegetation within the space capsule. The materials were kept to a minimum of Privalite Laminated Glass, light oak wood, white laqueer, and light blue and white illuminated light. 117


TRAVEL POSTER TRAVEL POSTER The concept behind the travel poster was to advertise space travel with Blue Origin and highlight the interior of the First Class Cabin. The visual language this poster presented helped promote space exploration to Mars while also maintaining the image of Blue Origin through the font, color, and layout choices.

COME ABOARD BLUE ORIGIN’S NEW SHEPARD FOR AN UNFORGETTABLE TRIP TO THE UNEXPLORED DEPTHS OF MARS. THIS REMARKABLE EXPERIENCE WILL ALLOW YOU TO MARVEL IN WEIGHTLESS FREEDOM, TAKE IN BREATHTAKING VIEWS, AND EMBARK IN A FULLY SUSTAINABLE SUBORBITAL FLIGHT THROUGH THE COSMOS. READY TO TAKE YOUR FIRST STEP?  

START YOUR JOURNEY

Study Model 118


CLAUSTROPHOBIA DIAGRAMS OBJECTIVE Space exploration to Mars brings on various issues and conditions such as claustrophobia, isolation, access to daylight, time/seasons, connection to nature, and privacy. The diagrams below were to address the issue of claustrophobia, how life on Mars will make claustrophobia worse, and solutions to reduce the issue on Mars. Set of Diagrams I

ISSUE Claustrophobia is caused by traumatic events, being confined to small spaces, and being trapped. Symptoms of claustrophobia are not only mental, but also trigger physical symptoms.

16’ 12’ 9’ 7’

7’

CONDITION ON MARS

9’

12’

16’

7’

Living inside of a capsule can promote a lonely environment, coupled with a confined environment can cause Claustrophobia. It causes one to feel various emotions of isolation, anxiety, and even space madness.

Set of Diagrams II

7’

7’

7’

7’

7’

7’

7’

ISOLATION

SPACE MADNESS

ANXIETY

PANIC ATTACKS

LIMITATIONS

LIMITATIONS

SPACE MADNESS

CONFINEMENT

ISOLATION

SOLUTIONS One solution to help one avoid these emotions is systematic desensitization which includes one to emerse themselves into the environment to which they fear. Another way to solve this issue is socialization and being around others which helps create a healthier environment. All Diagrams created in partnership with Christian Esparza 119


MOOD MAINTENANCE PODS SIGHT LINES POD Direct sight line for the occupant to see that there is a way out of the claustrophobic space they are occupying. By having these sight lines elongates the space and makes the room much bigger to help the occupant feel more at ease with small, compact space.

SCENT POD Custom scent pod where the occupant is able to pick a scent through the pods and it will circulate around the space. They are also able to combine multiple scents to create a customized smell. The feeling of customization allows the occupant to create a familiar atmosphere around them and customize the white canvas walls.

Scents and Colors Red- Strawberry Orange- Citrus Yelllow- Flowers

3 2

Green- Forest Blue- Ocean Purple- Lavender

Pink- Peony Brown- Baked Cookies

VIEWS POD This pod includes adjustable glass finish to allow occupant to determine how much light will be allowed into the space. This will help alleviate the feeling of claustrophobia within the pod due to the visibility of the outside.

1

1

2

4

Adjustable Glass Finishes

3

4

1- Opaque 2- Transparent 3- Translucent 4- Frosted

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SPRINGS WELLNESS CENTER INSPIRATION & SITE VISIT To begin the Mars Wellness Center project, a site visit to The Springs Wellness Center in Los Angeles was taken to gain inspiration about how to design a wellness center for Blue Origin. The space gave off an industrial atmosphere and did not resemble a traditional spa center. The exposed structures, concrete flooring, lounge-style furnishings, and ambient fixtures made the center feel more relaxed and communal. It had an open floor plan which included a juice bar/cafe, three dining areas, various seating conditions, and a pop-up shop which sold clothing, lotions, and succulents.

MEDITATION To further gain an understanding of how a wellness center makes one feel, myself and a few other students participated in a 30-minute meditation session at The Springs Wellness Center. By fully immersing myself into a complete calm and soothing state of mind, I was able to clear my thoughts and focus on my breathing and calming all the nerves and tension in my body and mind. This experience was very insightful because I was able to gain an idea of how I would want the guests in my wellness center to feel and how I would design my center around those experiences and feelings.

121


BLUE ORIGIN WELLNESS CENTER

CONCEPT Blue Origin’s wellness center is a relaxing sanctuary for people to retreat to when they are stressed, anxious, or depressed; but it also doubles as a place to heal the mind, body, and soul through its various health and wellness services. Visitors are able to take the engaging user experience outside of the space capsule and into a new environment. This wellness center is based around Eco-therapy which refers to healing and growth nurtured by a healthy interaction with the Earth. Each service provided adds to the biophilic design of the wellness center because it helps people possess an innate tendency to seek connections with nature.

Exercise Studio 400 sq. ft.

Sound Bath 100 sq. ft.

Therapeutic Massage 100 sq. ft.

MEZZANINE 800 sq. ft.

Bathrooms/ Showers/ Changing 400 sq. ft.

Virtual Reality World 100 sq. ft.

Community Garden/ Relaxation Meditation 250 sq. ft.

FIRST FLOOR 1,450 sq. ft.

Yo g

a/ M 40 edita 0 s tio q. n S ft. tud

io

Kitchen/ Bar/ Restaurant 400 sq. ft.

Therapy 100 sq. ft.

HISTORY OF THE LAVA TUBE DOME Lava Tubes serve as underground structures that are formed by flowing lava through a channel, overflows that build along the sides, and connect and harden which forms a canopy. This natural channel can actively drain flowing lava from a volcano and cease the flow of lava causing the rocks to cool and leave a long, cave-like tube. They act as enclosures for humans because they have roods that are meters thick which helps shields humans from solar radiation, micrometeorites, extreme temperature fluctuations, winds, and dust storms.

Organizational Diagram 122


B

B

3

4

5

A

6

1

2

7 8

First Floor Plan 0

5

10

15

9

Second Floor Plan 0

5

10

15

CONCEPT The first floor of Blue Origin’s Journey to Rejuvenation Wellness Center includes “rejuvenation stations” which are activities that do no require a lot of time, occupants will stay for about an hour or less and experience quick wellness spa services. For occupants who wish to stay longer and receive the full experience, the second floor includes “relax and renew” services that take a longer amount of time, but will leave the occupant feeling healthy, happy, and relaxed. Throughout the wellness center, visitors will be fully immersed into the nature environment with live greenery growing around them. Blue Origin focuses on living a sustainable, comfortable lifestyle. 123

LEGEND

1 Yoga & Meditation 2 Kitchen & Juice Bar 3 Changing Rooms,Showers, Restrooms 4 Community Garden 5 Exercise Studio 6 Sound Bath 7 Therapeutic Massage 8 Virtual Reality World 9 Therapy


Section A

Section B

CONNECTION TO NATURE The elder trees, community garden, and relaxation meditation in the garden are unique aspects of Blue Origin to promote sustainability and are incorporated to surround visitors with greenery which elevates their mental and spiritual state of mind. The various areas of nature are used to provide familiarity of nature to visitors, since they are on a desolate, dry planet. Visitors can interact with the community garden by growing their own vegetation and gaining that sense of taking care of a “pet plant� further alleviating any street or anxiety they may have. 124


EXCERCISE STUDIO

400 sq. ft

MASSAGE

100 sq. ft

SOUND BATH

100 sq. ft

CHANGING ROOMS, SHOWERS, & RESTROOM

400 sq. ft

YOGA

400 sq. ft

COMMUNITY GARDEN

250 sq. ft

JUICE BAR

400 sq. ft

3D Axonometric Cutaway

SOLAR COLLECTION DISH TRACKING MECHANISM

Reflective parabola collects sunlight Follows the path of the sun throughout the year

HELIO TUBE Fiberoptic cable channel sunlight through ground surface to lava tube dome

RAAD STUDIO’S SOLAR COLLECTOR DIAGRAM RAAD Studio designed a solar collector dish system that uses a reflective parabola to collect sunlight, the sunlight travels through a helio tube, and is directly dispersed onto a green space underground. This includes a tracking mechanism that follows the path of the sun throughout the year. Since the Lava Tube is 5’-20’ beneath the surface, the solar collectors will have an extension of 15’-20’, so that the trees and community garden are able to receive natural sunlight despite being underground.

DOME Reflects and distributes channelled sunlight

GREEN SPACE Underground sunlight sustains plants, trees, and grass

Solar Collector Diagram 125

Designed by RAAD Studio


Mezzanine

Juice Bar & Cafe

MATERIALS

Leaf Texture

Leaf Texture

Bark Texture

Oak Wood

Granite

Granite

Textured Glass

Textured Glass

Community Garden 126


1


10 BUILDING SYSTEMS & CODES Woodbury University Spring 2017 Branka Olson

The objective of this course was to analyze and study the role of different systems properties and building code regulations throughout various spaces. Construction materials, structural, acoustical, mechanical, and electrical, and plumbing systems were studied and applied in accordance to the International Building Code and California Building Code and the Americans with Disabilities Act.


PROGRAM ANALYSIS & EXITING OBJECTIVE The project was to design a VIP bar/pub for a new craft brewer in the Los Angeles area. There was an analysis of the occupancy type for each space, the occupant load factor for each space, required number of exits, length of travel distance, and the minimum width of each exit. By analyzing the required codes in regards to the International Building Code and the California Building Code, the system of the project was illustrated through a block diagram. 200 sq. ft.

ANALYSIS The barrel storage room, private dining room, and pub/dining room are adjacent to the exits due to the high circulation of occupants that these spaces generate. In case of emergency, occupants are able to safely and conveniently exit the bar.

BAR

Pub/Dining Room 1300 sq. ft.

Mezzanine 300 sq. ft.

Pub/Dining Room 1300 sq. ft.

Women’s Restroom 165 sq. ft.

Men’s Restroom 165 sq. ft.

Executive Office 150 sq. ft.

Executive Office 150 sq. ft. Barrel Storage Room 990 sq. ft. Private Dining Room 320 sq. ft.

Chef’s Office 150 sq. ft.

First Floor Plan

Mezzanine Plan

NOTES - 3’ width door clearance for and entry and exit. - The two exits are placed 41’ from each other which is half the diagonal dimension of the space (82’). The distance between the exits is helpful when in an emergency to avoid occupants running into one another. 127

NAME OF SPACE

AREA

OCCUPANCY TYPE

OCCUPANT LOAD FACTOR

Bar

200 sq. ft.

Assembly without Fixed Seats (Group A)

7 Net

28

Pub/Dining Room

1300 sq. ft.

Assembly without Fixed Seats (Group A)

15 Net

79

Private Dining Room

320 sq. ft.

Assembly without Fixed Seats (Group A)

15 Net

21

Barrel Storage Room

990 sq. ft.

Accessory Storage Areas (Group M)

300 Gross

3

Mezzanine

300 sq. ft.

Assembly Gaming Floors (Group A)

11 Gross

27

Private Offices (3)

450 sq. ft.

Business Areas (Group B)

100 Gross

4

# OF OCCUPANT


STRUCTURES OBJECTIVE The Vakko Fashion Center was analyzed to determine the structure systems within the building, enclosures found, various codes and regulations apples to the building, and a synopsis of the design concept. The building systems and codes learned in each lecture were able to be applied and analyzed carefully for this project.

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DESIGN CONCEPT REX Architecture embraced this project through means of integrating two separate structural systems and re-purposing of existing resources. Such resources include the existing concrete posts and slabs and a design taken from a canceled project. By keeping the systems separate, the project was completed within a year, per the client’s request. R29

R30

POINTS AND LINES Vakko is divided into 2 components. The “Ring”, the original unfinished hotel project that Vakko was built upon, was a post and slab concrete structure. The concrete structure is traditional and formal as it contains the steel structure. The “Showcase”, the center of the “Ring”, is a six floor steel frame. The steel frame is more robust and dynamic. R31

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ENCLOSURE The “Ring” is enclosed in a thin sheet of glass and it also allows for the original structure to be seen. In addition, it allows occupants to also see the “Showcase”. Due to the reflection of the mirrors, workers have reported losing their orientation while circulating through the building. This creates an interactive experience. All research done in partnership with Bennet Cariaga

R33

128


INTERIORS OBJECTIVE A synopsis of the Walt Disney Concert Hall was conducted to gain an understanding of the interior and structural systems and its relationship to the design of the building. The interior environment conditions, code regulations, materials and furnishings, and spacial scenarios were also analyzed to further help gain an insight into the design concept as a whole.

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DESIGN CONCEPT

In order to create an acoustical environment, that connects the orchestra and the audience throughout the spaces, Frank Gehry incorporates the use of materials found in musical instruments.

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STRUCTURAL SYSTEM The structural system is made up of mostly steel. It does not allow a traditional pattern to emerge because of the way it is formed, however, it is evident that the organic form is repeated throughout the exterior and interior of the building. The molded “X� on the facade strengthens the glass which is why mullions are not needed. Due to the non-combustible material near the escalators and the placement of sprinklers throughout the building, the escalators do not need to be enclosed.

R36

R36

MATERIALS The materials used in the Walt Disney Concert Hall include stainless steel, glass, Alaskan yellow cedar, stone, fir-wood (flooring, ceiling, walls). These materials generate spatial scenarios because they create spaces within spaces. Frank Gehry used these materials because they promoted acoustical environments throughout the spaces. R37 129

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All research done in partnership with Bennet Cariaga


WOODY’S CAFE RE-DESIGN PROJECT SCOPE & MISSION STATEMENT The goal of this project is to re-design Woody’s Cafe to better accommodate faculty, students, and visitors while also creating designated spaces for various meetings and eating arrangements of different occupants throughout Woody’s Cafe. The addition of a second floor acting as “cafe library” will allow occupants to have more privacy while holding formal meetings or doing homework.

SITE MAP

PROJECT INFORMATION APPLICABLE CODES According to the 2016 Los Angeles Building Codes & 2016 California Building Code SCOPE OF WORK: Re-design of Woody’s Cafe dining area and the addition of a second floor CONSTRUCTION TYPE: Existing two story building

OCCUPANCY TYPE & LOADS OCCUPANCY TYPE: Assembly, A-2, 11 Gross OCCUPANCY LOADS: Section 1004.3 according to the International Building Codes

PROPERTY LINE

FIRST FLOOR PLAN:

WOODY’S CAFE

OCCUPANTS: 177

BATHROOMS:

OCCUPANTS: 193

SECOND FLOOR PLAN: OCCUPANTS: 210

EXITING REQUIREMENTS FIRST FLOOR: 2; Separation of exits is 1/2 of the overall diagonal diameter of the building SECOND FLOOR: 2; Separation of exits is 1/2 of the overall diagonal diameter of the building

BUILDING KEY WOODY’S CAFE Dining Area

SHEET INDEX TITLE SHEET BUILDING PLAN FIRST FLOOR PLAN SECOND FLOOR PLAN FRAMING PLAN REFLECTED CEILING PLAN-FIRST FLOOR REFLECTED CEILING PLAN- SECOND FLOOR SECTION ELEVATIONS RESTOOM PLAN FINISH PLAN- FIRST FLOOR FINISH PLAN- SECOND FLOOR FURNITURE PLAN- FIRST FLOOR FURNITURE PLAN- SECOND FLOOR

130


AREA OF WORK & EXISTING BUILDING PLAN NOTES Existing building construction is 2,663 sq.ft. and is open to main cafe area, storage room, patio, and fashion building.

AREA OF WORK EXISTING BUILDING PLAN EXITS

131

PATH OF TRAVEL


FIRST FLOOR PLAN

MEN’S BATHROOM 290 sq. ft.

WOMEN’S BATHROOM 290 sq. ft.

DINING AREA 2,663 sq. ft.

C100- THE NEW WOODY’S 2699 sq. ft.

0

5

10

15

NOTES - Exterior and construction of the main floor of the building was kept, but the existing storage room was transformed into a men’s restroom and women’s restroom. - Existing columns are placed 14’ apart from each other and includes a second set that is 26’ feet from first set of columns. - 2 required staircases were placed on opposite ends from each other to allocate occupants from either side and also is used for fire safety requirements in case of emergency.

OCCUPANCY TYPE: Type A, Assembly without fixed seating OCCUPANCY LOAD: 177 Occupants TOTAL SQUARE FOOTAGE: 2,663 sq. ft. TOTAL NUMBER OF SEATS: 56 132


SECOND FLOOR PLAN 1

2

3

4

5

6

BOILER

PUMP

A COOLING TOWER

B SECOND FLOOR 3,155 sq. ft.

C 0

5

10

15

NOTES - A second floor was built instead of mezzanine for acoustical privacy for the “cafe library” areas in the second floor. By blocking out the acoustics from the first floor, occupants are able to have a more quiet space to study, hold meetings, or work in group projects. -This floor includes 2 staircases to accommodate fire regulations and also the occupancy load. - The inclusion of two conference room is for added privacy for meetings or group projects. 133

OCCUPANCY TYPE: Type A, Assembly without fixed seating OCCUPANCY LOAD: 210 Occupants TOTAL SQUARE FOOTAGE: 3,155 sq. ft. TOTAL NUMBER OF SEATS: 101


FRAMING PLAN 1

2

3

4

5

6

BOILER

PUMP

A COOLING TOWER

OPEN TO BELOW

B

OPEN TO BELOW

C 0

5

10

15

LEGEND 2” x 10” Joists 2” x 10” Beams 1’4” x 2’ Columns

134


REFLECTED CEILING PLAN- FIRST FLOOR 1

2

3

4

5

6

A

B C100- THE NEW WOODY’S 2699 sq. ft.

C 0

LEGEND 5” and 11” Wooden Beams 2’x 2’ Ceiling Grid Tile Return Air Grill Supplies Drop Down Pendant Lighting Sprinkler

135

5

10

15


REFLECTED CEILING PLAN- SECOND FLOOR

BOILER

PUMP

COOLING TOWER

0

5

10

15

LEGEND 5” and 11” Wooden Beams 2’x 2’ Ceiling Grid Tile Return Air Grill Supplies Drop Down Pendant Lighting Sprinkler

136


SECTION & ELEVATION

+11’- 0” (n) Loft Fin. Floor

0 - 0” (e) Auditorium Fin. Floor

Elevation

+11’- 6” (n) Loft Fin. Floor

+3’- 0” (e) Backstag Fin. Floor 0 - 0” (e) Auditorium Fin. Floor

Section

NOTES -Stairs are 11’-6” above the ground surface and lead to the second floor. -Each staircase includes additional bench seating along the side of the stairs for occupants to use. -Additional bench provides additional lounge seating for the first floor. 137


RESTROOM PLANS

29’

29’ 12” 1’

2’ 3’5”

MEN’S BATHROOM 290 sq. ft. ”

” 60

5’

3’5”

12”

10’ 3’

WOMEN’S BATHROOM 290 sq. ft.

60

1’4”

3’

5’

12”

NOTES OCCUPANCY TYPE: A-2, Assembly occupancy OCCUPANCY LOAD OF MAIN FLOOR AND SECOND FLOOR: 387 Occupants, 193 Men and 193 Women TOTAL SQUARE FOOTAGE: 700 sq. ft. MEN’S RESTROOM: Water Closets: 3 minimum, In Plan: 3 included with 1 Handicap Stall Urinals: 1 minimum, In Plan: 2 Lavatories: 2 minimum, In Plan: 3 Trash Receptacle and Paper Towel Dispenser: 2 WOMEN’S RESTROOM: Water Closets: 4 minimum, In Plan: 4 included with 1 Handicap Stall Lavatories: 2 minimum, In Plan: 3 Trash Receptacle and Paper Towel Dispenser: 2

CALCULATIONS OCCUPANCY TYPE: A-2, Assembly occupancy TOTAL OCCUPANCY LOAD: 387 Occupants, 193 Men and 193 Women 1. Total Square footage 2,663 sq. ft. = = 177 Occupants (Main Floor) Net/ Gross 15 Net

=

3,155 sq. ft. = 210 Occupants (Second Floor) 15 Net

2. Add Occupant Load of Main Floor and Second Floor to get total occupant load. 177 + 210 = 387 Total Occupant Load 3. Total Occupant Load 387 = = 193 Occupants 2 2

138


FINISH PLAN-FIRST FLOOR

0

MATERIALS FLOORING- Timberwise, Olive Lacquered Ash Parquets PAINT- American Clay, Everglades

STAIRS- Light Wood

139

5

10

15


FINISH PLAN-SECOND FLOOR

0

5

10

15

MATERIALS FLOORING- Timberwise, Olive Lacquered Ash Parquets PAINT- American Clay, French Quarter

STAIRS- Light Wood

140


FURNITURE PLAN-FIRST FLOOR

0

141

5

10

15


FURNITURE PLAN-SECOND FLOOR

0

5

10

15

142


STAIRS INSPIRATION STAIRS DESIGN The objective of analyzing a chosen stair, such as the one in House S designed by Nimmrichter CDA, was to interpret the existing systems, material palette, and code requirements and how it leads to a clearer understanding of how these systems are used as a design element. This helped formulate the basis for the new stair system in Woody’s Cafe which was illustrated through plans and section with the appropriate calculations.

BACKGROUND Nimmrichter CDA is an architecture and design firm in Zollikon, Switzerland who specializes in corporate architecture. House S is located in Dietlikon, Switzerland and was designed to the client’s wish of living in a place that offers “different degrees of openness or seclusion”. It was built on top of an existing piece of architecture which included a swimming pool and summer house which became the foreground for House S. There are 3 floors which allow the occupant’s to have a complete 360 view of the surrounding environment. Form and materiality were the main objectives that the structure focused on while it was being built and how it would interact with the pre-existing layout. The angled facade and exterior both represent the different degrees of openness and seclusion that the client had asked for. House S is also Minergie certified, a registered quality label for low-energy buildings. This energy concept includes making use of the house’s existing heating system and using solar panels to heat water.

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STRUCTURAL SYSTEM The structural system of the staircase is a simple construction of wood and steel and were built in relation to the existing beam in the building. The complete construction of the staircase is built into a spiral array that leads the occupant from the ground floor to the third floor. The addition of glass on one side of the staircase proves to be a safety hazard due to the missing required handrail therefore, making that part of the staircase not compliable to the International Building Code. 143

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COMPLIANCE TO CODE REQUIREMENTS The stairs in House S are compliable to the code requirements because they abide by the codes set by the International Building Code. They were designed to be functional, safe, and comfortable for the occupants to use. It does not abide by the code that states that stair treads and risers should have a uniform size and shape due to the additional custom design at the bottom of the stairs. The custom design of the bench and storage compartment was designed to help accommodate the occupant better and utilize every inch of the building including portions of the staircase. Due to the protrusion of the storage compartment, the first 4 risers and treads are extended in length therefore, they are not compliable to the International Building Code.

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CODE REQUIREMENTS House S meets the standard code requirements in regards to: - Stairways serving an occupant load of 50 or less may be 36” wide. Private stairways serving an occupant load of less than 10 may be 30” wide. - Stairways shall have a minimum headroom clearance of 80“ measured vertically from the line connecting edge of the nosings. - Minimum stairway width shall not be less than 44”. - Stair riser heights shall be 7” maximum and 4” minimum. - Tread depths shall be 11” minimum. - The tolerance between the largest and smallest riser/tread depth shall not exceed 3/8“ in any flight of stairs. - Any angle of pitch between 28” and 36” is safe and comfortable.

The extension of the staircase has to be adapted to comply with Woody’s Cafe because instead of the extension acting as a storage area, it will act as an additional casual bench seating. Therefore, it will be 18” in height and width, and will be around 10’ long.

Woody’s Cafe staircase will meet the standard code requirements listed above, however it will be serving an occupant load of more than 50, meaning that the width cannot be less than 44”. 144


MATERIAL PALETTE To adhere to the clients’ needs of wanting various spaces of different degrees of openness and seclusion, the designers used chestnut wood to frame the interior of the entrance hall, cloakroom and externallyaccessible guest toilet, and the staircase. The use of glass against the right-hand side of the staircase provides a sense of more openness as the resident walks up and down the staircase rather than it being blocked off with another piece of chestnut wood. By adding elements of lighter colored materials, the space opens up and gives off a more free, clear atmosphere as you walk throughout the building. The drop ceiling attached to the staircase includes recessed lighting to add to the open environment because it is not an obstruction as you are walking throughout the space and is simply just an additional light source to the natural light coming through the windows. The contrast between the chestnut wood and the dark, rough concrete floor provides the occupant a balance of light and dark, so that the material palette of the space is not static and is instead more flexible.

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STRUCTURAL SYSTEM The structural system of the staircase is a simple construction of wood and steel and were built in relation to the existing beam in the building. The complete construction of the staircase is built into a spiral array that leads the occupant from the ground floor to the third floor. The addition of glass on one side of the staircase proves to be a safety hazard due to the missing required handrail therefore, making that part of the staircase not compliable to the International Building Code.

145

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CONCEPT I chose to design a style of stairs that was similar to the one in House S because it was multi-functional in a way that makes the system more incorporated into the space and does not define it as a single structure in the corner of the room. I attached a bench on the side of the stairs because it would allow students, faculty, and visitors a place to sit while waiting for class or for a friend to come down from the mezzanine. The appropriate calculations were done to determine the number of risers and treads and the riser heights and tread heights. 4-1/2”L 4-1/2”W 2’10”

PLAN

DIMENSIONS Total Rise= 11’- 6”= 138” Rise Height= 6” Tread Depth= 2R + T= 24; 12”

11’6”

6’6” 18”W

Number of Risers= 23 Riser Height= 6”

18”L 10’

6” 34”

12”W

7’6”

Number of treads= 22 Tread Depth= 12”

146


1


11 BEGINNING DRAWING Woodbury University Spring 2016 Michelle Weiner

The objective of this course was to observe objects and study line, shape, form, proportion, perspective, and tone while illustrating spatial awareness and the effects of light. This course also observed different methods of drawing, interpreted various volumes and proportions, and identified drawing terminology.


BEGINNING DRAWING

147

ABSTRACT

CROSS CONTOUR DRAWING OF COMPOSITION OF OBJECTS

This abstract drawing symbolizes anger and frustration by avoiding obvious symbolism and images. It concentrated

Cross contouring objects helped gain an understanding of compositional framing and spatial relationships of objects. A

on the feeling and mark-making that the drawing gave off to the viewer. Various mediums were used including charcoal and lead to provide different textures to the drawing.

gray scale using cross contour was helpful to gain a handle of different leads and how much pressure to put on paper to obtain the different shades of gray.


1 AND 2 POINT LINEAR PERSPECTIVE This project started the beginning of perspective drawing for this course by starting off with a grid layout, studying and analyzing various figures in different positions, and drawing the angles and curves according to each position.

148


149

COMPOSITION OF OBJECTS IN LIGHT, SHADE, AND SHADOW

DRAPERY STUDY IN VALUE USING RUB-OUT TECHNIQUE

This drawing was the introduction to light and shadow and its effect on various objects. A gray scale and drawings of

This drapery study analyzed line, light, shade, and shadow values of a cloth draped against a wall and a directional light

singular objects using continuous tone, hatching, and cross contouring was made to test different methods of blending lead into multiple shades of shadows.

shining on it. The curves and folds of the cloth each had a different shadow of light which was illustrated by the rubbing of charcoal.


“BOX CITY” COMPOSITION IN COOL & WARM PRISMA COLOR

LIGHT AND SHADOWS

This study was based around the relationship between 1-point and 2-point perspective, shadow, and color. The use of

This was the final project for beginning drawing which practiced the various skills obtained in accordance to objects,

Prismacolor colored pencils in the color scale and “box city” was helpful to understand the different shades of light in a different medium other than lead and charcoal.

drapery, and perspective in values of light. The spatial relationship between objects was a key point in this project because it helped guide the direction of shadows on each object. 150


1


12 COLOR THEORY & INTERACTION Woodbury University Fall 2016 Olivia Booth

The objective of this course was to analyze the principles and interactions of colors, explore new mediums, apply color systems and color harmony to various projects, and recognize color trends from multiple perspectives.


COLOR THEORY & INTERACTION VALUE EMPHASIS STUDIES A traditional gray scale was painted to understand the varying values of gray ranging from the lightest to the darkest shade. This was important to understand because it defines form and creates spatial illusions when designing a space based around color. The two paintings above the gray scale were painted in accordance to light values of gray with a white focal point and medium values of gray with a lighter focal point.

COLOR WHEEL The objective of painting a color wheel is to understand the relationship between primary, secondary, and tertiary colors and how complimentary and analogous colors mix well together.

BEGINNING COLOR STUDIES This project began to recognize prismatic colors, complimentary colors, and chromatic colors and how they differentiate from each other. The ways that certain colors blend together can make an art piece look completely different just by using the correct colors together.

151


INTERACTION OF COLOR Using Color Aid paper and paint, similar value colors were placed on top of colors of the same hue and value and were then analyzed to see whether or not the values look the same or different when places on different colors. This deception of color was interesting to analyze because the viewer is looking at the same color, yet it appears different. 152


NON-PROPORTIONAL COLOR INVENTORY The objective of this project was to use organic objects and depict the different values, saturations, and hues used within the color palette of the object. By analyzing the color palette, it created a sense of depth within the object due to the intensive dissolution of breaking down each color found in the form. I chose two distinctly different forms to compare and contrast the colors found in both items. 153


PAINTING ANALYSIS & COLOR INVENTORY This project was based off of Vincent van Gogh’s “The Mulberry Tree” and the various colors used within the painting to create a color inventory and a deformed color inventory painting. By creating the newly transformed color inventory, new ways of illustrating color palettes were discovered and performed. 154


REFERENCES R1: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-art-history/later-europe-and-americas/modernity-ap/a/corbusier-savoye R2: http://www.archdaily.com/84524/ad-classics-villa-savoye-le-corbusier R3: http://theconversation.com/sublime-design-le-corbusiers-villa-savoye-26625 R4: https://www.flickr.com/photos/88017382@N00/5899621004 R5: https://eventseeker.com/venue/9212-prada-epicenter-los-angeles R6: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/0b/17/15/0b1715a8bd6338d6af17bc44881e7fc0.jpg R7: http://oma.eu/projects/prada-los-angeles R8: http://buro-os.com/prada-la/ R9: https://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=eames%20house&rs=typed&term_meta%5B%5D=eames%7Ctyped&term_meta%5B%5D=house%7Ctyped R10: http://design-milk.com/milkweed-the-eames-alive-and-well-and-green/ R11: https://c1.staticflickr.com/6/5223/5622134886_3fe0e4292d_b.jpg R12: http://www.artmuseumgr.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/RentalImage-1.jpg R13: http://42l9x93l42oi2vqtshg3va1s.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/wHY_Speed_205-e1472069310558.jpg R14: http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/5010/23c7/28ba/0d42/2200/0d87/medium_jpg/stringio.jpg?1414338044\4 R15: http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/5723/20b0/e58e/ce75/7b00/007b/newsletter/Pomona_College_wHY_1268.jpg?1461919908 R16: https://www.pomona.edu/sites/default/files/styles/in_content_slide/public/images/paragraphs/studio-art-hall-night-arts.jpg?itok=F_G4m7hi R17: http://urbanize.la/sites/default/files/styles/1140w/public/ArtHallroomonsecondfloornorthside.jpg?itok=e79_5O_P R18: http://magazine.pomona.edu/wp-content/uploads/images/2015/02/Studio-Art-Hall-Classrooms-2014-150-620x414.jpg R19: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/21/cd/d3/21cdd3f3d629f4f8d0b691c0347d14da.jpg R20: http://www.fifthroom.com/images/ProductSet/Zoom2/Cedar-Gazebo-with-Log-Accents-7108-A.jpg R21: https://media.atre.yardi.com/2/51450/images/28284443830_bb25a7ab49_o.png?height=450 R22: https://www.wework.com/zh-CN/buildings/custom-house--portland--OR R23: https://www.blueorigin.com/news/blog/launch-land-repeat R24: http://robohub.org/blue-origin-successfully-tests-autonomous-suborbital-system/ R25: http://money.cnn.com/2017/03/29/technology/blue-origin-capsule/ R26: https://vimeo.com/13332379 R27: https://livezoku.com/ R28: http://www.archdaily.com/ R29: http://www.archdaily.com/56149/vakko-headquarters-and-power-media-center-rex-2R30 R30: https://www.architonic.com/en/project/rex-vakko-headquarters-and-power-media-center/5100982 R31: http://sigalonenvironment.soup.io/post/52881545/Vakko-Headquarters-and-Power-Media-Center-REX


R32: https://www.inc.com/articles/201110/coolest-offices-vakko-fashion-center-by-rex.html R33: http://www.rex-ny.com/vakko-fashion-center/ R34: http://www.laphil.com/philpedia/about-walt-disney-concert-hall R35: http://interactive.wttw.com/tenbuildings/walt-disney-concert-hall R36: https://www.mortenson.com/cultural-performing-arts/projects/walt-disney-concert-hall R37: http://wdch10.laphil.com/wdch/architecture.html R38: https://laonabudget.wordpress.com/2012/10/03/walt-disney-concert-hall-tour-by-steven/ R39:https://karmatrendz.wordpress.com/2010/01/22/house-s-by-nimmrichter-cda/


Woodbury University Interior Architecture Portfolio  

Portfolio work from Woodbury University; 2015-2017.

Woodbury University Interior Architecture Portfolio  

Portfolio work from Woodbury University; 2015-2017.

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