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FE A R

• “If I can’t beat this guy, how can I ever beat regulars at the next limit?” The second step is to reword questions about the future that can’t be answered yet. Here are a couple good examples: • “When is the bad run going to end?” Since you can’t know that, the better question is, “What do I need to do to improve how I handle running bad?” • “Can I make it as a pro?” The better question is, “What do I need to do to give myself the best chance to make it as a pro?” The third step is to answer each question. Too often, players ignore their questions and think they’re stupid or illogical, when really they’re legitimate and reasonable questions to ask. By answering them, you develop the certainty needed to resolve your fear. You can’t eliminate uncertainty in poker, but you can eliminate fear. Answering the legitimate questions in your game helps you to accomplish this. For both writing exercises, if the answers don’t come immediately, it’s better to be accurate and go slower rather than force it and get the wrong answer.

COMMON FE A R S What follows is an analysis of the common fears poker players face. For any fears not mentioned, use the general strategies provided previously in this chapter and in chapter 4 to analyze and resolve that fear. Fear of Failure “[The formula] for. . .success? It’s quite simple, really: Double your rate of failure. You’re thinking of failure as the enemy of success. But it isn’t at all . . .” — Thomas J. Watson, first president of IBM. 167

The Mental Game of Poker Excerpt: Chapter 6 Fear  

Here are a few sample pages from the chapter on Fear. They'll help you better keep your sanity and make sound decisions right now.

The Mental Game of Poker Excerpt: Chapter 6 Fear  

Here are a few sample pages from the chapter on Fear. They'll help you better keep your sanity and make sound decisions right now.

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