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THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2011

Donor Ruth Perelman dies Perelman, 90, and her husband have been major contributors to the University

SEPTA ridership on the rise

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QUAKER on national radar

BY PRAMEET KUMAR News Editor Ruth Perelman — who along with her husband Raymond, a 1940 Wharton graduate, had been among Penn’s largest benefactors — died Sunday morning of pneumonia. “Philadelphia has lost a most beloved and consummately gracious civic leader with the passing of Ruth Perelman,” Penn President Amy Gutmann said in a statement. “In our city’s centuries-

long history, Mrs. Perelman and her husband, Raymond, have made a mark unlike any other.” Perelman, 90, and her husband had given a number of large gifts to the University over the years, the most recent of which was a $225 million donation to the School of Medicine in May — the largest gift in Penn’s history. The school was renamed the Raymond and Ruth Perel-

man School of Medicine in their honor. “Ruth and I believe the future of medicine depends on the ability to produce worldclass clinicians and researchers, the hallmark of a Penn education,” Raymond, a Penn Medicine trustee, wrote in an email at the time. The couple also donated $25 million to fund the development of the Ruth and Raymond Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine at Penn in 2005. “Ruth was an enlightened philanthropist and devoted friend and supporter of arts, education and health causes

throughout the region,” said Timothy Rub — the director and chief executive officer of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, another institution to which the Perelmans have been major contributors — in a statement. “Elegant, wise, civic-minded and committed to helping people in need, Ruth was a full partner with her husband Raymond in the couple’s philanthropy, which helped transform so many Philadelphia organizations.” Raymond told The Associated Press in an interview on Sunday that the two of them had been married for 70 years.

RUTH PERELMAN

Philanthropist and wife of 1940 Wharton grad Raymond Perelman “Whoever knew her really loved her because she was a kind person,” he said. Perelman is survived by her husband, sons Ronald and Jeffrey, sister, eight grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer. She died at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. n

>>BACK PAGE

desire for food justice ‘rooted in community’

OPINION ‘I Am I plus my circumstances’ Sara Brenes-Akerman asks whether we can truly be ourselves wherever we go.

>> PAGE 2

NEWS

Drexel student killed Friday, Evan Morris was stabbed to death at 34th and Race streets BY SARAH GADSDEN Editor-in-Chief

popular dating site to come to penn Columbia MBA graduates developed DateMySchool, which already boasts over 30,000 users.

>>theDP.com/news

SPORTS To stay in school or to go professional? Weighing the arguments for whether Penn athletes should stay in school or go pro early

>> PAGE 6

events @penn AUG. 4 - AUG. 10

blackboard walkin support Receive personal assistance using Blackboard from the Courseware Support Team. van pelt room 129 10 a.m. Fri., AUG. 5

‘writer’s bash’ music and auction Enjoy music and food over an auction of writing-related items such as a manuscript. smokey joe’s 7 p.m. sat., aug. 6

summer nights: bohemian sunrise See dancers perform to Latin, Caribbean, reggae, jazz and funky music. penn museum 5 p.m. wed., aug. 10

piccirillio sciencetellers Learn the science behind fire and ice through a show about dragons and dreams. penn museum 10:30 a.m. WED., AUG. 10

For more events, see eventsatpenn.com

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Number of offers a Penn hoops recruit has received after a stellar summer showing

>> BACK PAGE

Alexandra Fleischman/DP Senior Photographer

The Urban Nutrition Initiative, a program of Penn’s Netter Center for Community Partnerships, presented its “Declaration of Youth Food Bill of Rights” outside the Consitution Center on Saturday. The Initiative works to improve community nutrition.

Campus ghostwriting charges haunt Gutmann A watchdog group is calling for her removal as chair of Obama’s bioethics commission BY PRAMEET KUMAR News Editor “It shouldn’t take a letter to the President of the United States to spur Penn to act,” Paul Thacker said. “But that’s just where we’re at right now in plagiarism involving a professor.” Thacker is an investigator for the Project on Government Oversight, a watchdog group that asked President Barack Obama last month to remove Penn President Amy Gutmann as chair of his Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. The request came soon after the Department of Health and Human Services launched an investigation into charges of research misconduct levied by a Penn professor against five other researchers, including two of his colleagues in Penn’s Psychiatry department. The researchers are accused of claiming authorship of a ghostwritten paper — one that has been written by someone

Editorial (215) 898-6585 • Business (215) 898-6581

Alexandra Fleischman/DP Photo Illustration

else without giving due credit — about a drug manufactured by the pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline. According to the charge, the paper was drafted by a company hired by GSK itself. “No reasonable person can justify” academic ghostwriting, said Eric Campbell, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. “To claim you did something when you didn’t is a fundamental violation of one of the tenets [of research].” Corporate-funded medical

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ghostwriting can have especially negative effects. “The entity that’s being represented [in a ghostwritten medical article] is a corporate view, and that influence is unseen,” said Adriane Fugh-Berman, a professor of pharmacology at Georgetown University. “There are marketing messages that are included.” Medical ghostwriting is not an uncommon occurrence; in 2009, The Journal of American SEE GHOSTWRITING PAGE 3

Drexel University student Evan Morris died Friday morning shortly after Philadelphia Police found him in an off-campus apartment near Drexel’s campus with a critical stab wound. Morris, 22, entered the apartment at 34th and Race streets and was stabbed once in the chest by a resident, Philadelphia Police spokeswoman Officer Jillian Russel said. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that the altercation occurred after Morris kicked in the apartment’s door. The police arrived on the scene in response to a call at about 4:55 a.m. that reported a break-in. Morris was pronounced dead at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania at 5:58 a.m. The Philadelphia Homicide Division is handling the investigation and states that the resident was acting in self-defense, according to Philadelphia Police spokeswoman Officer Officer Christine O’Brien. “As of now, it doesn’t look like there are going to be charges,” Russell said on Tuesday. The resident is a student of a university other than Drexel. Penn’s Department of Public Safety is not aware of any Penn students involved in the incident. The Morris family’s attorney, Willie Nattiel Jr., said the incident may have been a “setup” staged by Morris’ ex-girlfriend and her new boyfriend, according to the Philadelphia Daily News. “We believe there is much more involved with this,” Nattiel said. Drexel first alerted its community about Morris’ death in a school-wide email from President John Fry at about 10 a.m. on Friday. “Everyone at Drexel is affected when we lose one of our own, especially as a result of senseless violence,” he wrote. “I know our University community will stand together to mourn and remember Evan and to give strength to his family and friends.” The school’s Counseling Center is offering its services to those who have been affected by the incident, and university officials have been in touch with the Morris family, he added. The Drexel Department of Public Safety chose not to deploy a DrexelALERT — an emergency notification that communicates critical information to the entire Drexel community through phone, email and text messages. Fry explained in his email that the university did not use the system because the student who stabbed Morris was immediately taken into custody and did not pose a threat to the community. “Our Department of Public Safety takes very seriously the responsibility of creating and maintaining the safest possible environment for students, faculty and staff,” Drexel’s Senior Vice President of Communications Lori Doyle wrote in an email. “This was an isolated incident that occurred at a private residence.” The intersection of Race and 34th streets is about four blocks north of Market Street, the northernmost street of the Penn DPS patrol zone. Morris was a resident of North Potomac, Md. Grace Zapol, a 2011 Montgomery College graduate who dated Morris for about three years when they attended high school together, said that “he was a really nice guy.” “I wasn’t there [when he was stabbed], and I still don’t even really know what the fight was about,” she added. “I’ve heard a whole bunch of stories.” n

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Page 2 THURSDAY, August 4, 2011

The summer Pennsylvanian

Opinion EDITORIAL ART The Summer Edition of the Independent Student Newspaper of the University of Pennsylvania | 28th Year of Publication

Dan NEssenson is a rising Engineering junior from Berkeley Heights, N.J. His email address is dness@seas.upenn.edu.

SARAH GADSDEN, Editor-in-Chief DAN NESSENSON, Editorial Page Editor ELLEN FRIERSON, Design Editor ALEXANDRA FLEISCHMAN, Photo Editor ELIZABETH HORKLEY, Summer Street Editor

PRAMEET KUMAR, News Editor GRACE ORTELERE, News Editor CHAN PARK, Sports Editor

LETTERS AND GUEST COLUMNS Make your opinion heard by submitting letters to the editor or guest columns to The Summer Pennsylvanian. Letters to the editor must be fewer than 200 words and include the author’s name, phone number and description of University affiliation. Guest columns must be fewer than 700 words. All submissions become property of the SP and are subject to editing for style, clarity and space concerns. Anonymous letters will be read, but not printed. The SP will print only one letter per author per month.

Direct all correspondence to: Dan Nessenson Editorial Page Editor The Summer Pennsylvanian 4015 Walnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19104 Phone: (215) 898-6585 x142 Fax: (215) 898-2050 Email: letters@theDP.com

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS If you have a comment or question about the fairness or accuracy of a story, contact Editor-in-Chief Sarah Gadsden at (215) 898-6585 x139, or send an email to gadsden@theDP.com.

Your Voice | Penn’s new diversification plan is discriminatory P e n n’s p l a n t o d i v e r s i f y i t s f a c u l t y w o u l d b e a r e ason t o celebrat e i f , by d iver sit y, t he aut hor s of t he pla n mea nt i ntel lectua l d iversit y. This wou ld be especia l ly t r ue i f t he ideolog ic a l u n i for m it y of t he M idd le E a st C ent er at Pen n wou ld b e d iver si f ie d . T he u n i for m out look of Pol it ic a l Science professors A n n e No r t o n , B r e n d a n O ’ L e a r y, I a n L u s t i c k a n d R ober t Vit a l is c a n be su m med up as “it’s A mer ica a nd Israel’s fau lt .” A las, we learn from a Daily Pennsylvanian article that instead Penn plans to diversif y the race and gender of its faculty. The only way to do that is to discriminate based on race and sex against white males. The word diversity is a code word for discrimination, and discrimination is wrong. When Martin Luther K ing Jr. gave his “I Have a Dream” speech, he did not say that he dreamed of a day when A merica would discriminate against white men. He d reamed of a day when there would be no discrimination at all. Rev. K ing said: “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” I have a dream that some day the University of Pennsylvania will hire faculty based on the quality of their work and not their race, gender or creed.

Gamaliel Isaac Penn alum and current staff

Share your thoughts. letters@theDP.com

‘I plus my cirumstances’ column by Sara Brenes-Akerman | Can we always be ourselves, or is our environment a part of us?

E

very sound increases tenfold when it’s 11 o’clock at night and you’re the only one awake in the house. I go quietly about my business, look at the time and start wondering how I’m going to make it out of bed when the alarm goes off at 5:30 a.m. tomorrow. It won’t be easy. I’m back in Costa Rica for the summer and, by now, have fully readjusted to my “at-home self.” Here, I get at least eight hours of sleep every night, usually starting at around 10 p.m. It’s ha rd to bel ieve, g iven t he above-described scenario, that only three months ago I was a Penn student who viewed an 11 o’clock bedtime as a rather implausible thing, my days almost always packed with carefully scheduled classes, meetings and extracurriculars. As a rising senior, I am sure that I remain a Penn student but still use the past tense because I am somehow certain that my at-home self and my Pennself are two rather different people. “I am I plus my circumstances” — a nice sounding phrase by the Spanish liberal philosopher Ortega y Gasset — gains critical importance every time I leave Penn or return to it. The argument is that we cannot separate ourselves from the collection of things that make up our version of the world, nor can we dismiss its formative power over who we are. I happen to have been given the opportunity to inhabit two worlds: San

José, Costa Rica, where my family resides, the weather is always warm, I never have to worry about laundry and I think and speak in Spanish; and Philadelphia, where I live by myself, winter sometimes strikes, responsibilities abound and the official language is English. The d i f f icult bit comes when I freak out thinking that I much prefer my Penn self. A preference determined by the fact that I’ve spent the greater part of the last three years

‘‘

I much prefer my Penn self … if who I am at Penn cannot be transported back home or out of Penn, I think I’m in big trouble.”

there, have done a lot of growing up between Locust Walk and Chestnut Street and have generally come to think of it as a space where I can feel free to be whomever I’d like to be. I’ve become who I’ve wanted to become. If who I am at Penn cannot be transported back home or out of Penn, I think I’m in big trouble. Considering the possibility that my circumstances might shape me almost completely is a frightening thought. One that I know I share with

many of my fellow Penn students, particularly the study abroad returnees. After life-changing experiences in faraway places, they often come back to discover that once they re-enter familiar territory, things, including themselves, feel a little off. I know this because I’ve seen it happen to two of my closest friends. People who describe feeling much of what returning home feels like to me. Full of wondering whether you’ve left some irrecoverable part of yourself behind or, worse, that who you have become during your stay depends on a place to exist. I must confess that I don’t have the answer. How to bring your experience back with you and how to reconcile the versions of yourself created by the var ying circumstances is a personal struggle that we each must face alone. I f I l ived somewhere else a nd spoke a different language would I like the same music? Have the same political opinions? Or react in the same way to comparable situations? The answers only point to a greater question: how much of us is defined by things other than ourselves? For my sa ke, a nd t hose of t he study abroad students who feel a little lost upon their return, I’ll say that we shouldn’t let places define us. A nd, if I am in fact “I plus my circumstances,” the “I” part of the equat ion shou ld c a r r y t he most weight. sara brenes-akerman is a rising College senior from Costa Rica. Last semester, her column appeared on Wednesdays. Her email address is sarabre@sas.upenn.edu.

Society’s guilty role in the fall of celebrities column by Siede Coleman |

Glorifying celebrities after their deaths glorifies their bad decisions

A

my Jade Winehouse, dead at 27 years old. Nobody expected it, yet everyone saw the soulful singer’s demise coming. Her struggles were no secret — the tabloids made sure of that — documenting every misstep and creating headlines too good to for us to ignore on the newsstands Amy was a laughingstock; I remember when she was the butt of jokes on my favorite entertainment news programs. Yet, if her interviews can be any indication, Amy embraced her problems and became successful — she won 5 Grammys — from a song that firmly asserted her denial to save herself. Then, why is her death so sad? Is it a tinge of guilt that plagues us? Amy careened down a path that could lead to no good end and yet we all watched with rapt attention. She was a train wreck and, as the saying goes, everyone loves those. Lady Gaga (who’s never met Amy, mind you) recently claimed on The View that it was not Amy that needed to change, but rather the world that needed to be kinder to Amy.

Of course, my initial reactions to Gaga’s sentiments were, “there you go, another person trying to capitalize on the death of Amy.” But the longer I thought, I wondered, do we all just need to be a little nicer to our celebrities? I know that I, along with others, laugh along every week to shows like The Soup and Fashion Police, where the hosts are far from kind to failing celebrities. The internet is no better, with sites like PerezHilton.com, TMZ. com and even the entertainment section of news sites that dissect the every move of celebrities. Still, we follow them. We love to pick people apart. The jokes start innocuously enough, but soon devolve into something sinister. Remember when “Rehab” first became big? Halloween was filled with Amy looka-likes, and no outfit was complete without the beehive hair, the ridiculously flared cat-eye and a bottle of vodka, of course. That imitation rapidly turned into mockery in the years before Amy’s death — she was criticized and even booed when she was convinced to tour again (prematurely) and performed miserably. When Michael Jackson was alive, he too was picked apart mercilessly and there was no focus on the many acts of philanthropy he did in his lifetime. This is the age where lives are entertainment.

The age of reality television. Outrageous behavior is not chastised, it is glorified. We “fist-pump” along to the drunken antics of Snooki and the gang on Jersey Shore. Sure, they show signs of being serious alcoholics, but hey, they are young and having fun! We laugh at the attempts of those like Heidi Montag who, at 24 years old, has had as much surgery as any of the women on The Real Housewives franchise. Does anyone even remember the precocious little redhead with so much potential that Lindsay Lohan used to be? It is hard to with all of her courthouse woes and volatile relationships. However, we make badly behaving celebrities continually relevant. Charlie Sheen acted poorly and unapologetically and we rewarded him for his behavior. TV stations and internet outlets fixated on Charlie and his escapades with his bleach blonde “goddesses,” while the world found creative ways to use his catchphrase, “Winning!” We emboldened him, strengthened his resolve by subscribing to his Twitter rants and encouraging him. Whether we admit it or not, it is oddly satisfying to watch celebrities fail. They are not our role models, they are our toys. We cheer when they have a little too much fun on vacation and gain weight, when they wear terrible outfits, and when they mess up in public. They cry out desperately for our attention,

and we give it to them. After all, they owe us ­— it is our money that supports the lavish lifestyles they lead. If they go to rehab but slip out of it, well, some people do not change. Handlers exacerbate the issue, pushing celebrities further into the public eye, because after all, they are a brand and a business. How is it possible for the world to see stars as anything more than entertainment when they are paraded and marketed as such, down to their very lives? The routine is set: a celebrity spirals, we mock said celebrity, celebrity dies and we briefly grieve. Then immortalization comes, with all the faults glossed over. And the cycle repeats. With Amy Winehouse we have entered the immortalization phase, canonizing her by making her Back to Black album a chart-topper again and leaving bottles of vodka as a shrine near her home. This only aggravates the problem and trivializes her life. Another troubled girl lost to addiction. Lady Gaga, Amy needed to change. The cycle has to stop. The best way to be “kinder” to these stars is to deny them the attention and demand they get help. If they seek it, reward the good, not the bad. Encourage change. Siede Coleman is a 2011 College graduate from Allentown, Pa. Her email address is colemanf@sas.upenn.edu.


N e ws

The Summer Pennsylvanian

‘THE CITY OF MOTHERLY LOVE’

Thursday, AUGUST 4, 2011 Page 3

BRIEF Stephen MacCarthy will become Penn’s vice president for university communications later this month, Penn President Amy Gutmann announced last week. MacCarthy, currently the vice president for external relations at the University of Arizona, will be in charge of conveying information about Penn’s activities to internal and external stakeholders. “Steve is a strategic communications leader who brings a wealth of experience to the position,” Gutmann said in a statement. “He will be a won-

derful addition to our leader- signed to become senior vice ship team, and I look forward president of university comto working closely with him in munications at Drexel Univerthe months and years ahead.” sity. MacCarthy has also served “Lori’s decade of achieveas vice president for university ment has been defined by relations at Pennsylvania State collaborative leadership, unUniversity and director of pub- flagging adaptability, and dilicThe affairs and university rela- verseSales expertise,” Gutmann New York Times Syndication Corporation tions for California StateNew said in aN.Y. statement 500the Seventh Avenue, York, 10018 at the Information Call: time. 1-800-972-3550 UniversityFor system. Release Monday, June 06, 2011 “He hasFor a deep and extenPhyllis Holtzman, associate sive understanding of higher vice president for university education,” Gutmann said. communications, filled the vaMacCarthy will occupy the cant role in the interim. post previously held by Lori MacCarthy will assume his Doyle, who served from 2001 Edited position on 29. Shortz byAug. Will to January 2011, when she re— PRAMEET KUMAR

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BRIEF

Amrit Malothra/DP Staff Photographer

On Wednesday, mothers connected at The City of Motherly Love Breastfeeding Fair and Rally organized by Milk For Thought in Houston Hall’s Bodek Lounge. Groups, including CHOP, presented information about their available resources.

Ghostwriting is not uncommon GHOSTWRITING from page 1 Medical Association surveyed authors of 630 medical articles in top journals, 7.8 percent of whom anonymously admitted to omitting names of significant contributors. “It’s not a rare phenomenon,” said Mildred Cho, the associate director of Stanford University’s Center for Biomedical Ethics. “So in many ways I’m not surprised [it may have happened at Penn].” But what especially galls Thacker is that POGO accused one of the Penn professors currently under investigation — Dwight Evans, chairman of the department of psychiatry — of ghostwriting once before. Penn stood by Evans when he was initially accused at the end

of last year. “We believe that the allegations of ghostwriting made by POGO … are unfounded,” Penn Medicine spokeswoman Susan Phillips wrote in a statement at the time. Thacker now questions the thoroughness of Penn’s internal investigation conducted at that time. “This is an issue of very serious concern that was brushed aside in just 72 hours,” he said. “The idea that Penn was able to pull a serious inquiry in the matter was just wrong.” Berman, too, was struck by how quickly Penn came to Evans’ support. “It does not seem like the school’s taken a strong stand on [the ghostwriting charge],” she said. “With the original case, they just said that the allegation was unfounded. That’s implausible. There’s documentation.” Phillips wrote in a statement that the recent charges of research misconduct are currently underway and defended the investigation last year. “The inquiry made last year by POGO regarding a single article

was taken seriously by the medical school and the University, and was reviewed appropriately at that time,” she wrote. But for what POGO sees as Penn and Gutmann’s initial failure to respond to ghostwriting on campus, the organization is calling on Obama to remove her from her post on the bioethics commission. “If this happens over and over again, it does raise questions,” Campbell said of the ghostwriting accusations. “Failure to take those [accusations] seriously does raise concerns about anyone’s ability to serve as an advisor to the president.” Cho, however, is skeptical of POGO’s request. “I don’t think there’s a reason she should have to step down,” Cho said, as long as Gutmann followed the proper protocol. But POGO remains committed to its crusade. “The buck needs to stop with her,” Thacker said of Gutmann. “So that’s why we made her the issue this time.”

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Page 4 Thursday, AUGUST 4, 2011

THIS WEEK IN: GOODBYE SUMMER!

ALL IN THE FAMILY A homey hookah hangout finally graces West Philly By elizabeth horkley and laura francis

Just far enough from campus, Aksum is a welcome and easy oasis for students looking to step outside the Penn bubble and relax in a friendly, vibrant locale. Filling West Philadelphia’s severe void of hookah options, the Meditteranean cafe also serves up a menu of fresh, authentic fare. Our hopes were high as we settled into our table outside. Aksum immediately exceeds other area hookah spots in its cozily lit, contemporary yet warm interior and the contrasting bustle of its exterior. It’s clear that Aksum considers its hookah as a part of its authenticity, and celebrates the fragrant aroma of the nonintrusive smoke. Though smoking is restricted to the outdoors until 9 p.m., it’s unlikely that it would spoil the meals of anyone just there for the food. We started out light, with the owner–recommended stuffed grape leaves ($4.50). The plump leaves hit just the right tangy notes and graciously wetted our palettes for the pitas we ordered as a main course. The mahi mahi pita ($9.50) was wrapped up with a host of veggies and other sweet flavors, most notably a rich aioli mayonnaise. Although the dressing made the meal a little saucy to handle, each ingredient complemented the others, rather than overpowering one another, to create a refreshing and delicious course. The side of asparagus could have been

The Summer Pennsylvanian

Summer Street bids you farewell this week with a few late–summer weekend picks. Don’t miss your last chance to celebrate some of this year’s summer highlights in warm weather, without the nagging responsibilities of school. The Mummy at The Franklin Institute

a little too salty by itself, but its contrast to the sweeter wrap and coleslaw actually worked better for both. The chicken pita ($7.90) got the better of our sense of adventure, and thankfully did not disappoint. The wrap was just the right mixture of salty indulgence and cool complements. The vegetables that countered the rich feta cheese and tahini sauce cooled each mouthful in perfect measure. Satisfied from the none–too–heavy respite, we were ready to pass judgment on the hookah — no doubt the establishment’s main draw

for social students and neighborhood folk alike. Though we had taken it easy on our main course (Aksum offers a menu of heavier dinner options, including lamb shanks and grilled salmon), it was easy to imagine kicking back with a bellyfull of food and wine (Aksum is currently BYOB) and unwinding under the stars with the smoky dessert. Perhaps we were a little in awe of the delightful atmosphere, but the orange–peach flavored shisha ($15) we decided on satisfied our craving both in taste and effect. Light, fruity and seductive, the shisha demands leisurely drags and good

aksum

4630 Baltimore Ave. (267) 275-8195

Don't Miss: Orange–peach hookah Skip: Indoor seating $$$$$

company and conversation. Aksum is the pitch–perfect addition to an already thriving restaurant scene in West Philadelphia. If the food isn’t enough to beckon you back for another visit, the lingering aroma of sweet hookah flavors and the impression of a summer night well spent will.

THE MISFITS High school misfit dramedy squeaks past success with soul By christian graham

Terri

Directed by: Azazel Jacobs Starring: John C. Reilly, Jacob Wysocki, Bridger Zadina Rated R, 105 min.

Azazel Jacobs’ Terri is a high school loner drama/comedy that actually manages to draw some originality out of its relatively tired genre. Through strong performances, interesting characters and an original story line, Terri succeeds where so many like–minded movies have fallen short. Terri Thomson (Wysocki) is a misfit by nature — aptly communicated by the film’s opening shot, as his intensely overweight body sits jammed in his cramped bathtub. Unaware of the whereabouts of his parents, he lives with and cares for his stern, but mentally–deteriorating Uncle James (Creed Bratton). At school, he faces the steady ridicule of his classmates, while having no genuine friends to spend time with.

It seems like the only comfort he can get out of life comes from the sets of pajamas that he wears all day long. Eventually, Terri’s principal, the buddy–buddy Mr. Fitzgerald (Reilly), pals up to him in hopes of helping the teen out of his funk. Assuring Terri that he is “one of the good–hearted kids”, Fitzgerald sets aside time to meet with him every week. Terri strikes an unlikely friendship with another one of Mr. Fitzgerald’s regulars — the abrasive Chad, essentially a mangy stray cat in teen outcast form. At times, Terri sits rather ungracefully balanced on the line between drama and comedy — it tries its hand at both moods, but doesn’t manage to get an absolute grasp on either. One minute

your heart sinks for Terri as a classmate grabs his chest and obnoxiously honks, and the next you’re cackling as Chad wreaks havoc at a funeral. It’s not to say that tears and laughter can’t inhabit the same movie — it’s just that here, the emotional rhythm of the story can be so disjointed that at times you don’t even know how you’re supposed to feel for the characters involved. And by the final scenes, there are a few too many loose ends and unresolved story points to provide the film with a truly satisfying ending. It’s becomes clear that Jacobs is much more interested in crafting a quirky character study of oddballs and misfits than he is in a succinct and effective narrative. But at the end of the day, none of these shortcomings can take too much away from the Terri’s poignantly comical performances and refreshingly unconventional script. Almost all of the individual parts are there to make Terri a great movie, but their faulty placement is what ultimately brings the film down. Sure, Terri might earn the runner up for Prom King – the disappointment is that it could’ve gone home with the crown.

Miss the outdoor screenings on the Schuylkill? Who can blame you? With a line– up that mostly consisted of bloated superhero fluff and family–friendly irritants, this summer’s outdoor screening schedule did little to impress. Here to save the summer with their first–ever outdoor film screening is the Franklin Institute, screening The Mummy (1999) in conjunction with their Mummies of the World exhibition. Retro horror in a tongue–in–cheek setting? Franklin Institute, you had us at Brendan Fraser. Friday, Aug.5, 8 p.m., 222 N. 20th St., Free Baltimore Avenue Dollar Stroll Fear not, cheapies! Here is another chance to get a bang for your (single) buck, if by “bang” you mean ice cream, beer and other things that make you happy. This wonderful invention by the University City District will actually grace town once more at the beginning of September before going into hibernation, but chances are you’ll be busy with more important things come September (see you at NSO!). Thursday, Aug. 4th, 5:30–8:30 p.m., Baltimore Ave., 42nd to 50th st.

Night Market – Mount Airy

Remember the University City Night Market? If you do, you were one of the few to brave the menacing skies and torrential downpour that put a literal damper on U. City’s debut in the Night Market series. Luckily, the popular food market continues its run tonight, albeit a little further from home. A quick trip on the regional rail will no doubt make you forget about that rainy tragedy in June. Thursday, Aug. 4, 6–10 p.m., Germantown Avenue-Mount Airy


Despite a decreased capital budget, the public transportation authority saw 334 million trips

raised its fare and cut 25 percent of its capital budget due to less funding, which forced the authority to put multiple projects on hold, Busch is impressed that it was able to sustain its ridership, let alone experience a record rise in passengers. “Historically, when you put fare increases, you see a dip in ridership,” he said. “But this year, we mitigated it through small incremental increases.” In hopes of gaining more riders in the future, Williams said that SEPTA will continue its focus on providing better customer service. Some initiatives already underway include the implementation of a new payment system that utilizes cards instead of tokens, which Williams hopes will be available a few years down the road. Busch said that maintaining passengers is key. “Our job is to Lindsey Stull/DP File Photo keep people in the system and make sure SEPTA is their first SEPTA passengers ride the subway. Although fares increased this year, the public transportation authority saw its highest ridership figure since 1989. Ridership has increased in the University City neighborhood, among others. option.”

BY QUAN NYUGEN Contributing Writer SEPTA has experienced its highest ridership in 22 years. Passengers took 334 million trips using the service’s system of buses, trains and trolleys in the 2011 fiscal year, which ended June 30, according to a SEPTA statement. This figure was a 4 percent increase from last year and its highest yearly total since 1989. “It’s an upward trend that we hope to continue,” SEPTA spokeswoman Jerria Williams said. SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch said that the Center City area, as well as its surrounding neighborhoods like University City, saw an increase in the number of young riders. Many of these riders are people “who are out of college, don’t have a car and are either working or living in the city,” Busch said. Using SEPTA would be the most practical choice of transportation for them, he added. Ridership has increased on the various lines that Penn students use between the University City and Center City areas. All five of the bus routes that go through University City have increased weekday average ridership, according to Busch. The route 30 bus in particular saw a 29 percent increase in ridership. Trolleys 10, 11, 13, 34 and 36 all had their average daily ridership up 3 percent. The subway system’s Market-Frank-

ford Line — SEPTA’s busiest transit line — saw ridership increase by 4 percent. Asdy Wan, a rising Wharton sophomore, takes the MFL as well as the number 10, 11 and 34 trolleys to travel between Penn and Center City. Although she said that the poor economy may have had an influence in the ridership gains, Wan hasn’t noticed a big change in the number of passengers using SEPTA. “Personally, I don’t see any difference compared to five years ago,” she said. Busch cited improvements to customer service, refurbished facilities, spikes in gas prices, an ailing economy and increased younger riders as agents behind the increase. In a year in which SEPTA

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Sundays, 10:30 AM 

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31ST AND SPRING Garden area. 4BR single furnished home with 2nd floor deck, back and side yard. 1.5BTH, HW/FL, laundry in basement, permit street parking, walk everywhere - Penn, Drexel, Center City. $550/person, cable, internet, and water included, 4 year lease available. Reply to mamcintyre@yahoo.com

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41 Ones given latitude?

43 Total messes

45 Titus, e.g.: Abbr. 48 Western master 50 Innʼs end

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13 One for whose benefit a legal suit is brought

54 “___ Adventures 21 Collect copiously Under Ground” 22 Cliff dwellerʼs 55 Poor setting 58 Be completely 23 Gets by set 24 “True, alas” 60 “Oh, No! Itʼs Skill: 28 Weapon ___” (1982 rock lengthener? album)

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box bold 2007 borders) contains 11.(inJan Partevery A digit 1 to 9.

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ROOMMATES

HELPWANTED

WANTED IMMEDIATELY: Manager for private club with knowledge of poker and following, tournament directors for WPT World Poker Tour Amateur Poker League. For more info call John: 267-2524924

FOR ANSWERS TO TODAY’S PUZZLES, PLEASE SEE PAGE 3!

RENT 1BR IN 4BR/2BTH house. $385.00/month plus 1/4 utilities. 12 month lease beginning 8/1.Corporation 1200 block The New York Times Syndication Sales South 50thN.Y. close to trolleys. NEW.CHEAP.SUBURBS. 500 Seventh Avenue, New York, 10018 are USP stu1/2 hourFordrive. 1-2 ok. Information Call:Roommates 1-800-972-3550 dents (brother/sister, addicspielbe@yahoo.com For Release Saturday, June 04, 2011 tional female). Call 609-8200110.

29 Heat-seeking grp.?

5 Chopping center?

Skill Level:

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FORRENT

ON PENN CAMPUS, various size apartments, newly decorated, convenient public transportation. Weisenthal Properties: 215-386-2380. 4029 Spruce St. MondaySaturday, 9a.m.-4p.m.

LARGE STUDIOS AND 1BRs NOW AVAILABLE at 41st and Spruce! Separate kitchen with gas included. Call 215-382-2969.

1 Frame part

17 A cowboy may have a big one

SUDOKUPUZZLE 2

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Across

Treatment Research Center

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BEAUTIFUL 2BR APARTment! Available NOW. Located at 41st and Spruce. Renovated kitchen, very spacious! Call 215-382-1300.

FORRENT

LARGE 3BR. 40TH-Chestnut. Suitable for up to four persons. Modern kitchen and bathrooms, rear deck. Located on the same block as Penn Police. 8/1/11. $1,900, including heat. 215382-7167, 609-670-9860.

NEWYORKTIMESCROSSWORDPUZZLE Edited by Will Shortz

215-222-3200, extension 241

8

FORRENT

APARTMENTS ON PINE Street. HW/FL, on-site laundry, free shuttle to campus. Call about reduced security deposit! 215-382-1300.

GREAT 3BR ON 41st! Available August 1. 2BTH. Heat & hot water included. Convenient location! Call 215-3821300.

Call the University of Pennsylvania’s Treatment Research Center

4614 BALTIMORE, 2ND Floor Front, Efficiency. 100% renovated. Ceiling fan. Price negotiable. Skill: Available now. 267-872-5154.

6

LIVE NEAR LOCUST Walk! 4BR house available on 40th and Locust right next to campus! Call 215-382-2969.

Free 13-week research program for regular or daily drinkers. Brief counseling, combined with study medication (active drug or inactive placebo). Study is confidential.

40TH SANSOM, HOUSE for Rent. 5 or 6BR, 2BTH. $3600/month + utilities. Includes refrigerator, gas range, microwave, G/D, W/D, some furniture, large yard. 9 or 10 month lease available with move-in dates between 8/1 and 9/1. For additional information, contact Norstar Properties: 610-5278700 or info@norstar properties.com

3

FORRENT

4614 BALTIMORE, 3RD floor. Newly renovated. Very large 3BR, two full bathrooms, balcony, large L/R, EIK. Price negotiable. Available 5/1. 267-872-5154.

WANTED

WANTED

Advertisers without established credit are required to pay in advance. No refunds are given for cancelled classified ads. Visa, MasterCard and American Express cards are accepted.

12 noon, 1 business day before publication. 3 p.m., 2 business days before publication.

WANT TO REDUCE YOUR DRINKING?

40TH & SPRUCE. Apartment share. *New Construction.* 4BR, 2BTH, $700/month, WOMEN PREFERRED. Call 215-387-9523.

Part A

4612 BALTIMORE AVE. First floor, front. 100% renovated. 1BR apartment. $695/month, including hot and cold water and heat. Available September 1st. 1 year lease. 267-872-5154.

APARTMENTS FOR PENN Students. Reserve yours today @ www.BergerPropeties.org 215-771-1036

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4518 WALNUT. SPACIOUS 7-9BR, 3.5BTH. C/A. W/D, yard. BAND PRACTICE SPACE. Great location. Available 9/1. $2900/month plus utilities. 267-808-5432.

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2BR ON 39TH and Pine for immediate move-in! Heat & hot water included. Call 215382-2969 before they’re gone!

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NOTICE TO READERS

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Thursday, AUGUST 4, 2011 Page 5

SEPTA sees highest ridership in 22 years

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Sports THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2011

online at theDP.com

New Quaker rows to defend world title m. rowing | Incoming freshman races for U.S. Junior team in World Championships

against other high school oarsmen.” This will be the Maryland native’s first Junior World ChamBY CHAN PARK pionships, and it may be quite Sports Editor an experience. Even before officially mov- Championships in Eton Dorney, Only one of the nine members ing on to campus, one future Great Britain. on last year’s gold medal team Quaker rower has made quite “We are very pleased know- has returned, leading to an ina splash. ing that Harry is demonstrating teresting storyline in which a Incoming freshman Harry this type of potential,” heavy- new group of U.S. junior rowers Holroyd is a part of the U.S. Ju- weight rowing coach Greg Myhr are hoping to defend the title. nior Rowing Team and is row- said. “The fact that Harry has While it won’t be an easy task, ing in the men’s eight (8+) in made the junior national team Myhr believes that his recruit the 2011 World Junior Rowing means he stacks up very well has much to offer the team as it

seeks to repeat as champions. “He’s had to contend all summer with a team full of talented athletes, and he’s managed to prevail,” Myhr said. “I truly hope the team has success in Eton, as this will clearly magnify his confidence as an athlete and competitor.” Back at Penn, Holroyd will join eleven other heavyweight rowing recruits in the class of 2015. The eager freshmen will hope to further improve a program that won two Cup races

in the 2011 season and finished 14th overall at the Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) National Championships. While each rower will undoubtedly bring a high level of experience and skill to the team, Holroyd has the added benefit of having spent part of the summer rowing with some of the best in the nation. “I have no doubt that Harry’s experience this summer will go a long way towards preparing him for his upcom-

Strong play opens doors for recruit

Learning

from the

nation’s

m. hoops | Penn loses top spot on Philly native’s list of schools after his highly impressive summer play

best

BY kevin esteves ‘DP’ Sports Editor

Pete Lodato/DP File Photo

Rising senior goalkeeper Emily Leitner completed the second part of the tryouts for the U.S. Women’s Senior Lacrosse Team this past weekend in Cantonsville, Md. The Darien, Conn. native was named second-team All-Ivy this past season and posted an 8.38 goals-against average which was best in the Ivies and seventh in the nation.

w. lax | Rising senior falls short at national tryouts but looks forward to coming season BY sushaan modi Staff Writer With temperatures along the East Coast rising to suffocating levels last week, many people, athletes included, found refuge indoors. That, however, wasn’t the case for Quakers lacross player Emily Leitner who spent her weekend in Cantonsville, Md., sweating through several 100-degree days while vying for a spot on the U.S. Women’s Senior Lacrosse Team. “It was really hot,” Leitner said. “All the selectors and organizers made sure when you weren’t playing you were in the air-conditioning with lots of water breaks. They re-

ally monitored the situation well with hydrating.” Leitner received the opportunity to try out for the national team after a solid junior year between the pipes. A strong showing at the preliminary tryouts at Stony Brook, N.Y. during Memorial Day weekend earned her another trip, this time to the second round at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County. The conclusion of the three-day tryout featured more than 80 of the top women’s lacrosse players in the nation fighting for 36 positions that

ing collegiate career,” Myhr said. “The fact that Harry has made the junior national team means he stacks up very well against other high school oarsmen, and it gives him a nice ‘head start’ on what he will have to do here at Penn to be successful at this level.” Only time will tell as to how Holroyd will impact the Quakers, but if his rowing in Great Britain says anything, it may mean smooth sailing for the heavyweight rowing team. n

would ultimately act as the foundation for the team that will compete in the 2013 Federation of International Lacrosse (FIL) World Cup in Oshawa, Ontario. Unfortunately, Leitner was ultimately left off the list that was released on Sunday. However, she looks back at the weekend as a positive learning experience and something to build upon for next year. “It was a great experience [playing] some of the best players in the country — both in college and out of college,” Leitner said. “There was a huge learning experience playing with some of the players who have tried out before and been on the team before.” “The biggest thing was to take chances outside the goal, to pick up a player or pick up a ground ball,”

she added. “It’s something that I tried to do throughout the weekend and I’ll take into my game next season hopefully.” In her first season as a starter, the rising senior was named second-team All-Ivy and helped Penn lead the Ivy in goals allowed per game. “She’s really ready to own that position this year, and she’s a great leader,” Penn coach Karin Brower Corbett said leading up to last year. “She’s real confident with the ball, so we can use her a lot in transition.” Leitner will continue to play in summer tournaments including one in Lake Placid next weekend as well as several pick-up summer leagues before returning to campus in the fall. n

One of Philly basketball’s best kept secrets is no longer just that. Boys’ Latin point guard Maurice Watson, who had Penn at the top of his list in late March, made the summer AAU circuit his personal showcase and now has offers from a whopping 18 schools. “We’re really excited and overwhelmed with joy,” Watson’s father and high school coach, Maurice Sr., said. “[This summer] I felt like I was watching a kid I’ve never seen before.” The Watson family was initially expecting three to five offers by the end of the summer, but after a highly impressive July, the scholarships kept rolling in, resulting in a dramatic change. The undersized — listed at 5’10 — yet explosive guard has not ruled out joining the Quakers in 2012, but Penn is no longer among the schools he’s most seriously considering. But that’s not just because of the other opportunities on the table, which include offers from high-major Texas Tech and Philly’s own, La Salle. Two other factors include the recent verbal commitment to Penn of fellow point guard Jamal Lewis and the academic requirements Watson would need to meet in order to gain admission. Lewis — a 6-foot, Class of 2012 point guard from Washington, D.C. — is regarded as a steal for Penn by Scout.com’s Evan Daniels and in the case that Watson chooses to join the Red and Blue, the two would likely share minutes in the backcourt. Additionally, Penn recently raised its SAT score requirement, according to Watson’s father. Last school year, his son was told he needed a 100-point boost from his PSAT score on the SAT to be within range for admission to Penn. However, that minimum score has recently increased, now up to an 1820. The younger Watson says he spoke to Penn coach Jerome Allen about the commitment of Lewis as well as the increased standards, and the point guard doesn’t think he’ll be suiting up for the Quakers in 2012. Still, the Watsons will continue to consult with Allen — a family friend and mentor — during this process. “For [coach Allen] to be the kind of person that he is … he really knows what he’s doing and he knows what he’s talking about,” Watson Jr. said. “And [he] has my best interests at heart. So to have him in that position to help me out with things is a blessing.” Watson will be looking to trim his list down to about five schools by week’s end and will make a decision as early as mid-September. n

Staying in school vs. going pro penn athletics | Weighing the arguments for staying in school and pursuing a pro career BY chan park Sports Editor To stay in school or go pro? Just this past year, there were several Quakers who asked themselves that very question. Here’s a list of reasons to stay or to go pro. STAY IN SCHOOL More experience. Like it or not, most college athletes see their playing time drop upon joining a professional team. More time in college gives athletes more playing time to hone their skills and develop as an athlete. Speaking of developing...

to find work in sports after retirement, having a diploma — and one from Penn at that — opens up doors once the playing days come to a close.

may have become slightly more difficult. Greater challenges. She wasn’t perfect, but rising sophomore tennis phenom Connie Hsu was pretty close, going 44-3 (7-0 Ivy) in singles Improve stock. Staying in school GO PROFESSIONAL this year. She did see an early exit can give athletes more time to Missing the window. It’s impos- in the NCAA Championships — she improve and impress scouts. It’s sible to predict the future, but once lost in the second round — but going not entirely clear yet as to where an athlete misses the window of op- pro now could be what she needs Quaker pitcher and rising senior portunity, the road to the pros gets to continue improving, not that the Vince Voiro will be come fall, but if that much harder. This past year, Quakers mind her dominating the he chooses to return to Penn, it’ll Penn soccer player Loukas Tasi- Ivies for the next three years. most likely be to raise his stock for gianis turned down an offer to play It’s where the money is. We all next year’s draft. for the Chicago Fire. Though he did know that sports is about playing Prepare for life after sports. help lead Penn to the NCAA Tour- for the love of the game, but at the Whether an athlete’s career is long nament, he hasn’t had the same in- professional level, it’s undoubtedly or short, it will inevitably come to terest from MLS teams since then. also about the money. And when you and end. While there are several This isn’t to say he made the wrong can get paid to do what you love, it’s professional athletes who are able decision, but his path to the pros at least worth considering, right? n

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Christina Wu/DP File Photo

Rising sophomore Connie Hsu is one of several Quakers who has had to consider whether to go pro or stay in school.

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