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Retirements

Check out photos from last Saturday’s music festival. Campus Life, page 8

jareddjanzen@tabor.edu

Read about several faculty and staff who won’t be returning next fall. Features, pages 4-5

Season Wrap-ups Find out how teams did in KCAC Conference Tournaments this year. Sports, pages 6-7

Issue 7

May 6, 2014

Student Senate advocates change in open hours policy Jessica Vix

(From left) Heather Loewen, Esther Schmidt, Cora Ruhl and Sam Klien rehearse a scene from “Marred Bliss,” one of the three one-act plays directed by students this semester. Photo by Courtney Reed.

Students experiement with directing Jared Janzen

Editor-in-Chief

Watch out, Laurel Koerner. Tabor has three new directors on campus, and they are ready to show the school what they can do. This semester, three students have taken the opportunity to direct a one-act play. All three dramas will be performed at 8 p.m. Tuesday, May 6 in the Lorentz theater lab. Admission is free. Senior Alex Eurit will direct “The Sound of a Voice” by David Henry Hwang. It is set in ancient Japan and tells of a samurai who meets a supposed witch. The play has only two characters, played by Ben Schmidt and Micah Leake. Junior Katie Bair is directing “Marred Bliss” by Mark O’Donnell. This play tells of an engaged couple, but when their exes arrive to wish them well, mass miscommunication ensues. Sam Klein, Cora Ruhl, Heather Loewen and Ester Schmidt are the performers of this drama.

Junior Cheyenne Derksen is directing “Filled,” a student-written drama that originated during the Brave New Works festival at the end of February. The work is entirely interpretive dancing with no words spoken. Its inspiration according to Derksen began with the phrase “see a need, fill a need.” The cast for Derksen’s play is Crystal Holmes, Sam Klein, Mikey Wager, Faith Tonne and Katie Bair. Assistant Professor of Theater Laurel Koerner has been helping the student directors as needed. She has sat in on a few rehearsals, made some suggestions and answered questions about directing. Derksen directed two plays when she was in high school. For her, the new challenge with “Filled” is the combining directing with dance choreography. Neither Eurit nor Bair has ever directed before.

See ONE ACTS, page 2

West Africa struck by epidemic Chelsea McWhirt

Reporter

An epidemic has spread throughout the region of West Africa that has claimed more than 100 victims. The virus, known as Ebola, is considered the world’s deadliest virus according to CNN. com. The disease causes hemorrhagic fever, which shuts down the immune system. An outbreak of this magnitude has never happened before. The outbreak occurred in a city of 2 million people and within the vicinity of an international airport. The outbreak is currently contained in Guinea and Liberia. A report on CNN.com said

that the virus is being contained through the use of precautionary measures. Before being allowed onto an international flight, citizens are required to fill out a questionnaire and have their temperature taken. This is meant to discover individuals who have contradicted the disease. The epidemic proves difficult to counteract due to lack of experience with this disease. According to CNN, this scale of an Ebola outbreak is unprecedented. Normally the disease has been limited to a small periphery village. Various deaths have occurred at the Liberian border as well as in Mali and Ghana. Health

Investigators will determine whether the victims were infected. The virus attacks the lining of the organs within the body, causing holes that allow blood to pass through. Eventually this leads to internal bleeding, and without proper amounts of blood sent to the brain, victims begin to exhibit deranged behavior. Signs of hemorrhaging may include blood around the ears, mouth, nose and even in tears. The virus spreads from animals and their contact with humans. CNN reported that the unique ecosystem of the rain See EPIDEMIC, page 2

Sports Editor

Changes may be coming to Tabor’s open hours policy in the near future. Student Senate is drawing up a survey for students to complete about the current policy and whether it should be changed for the 2014-2015 school year. Student Body President Stacey Warkentin, who is in her fourth year at Tabor and spent two years living in the women’s quad, believes that the open hours policy is one that students would like to see changed. When she took office at the beginning of this school year, Warkentin immediately began thinking about ways that Student Senate could bring positive change that would affect a large portion of students.

“I talked specifically to some underclassmen because they are the ones any changes would affect the most,” said Warkentin. Freshman Laurie Daniel believes that having specific open hours is a good policy, but she would like to see an extension to the current hours. “I have had quite a few people mention in discussion over the year that they would like to see later open hours overall,” said Daniel. Warkentin said that because the townhouses and houses already have extensive daily open hours, the focus of the change will be on the men’s and women’s quads. Options for change could include extending the hours or simply See POLICY, page 2

Changes come to campus pastor position next fall Jared Janzen Editor-in-Chief Next year Tabor will no longer have a full-time campus pastor due to budget cuts. For this reason, current campus pastor Jake Schenk will not be returning in the fall. Schenk said he thought it would be best for his family if he had full-time employment, and since that was no longer available from Tabor, he decided to move on. He also said he wants to emphasize that he isn’t bitter about losing his job and that he understands that circumstances like this happen in life. Schenk had been campus pastor at Tabor for two years. He doesn’t know yet what job he’ll have after this. “I want to stay in some type of ministry and obviously go where Lord leads,” said Schenk. “I want to stay in town, but that depends on what happens.”

Campus Pastor Jake Schenk will not be returning to Tabor next fall.

FIle photo

He also said that the toughest part about leaving Tabor would be losing touch with students. If he is able to remain living in Hillsboro, he said it would be easier to keep up the relationships he has developed with students, but if his family needs to move, he would still try to stay in contact through emails and phone calls. The roles of the full-time campus pastor according to Schenk included organizing See PASTOR, page 2


NEWS 2

May 6, 2014

Instrumental groups tour northeast Kansas Janelle Rust

Reporter

The Tabor College Symphonic Band and Chamber Strings had an exciting month of April, going through eastern Kansas for their annual spring tour. The band and strings were on the road April 25-28, performing at six different locations in the Kansas City area as well as in Leavenworth, Manhattan, Topeka and Shawnee. Playing at mostly schools, the group got to entertain a lot of people. They also played at two churches on the tour. The theme of this year's tour was “Bright Shining as the Sun,” taken from the popular hymn “Amazing Grace.”

POLICY

Instrumental Director Larry Ediger picked both classical and sacred music to fit this theme. “All the music we played was either fast, bright, or contemplative towards Christ and His mission,” said junior violinist Cheyenne Derksen. The band performed classical music as well as hymns such as “A Mighty Fortress,” “Amazing Grace” and “Deep River.” Freshman flutist Jenna Thayer said one piece stood out to her above the rest. “‘Festival Overture’ was my favorite because it is the song with the most energy,” said Thayer. “It was the one song that I never got tired of and always enjoyed.” In addition, the chamber strings played a variety of familiar melodies, including “Hallelujah Chorus,”

“The Stars and Stripes Forever” and John Rutter's “Suite for Strings.” While there are many fun parts about going on band tour, Derksen had one thing that she exceptionally liked. “Food, definitely the food,” Derksen said. “Every meal we have in a church is usually a potluck and is always delicious.” The band enjoyed these tasty meals at the various churches they performed at, as well as staying in host homes. This gives the students a chance to connect and fellowship with new people. The band and chamber strings wrapped up their busy month with a home concert May 4 at the Hillsboro Mennonite Brethren Church.

ONE ACTS

in input on how they thought the play could go better.” Many hours of rehearsal have been put into these one-acts. Eurit said his cast has been meeting about five times a week, working especially hard on portraying Japanese characters and choreographing swordplay. Bair’s team has been practicing as much as the busy schedules of her performers allow. She said this hasn’t given as much time as she would have liked, but they have made due. The actors and actresses for Derksen’s play have met for 10 hours over the past month. They have focused on conveying emotion without words as well as getting comfortable with each other as a cast. All three directors hope these long hours of rehearsal pay off so that when the curtain rises, the audience will be in for a treat.

Continued from page 1

Continued from page 1

opening both quads on nights that currently have open hours. Logan Whitney, freshman, says he appreciates having specific open hours but would also like to see some changes implemented. “I actually like the open hours because you don’t have to worry about girls being around during certain days,” he said. “However, I would like open hours to be till at least 11 p.m. on Saturdays, because ending the hours at 7 p.m. doesn’t take sports teams and other activities into consideration.” Warkentin consulted Vice President of Student Life Jim Paulus about conducting the survey. The decision of whether or not to change the current policy lies with the Student Life staff. “It’s a definite possibility,” said Warkentin. “Someone just needed to get the ball rolling.” One potential problem with increasing open hours in the quads would be increased responsibilities on the RAs, who have to clear the floors of opposite sex students each night. However, Warkentin believes it would be worth it in the long run if it means students are happier with the policy. Warkentin said she hopes that the survey and possible change in policy will also shed a positive light on Student Senate. “I want people to see that we care about what the general need on campus is,” she said. The survey will be available outside the cafeteria Tuesday, May 6 throughout the day and Wednesday, May 7 during lunch.

“What’s surprised me the most was how well it came together,” said Eurit. “I was amazed at what just happened to be right there.” Eurit said he had decided to try directing because he had been unable to participate in other dramas that Tabor presented. He said he sees this as one way that he can give back to Tabor for everything the school has done for him. For Bair, taking the opportunity to direct a play was about trying something new and following a vision. “In high school I always had a lot of thoughts on how things could go better, but no one would listen to me,” said Bair. “Now I get to do this myself and correct all the mistakes that my directors made by not letting their cast put

EPIDEMIC Continued from page 1 forest throughout the affected countries may be the cause of the virus. It is reported that bats are the common carries for the Ebola virus.

News in brief Choirs to present “Requiem”

— Chelsea McWhirt The Concert Choir and Concerto Belle Voce will combine their musical talents to perform John Rutter’s “Requiem” at 7 p.m. May 11 at Hillsboro Mennonite Brethren Church. “Requiem” is a 40-minute piece for chorus, soprano solo and orchestra. The orchestra will have members from the Wichita Symphony Orchestra to give a strong, professional combination with the choir Assistant Professor of Choral Music Janie Brokenicky will be the soloist. “The entire work is very lyrical and lovely--full of singable melodies and lush harmonies,” said Professor of Choral Music Brad Vogel, who will direct the performance. This is the second time that Tabor has performed this piece.

New gen. ed. to be offered

— Jessica Vix Beginning next fall, Intro to Philosophy will no longer be offered at Tabor College. The goal of a current revision of Tabor’s core curriculum is to somewhat reduce its size, according to Professor of Philosophy David Faber. “There will be two parallel paths to ultimately taking Christian Faith,” said Faber, referring to the final Bible class required to graduate. “One path is through a biblical studies direction and one is through a philosophy direction. Students can choose one or the other instead of doing both.” Incoming students will have a choice between taking either Bible, Community and Culture or Intro to Worldviews, the class replacing Intro the Philosophy. For current students who need Intro to Philosophy to graduate, Intro to Worldviews will act as a substitute. It will be offered every semester beginning in Fall 2014.

CMC names leaders for next year

— Lauren Wall Tabor’s Christian Ministries Council has been in the process of filling leadership positions for next year, including president, treasurer and publicist. So far Ashley Kemling has been named CMC President and Erin Winter has been named treasurer for next year. The publicist and secretary positions are currently still open. “Ashley will decide to do email vote or wait until next fall for these positions,” said current CMC President Kristen Harris. “What we normally do is have the individual write a paragraph of why they want to be involved with the leadership and then have all the members vote.” CMC leads and organizes the student ministries at Tabor and is involved with decisions about ministry needs and funds. Officers participate in CMC meetings every week with ministry representatives, other officers and the campus pastor.

EBSCO gets new password

Photo by Courtney Reed.

The actors of “Marred Bliss” practice a confrontation during the play, which revolves around miscommunication.

The Ebola virus first appeared in 1976. According to officials, technology has not advanced far enough to combat the virus. Victims are extracted and put into quarantine and given care.

PASTOR Continued from page 1 the biweekly chapel services and advising the Campus Ministries Council and training small group leaders for discipleship. The new part-time campus pastor

— Lauren Wall Tabor’s library has a new username and password for the EBSCOhost series of databases. The new username and password are: username: bluejays1 password: tclibrary Students should only be asked for the username/password combination when they are off-campus. Please contact the library atlibrary@tabor. edu or 620-947-3121. ext. 1201 if you have any questions or problems using any of the library's resources.

will mainly be responsible for organizing chapel, according to Schenk. A group of students has been making a petition to keep a full-time campus pastor position. They say that a fulltime position is necessary for ministry to continue. So far they have more than 200 signatures.


May 6, 2014

OPINIONS 3

Letter to the editor:

Tabor’s credit limit should be increased Dear Editor, The 15 hour credit limit is something that I find to be a deterrent to learning. There are some classes that I would like to take that would complement my major, but because of the credit limit, I would have to spend hundreds of dollars to take them. It is interesting to note that many colleges in central Kansas have higher credit limits than Tabor. For example: Bethel has 17, McPherson has 16, Sterling has 17 and Friends has 18. At Newman the credit limit is 19, but if the advisor approves it, students can take more hours at no extra charge. Why is it that every other college in our area has a higher credit limit? If Tabor does wish to begin new programs, they are going to need to expand the credit limit in some way. New programs, like theater, are not going to happen unless they pull students from other disciplines. Technically, five people are need-

ed to form a class. About three students are currently minoring in theater. Simple addition shows that three does not make a class. If there are not enough people to make the classes, there will not be enough people to make the major/minor happen. If students could take more than 15 credits without paying large fines, they may be more inclined to take classes because they are interesting or because they complement their major. Maybe for some people, getting an education is about someday making lots of money, but that’s not why I’m coming to school. Yes, I want to be able to support myself, but learning about subjects that I find interesting and good is just as important to me. I was advised by an upper class-

Movie Review: Jared Janzen Editor-in-Chief “Heaven is for Real” is the most recent film in a slew of Christianbased movies that have hit the box offices in the past few months. It is based on the true story of a four-year-old boy named Colton Burpo who visited heaven and met Jesus during a life-threatening operation on his appendix. I think “Heaven is for Real” offers an inspirational story that will remind Christians about the glory of God’s promise and that will make everyone, including non-Christians, put some thought into what happens after death. The movie starts off depicting a family of four in Nebraska. The father, Todd, is a pastor and he and his wife Sonia have two kids. The family begins experiencing hardships, which culminates in Colton having an emergency surgery. After a few scary hours full of prayer, Colton pulls through. A couple days later Colton is talking with his dad and casually mentions that he had gone to heaven during his operation. Colton is able to tell him what his parents were doing during the operation, even though there was no way he could have known. Todd is instantly curious, but

men to not take classes that did not pertain to the completion of my major. The reason he gave was that it would put me behind in completing my major. My curiosity should not be killed by fears of not being able to complete my major. That is the exact opposite of what a college of liberal arts should be trying to do. Professors can only teach so many classes, so having a credit hour limit allows them to have lighter loads. This is a valid point. Overloading our professors would only make for stressed and tired teachers. If this is the reason for the credit limit, then why isn’t the limit on the professors? I realize that not everyone can handle over 15 credit hours. I like the Newman model of having advisors decide whether a student can handle more credit hours. Tabor is a great school; I’m just wondering, why the limit? Respectfully, Benjamin Schmidt

What has been the highlight of this school year for you?

“Going to Europe over interterm.” Freshman Heather Loewen

“Heaven is for Real”

Colton, being only four years old, is a tough subject to interrogate. Over the next few weeks, every so often Colton will mention something that happened to him in heaven. Some of these things are so incredible that his parents have no choice but to believe their son actually went to heaven. For example, Colton says that he met his grandpa in heaven. This grandpa died years before Colton was born, but when Todd shows Colton a picture of the elderly man, Colton doesn’t recognize him. Then Todd shows his son a picture of the grandpa, when he was a young man,

and Colton instantly knows who it is. This shows us that heaven is a place of youth and vitality. And that’s not even the most incredible relative Colton meets in heaven, but you’ll have to watch the movie to find out the rest. Overall, this is a great family film that offers lessons about faithfulness and God’s sovereignty, and it definitely has some funny parts along the way. So if you’re looking for a movie that could answer some of your questions about what happens after death, this one is worth your time.

“Playing backyard baseball with California Crew and Co.” Sophomore Elliot Money

“Spending time with tennis teammates.” Senior Karly Lindroth-Yates

Want a better View? The View welcomes all comments, opinions, questions and suggestions from students, faculty and employees. We want to hear what you have to say. Let your voice be heard! Send all letters to the editor, Jared Janzen, at jareddjanzen@tabor.edu.

The View Staff Editor-in-Chief, Opinions Editor: Jared Janzen

The Tabor View is the official

Campus Life, Features Editor: Elizabeth Janssen

newspaper of Tabor College in

Sports Editor: Jessica Vix

by Print Source Direct, LLC,

Reporters: Jessica Vix, Janelle Rust, Becky Bryan,

Hillsboro, Kan. It is published 116 S. Main, Hillsboro, Kan., 67063. The opinions expressed

Jared Janzen, Lauren Wall, Chelsea McWhirt

in The Tabor View are not

Photographer: Courtney Reed

View staff.

Adviser: Sara Jo Waldron

necessarily those of The Tabor

“Going to a scientific conference in Chicago.” Senior Tyler Dort


Open Mic Night

‘Cafe’ Changes

See what is new and improved about the Tabor Cafetieria

SAB hosts annual event with a great turn out Features, pg 4-5

News, pg 2

Arts and Crafts Fair Photos

See some photos from last weeks craft fair

Campus Life, pg 8

May 6, 2014

FEATURES 4

theview@tabor.edu

September 19, 2012

Issue 1

Art show features five seniors’ talent New Women’s Choral group on campus Kelsey Unruh

Jared Janzen Editor-in-Chief Five art and design majors had the opportunity to exhibit their creativity to Tabor and the community during the senior art show last Thursday, May 2. The theme of the show was “Stick It.” This phrase comes from a process design students use when brainstorming ideas for a project. They make numerous possibilities in their sketchbook, and then when they go back and review them, they mark the best ideas when a star, checkmark or sticker. At the art show, attendants were given large, circular, colorful stickers. Attendants wrote their name on the stickers and stuck them in each of the artists’ guestbook.

Reporter

One of the new additions to the Tabor College curriculum this year is Concerto Bella Voche, the women’s chorale that is directed by new coming professor Janie Brokenicky. “It’s Italian for ‘a collection of beautiful voices,’” said Brokenicky. “Women’s chorale before was a very universal name and you’d hear it and think it could be anyone’s choir. Concerto Bella Voche will, after a while, become a familiar name for Tabor and help give the group identity.” Brokenicky joined the Tabor music department after applying for Assistant Professor of Choral Music at the request of Dr. Brad Vogel. “I’m thrilled to have Janie here,” said Vogel. “When the position opened, I ran into her at the National Association of Teachers of Singing and I talked to her and asked her to ap-

ply. There were 30 applicants.” One of the reasons Brokenicky was picked for the position was because of her previous work records with other chorale groups. “Getting the group re-established was the primary goal,” said Vogel. “The goal over 3 years is to have 40 voices in women’s choral. Janie is very good, and has a track record of building good chorale programs. She’s the perfect person for the position.” Brokenicky is looking forward to what the school year will bring. “I’m excited for the girls to have such a strong variety in musical performances,” said Brokenicky. “We will get to perform on our own at the Thanksgiving concert and we are touring, but we also get to sing The Messiah with the concert choir. I never got these opportunities in college, so I’m excited for all of these opportunities for the girls.”

Graphic design major Daniele A large variety of art forms “It turned out to be a nice Most of the artwork was reWendland was one of the stu- were on display at the show. gallery space that is user moved from the Schlict after dents whose work was featured. These included drawing, paint- friendly,” said Shin-hee Chin, the two-hour show, but Chin She said she finds inspiration for ing, printmaking, graphic de- associate professor of art and said that some of the less valuher work all around her. sign, video, photography, ce- design. She said that the natu- able design work may remain “Growing up in Kansas, you ramics and even t-shirt design. ral lighting and the multiple on display a little longer. have to find the fun in things,” Students selected their best levels were assets to displaysaid Wendland. “I find details artwork from Former students return tothe keyassignments staff roles ing artwork there. in the simple things Ben in Schmidt life.” they’ve completed during their Reporter Once she finishes up one last college career to display dursemester of classes this fall, ing the show. Wendland plans to look for a “I like the design stuff theStudent Senate sets up job as a freelance graphic de- most, and also pencil artwork,” new campaign Zach Bissell signer. said Clark. Editor-in-chief Kaitlyn Brown, Elizabeth After graduation, Clark will Janssen, Taylor Loewen and be completing an internship at See SENATE, pg 2 Molly Clark were the other a small design firm in Coloraartists who showcased their do that does branding for other talent at the event. companies. STAFF,held pg 2 Clark, like Wendland, said The senior art showSeewas she finds artistic inspiration all in the Schlict this year for the over. She said she especially first time. It was formerly held Each edition of the Tabor View will be put on Facebook as well as extra material and contests Photo by Courtney Reed. enjoys trying to imitate the in the library, but renovations Keep an eye on the page for photo contests throughout thedesign major Elizabeth Janssen explains a piece of her Graphic rest ofathis styles of other designers she to the Schlict fewyear. years ago artwork to junior Natalie Hartzell during the senior art show May 2. likes. made it a more attractive venue. Photos by Zach Bissell

Welcome Back

Left: Jake Schenk sits at his desk thinking about several different things that are happening around campus as well as what God is doing. Right: Erica Haude takes a break from helping students to enjoy some company. Both Schenk and Haude are Tabor Grads that have come back to give back to the Tabor community.

Two major positions have recently been filled this year including Student Success Counselor and Director of Campus Ministries. Both positions were filled with Tabor College graduates. Erica Haude There is a new face in the Student Success & Career Services Office. Erica Haude is Tabor’s new Student Success Counselor. She is the supervisor of Andrea Batista, oversees students on academic probation and works on accommodations for students with disabilities. She also does counseling on a referral basis. She has ample experience for her position. After graduating from Tabor in 2006 she went to Denver Seminary to get her Masters in counseling, which she received in 2010. She has worked

as a youth pastor for First Mennonite Brethren in Wichita and for the last two years at a residential treatment center. While praying for God’s guidance she received an e-mail from Directo of Admissions Lee Waldron and Vice President of Athletics and Enrollment Management Rusty Allen. She felt like God was telling her not to say no and accepted the job. She feels called to work with people who are, as she says, “on the fringes.” She loves being at Tabor and getting to counsel. Riding her bike in the snow and chasing a possum out of a mod are among the memories Haude has of her time at Tabor. She also remembers being undefeated in conference while she played during basketball season. You could most likely find her and her husband at sporting events at Tabor. Haude’s office is in the Student Success & Career Services

Office in the library. As she says, “I want to get to know people. I want to hear their story.” So go and visit her in her office or find her at a football game, she’d love to get to know you.

Jake Schenk You may have seen Jake Schenk around campus and wondered what he does. Schenk is our new Director of Campus Ministries. In this position it is his job to organize the chapels, oversee small group, and get to know and minister to students. Schenk graduated from Tabor with a dual degree in Physical Education and Bible in 2006. After graduating he coached football. Two years at Tabor and Two at Greenville College Illinois, but he always felt called to sports and ministry. As he says, “God gave me football as something to enjoy while He prepared

Student Senate is planning to help students even more this year than in previous years. They are looking to start a “Tabor Proud Campaign.”

“Tabor Proud is a fundraising effort to raise money for students who experience a family crisis during the year” said Senate President Mike Klaassen. Mission statement for the new

Ministry Spotlight:

Tabor students tutor, mentor kids in CHUMS Jared Janzen Editor-in-Chief CHUMS is a mentoring program through Tabor that pairs college students with elementary school kids who come from a challenged background or who struggle academically. “This is an opportunity to serve and share the light of Christ with students in the community,” said sophomore Alley Lehman, who has been involved with CHUMS for two years. CHUMS meets from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday and Thursday throughout the school year. A typical session includes snacks and homework help, but this time can also be flexible if the student needs a break or has something he or she needs to talk to about. On Thursdays, they take thirty minutes for all mentees to get together and play a game. The game is chosen by the “CHUMS of the Week,” who are two students who exhibited hard work or positive attitudes that week. The CHUMS program will be celebrating the end of another school year Fri-

day, May 9 by marching in the annual McPherson County All Schools Day Parade in McPherson, Kan. After the parade, mentors and mentees will gather in a park for a picnic and playtime. Then they will ride buses back to Tabor where game stations will be set up for the kids and ice cream will be served. Senior Micah Leake has been the head student director of CHUMS for three years. “CHUMS is the perfect opportunity for those wanting to experience what the Tabor life has to offer,” said Leake At the beginning of the school year, Leake met with the principal and counselors from Hillsboro Elementary School to match Tabor students and kids with compatible personalities. This semester 48 Tabor students served as mentors in the CHUMS program, including Leake and Lehman. Being able to form a meaningful relationship with the student she mentors is one of Lehman’s favorite aspects of this program.

“I have learned through my experiences of being a mentor that even though helping your CHUM with homework may seem small, it is that interaction that we have with our CHUMS that they will remember and help them in the future,” said Lehman.

“Even though helping your CHUM with homework may seem small, it is that interaction that we have with our CHUMS that they will remember and help them in the future”

Photos by Courtney Reed.

Freshman Phylicia Don guides a student through her homework.

Alley Lehman Leake encourages students who love kids and are looking for ways to serve the community to get involved in CHUMS next year. “It is only two hours a week, yet has a profound impact on the next generation as well as you as you serve,” said Leake.

Sophomore Jeremy Johnson reads to a kid during CHUMS.

Freshman Kat Wells shares a hug with the girl she mentors.


Open Mic Night

SAB hosts annual event with a great turn out Features, pg 4-5

May 6, 2014

‘Cafe’ Changes

See what is new and improved about the Tabor Cafetieria News, pg 2

theview@tabor.edu

Arts and Crafts Fair Photos

See some photos from last weeks craft fair

Campus Life, pg 8

September 19, 2012

FEATURES 5

Issue 1

New Women’s Choral group on campus

Registrar retires after four decades with Tabor Kelsey Unruh

Lauren Wall

Reporter

Deanne Duerksen will be retiring from Tabor in June after 41 years of service here. She has served as both assistant registrar and registrar during her time and said she never dreaded going to work; she loves everything about the job. Before becoming a registrar, Duerksen was an accountant. “I got to work with numbers and people,” said Duerkson, combining two things she loves. Susan Lehrman, assistant registrar, has worked with Duerksen for 25 years.

Reporter

One of the new additions to the Tabor College curriculum this year is Concerto Bella Voche, the women’s chorale that is directed by new coming professor Janie Brokenicky. “It’s Italian for ‘a collection of beautiful voices,’” said Brokenicky. “Women’s chorale before was a very universal name and you’d hear it and think it could be anyone’s choir. Concerto Bella Voche will, after a while, become a familiar name for Tabor and help give the group identity.” Brokenicky joined the Tabor music department after applying for Assistant Professor of Choral Music at the request of Dr. Brad Vogel. “I’m thrilled to have Janie here,” said Vogel. “When the position opened, I ran into her at the National Association of Teachers of Singing and I talked to her and asked her to ap-

“When you’ve worked to- and spending time with grand- part-time with eligibility and gether as long as we have you children. will assist Bethany College in share many experiences both “I have seven grandchil- their registrar department. professionally and person- dren,” said Duerksen. “Five Duerksen said she will miss ally,” said Lehrman. “Over live in Hesston and two live in everything about Tabor. the years she has encouraged Andover.” “Graduation is my favorite me to take advantage of evDuerksen is also looking day of the year,” said Duerkery opportunity expand return my forward to visiting Formerto students to key staff roles her daugh- sen. “I was a freshmen advisor knowledge and I am thankful ter who lives in Phoenix and for years, and to watch stuBen Schmidt Reporter to call her a friend.” sister who lives in California. dents grow and get degrees — Duerksen has dedicated her “The job has been a very full I love that.” life to serving Tabor and Leh- time job and I haven’t been commitment Student Senate“Duerksen’s sets up rman said that her opinion and able to keep up with new manycampaign and dedication to Tabor is adexpertise will be missed on hobbies, but I planZachonBissell return- mirable,” said President Jules Editor-in-chief campus. ing to the things I used to en- Glanzer. “Her legacy is one of After retirement, Duerksen joy like quilting and baking,” serving students, faculty, staff said she looks forward to vol- said Duerksen. SENATE, pg 2 and See alumni and is summarized unteering at her church, readAfter retiring, Duerksen will in the Centennial Plaza sign ing, taking up former hobbies continue working for Tabor Photos by Zach Bissell

Welcome Back

Left: Jake Schenk sits at his desk thinking about several different things that are happening around campus as well as what God is doing. Right: Erica Haude takes a break from helping students to enjoy some company. Both Schenk and Haude are Tabor Grads that have come back to give back to the Tabor community.

Two major positions have recently been filled this year including Student Success Counselor and Director of Campus Ministries. Both positions were filled with Tabor College graduates. Erica Haude There is a new face in the Student Success & Career Services Office. Erica Haude is Tabor’s new Student Success Counselor. She is the supervisor of Andrea Batista, oversees students on academic probation and works on accommodations for students with disabilities. She also does counseling on a referral basis. She has ample experience for her position. After graduating from Tabor in 2006 she went to Denver Seminary to get her Masters in counseling, which she received in 2010. She has worked

as a youth pastor for First Mennonite Brethren in Wichita and for the last two years at a residential treatment center. While praying for God’s guidance she received an e-mail from Directo of Admissions Lee Waldron and Vice President of Athletics and Enrollment Management Rusty Allen. She felt like God was telling her not to say no and accepted the job. She feels called to work with people who are, as she says, “on the fringes.” She loves being at Tabor and getting to counsel. Riding her bike in the snow and chasing a possum out of a mod are among the memories Haude has of her time at Tabor. She also remembers being undefeated in conference while she played during basketball season. You could most likely find her and her husband at sporting events at Tabor. Haude’s office is in the Student Success & Career Services

Office in the library. As she says, “I want to get to know people. I want to hear their story.” So go and visit her in her office or find her at a football game, she’d love to get to know you.

Jake Schenk You may have seen Jake Schenk around campus and wondered what he does. Schenk is our new Director of Campus Ministries. In this position it is his job to organize the chapels, oversee small group, and get to know and minister to students. Schenk graduated from Tabor with a dual degree in Physical Education and Bible in 2006. After graduating he coached football. Two years at Tabor and Two at Greenville College Illinois, but he always felt called to sports and ministry. As he says, “God gave me football as something to enjoy while He prepared

Student Senate is planning to help students even more this year than in previous years. They are looking to start a “Tabor Proud Campaign.”

Husband, wife to retire from Tabor Chelsea McWhirt

See STAFF, pg 2

Each edition of the Tabor View will be put on Facebook as well as extra material and contests

Reporter

Dr. Bradley Penn of the psychology department along with his wife and colleague Debbie Penn, also of the psychology department, will be retiring this year from Tabor. Both taught here for five years. “I hope (students) remember me as being open about my Christian faith, trying to be honest and fair and engaging in the classroom,” said Brad Penn. Even though he is retiring from Tabor, he is not retiring from life. He said he considers this a point in his life in which to fulfill God’s work and leave behind a legacy for future generations. He will pursue the next five years as a full-time head pastor at a church in Durham, Kan., before he retires at age 65. He said he chose this year to move on from Tabor because he wanted to be doing something more influential that would have more eternal value. “I felt like God was saying this is the time for you

ply. There were 30 applicants.” One of the reasons Brokenicky was picked for the position was because of her previous work records with other chorale groups. “Getting the group re-established was the primary goal,” said Vogel. “The goal over 3 years is to have 40 voices in women’s choral. Janie is very good, and has a track record of building good chorale programs. She’s the perfect person for the position.” Brokenicky is looking forward to what the school year will bring. “I’m excited for the girls to have such a strong variety in musical performances,” said Brokenicky. “We will get to perform on our own at the Thanksgiving concert and we are touring, but we also get to sing The Messiah with the concert choir. I never got these opportunities in college, so I’m excited for all of these opportunities for the girls.”

Keep an eye on the page for photo contests throughout the rest of this year.

“Tabor Proud is a fundraising effort to raise money for students who experience a family crisis during the year” said Senate President Mike Klaassen. Mission statement for the new

Photo by Courtney Reed.

to make a change here,” said Brad Penn. But there will be some parts of being professor that he will miss, such as being around college students. “College students feel like they can tackle anything if they put their mind to it, and I really like that,” said Penn. Debbie Penn said that Tabor isn’t the first time that she and her husband have taught at the same school. She said working with her husband over the years made them adjust to demands such as scheduling and high stress, particularly during finals.

“We really enjoy working together,” said Debbie Penn. Previously the Penns taught at bible colleges in Ohio and Iowa. Brad Penn also once coached basketball and served as an athletic director at other schools. Debbie Penn said she hopes that students will remember her as a great listener and being fair. Retiring from Tabor will allow her to spend more time with her family and enjoy being a pastor’s wife, which she said she considers to be very important to her and part of passing on a legacy.

Deanne Duerksen will retire this year after 41 years working in the registrar’s office.

Public speaking course tries online format Becky Bryan

Brad and Debbie Penn will be leaving Tabor this year in search of a new path in life.

that reads ‘Called to serve.’ She has served Tabor and us very well.”

Reporter

Aleen Ratzlaff has taught the Public Speaking course at Tabor for many years, but this semester she is doing something she hasn’t done before: teaching the class online. “I never thought I would teach Public Speaking online because I think you need to be in front of people, but online can be beneficial for a self learner and a nontraditional student.” Ratzlaff said that there are five students in her Tabor Wichita online course. “I’m glad it’s small because it’s my first time teaching an online class and it makes it easier when there aren’t as many people” The online class has five graded speeches. The students record themselves giving their speech and sumbit an outline. Ratzlaff says being able to go back and watch the videos is very helpful because she can’t do that in the classroom setting. Each week the students have online readings, quizzes and

posts. They also give feedback by commenting on each other’s speeches. With online classes there is a different grading scale. The students are graded on their activity level in the course rather than attendance. They are also able to work ahead, which makes an online class more helpful for some students. Next time she teaches the course, Ratzlaff said she will give more examples and will not include the group speech requirement. The course focuses more on knowing how to organize a speech, said Ratzlaff, and it falls short with learning to adapt speech for an audience. Other Tabor professors have learned to adapt to teaching classes online. Professors Brad Penn and Chris Dick are among those. For those looking to take an online class, Ratzlaff said “it is good for people who like to work at their own pace, have a challenging schedule or are self motivated.”

Seniors share testimonies with student body Lauren Wall

Reporter

During chapel on May 1 and May 6, four students had the opportunity to tell their story. Seniors Jasmine Gilkey, James Monroe, Holli Wolf and Ozzie Orozco got to share about their Tabor experience. James Monroe shared about how he was born-again by the

grace of Jesus Christ “I thought I was a Christian, but I was a hypocrite,” said Monroe. “It’s a blessing and an honor to brag about Christ and what He did for me. If Jesus can forgive me and save me, then I know He can do it for someone else too.” Ozzie Orozco talked about his journey with his faith, using Mark 2:17, which says,

“Healthy people don’t need a doctor--sick people do. I have come to call not those who think they are righteous, but those who know they are sinners.” Orozco used this verse as a foundation and said he believes that “God’s good is better than our bad.” Holli Wolf shared about the storms in her life that helped shape her relationship with God.

“I am excited to share my testimony with the Tabor community,” said Wolf. “God is using my life to shape and influence the lives of others, and I am incredibly blessed for the opportunity.” Jasmine Gilkey said sharing her testimony was so much fun and something she wants to do for the rest of her life. “I love sharing my story

with others and telling people about Jesus,” said Gilkey. “I shared about how God called me to Tabor to put me in an uncomfortable place so that I can see my need for him.” This was the first year seniors at Tabor had the opportunity to share their stories in chapel, but hopefully it will continue in future years to inspire and challenge students.


May 6, 2014

SPORTS 6

Baseball team clinches regular season, KCAC tournament titles

performed very well,” Reporter said junior shortstop Gadi Baez. “Our pitching was The Tabor College outstanding and our hitbaseball team closed out ters got key hits when we the conference season needed them to. with nine straight wins, “As a team, we are which propelled them to very proud to bring home a first place finish in the the first ever conference conference. (tournament) championThe team finished out ship to Tabor.” the conference season with The KCAC showed the a record of 24-4 and an baseball team a lot of reoverall record of 43-10. spect, with a total of 13 Tabor entered the conBluejays earning an award ference tournament seedfrom the conference. ed number one and took Senior outfielder Kirk on Bethany College in the Rocha took home the top first game, winning 6-3. honor, receiving the PlayIn the semifinals the er of the Year award. RoBluejays played Friends cha led the conference in University and won with batting average. ease, 9-3. Sophomore pitcher JaTabor would again play cob Webb was also recogFriends in the championnized for his outstanding ship. Leading the Falcons play this year by being the whole game, Tabor named the Co-Pitcher of gave up three runs in the the Year. Webb averaged top of the ninth inning and 11.92 strikeouts per game, fell 3-2 in the first game. totaling 117 on the season. In game two, the Jays Named to the First Team regrouped and crushed All-KCAC were Rocha, Friends 19-7 to win the Webb, senior third baseconference tournament man Troy Torres and senior championship. pitcher Junior Mustain. “I thought the team Earning Second Team

Janelle Rust

All-KCAC were junior shortstop Gadi Baez, senior catcher C.J. Dedeaux, senior pitcher Alex Mann, senior outfielder Grant Silva and senior first baseman Kevin Seeger. In addition to being named to the second team, Silva also earned the Gold Glove award for Tabor, given to the best defender. Receiving All-KCAC Honorable Mention were senior outfielder Keenen Chanin, junior pitcher Russell Longworth, junior pitcher Juan Acevedo and junior DH Armando Castillo. Coach Mark Standiford was recognized by the KCAC as Coach of the Year. Tabor will compete in the regional baseball tournament May 12-15 in Hutchinson, Kan. Tabor was one of nine schools selected to host the opening round of the NAIA national tournament. The tournament is double elimination, and the Bluejays are waiting to hear their seed and who they will play.

Softball team finishes second in KCAC tournament Janelle Rust

Reporter The Tabor College softball team finished out their season on a high note. In the regular season, Tabor won three of their last four conference games, which put them in sixth place. Going into the tournament as a sixth seed, the Lady Jays knew that they had to play their best if they wanted to keep advancing. They lost the first game to third seed Bethany College, a team that Tabor had beaten in the regular season. The team did not let this faze them and rallied to beat McPherson College 11-7 to keep their hopes alive. Tabor kept rolling with a victory over fourth seed Friends University to move on to the next day. In the quarterfinals, the Lady Jays crushed St. Mary’s 8-1. Taking on Ottawa in the semifinals would prove to be a challenge for Tabor, but the Jays won by a narrow margin of 2-1. Moving into the finals, Tabor battled hard against number one-ranked Kansas Wesleyan, but fell short 7-3 to end their season.

Tabor had a couple of players receive all-conference honors. Preseason all-conference pick Katie Henning was named to First Team. Henning, a senior catcher from Olathe, Kan., led the Lady Jays in batting average and RBIs. Named to Second Team was freshman pitcher Marilee Burge. Burge, from New Braunfels, Tex., was Tabor’s leader from the mound, totaling 92 strikeouts on the season. Also receiving honors was senior Sarah Massey, who received honorable mention all-conference. Massey, outfielder from Cedar Vale, Kan., was a preseason pick as well. The Lady Jays graduate five seniors who all left a mark on the softball team while at Tabor. The returners will look to continue where they left off. “We are very excited to build off of this year’s success and to come back next season and make another run in the KCAC tournament,” said junior Lauren Massey. The Lady Jays finished the 2014 season with a 2426 record, 9-9 in the KCAC.

Track and field athletes bring home KCAC titles Jessica Vix

Sports Editor The track and field season wrapped up for a majority of Tabor’s athletes May 2-3 at the KCAC Conference Championship at Bethel College. Tabor brought home several first-place finishes in individual and relay events. The men took fourth out of nine teams, and the women took seventh out of 10 teams in the KCAC. “The effort was excellent and the teams represented Tabor College very well,” said Head Coach David Kroeker. For the men’s team, junior Tyler Entz won the high jump in his first track season with Tabor. “To win a KCAC title in my first college season surpassed any expectations that I had about the season,” said Entz. “I am blessed beyond belief to have the coaches that I have.” The men’s relay teams excelled, earning gold in Photo by Courtney Reed the 4x800-meters and silver in both the 4x100 and Above: 4x400. The 4x1 and 4x8 Senior Kristen Harris wrapped up her track and field career with a relays both qualified for the title in pole vault and second place in the 400-meter hurdles.

NAIA National Championships. Also qualifying for nationals in the 100-meters was Alex Grier, who finished second in the event on Saturday, as well as winning a title in the 200. His fellow sprinter Caleb Blue earned second in the 400. Garrett Daugherty, men’s Athlete of the Meet at the indoor conference championships, took home the award again after defending his title in the 1500-meters and placing second in the 800. He was also part of all three men’s relays, which brought his medal count to five: two gold and three silver. In field events, Robert Nenandal took ninth of 24 in discus and David Loewen took sixth of 20 in javelin. On the women’s side, Kristen Harris won the KCAC title in pole vault and was runner-up in the 400-meter hurdles. Brielle Lund placed third in both the 1500 and 5000, and Hannah Holmes finished fifth in the 10,000. The NAIA National Championships will take place May 22-24 in Gulf Shores, Ala. In addition to

the relays and Grier in the 100, Daugherty has qualified in the 800, Grier in the 200 and Lund, Holmes and Joel Allen in the marathon. Lund, Holmes and Grier’s 100 have all qualified “A-standard,” which means they have automatically earned the right to compete at nationals. Each team is then allowed to enter three athletes, including one relay team, that have met the “Bstandard” qualifying time. Kroeker explained that he generally will select relays over individuals and upperclassmen over lowerclassmen if forced to decide between B-standard qualifiers. He also takes into account national competitiveness and injury. The athletes will have one more chance to try to get A-standard qualifying times at the last chance meet at Emporia State University May 10; otherwise Kroeker will be tasked with determining which of the remaining B-standard athletes and relays will compete for Tabor at the national championship.


SPORTS 7

May 6, 2014

Tennis teams reflect on season, look to next year

Becky Bryan

Reporter The men’s and women’s tennis teams have finished their season just shy of qualifying for the conference tournament. The women finished fifth and the men finished sixth in the KCAC this year. Becky Faber, junior, earned a second team all KCAC conference honor. Faber said that although the season may not have gone how the team would have liked, it was a good season because the team bonded. “It was different than last year because we had new players,” said Faber. “It was fun to get to know the new people.” This was John Ruder’s second season with the team. Faber said that after a second year, they are starting to understand his expectations and the way he structures practices. “It will be even more noticeable next year because everyone will be used to him,” said Faber. Faber is confident of her merit this year. “I am using shots I wasn’t even using in the fall,” she said. Next year she hopes to improve in doubles because most of her tennis career has been focused on improving her singles game. Faber also said she hopes the team does more activities together at the beginning

of the next year to help with bonding even more. Two recruits have already signed for next year’s women’s team. Tyler Dort, senior, described the season as fulfilling. “I’m very grateful to have played four years of tennis here,” said Dort. “It was a year full of improvements for the younger players.” Dort said that being a senior brings a different feeling. “I didn’t have as much pressure and that allowed me to play more loose and have fun at the same time,” said Dort. The men’s team has two seniors, Dort and Kelyn Vix. There are several younger men who will be back next year more acclimated to the college level of play. “I believe I improved more this year than any year past,” said Dort. “I was very happy to help the younger players get adjusted to the college level.” Dort says he will miss the friendships with teammates as well as the high level of competition. The men’s and women’s teams along with their families enjoyed a banquet May 4. Team awards such as most valuable player and most improved were recognized. Highest serving percentage based on statistics taken in practice was also awarded.

Intramural basketball offers both fun and competition Lauren Wall

Reporter Intramural basketball has become a fun way for students to get involved in a competitive sport here on campus. The season started at the beginning of April and playoffs took place April 27-May 6. “There are a number of teams that are really talented,” said Joe Wuest, who coordinates intramurals. “There are also some teams of friends who just want to play on a team with one another.” There are currently 14 men’s teams and three women’s teams. There had been four women’s teams but one forfeited after the first game due to time constraints. “This season has molded and strengthened me physically, emotionally and spiritually,” said

sophomore Jesse Allen. “My teammates played with honor, valor, integrity and most of all, sportsmanship.” Allen said he believes this season has made him the man that he is today and he hopes his team remembers who inspired and invested in their lives each time they expanded to the next level. Having the opportunity to be a part of intramurals can be more than participating in the game. “I have increased the amount of referees and other helpers in each sport, which in turn creates more jobs,” said Wuest. “The only thing different about intramurals this year was my desire to have intramurals serve as another avenue for students to receive employment on campus.”

Spring Sports Showcase Saturday, April 26

Baseball photo by Courtney Reed Football and soccer photos by Vance Frick

Athletic Banquet to honor athletes and induct alumnus into Hall of Fame Janelle Rust

Reporter Tabor College will be hosting its annual Hall of Fame All Sports Banquet on Sunday, May 11. The banquet features Tabor sports teams and highlights the athletes’ accomplishments for the year. Rusty Allen, athletic director at Tabor, said it is a time to reflect on both current and former athletes. The focus of the evening is the Athletic Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony. Every year someone who has made an impact on Tabor athletics, whether that be a coach or a player, gets inducted into the Hall of Fame. This year it is former coach and alumnus Don Brubacher. “(Brubacher’s) contri-

bution to Tabor College athletics is nothing short of amazing,” said Allen. “His resume includes time as a student-athlete, a very successful coach and an effective leader as athletic director. His tenure with Tabor College totals 31 years.” A reception will be held to honor Brubacher prior to the banquet at 4:00 p.m. in Java Jays. Following the reception, a silent auction of sports memorabilia will be held in the Tabor College Gymnasium. The auction will go on throughout the evening, with opportunities to bid during dinner. The dinner, program and induction ceremony will begin at 5:00 p.m., also in the gymnasium. During the program, all athletes who received

a conference or national honor this year will be recognized. Also, the athletic department will name a male and female scholar athlete of the year as well as a male and female athlete of the year. Allen said that this is a special occasion for Tabor athletics. “We honor current athletes and coaches, while on the other hand we induct someone into the Hall of Fame who has made an outstanding contribution,” said Allen. “It is a great time of bringing together athletes, coaches, parents, friends and alumni to recognize and honor both those who have gone before us and those who have accomplished great things during the past year.”


Open Mic Night

‘Cafe’ Changes

Features, pg 4-5

CAMPUS LIFE 8

Kelsey Unruh

Left: Jake Schenk sits at his desk thinking about several different things that are happening around campus as well as what God is doing. Right: Erica Haude takes a break from helping students to enjoy some company. Both Schenk and Haude are Tabor Grads that have come back to give back to the Tabor community.

Former students return to key staff roles

Erica Haude There is a new face in the Student Success & Career Services Office. Erica Haude is Tabor’s new Student Success Counselor. She is the supervisor of Andrea Batista, oversees students on academic probation and works on accommodations for students with disabilities. She also does counseling on a referral basis. She has ample experience for her position. After graduating from Tabor in 2006 she went to Denver Seminary to get her Masters in counseling, which she received in 2010. She has worked

as a youth pastor for First Mennonite Brethren in Wichita and for the last two years at a residential treatment center. While praying for God’s guidance she received an e-mail from Directo of Admissions Lee Waldron and Vice President of Athletics and Enrollment Management Rusty Allen. She felt like God was telling her not to say no and accepted the job. She feels called to work with people who are, as she says, “on the fringes.” She loves being at Tabor and getting to counsel. Riding her bike in the snow and chasing a possum out of a mod are among the memories Haude has of her time at Tabor. She also remembers being undefeated in conference while she played during basketball season. You could most likely find her and her husband at sporting events at Tabor. Haude’s office is in the Student Success & Career Services

May 6, 2014

Issue 1

New Women’s Choral group on campus

Photos by Zach Bissell

Welcome Back

Two major positions have recently been filled this year including Student Success Counselor and Director of Campus Ministries. Both positions were filled with Tabor College graduates.

Campus Life, pg 8

September 19, 2012

TABORSTOCK 2014 Reporter

See some photos from last weeks craft fair

News, pg 2

theview@tabor.edu

Ben Schmidt

Arts and Crafts Fair Photos

See what is new and improved about the Tabor Cafetieria

SAB hosts annual event with a great turn out

Office in the library. As she says, “I want to get to know people. I want to hear their story.” So go and visit her in her office or find her at a football game, she’d love to get to know you. Jake Schenk You may have seen Jake Schenk around campus and wondered what he does. Schenk is our new Director of Campus Ministries. In this position it is his job to organize the chapels, oversee small group, and get to know and minister to students. Schenk graduated from Tabor with a dual degree in Physical Education and Bible in 2006. After graduating he coached football. Two years at Tabor and Two at Greenville College Illinois, but he always felt called to sports and ministry. As he says, “God gave me football as something to enjoy while He prepared

Reporter

One of the new additions to the Tabor College curriculum this year is Concerto Bella Voche, the women’s chorale that is directed by new coming professor Janie Brokenicky. “It’s Italian for ‘a collection of beautiful voices,’” said Brokenicky. “Women’s chorale before was a very universal name and you’d hear it and think it could be anyone’s choir. Concerto Bella Voche will, after a while, become a familiar name for Tabor and help give the group identity.” Brokenicky joined the Tabor music department after applying for Assistant Professor of Choral Music at the request of Dr. Brad Vogel. “I’m thrilled to have Janie here,” said Vogel. “When the position opened, I ran into her at the National Association of Teachers of Singing and I talked to her and asked her to ap-

ply. There were 30 applicants.” One of the reasons Brokenicky was picked for the position was because of her previous work records with other chorale groups. “Getting the group re-established was the primary goal,” said Vogel. “The goal over 3 years is to have 40 voices in women’s choral. Janie is very good, and has a track record of building good chorale programs. She’s the perfect person for the position.” Brokenicky is looking forward to what the school year will bring. “I’m excited for the girls to have such a strong variety in musical performances,” said Brokenicky. “We will get to perform on our own at the Thanksgiving concert and we are touring, but we also get to sing The Messiah with the concert choir. I never got these opportunities in college, so I’m excited for all of these opportunities for the girls.”

All photos by Courtney Reed.

Student Senate sets up new campaign

“Tabor Proud is a fundraising Zach Bissell Editor-in-chief effort to raise money for students Student Senate is planning to help students even more this year than in previous years. They are looking to start a “Tabor Proud Campaign.”

who experience a family crisis during the year” said Senate President Mike Klaassen. Mission statement for the new

See SENATE, pg 2

See STAFF, pg 2

Each of the Tabor View will be interaction. put on Facebook as well as extra material andSenior contests Cassie Whiteneck was one of many students who found themDominic Gibbs of the band Loftland uses a variety of tactics toedition encourage audience Loftland was Keep an eye on the page for photo contests throughout the enjoying the performances during Taborstock. selves one of five acts featured at SAB’s annual Tabostock this year on May 3 in the townhouse courtyard.

rest of this year.

Lead singer Adam Agee (right) and guitarist Nick Baumhardt of the band Stellar Kart pump up the crowd during Taborstock’s final act.

Members of Stellar Kart jam on their guitars. Other performers at Taborstock this year were Brandon Michael Ellis, Grant Terry and Tricia Brock (the former lead singer of Superchick).

Spring weather arrives

Students have been taking advantage of the warm weather that Kansas has kindly allowed recently through a variety of outdoor activities, including sand volleyball, ultamate Frisbee and campus golf.

Fu Wager cooks up some Filipino barbeque at the MSU concessions booth.

Looking for a summer job?

Need help with your resume? Freshman Catherine Christie sets the ball for freshman Tena Loewen during an intense match of sand volleyball.

Dates to know:

Photos by Courtney Reed.

Freshmen Tim Regier and Josiah Robertson watch as their teammate, sophomore Ben Schmidt, bumps the ball.

Friday, May 16 at 10:00 a.m.: graduation rehearsal in the Joel H. Wiens Stadium. Friday, May 16 at 6:30: President’s Party for graduates and their families in the Tabor College Park. Saturday, May 17 at 10:00 a.m.:Commencement in the Joel H. Wiens Stadium. Graduates should meet in the football locker room at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, May 17 at 6:00 p.m.: All students must be checked out of their rooms.

To get help creating a professionallooking resume that will show employers everything you’ve got to offer, stop by Student Sucess office (located in the library) or contact Daneen Hook at daneenh@tabor.edu.


May 6, 2014