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Slimp: 60 Minutes looks at the TimesPicayune.

60 Minutes Tackles Times-Picayune Kevin Slimp

Morley Safer said, referring to newspapers, “virtuPAGE 5 ally an entire industry in free-fall.” The story, of course, was about the Times-PicInstitute of ayne’s move from a daily to a three days a week pubNewspaper Technology Official publication of the Colorado Press Association / coloradopressassociation.com LXXXIV, No. 1 because some of January 2013 lication./ IVol. was especially interested kevin@kevinslimp.com the folks in the story were the same folks who contacted me back when the shift was announced. Instead we spent most of our conversation talkSteve Newhouse declined to be interviewed for My 13-year-old son received an iPod Touch for Christmas this year. I know my son. Probably as the story. That job fell to Jim Amoss, longtime edi- ing about his new job in Orange County. OCR is 20 biggest as I’ve everDknown 2 0 1 3 C Owell LO RA O Panyone. R E SAndS I knew, A S given S O C tor I AofTtheI paper. O N A N N U A L C O N V EoneNofTtheI O N papers in the country. Rob has left his role as online guru to serve as one Safer’s first question to Amoss seemed simple time, he would lose his expensive gift. In an effort to soften the blow when the device enough. “Did you agree with the decision to start of five deputy editors of the paper. He explained that, since July, OCR has increased its newsroom did turn up missing, I had Zachary create a back- publishing three days a week?” I’m listening to this interview for the fourth time staff room 185 writers and editors to 300. ground screen with the words, “If you find this I could write several columns about the changes iPod, please email kevin@kevinslimp.com to let my as I write. And for the life of me, I still haven’t heard him answer the question. He gave what sounded at OCR, but I can sense Rob’s excitement when he dad know you have it.” I had to tell you that story, so you would under- to me like a “packaged” response, the kind I might discussed his work with America’s “largest community newspaper,” a description credited to Ken stand the reference to my son a little further down have written years ago. It reminded me so much of my son, when I Brusic, executive editor. this column. th After spending my afternoon interviewing Carl fullCONVENTION well it had Now for story number two. In the late 90s, I left asked where his iPod was, knowing 2013 SCHEDULE the newspaper world for a few years to be direc- been lost. He told me all about the possible places Redman and Rob Curley, I found it difficult to untor of communications for the United Methodist an iPod could be, without coming out and telling derstand why Safer referred to newspapers as “dyn Thursday, ing.” and moving private collection of Pulitzer Prize it a few21, days2013 earlier. Church in my part of the United States. I had a me he’d lostFeb. winning photos of Larry Ryckman – The I found it even hardercourtesy to understand after readI felt for him. I wanted Amoss to tell us what staff that created publications, online content, P.R. story in News & Tech today that six of eight he really thought, one way or the other. All I got ing aTribune. material and a newspaper. Some of the most inter1:30 p.m. – 4 p.m. listening to his interview was thatMedia the industry publicly traded newspaper companies showed inesting aspects of my job came under the heading of fromPress Colorado Association/SYNC2 their stock Not small inwas grappling with options. Safer equated what was creases inNote: “crisis communication.” Thereprices will in be2012. no Governor’s Reception this Directors Meeting happening to surgery, where all the limbs are ampu- creases, but double-digit increases. As crisis communication director, I preparedBoard the of year. All association members are welcome I love talking with folks who are excited about organization for emergencies we hoped we’d never tated and replaced by artificial limbs. to letter attend. This is athe regularly In an open to Advance, paper’s parent working for their newspapers. I visited with two see. Several thousand professionals made upand the encouraged several highboard. profile citizens of New Or- newspapers in Virginia and Kentucky over the past clergy and staffs of these congregations and itscheduled was company, meeting of the to work with their22, staffs.2013 Both papers are my job to be sure they were ready in the event of leans, including many names that you would know, few weeks n Friday, Feb. a “media event.” I was quite adept at getting TV wrote that “The Newhouses are losing the trust of doing well and continue to invest in the future. 5 p.m. – 7 p.m. It’s no coincidence that papers that invest in the reporters to report just about anything. Newspapers the community.” a.m. – 8:45 a.m. Reception hosted thereporter, Denversaid, “I future7:30 thrive. And while the Orange County RegisDavid Carr, New York by Times weren’t as quick - you might say “gullible” - toWelcome acColorado Press Association Downtown largest community Annual paper, youMeeting think theyHotel expected the hurricane winds that ter may be America’s cept everything as the truth, so I generally used Westin tele- don’t Please to attend the annual meeting can bet that plan thousands of community papers will to came against them.” vision to get information out to the masses. In conjunction with the reception, attendees and surprise on page 2 a radio interview froma avery few special weeks ago, continue to serve their communities This meant I would create text that ministerswill and have Yet theinopportunity to view See CONVENTION others were to use if called by a member of the me- David Francis, business manager for the NOLA Morley Safer at the same time. My suggestion? Remind your readers that your dia during a crisis. They were always instructed, if Media Group, of which The Times-Picayune is a the reporter wanted more information than I had part, said that New Orleans is “embracing us again.” paper is providing a vital service to the community I called Carl Redman, executive editor of The as it has for years. And, perhaps, take a cue from provided, to contact me directly. Understanding that story will also come in Advocate in Baton Rouge to ask him about the new the folks in Orange County and continue to invest daily paper in New Orleans created by the Baton in the future. handy as you read further. So last night I was having dinner with a friend Rouge paper. Redman reports that his group was when I got a text that read, “Are you watching 60 overwhelmed by the response to the new daily. They had hoped for a circulation of 10,000 by FebMinutes?” ruary 2013. Instead, more than 10,000 subscribed “No,” was my immediate response. Kentucky Press Association Convention “They’re saying the newspaper industry is dead. I to the newspaper within a week. Between home deMichigan Press Association livery and single copy sales, The Advocate currently thought you’d want to know.” Within minutes came an email from Karen reaches approximately 20,000 homes each day. Alberta Symposium, Edmonton I tried to reach someone at The Times-Picayune, Geary of the Paris Post-Intelligencer in West Tennessee. “Did you see 60 Minutes? It’s a story about sending emails to the publisher and several managTennessee Press Association The Times-Picayune. They’re saying newspapers are ers, but received no response. Colorado Press Association Finally, I decided to talk with Rob Curley, depdead.” The evening continued like that with texts, uty editor of the Orange County Register (OCR), TCNA, San Antonio emails and calls arriving from concerned viewers whose resume includes more experience in online journalism than anyone I can think of. Rob is a near and far. kevin@ This morning, I found the 12 minute clip online household name and I figured he could give me kevinslimp.com and watched it. Then I watched it again. Then I insight on whatever it is I’m missing related to The watched it and took notes. In less than 11 seconds, Times-Picayune conversion to a non-daily. Invite Kevin to your next conference or training event!

2013 convention time is almost here The 135 Annual Convention of the Colorado Press Association kicks off Thursday, Feb. 21 in downtown Denver. The event, held at the Westin Denver Downtown Hotel for the second year, promises to be every bit as social and educational as last year with some new twists. Online registration begins Monday, January 14. Register, book hotel rooms and pay online in one easy location. An email link to online registration will be emailed to all CPA members on Monday, January 14. Let the fun begin.

Coming Soon...

Laying out the plan for 2013 Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper addresses questions during the 17th Annual Colorado Press Association PreLegislative Forum. More than 60 print and broadcast journalists attended the annual event to hear the 2013 legislative priorities of the Governor and Colorado General Assembly Leadership. See more photos from the event on Page 8 Photo by Thomas Cooper


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colorado editor ISSN #162-0010 USPS # 0122-940 Vol. LXXXIV, Issue 1 January 2013 Colorado Editor is the official publication of the Colorado Press Association and is published monthly at 1336 Glenarm Place. Denver, CO 80204-2115 p: 303-571-5117 f: 303-571-1803 coloradopressassociation.com

Subscription rate: $10 per year, $1 single copy Staff Samantha Johnston Publisher/Executive Director sjohnston@colopress.net Brian Clark Design Editor Board of Directors OFFICERS President Brenda Brandt The Holyoke Enterprise bbholent@chase3000.com Vice President Bryce Jacobson Craig Daily Press bjacobson@craigdailypress.com

vote on the 2013 board officers and directors, as well as to hear a National Newspaper Association update by NNA president Merle Baranczyk and an update about the CPA Philanthropic Advisory Committee by PAC Chairman Denny Dressman. All members are welcome to attend. Convention Kick-Off Keynote 9 a.m. – 10 a.m. Jason Taylor Chattanooga Times Free Press Don’t miss this energetic newspaper man with a unique ability for finding non-traditional revenue streams for newspapers, preaching customer service like nobody’s business and encouraging papers to stretch their minds and business lines. This isn’t only for the business side. Editorial gurus will get a ton out of this. It’s for everyone. And it kicks off the convention. Morning Concurrent Break-Out Sessions 10:15 a.m. – Noon • Editorial Audience Development – Shannon Kinney, Dream Local • The Sales Survival Workshop – Mike Blinder, The Blinder Group • Teach Me Even More Photoshop – Kevin Slimp

Treasurer Terri House The Pagosa Springs SUN terri@pagosasun.com

• Cultivating Daily Stories for the Bigger Picture (Advanced Reporting) – Kevin Vaughan, Jim Trotter, iNews Network

Secretary Keith Cerny Alamosa Valley Courier krcemail@aol.com

• COLLEGE TRACK: Ethics Panel – Moderated by Doug Bell. Panelists Fred Brown, Jim Anderson, Deb Hurley Brobst and Raj Chohan

DIRECTORS Mark Drudge Cortez Journal mdrudge@cortezjournal.com Bart Smith The Greeley Tribune bsmith@greeleytribune.com Laurena Mayne Davis The Daily Sentinel laurena.davis@gjsentinel.com David McClain Sterling Journal-Advocate dmcclain@journal-advocate.com Paula Murphy Trinidad Times Independent paulamurphy@ratonrange.com Curtis Hubbard The Denver Post chubbard@denverpost.com Matt Lubich The Johnstown Breeze mlubich@johnstownbreeze.com Periodical postage paid at Denver, CO 80202. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Colorado Editor 1336 Glenarm Place Denver, CO 80204-2115

Capitol Hill Luncheon 12:30 – 1:45 p.m. All convention attendees should plan to attend this luncheon. This is an important opportunity for CPA members to eat lunch with their legislators and to discuss issues important to our industry. Public notices are under attack again this year and with many new faces at the Capitol, this is an opportunity that should not be missed. Friend of the First Award Presentation Keynote Speaker: Judy Muller Award-winning broadcast journalist Judy Muller is a professor at USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. Previously, she was a correspondent for ABC News and CBS News. She is also a commentator for NPR’s “Morning Edition” and APR’s “Marketplace Money”. Afternoon Concurrent Breakout Session – I 2:15 – 3:15 pm. • Data Organization, Source Development (Advanced Reporting) - Kevin Vaughan,

Scenes from a Convention 2012 Colorado Press Association Annual Convention attendees catch up on the latest news between sessions at the Westin Downtown Denver Hotel. Photo by Thomas Cooper

Jim Trotter, iNews Network • Making Digital Dollars Today – Mike Blinder, The Blinder Group

in Colorado interested in journalism. Let’s give them a great showing by giving some of our passion for the business back.

• Even More InDesign for Newspaper Designers – Kevin Slimp

Associated Press Annual Business Meeting 3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

• What Makes Smart Social News Strategy? – Travis Mayfield, Fisher Interactive

Associated Press/Colorado Press Association Cocktail Reception This is a complimentary cocktail and hors d’oeuvres reception for all attendees before you head to evening events.

• COLLEGE TRACK: Social Media Panel. Afternoon Concurrent Break-out Session – II 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. • Finding and Fixing Problems in PDF Files – Kevin Slimp • Advertising Audience Growth/ Education – Shannon Kinney, Dream Local • The Drumbreat of Social News Strategy in your Newsroom – Travis Mayfield, Fisher Interactive • iNews Network Training – Laura Frank, iNews Network, (this is a must attend for all publishers and managing editors who want to gain the most from the CPA/iNews Network Parntership. Member papers receive investigative packages at no charge to the newspaper. If you aren’t taking advantage of iNews Network, attend to find out how). College Student Job/Internship Fair 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Editors, publishers and hiring managers, please plan to have someone from your staff attend this convention event. There are thousands of students

Past President Reception – Invitation Only. 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. Palm Restaurant – Westin Denver Dowtown Hotel CAPER Awards Banquet 7 p.m. – 10 p.m.

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Saturday, February 23

Saturday Morning Kick-Off Keynote Jim Brady – Editor-in-Chief, Digital First Media Jim Brady talks about Project Thunderdome, editorial Digital First and what successes and failures look like in an editorial digital first world. Morning Concurrent Break-out Sessions 10:15 a.m. – Noon • Covering Community in Crisis: Covering the news while caring for the needs of staff covering tragedy in their backyards – Moderated by Larry Ryckman, The Tribune. Panelists: Doug Bell - Evergreen Newspapers, Josh Awtry – Fort Collins Coloradoan, Dave Perry – Aurora Sentinel and

Jim Anderson – The Associated Press. • SYNC2 Media – Getting the Most Print and Digital Dollars from Your Trade Association – Elizabeth Bernberg, VP Sales & Marketing, SYNC2 Media, Mike MacDonald, Senior Outside Sales Consultant SYNC2 Media. • Customer Service: A Common Sense Approach – Kevin Slimp. • Circulation and Audience Engagement – Mike Newland, Dubuqe Telegraph Herald. 12:30 p.m. – 2 p.m. Keynote Speaker Joe Boydston, Vice President of Technology and New Media, McNaughton Newspaper Group Meet a guy who disagrees with Digital First. He’s a print first proponent with a strong digital push and he’s making money doing it. His practices at McNaughton aren’t mainstream and he’s not afraid to speak up about what the industry is doing right, what we’re doing wrong and what’s working for his company. Joe is a don’t miss. Annual CPA Better Newspaper Contest Cocktail Reception to follow 2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Yes, that’s right. No charge. Theater style. Cash bar in the back of the room (okay, there will be two). Just like the good ol’ days. Bring the whole staff to enjoy a fast-paced awards ceremony where clapping and cheering and carrying on is not only welcomed, it’s expected. Meet the 2012 Newspaper Person of the Year and the Rising Star and learn who is most innovative in the state. It’s going to be a great time.


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Conference Speakers and Descriptions DESCRIPTIONS CPA/SYNC2 Media Board Meeting All convention attendees and CPA members are welcome to attend the regularly scheduled CPA/SYNC2 Media board meetings which will be held back-toback. The annual meeting where new board members are voted in, etc. will be held Friday morning. Pulitzer Prize Photoraphy Display & Cocktail Reception Enjoy complimentary cocktails and hors d’oeuvres while viewing former AP correspondent and current Greeley Tribune City Editor Larry Ryckman’s collection of Pulitzer Prize winning photos. This is a great opportunity to network, socialize and catch-up with your newspaper colleagues and convention speakers. CPA Annual Meeting We hope you’ll attend the annual meeting of the Colorado Press Association to vote on incoming board members, hear an update from NNA President Merle Baranczyk and learn about what is happening at with the Foundation. All members are invited to attend.

SPEAKERS Shannon Kinney Shannon has over 15 years of experience in the development of successful Internet products, sales and marketing strategies. She has worked on the teams developing successful Internet brands such as cars. com, careerbuilder.com, and over 60 online media Kinney properties for newspapers all over the U.S. and Canada. Prior to that, she spent over 10 years in media sales and sales management in Maine. She is an experienced speaker, trainer, and consultant, and has worked with small and large companies alike. Shannon is considered an expert in the field of online marketing and social media, and speaks regularly at conferences on the subject. She serves as an advisor to many established and start-up companies, and local charitable groups such as the Maine Lobster Festival Committee. Mike Blinder Mike Blinder started fresh out of college as a disc jockey who eventually became a sales manager for a group of radio stations. Afterwards, he went on to manage television and radio groups until Guy Gannett Com-

munications asked him to help launch their online division for their Media and TV holdings. From there Mike’s career blossomed Blinder moving on to consult companies of all sizes, all over the world on multimedia sales strategies. Today over 350 media companies are clients of Mike’s company. The Blinder Group, a Florida based firm that assists in maximizing revenues for their clients, through effective on-site sales training programs. Gannett, Hearst, Media General, Morris Communications, CanWest, Quebecor, Media News Group, Scripps and the New York Times are just a few of the companies that avail themselves of Mike and his team of “street fighting” multimedia specialists, who are experts at training traditional sales people on how to embrace new media sales. One of Mike’s mottos is “train in the car as well as the classroom,” which means that Mike’s company has made thousands of sales calls on small, medium and large advertisers in a 4-legged” sales call setting with traditional ad reps, closing millions of dollars of new business for client media companies, all over the world! Learn more about some of the Blinder Group’s client success stories at: http://www.blindergroup.com/ articles/index.shtml Mike’s latest book: Survival Selling is receiving critical acclaim as a must read guide to assist sales reps on how to garner more revenue in tough economic times. Mike currently resides in Florida, with his wife Robin, 8- year old daughter Haven and “Golden Doodle” named Ginger. He is an avid boater living on the Gulf of Mexico. Kevin Slimp Kevin Slimp wears many hats. To some, he’s the director of the internationally-recognized Institute of Newspaper Technology. To others, he’s a syndicated columnist whose columns are carried by more than 60 industry-related journals throughout the world. Others have heard him keynote one or more Slimp of hundreds of publishing, advertising and print conferences over the past 15 years. He was very involved in the aftermath of the decision to convert daily papers in four southern cities to tri-weeklies and has been an outspoken critic of that

decision. A column he wrote in October ultimately saved newspapers in America metro areas from losing financial backing. In 2012, He was called “America’s customer service crusader” by one magazine after his legendary battles with some of America’s biggest companies over the past two years. Publishers’ Auxiliary called him “probably the most popular and effective speaker among community newspaper publishers today” in a column three years ago. His popularity has grown immensely since then. He’s become a successful publisher in his own right, first with periodicals for teenagers in the 90s and more recently with a new venture as founder and managing partner of Grade A Media, who’s goal is to get more elementary school children to read newspapers. He’s worn many hats through the years. Publishers, ad agency executive, speaker, trainer and advocate for the newspaper industry. Don’t miss this opportunity to see Kevin in person. Kevin Vaughan Kevin Vaughan, senior reporter for I-News Network, is known for his narrative storytelling skills. He has been a Pulitzer Prize finalist and reported many of Colorado’s most important news stories during two decades as a reporter at four Colorado newspapers: The Fort Morgan Times, The Coloradoan in Fort Collins, the Rocky Mountain News and The Denver Post. Jim Trotter Jim Trotter, I-News program director, has edited a Pulitzer Prize winning story and an Emmy-winning documentary. He’s been a metro newspaper columnist and a public affairs TV show editorial director. He was senior editor for enterprise at the Rocky Mountain News and then oversaw enterprise reporting in 13 western states for the Associated Press. Judy Muller Award-winning broadcast journalist Judy Muller is a professor at USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. Previously, she was a correspondent for ABC News for fifteen years, Muller reporting for such broadcasts as World News with Peter Jennings, Nightline and 20/20. From 1980 to 1990, she was a correspondent for CBS News, reporting for the radio network and for the television broadcast Sunday Morning. She is also a commenta-

tor for NPR’s “Morning Edition” and APR’s “Marketplace Money”. For the last five years, she has been a contributing correspondent to KCET TV’s “SoCal Connected,” where her reporting has won numerous honors, including a George Foster Peabody award, a Columbia DuPont, an Emmy and two Golden MICs. Her latest book, about weekly newspapers in America, is entitled “Emus Loose in Egnar: Big Stories from Small Towns” (July, 2011, Univ. of Nebraska Press). She is also the author of “Now This – Radio, Television and the Real World” (Putnam). Prior to coming to USC, Muller was a correspondent for ABC Network News, reporting for such broadcasts as Nightline, World News Tonight with Peter Jennings, Good Morning America, and This Week. During her 15 years at ABC, she covered such stories as the Rodney King beating trial, the Presidential campaigns of Paul Tsongas and Bob Kerrey, the Los Angeles earthquake in 1994, the O.J. Simpson case, and numerous environmental stories throughout the West. From 1981 to 1990, Ms. Muller was a correspondent for CBS News, where she was a contributor to CBS Sunday Morning and CBS Weekend News. Her primary duties, however, were in the Radio News Division, where she anchored a daily commentary, “First Line Report,” “Correspondent’s Notebook,” and was the summer anchor for “The Osgood File.” She also covered the space shuttle program, both national political conventions in 1988 and the 1988 Bush Presidential Campaign. Ms. Muller was previously an anchor/reporter for KHOWAM in Denver and WHWH in Princeton, New Jersey. She began her career in journalism as a reporter for the Colonial News in Princeton, New Jersey. From 1970 to 1973, she was a high school English teacher in Metuchen, New Jersey. A 1969 graduate of Mary Washington College of the University of Virginia, Ms. Muller has received numerous journalism honors, including an Emmy award for coverage of the O.J. Simpson case and an Edward R. Murrow award for coverage of the impeachment of President Clinton. Travis Mayfield Travis Mayfield is the Director of Digital Social Strategy at Fisher Interactive Network where he oversees the social media and digital efforts for all of Fisher Communications’ broadcast properties in Washington, Oregon, California and Idaho. Travis started his career in broadcast journalism at NBC’s Today Show in New York City, followed up with a year at KHQ-TV in Spokane all while still attending

Gonzaga University. After earning a degree from GU Travis went to Montana where he produced, reported and anchored for NBC Montana. Travis returned to Washington Mayfield to work as a special projects reporter at KNDO-TV in Yakima before again winding up in Spokane to work as KXLYTV’s consumer reporter. For the past 6 years Travis has been in Seattle where he first served as a reporter for KOMO 4 News and KOMO News radio. He was then promoted to Community Network Manager, Executive Producer and now to his current role as Director of Digital Social Strategy for the entire company. Travis’ work has been honored by the Society of Professional Journalists, the Associated Press and National Academy of Television Arts and Science. Travis was also honored in 2012 to receive a Fisher Communications “Innovation” award. Follow Travis on Twitter and Instagram @TravisMayfield Doug Bell Doug Bell started his newspaper career on the sports staff of a small daily south of Pittsburgh, Pa. His career has spanned 34 years and many jobs, including long stints as copy desk chief at Denver’s two dailies and news Bell editor jobs in Boulder and Greeley. Currently he serves as editor of the four weekly newspapers based in Evergreen. Bell has a strong interest in ethics and First Amendment issues and received the SPJ First Amendment Award in 2008. He has been a frequent guest speaker in college ethics classes and was one of the authors of the Denver Post ethics policy. For the past 23 years, Bell has served as an adjunct faculty member at Metropolitan State University; he also is on the advisory board for the journalism certificate at Arapahoe Community College. Bell serves as advocacy chair for the Colorado Pro chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and is a member of the philanthropic advisory committee for the Colorado Press Association. Outside work, his hobbies include ice hockey and tennis, as well as taking care of a demandSee SPEAKERS on page 4


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2 0 1 3 C O L O R A D O P R E S S A S S O C I AT I O N A N N U A L C O N V E N T I O N SPEAKERS from Page 3 ing cat and a very active canine. Bell’s wife, Christa, works in corporate communications for United Launch Alliance. Raj Chohan Raj Chohan is an attorney and recovering journalist. He practices law at the Denver offices of Baker Hostetler. Formerly, he was an award winning news reporter at CBS News Corporation’s Denver television station KCNC where Chohan he spent more than a decade covering politics, crime and breaking news.  Raj also hosts and moderates Colorado Public Television’s (PBS Channel 12) Emmy Award winning discussion series “Colorado Inside Out.” Jim Anderson Jim Anderson is The Associated Press news editor for Colorado, Wyoming and Montana. Anderson previously was bureau chief in Venezuela and reported elsewhere in Latin America and the Caribbean, including Colombia, Cuba, Haiti, Mexico and Peru. He has served in Los Angeles and New York and also worked at The Miami Herald. Gil Asakawa Gil Asakawa is Manager of Student Media at the University of Colorado in Boulder. And serves as adviser to www.cuindependent.com, the student-run news website. He is an experienced journalist, editor, author and blogger who covers Asian American issues and culture in Asakawa several blogs and social media. His main blog is the Nikkei View at www.Nikkeiview. com), and he also posts articles to HuffingtonPost Denver. He can also be found at gilasakawa. tumblr.com, and he’s active on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and many other forgotten sites and platforms. He is a nationally known speaker, panelist and expert on Asian American issues and social media. He served as the Editorial Board Chair for the Pacific Citizen and a member of the national Board for the JACL, and is currently the Chair of the Society of Professional Journalists’ Digital Media Committee. He was a founding member and president of AAJA-Denver and is the Diversity Chair of SPJ-Colorado. He is co-author of “The Toy Book” (Knopf, 1991) and author of “Being Japanese American” (Stone Bridge Press, 2004).

Scenes from a Convention Matt Sandberg (Summit Daily News), right, and Craig Zablocki share a shirt to make a point during Zablocki’s keynote address at the 2012 Colorado Press Association Annual Convention. Photo by Thomas Cooper

Hotel Information Westin Hotel Rate: $129/ night, complimentary inroom wireless Visit the CPA website at coloradopressassociation.com for a link to online booking, or choose lodging when registering online. Hotel block cut-off is Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2013. Book rooms now for the best rate.

Jim Brady Jim Brady is the Editor-inChief of Digital First Media -- which operates the Journal Register Company and MediaNews Group -- and oversees the editorial strategy and operations of its 75 daily newspapers, 292 non-daily publications and 341 online sites. As part of the role, Brady is also Brady

overseeing the launch of Project Thunderdome, which will redefine how DFM produces journalism for the digital age by creating a centralized team that produces high-quality non-local journalism for all DFM properties on all platforms. Before joining DFM, Brady served as general manager of TBD, a new local news operation dedicated to comprehensive coverage of the Washington, D.C. region that combines the values of traditional journalism and the power of citizen journalism. Brady joined TBD after more than four years as executive editor of washingtonpost.com, where he led the site to numerous awards and accolades. As general manager of TBD, Brady was responsible for the business operations and editorial oversight of both TBD.com and TBD TV, a 24-hour local cable news station. On both platforms, TBD’s original journalism is supplemented with strong partnerships with other local news organizations and more than 175 area bloggers. TBD has quickly gained a reputation for innovative ways of covering local news, and gained high marks for its commitment to social media and engaging with its community in meaningful ways. TBD has also

displayed a strong commitment to mobile, with highly regarded applications for the iPhone and Droid. During Brady’s tenure as executive editor of washingtonpost.com, the site won a national Emmy award for its Hurricane Katrina coverage, a Peabody Award for its “Being a Black Man” series, an Editor & Publisher award for Best Overall Newspaper-Affiliated Web Site, two Digital Edge awards for Best Overall News Site, a KnightBatten Award for Innovations in Journalism, two Scripps Howard Foundation National Journalism Awards, four Edward R. Murrow Awards for Best Non-Broadcast Affiliated Web Site, and more than 100 White House News Photographers video awards. Brady also served as sports editor and assistant managing editor for news at washingtonpost.com from 1995 to 1999. In between his stints at washingtonpost.com, Brady spent more than four years at America Online, serving as Group Programming Director, News & Sports; Executive Director, Editorial Operations; and Vice President, Production & Operations. During his time at AOL, Brady was in charge of

the service’s coverage of the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the 2000 presidential election. Brady earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Print Journalism from The American University in 1989. Born in Queens, N.Y. and raised in Huntington, N.Y., Brady now lives with his wife, Joan, in Great Falls, Va. Mike Newland Mike joined the Telegraph Herald in March 2005 as the Circulation Manager and was named Circulation Director in 2007 and Operations Director in 2010. A veteran of the newspaper industry, Mike has held executive circulation positions with Howard Publications, Partnership Press (Ames Tribune), Lee Enterprises Inc. and Woodward Communications Inc. He serves on a variety of boards including Junior Achievement and Northern States Circulation Managers’ Association. In 2010, Mike received the distinguished H.G. “Lefty” Hymes Award from NSCMA. Mike has a BS in Business Administration from Upper Iowa University.


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60 Minutes tackles Times-Picayune

DEATH

My 13-year-old son received an iPod watched it again. Then I watched Touch for Christmas this year. I know it and took notes. In less than 11 my son. Probably as well as I’ve ever seconds, Morley Safer said, referknown anyone. And I knew, given time, ring to newspapers, “virtually an he would lose his expensive gift. entire industry in free-fall.” In an effort to The story, of course, was about soften the blow the Times-Picayne’s move from a when the device did daily to a three days a week publiturn up missing, I cation. I was especially interested Kevin Slimp Morley referring had Zachary cre- Safer said, because sometoofnewspapers, the folks in“virtuthe ally an entire industry in free-fall.” ate a background story were the same folks who The story, of course, was the Times-PicInstitute of screen with the contacted me about back when the shift ayne’s move from daily to a three days a week pubfind wasa announced. Newspaper Technology words, “If you lication. I was especially interested because some Steve Newhouse declined to of be kevin@kevinslimp.com this iPod, please the folks in theinterviewed story were the folks who email kevin@kevforsame the story. Thatconjob tacted me backfell when the Amoss, shift was longtime announced. kevin inslimp.com to let to Jim editor Instead we spent most of our conversation talkyear-old son received an iPod Touch for knowSteve slimp my dad you Newhouse of thedeclined paper. to be interviewed for his newand job several in Orange County.but OCR is fell to first Jim Amoss, longtime edi- ing about this year. I know my son. Probably publisher managers, have as it.” the story. That jobSafer’s question to Amoss one of the 20 biggest papers in the country. tor of the paper. ever known anyone. And I knew, given received no response. I had to tell you seemed simple enough. “Did you agree Rob hasFinally, left his role as onlinetoguru serveRob as one Safer’s first question to Amoss seemed simple ould lose his expensive gift. I decided talkto with that story, so you with the decision to start publishing deputy deputy editors of the paper. He explained ort to soften the blow when the device enough. “Did you agree with the decision to start of five Curley, editor of the Orange would understand three days a week?” that, since July,Register OCR has(OCR), increased its newsroom p missing, I had Zachary create a back- publishing three days a week?” County whose resume the reference to my son a little further interview staff room 185 writers and editors to 300. I’m listening toI’m thislistening interview to forthis the fourth timefor the een with the words, “If you find this includes more experience in online down this column.to let my as I write. Andfourth I write. And for the life I could write several columns about the changes for the time life ofas me, I still haven’t heard e email kevin@kevinslimp.com journalism than anyone I can think of. In the of question. me, I stillHe haven’t him answerat OCR, butisI acan sense Rob’s excitement when he answer the gave heard what sounded you have it.” Now for story number two.him Rob household name and I figured late 90s,soI left newspaper the question. He gave whatI sounded discussed his work with America’s “largest comto mefor likea a “packaged” response, the kind might to tell you that story, you the would under- world he could give me insight on whatever to befurther director of communicame like munity newspaper,” a description credited to Ken have written years ago. a “packaged” response, the kind eference to few my years son a little down it is I’m missing related to The Timestions for the United Methodist Church ago. I Brusic, executive editor. It remindedI might me so have muchwritten of my years son, when n. to ainterviewing non-daily. Carl in my part of the States.asked I hadwhere his iPod It reminded me so my AfterPicayune spendingconversion my afternoon was, knowing fullmuch well itofhad story number two. In the lateUnited 90s, I left Instead we spent most our constaff thatyears created publications, online when I askedthewhere his places iPod was, Redman and Rob Curley, I found itofdiffi cult to unlost. He son, told me all about possible aper world afor a few to be direc- been versation talking about his new jobasin content, material and a newspaper. fullcoming well it out hadand been lost. Hederstand why Safer referred to newspapers “dyan iPod couldknowing be, without telling munications for theP.R. United Methodist of the most allearlier. about the possible places an ing.” Orange County. OCR is one of the 20 me he’d lost it told a fewme days my part ofSome the United States.interesting I had a aspects biggest papers in to theunderstand country. after readit even harder I felt wantedbe, Amoss to tell us what of my jobonline camecontent, under the of for him. iPodI could without coming out and I found reated publications, P.R.heading has left his role as that online ing a storyRob in News & Tech today six guru of eight he really thought, oneme way the itother. I got d a newspaper. Some of the most inter“crisis communication. ” telling he’or d lost a fewAll days earlier. to serve as one of five deputy editors infrom listening to his interview wasI that the industry cts of my job came undercommunication the heading of director, As crisis I I felt for him. wanted Amoss to publicly traded newspaper companies showed of paper. Heprices explained that,Not since July, creases the in their stock in 2012. small inwas grappling tell withusoptions. Safer equated what one was way munication.” prepared the organization for emergenwhat he really thought, has increased its newsroom staff creases,OCR but double-digit increases. happening to surgery, where All all the limbs are listening ampu- to communication director, prepared cies we hopedIwe’ d neverthesee. Several or the other. I got from room 185with writers to 300. talking folksand whoeditors are excited about tated by artificialwas limbs. n for emergencies we professionals hoped we’d never thousand made up theand replaced his interview that the industry was I love I could write several columns about working for their newspapers. I visited with two In an open letter to Advance, the paper’s parent l thousandclergy professionals made up the and staffs of these congregations grappling with options. Safer equated newspapers in Virginia and Kentucky the past company, high le citizenstoofsurgery, New Orthe changes at OCR, but I canover sense staffs of these it was andcongregations it was my joband to be sure they were several what wasprofi happening where to excitement work with their staffhe s. Both papershis are namesare thatamputated you would and know, be sure they wereinready in the of event of leans, Rob’s when discussed ready the event a “media event.including ”I allmany the limbs re- few weeks doing well and continue to invest in the future. wrote that “Th e Newhouses are losing the trust of vent.” I was quite adept at getting TV work with America’s “largest commuwas quite adept at getting TV reporters placed by artificial limbs. coincidence that that invest in the the community.” In an open letter to Advance, the It’s no o report justtoabout anything. Newspapers nity newspaper, ” apapers description credited report just about anything. Newspathrive. And while the Orange County RegisDavid Carr, New York Times reporter, said, “I future to quick - you might say “gullible” - to acKen Brusic, executive editor. pers weren’t as quick - you might say paper’s parent company, several high America’s largestmy community paper, you hing as the truth, so I generally used tele- don’t think they expected the hurricane winds that ter may beAfter spending afternoon inter“gullible” - to accept everything as the profile citizens of New Orleans, includcan betviewing that thousands of community papers will came against them.” et information out to the masses. Carl Redman and Rob Curley, generally used inginterview many names would continue to serve their communities and why surprise Yet to in a radio from that a fewyou weeks ago,know, ant I wouldtruth, create so textI that ministers andtelevision I found it difficult to understand get information to the that manager “The Newhouses are losingMorley Safer at the same time. David Francis,wrote business for the NOLA to use if called by a memberout of the me-masses. Safer referred to newspapers as “dying.” This meant I would create text that the trust of the community. ” My suggestion? your readers that your a crisis. They were always instructed, if Media Group, of which The Times-Picayune is a I found Remind it even harder to understand ministers and others were to use if David Carr, New York Times providing a vital service to the & community r wanted more information than I had part, said that New Orleans is “embracing us again.” paper isafter reading a story in News Tech called by a member of the mediaIduring reporter, said, “I don’teditor thinkofthey called Carl Redman, executive The as it has for years. And, perhaps, take a cue from o contact me directly. today that six of eight publicly traded were come alwaysininstructed, expected hurricane winds that came the folks in Orange County and continue to invest Advocate in Baton Rougethe to ask him about the new anding thata crisis. story They will also newspaper companies showed increases if the reporter wanted more informathem.”created by the Baton in the future. daily paper inagainst New Orleans ou read further. in their stock prices in 2012. Not small than I hadwith provided, Yet inreports a radiothat interview from Rouge me paper. Redman his group wasa few night I was tion having dinner a friendto contact increases, but double-digit increases. DavidtoFrancis, business by theago, response the new daily. a text thatdirectly. read, “Are you watching 60 overwhelmed weeks I love talking with folks who are Understanding that story will also manager for the NOLA Media Group, They had hoped for a circulation of 10,000 by Febexcited about working for their newsruary 2013. Instead, more 10,000 subscribed as my immediate response. come in handy as you read further. of which Thethan Times-Picayune is a part, Kentucky Press Association Convention papers. I visited with two newspapers to the newspaper a week. Between home de- us saying the newspaper industry is dead. I dinner So last night I was having saidwithin that New Orleans is “embracing in Virginia and Kentucky over the past Michigan Press Association copy u’d want towith know.” a friend when I got a textlivery that and single again. ” sales, The Advocate currently few weeks to work with their staffs. reaches approximately 20,000 each executive day. minutes came from Karen read, an “Areemail you watching 60 Minutes?” I called Carlhomes Redman, AlbertaareSymposium, Edmonton Both papers doing well and conI tried to reach someone The Times-Picayune, he Paris Post-Intelligencer in immediate West Ten- response. “No,” was my editor of TheatAdvocate in Baton Rouge tinue to invest in thePress future. sending emailstotoask thehim publisher managd you see 60 Minutes? a story Tennessee Association “They’reIt’s saying theabout newspaper aboutand theseveral new daily paper It’s no coincidence that papers that but received response. Picayune. Th ey’re saying newspapers are you’ers, industry is dead. I thought d want in no New Orleans created by the Baton Colorado PressAnd Association Finally, I decided to talk with Rob Curley, depinvest in the future thrive. while to know.” Rouge paper. Redman reports that uty editor of the Orange County Register (OCR), ning continued like that with texts, the Orange County Register may be Within minutes came an email his group was overwhelmed by the TCNA, San Antonio includes more online calls arriving concerned America’s largest community paper, fromfrom Karen Geary ofviewers the Pariswhose Post- resumeresponse to theexperience new daily.inThey had journalism than anyone I can think of. Rob is a r. you can bet that thousands of commukevin@ Intelligencer in West Tennessee. “Did hoped for a circulation of 10,000 by rning, I found the 12 minute clip online household name and I figured he could give me nity papers will continue to serve their kevinslimp.com you see 60 Minutes? It’s a story about February 2013. Instead, more than ed it. Then I watched it again. Then I insight on whatever it is I’m missing related to The communities and surprise Morley Safer The Times-Picayune. They’re saying 10,000 subscribed to the newspaper and took notes. In less than 11 seconds, Times-Picayune conversion to a non-daily. to yourtime. next conference or training event! at Kevin the same newspapers are dead.” within a week. Between home delivery Invite My suggestion? Remind your readThe evening continued like that with and single copy sales, The Advocate ers that your paper is providing a vital texts, emails and calls arriving from currently reaches approximately 20,000 service to the community as it has for concerned viewers near and far. homes each day. years. And, perhaps, take a cue from This morning, I found the 12 minute I tried to reach someone at The the folks in Orange County and conclip online and watched it. Then I Times-Picayune, sending emails to the

Minutes Tackles Times-Picayune

Coming Soon...

I wanted (Times-Picayune Editor Jim) Amoss to tell us what he really thought, one way or the other. All I got from listening to his interview was that the industry was grappling with options. (Morley) Safer equated what was happening to surgery, where all the limbs are amputated and replaced by artificial limbs.”

About Kevin Slimp Kevin Slimp wears many hats. To some, he’s the director of the internationallyrecognized Institute of Newspaper Technology. To others, he’s a syndicated columnist whose columns are carried by more than 60 industry-related journals throughout the world. Others have heard him keynote one or more of hundreds of publishing, advertising and print conferences over the past 15 years. He was very involved in the aftermath of the decision to convert daily papers in four southern cities to tri-weeklies and has been an outspoken critic of that decision. A column he wrote in October ultimately saved newspapers in America metro areas from losing financial backing. In 2012, He was called “America’s customer service crusader” by one magazine after his legendary battles with some of America’s biggest companies over the past two years. Publishers’ Auxiliary called him “probably the most popular and effective speaker among community newspaper publishers today” in a column three years ago. His popularity has grown immensely since then. He’s become a successful publisher in his own right, first with periodicals for teenagers in the 90s and more recently with a new venture as founder and managing partner of Grade A Media, who’s goal is to get more elementary school children to read newspapers. He’s worn many hats through the years. Publishers, ad agency executive, speaker, trainer and advocate for the newspaper industry. Don’t miss this opportunity to see Kevin in person.

Kevin’s 2013 CPA Convention Schedule Friday, Feb. 22, 2013 10:15 a.m. - Noon Teach Me Even More Photoshop During this session, Kevin will focus on skills and tools that often get overlooked in Photoshop, but can enhance the quality of your photos and ads. Depending on the length of the session, Kevin can go everywhere from the basics of editing newspaper photos to features and tools that even Photoshop veterans will love. 2:15 - 3:15 p.m. Even More InDesign for Newspaper Designers Kevin keeps finding new features and tools to teach even the most experienced InDesign user. Novices and veterans of InDesign feel equally at home during this session that is great for users of any version of Adobe InDesign. 3:30 - 4:30 p.m. Finding and Fixing Problems in PDF Files We all run into them from time to time. Those dreaded problem PDF file. Learn from the guy who started the whole PDF craze back in the early 90s. Saturday, Feb. 23, 2013 10:30 a.m. - Noon Customer Service: A Common Sense ApproachKevin was called “America’s Customer Service Crusader” by one magazine in 2012. See why top executives from companies including AT&T, Delta, USAir and other cringe when they hear Kevin is calling and see why they utilize what they learn from him to become more customer oriented.


6

colorado editor

January 2013

cpa board Annual Meeting: 7:30 a.m. – 9 a.m. Friday, February 22, 2013 Westin Denver Downtown – Lawrence A Meeting topics: CPA Philanthropic Committee Update, NNA Update, CPA Leadership Election, CPA/SYNC2 Media Financial Overview, Lifetime CPA Membership Nominations The Colorado Press Association Nomination Committee recommended a slate of candidates for annual board election to be held Friday, Feb. 22 during the annual convention. The committee, established according to CPA bylaws, includes the immediate five past CPA presidents. This year’s committee members are: Jeanette Chavez – formerly of The Denver Post, Dean Lehman – Longmont Times-Call, Steve Henson – The Pueblo Chieftain, Tom Bredehoft – The Flagler News and Randy Sunderland – Delta County Independent. Candidates are nominated by industry peers during the “call for nomination” period in the fall, and selected by the Nomination Committee in December.

PRESIDENT Bryce Jacobson Publisher, Craig Daily Press jacobson@craigdailypress.com Bryce Jacobson started in the newspaper business at age 8, delivering the Journal-Advocate in Sterling. He later worked in the newspaper’s mailroom and circulation department, and was named circulation manager in 1998. Jacobson worked in the circulation departments at the Star-Herald in Scottsbluff,Neb., and later was with the Denver Newspaper Agency until 2006 when he was named publisher of the Craig Daily Press. He serves as President of the Board of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Northwest Colorado and is a member of the Kiwanis Club of Craig. Jacobson is the father of two children, Peyton, age 11 and Bayley, age 7. Jacobson was elected to the board in 2009. He served as Treasurer in 2011, and Vice President in 2012.

Regular CPA members may vote in person or by proxy at the annual meeting in February.

VICE PRESIDENT Terri House terri@pagosasun.com

Proxy forms and voting information will be emailed to all members on Monday, January 14, 2013.

Terri House began her newspaper career at The SUN at age 15, working in the mailroom. She held the positions of advertising manager, general manager and assistant publisher before purchasing the newspaper in 2003. Service to her community is of utmost importance to House. She received the Pagosa Springs Volunteer of the Year Award in 2008 and Citizen of the Year in 1996. She has served as President of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southwest Colorado and received the Mashaw’s Magic Moments Award in 2010. House has served as Council Chair of United Way, board of directors of Archuleta County Fair, Western Heritage Committee producing the Red Ryder Roundup Rodeo, Operation Helping Hand Christmas charity, the Prevention Coalition and Reach for the Peaks balloon rally among others. She is currently President-Elect of Pagosa Springs Rotary Club and serves on the advisory council of Southwest Colorado Community College.  Terri was elected to the board of Colorado Press Association in 2009. She served as Secretary in 2011 and Treasurer in 2012.

For information about the board of directors or the nomination and election process, contact Samantha Johnston at 303-571-5117 or by email at sjohnston@ colopress.net.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE CHAIR Brenda Brandt Publisher, The Holyoke Enterprise bbholent@chase3000.com Before beginning her newspaper career, Brandt earned a Bachelor of Science degree in education, with a double major in math and journalism from the University of Nebraska-Kearney in 1977. She taught high school math and journalism at Aurora, Neb. high school for two years, also serving as sponsor for the high school yearbook and newspaper. Brandt joined The Enterprise in 1979 as news editor and added the managing editor responsibilities in 1980. In 1994, she assumed the advertising manager›s role and became publisher. In 1999, Brenda and her sister and brother-in-law (Lori and Russ Pankonin) purchased Johnson Publications (Holyoke Enterprise, Imperial Republican, Grant Tribune-Sentinel and Wauneta Breeze) from Loral and Elna Johnson (Brenda and Lori›s parents). Brandt was appointed to the Board in September 2007 to fill a vacancy. She served as Board secretary in 2009, treasurer in 2010, Vice President in 2011, and President in 2011 and 2012.

TREASURER Keith Cerny Publisher, Valley Courier, Alamosa krcemail@aol.com Keith Cerny is publisher of the Valley Courier in Alamosa. He is also a division manager for News Media Corporation with oversight of nine newspapers in Colorado and Wyoming, including a daily, six weeklies and a shopper in the San Luis Valley. Prior to moving to Alamosa in 1992, Cerny served on the Wyoming Press As-

sociation Board of Directors while publisher in Evanston and Lusk, WY. Cerny sits on the Adams State College Foundation Board, is president of the ASC Grizzly Club Board, Alamosa County Economic Development Board, Creede Theatre Board, SLV Arts and Entertainment Committee, San Luis Valley Regional Council for El Pomar Foundation and the Alamosa Rotary Club. He was appointed to the CPA Board of Directors in 2009 to fill a vacancy, and was elected to a four-year term in 2010. He served as Secretary in 2012. SECRETARY Bart Smith Publisher, Greeley Tribune bsmith@greeleytribune.com Smith became publisher of the Greeley Tribune in 2007, and soon after was named general manager of the newspaper group for Swift Communications that includes the weekly Windsor Now, and the Fence Post weekly agriculture publications and websites in Colorado and Nebraska, as well as two agriculture weeklies in South Dakota. After earning a journalism degree from the University of Wyoming just up the road from Greeley and stints in Rawlins and Lander, Wyo., Smith moved on to Whitefish, Mont., Coeur d’Alene, Idaho and Roseburg, Ore. in editor and publisher roles before circling back to the Rockies. Smith got hooked on newspapers as a young U.S. Army correspondent in Vietnam in 1971. He is past president of the Montana Press Association and chaired the News Education Committee of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association. He is a former member of the National Press Photographers Association and the National Conference of Editorial Writers. Smith lives in Greeley with his wife and a daughter attending college. His oldest daughter is a reporter for the Summit Daily News in Frisco, Co.

HOLDOVER DIRECTORS DIRECTOR Mark Drudge mdrudge@cortezjournal.com Mark Drudge started his newspaper career in 1986 with the Glenwood Post as a Circulation District Manager and soon moved to the advertising department working as a Sales Account Executive for several years. In the late 90s, he moved back to the circulation side working as Circulation Director for the Western Slope Publishing Group. He held is first Publisher position at the Rifle Citizen Telegram in 2000.

Drudge left Colorado for a few years where he worked as both a publisher and a sales manager in York, Nebraska and Newton, Iowa. Following his desire to return to the mountains and be closer to his children, Drudge joined the Cortez Journal as sales manager in March of 2010. Drudge hold a BS from Ball State University. He loves to trout fish, and to get off road in his 1971 Toyota Land Cruiser. He has played the banjo since very young and he played and recorded in several working bluegrass bands over the years. He has two daughters, Kelly, in Battlement Mesa and Katie, in Guam with the US Air Force. DIRECTOR Laurena Mayne Davis laurena.davis@gjsentinel.com Laurena Mayne Davis was appointed in May 2011 to fill the position vacated by Harrison Cochran. Mayne Davis began her journalism career as a graduate assistant writing and editing stories for Northern Arizona University’s Graduate College magazine. She later was a full-time journalism lecturer at NAU with a news writing focus. Mayne Davis was hired as a copy editor at The Grand Junction Sentinel in 1994 and was promoted to features editor in January 2000. Mayne Davis left The Sentinel in 2003 to be an instructor of mass communication at Mesa State College (now Colorado Mesa University), where she continues as adjunct faculty. She spent time working at Community Hospital as a pool writer and editor. Mayne Davis is currently the managing editor at The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel. She holds a BA in Humanities from Mesa State College and an MA in English from Northern Arizona University. DIRECTOR Paula Murphy Publisher, Trinidad Times Independent paulamurphy@ratonrange.com Trinidad Times Independent and Raton Range publisher Paula Murphy was appointed to the Colorado Press Association Board of Directors in October 2011 to replace Bob Moore who resigned when he accepted a position in El Paso, Texas. The CPA appointment – Murphy’s first in Colorado – follows her New Mexico Press Association board membership from 1998-2001 and presidency in 2001. She sits on the New Mexico Foundation for Open Government Board of Directors. Murphy began her newspaper career in 1985 when she joined the staff of The Raton Range in Raton, N.M. She worked with The Range until 1989 when she left to pursue other opportunities. In 1991, she returned to the Range and accepted the position of Advertising Director. In 1997, she was promoted to publisher. Murphy and her husband Tom purchased The Raton Range and Trinidad Plus


colorado editor

January 2013 in 2001 from Boone Newspapers. She turned the weekly Trinidad Plus news/shopper into the twice-weekly subscription-based Trinidad Times Independent. Murphy and her husband also own and operate a cablecast television station, Trinidad Times TV in partnership with the newspaper. DIRECTOR Curtis Hubbard chubbard@denverpost.com Curtis Hubbard oversees The Denver Post’s daily editorial and opinion pages and Sunday Perspective section. He was elected to the board of directors in 2012 for a two-year term. A Colorado native, Hubbard has covered news and politics in the Interior West since 1993. Prior to joining The Post, he worked as a local news editor at the Boulder Daily Camera and as editor at the Jackson Hole (Wyo.) Guide. He joined The Post in 2004 as state editor, where he oversaw the paper’s out-state bureaus and Denver-based reporters and columnists. From 2007 until January of 2011, he served as the paper’s politics editor, handling the newspaper’s election coverage and reporters covering federal and state government, Denver City Hall and transportation. Hubbard served on the Wyoming Press Association Board of Directors during his time at the Jackson Hole Guide. Hubbard earned a bachelor’s degree in Creative Writing from Beloit (Wis.) College, where he minored in journalism, and is a graduate of Cherry Creek High School. He lives in Louisville with his wife and two daughters.

TWO-YEAR DIRECTORS DIRECTOR Matt Lubich Executive Editor, Co-Owner, The Johnstown Breeze mlubich@johnstownbreeze.com Matt Lubich is the Executive Editor and co-owner of The Johnstown Breeze. He has co-owned The Breeze with his wife, Lesli Bangert, since 1997. The 108-year-old weekly newspaper has been covering the communities of Johnstown and Milliken (Colo.) and surrounding Weld and Larimer counties since 1904. Lubich grew up in Pueblo, Colo., where his first job in the business was driving a Sunday morning contract delivery route for the Pueblo Chieftain; filling racks and newsstands around town. A graduate in 1986 with a degree in journalism from the University

of Northern Colorado, Lubich was voted the “Most Promising Freshman Journalism Student” and also was once introduced to someone by UNC J-School professor Dave Anderson as “my most recalcitrant student.” Lubich had to go home and look up recalcitrant. He worked at the Evans Star Press and for legendary Colorado editor Percy Connaroe at The Lafayette News in the late 1980s. Returning to Colorado in 1991 from New Mexico, he wandered into the Breeze one day looking for freelance work. He eventually became the paper’s editor, before he and his wife purchased it from Clyde and Ardis Briggs in 1997. In 2002, and again in 2005, The Breeze won the General Excellence Award for small weeklies from The Colorado Press Association. Lubich and Bangert have two daughters, Riley, a freshman at Montana State University in Bozeman, and Harper Lee, a junior at Roosevelt High School in Johnstown. Lubich was appointed to the board in September 2012 to fill a vacancy. DIRECTOR Don Lindley Managing Editor, The Durango Herald Dlindley@durangoherald.com Don Lindley moved to Colorado in 2010 to become managing editor of The Durango Herald. Before that, he had a long career with daily newspapers in Florida working as an environmental reporter, editorial writer, managing editor and executive editor. He serves on the board of directors of the National Freedom of Information Coalition and is an active member of the Colorado Freedom of Information Council. In Florida, he served eight years on the board of the Florida Society of News Editors as its FOI chair. He also was a trustee of Florida’s First Amendment Foundation for 12 years and chaired the FAF board from 2006 to 2010. A native of Milwaukee, Wis., Lindley holds a B.A. in political science from Yale University and a M.S. in journalism from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. He lives in Durango with his wife.

7

cpa marketplace FOR SALE Small weekly in Colorado mountain community. Grosses about $96,000. Fixed costs about $46,000. Good opportunity for young couple starting out, or older “downsized” journalists. Easy news beats. Monopoly situation. All buildings and equipment included in sale price; you can walk in on Monday and put out a paper on Tuesday. Current owner will stick around to help with transition. Beautiful location, great for fishing, hunting and outdoor recreation. Excellent schools, low crime, no traffic. Price includes office building and residence. Price reduced to $220,000 from $270,000. Call 970-723-4404. EDITOR The Aspen Times is a modern day media company publishing daily and non-daily newspapers as well as glossy-cover magazines with companion websites that reach across the region, the country and the globe. We want a top-notch editor We are seeking an outgoing, locally minded personality to serve as the point person managing our veteran and talented editorial team; someone who knows how content connects with the communities and audiences we serve. The ideal candidate is someone who is hard-working and who possesses excellent news judgment, market awareness, a knack for understanding divergent audiences and the desire to try new things. Superior communication, coaching and leadership skills will enable the ideal candidate to effectively coach reporters, photographers, page designers and section editors to plan a high-quality local news lineup every day as well as partner with the general manager and the rest of the newspaper team. The ideal candidate will have experience with the dynamics of a sophisticated resort community and understand how top-quality content served across multiple platforms meets the needs of visitors, locals and second-homeowners. The ideal candidate will have demonstrated success in a newsroom management role and experience in both a daily and non-daily newsroom environment, as well an orientation to

digital. The right candidate will take pride in ensuring communication lines, internal and external, are wide open and customer service is top-notch. The position is full time with excellent benefits. If this is you, send your resume and a cover letter that answers the questions of why you are the right candidate and why you are interested in being the editor of the Aspen Times to: aspeneditor@cmnm.org. Aspen is both a world-renowned resort community and an historic mountain community located three hours from Denver. Home of world class ski resorts and events ranging from ESPN’s XGames to the Food & Wine Classic in Aspen to the Aspen Ideas Festival, it is a remarkable place that offers great opportunity for a forward-looking journalist. Remarkable outdoor recreation opportunities and scenic adventures are truly a step away. Aspen has a small town feel but with world-class amenities. The Aspen Times is part of Colorado Mountain News Media, a family-owned communications company. Visit our website at aspentimes. com and see what we’re about. ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR FOR THE GREELEY TRIBUNE Are you a strong teacher/coach who has a passion for developing sales talent? Are you a natural in building great business relationships within the community that you are a part of? Are you a leader who focuses on the positive? Are you an expert in recruiting the best staff? Are you happiest when you can lead by example? Are you experienced at developing results oriented solutions? We are seeking an Advertising Sales Director to join the Greeley Tribune’s talented and experienced management team. The Tribune is a seven-day community newspaper with a robust web site. Greeley is located in northern Colorado, 60 miles north of Denver. The role of the advertising sales director is to provide excellent leadership and guidance to our

individual account managers and support staff, focusing on the success of our advertisers and our business. We are looking for someone who can develop and execute marketing and strategic plans that result in a growing market leadership position for our company. We need a positive and enthusiastic person who will work closely with editorial and circulation staffs to ensure that our multimedia products connect advertisers to their audiences every day. As a part of Swift Communications, a privately-held community news organization operating local print products and internet sites, we offer an outstanding income and career opportunity for driven leaders plus a competitive benefit package including paid time off and medical coverage. Please email your resume and cover letter to Kari McKay at hr@ cmnm.org. EOE REPORTER/EDITOR WHO LOVES COLORADO LIVING A Northwest Colorado weekly newspaper is seeking a motivated reporter who wants to live in a great town — Meeker or Rangely. This person must be a self-starter with a strong work ethic, an insatiable sense of curiosity and a positive attitude. This person must also be a team player who takes pride in the craft and is focused on putting out great print and digital products. The ideal candidate has experience, can cover news and features, has solid photography skills and has a passion for community journalism. The 126-year-old Rio Blanco Herald Times (theheraldtimes.com) is privately owned and serves Rio Blanco County. The area features the headwaters of the White River National Forest, worldclass hunting and fishing and an extraordinary quality of life. It has a solid economy built around tourism, oil and gas exploration and agriculture. Full-time position. Competitive compensation package available. Salary is negotiable. Interested candidates should e-mail a resume, clips and salary requirements to Mitch Bettis at mitch@ theheraldtimes.com. No phone calls please. Equal Opportunity Employer/Drug Free Workplace.

The Holyoke

Enterprise Community Newspaper covering Phillips County in NE Colorado

Full-Service Commercial Printing 970-854-2811•holyokeenterprise.com


8

colorado editor

January 2013

2013 pre-legislative forum

House Minority Leader Mark Waller speaks about his legislative priorities for 2013 while, from left, Speaker of the House Mark Ferrandino, Senate Majority Leader John Morse and Senate President Bill Cadman look on.

Longtime Colorado newspaperman Bob Sweeney pressed the Governor about funding for K-12 education during the pre-legislative forum. Photos by Thomas Cooper

Business cards Letterhead Envelopes Postcards Sales fliers Circulation forms Rate cards Promotional brochures Presentation folders Special publications Invoices Carbonless forms

Daily Sentinel reporter Charles Ashby questions the Governor during the 17th Annual Colorado Press Association Pre-Legislative Forum held Dec. 14, 2012 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Denver.

we’ll BRING it TO you

FYI

conTacT uS 466 Yampa Avenue Craig, CO 81625 (970) 824-7031 Fax (970) 824-6810 www.craigdailypress.com

adverTiSing deadLineS

Cancellation deadline is the same as the order deadline. If an ad is cancelled after the deadline, there will be a charge equal to 50% of the cost of the space reservation.

Monday Ads Thursday, 4 p.m. Wednesday Ads Monday, 4 p.m. Friday Ads Wednesday, 4 p.m. Saturday Ads Wednesday, 4 p.m. Classified Ads One Day Prior, 3 p.m. Inserts 8 days prior to insertion date

Special Services • Advertising design and copywriting available at no additional charge. Photographs taken at no extra charge. (Must be scheduled one week prior to publication.) • Proofs and tearsheets provided on request. Terms of Payment • Net due 30 days from statement date, 1.5% per month (18% annum) will be charged on all past due accounts. • New advertisers who wish to establish an account must submit a credit application with acceptable credit references. • Advertising from accounts more than 30 days past due cannot be accepted unless cash payment is made. • Ads that require payment in advance include those from advertisers who have not established credit privileges and advertisers who have been placed on a cash-only basis; political ads; and going-outof-business, bankruptcy and transient ads (such as circus, carnival, etc.). These ads must be paid for by deadline. • Advertisers billed at contract rate who fail to fulfill the contract terms will be billed at the appropriate earned rate retroactively. All contract discounts are cancelled on advertising more than 60 days past due. • Applicant agrees to pay Steamboat Pilot & Today/ Steamboat Today/Craig Daily Press for all expenses they may incur to enforce collection of any amount due for advertising placed at open or contract rates including reasonable attorney’s fees and court costs in connection therewith. Legal Policies • The terms Steamboat Pilot & Today, Steamboat Today, and Craig Daily Press hereafter referred to as the “company,” as used herein are meant to include the newspapers and their related publications, their employees, owners, officers, agents, and contractors. • The company reserves the right to reject or cancel any advertisement at any time. • The company is not bound by any terms or conditions printed or otherwise appearing on order blanks, advertising forms or copy instructions

when in conflict with the terms and conditions on the company rate schedule. • The Advertiser and/or advertising agency agree to defend, indemnify and hold harmless the company against any and all liability, loss, or expense arising from claims including but not limited to libel, unfair competition, unfair trade practices, infringements of trademarks, copyrights, trade names, patents, plagiarism, or proprietary rights or violation of rights of privacy resulting from the publication of the advertiser’s advertisement. • The company shall not be liable for any failure to print, publish, or circulate all or part of any issue in which advertising accepted by the company is contained if the failure is due to circumstances beyond the control of the company. • The company shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. In the event of errors that materially affect the value of the advertisement, if at fault, the company will be responsible only for the space in which the error occurred. Liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any moneys paid for the advertisement. Any request for adjustment on billing that may be open to question must be made within the month following the month in which the purported error occurred. • Unfulfilled advertising contracts will be short-rated to appropriate earned level at end of contract term. • We reserve the right to revise advertising rates at any time. In the event advertising rates increase during contract term, Company will provide 30 days written notice to Advertiser. Advertisers who do not accept new rates may elect to cancel advertising agreement without penalty, by providing notice in writing to Company at least 10 days prior to the effective date of the new rates. • Advertising contracts will automatically renew for consecutive terms unless Advertiser notifies the Company in writing 10 days prior to contract expiration date.

{

FTP Site for ad delivery and retrieval

FTP address: ftp2.steamboatpilot. com username: advertiser Password: up2steam!

2011 ADVERTISING RATES (Rates effective Jan. 1, 2011)

All rates are per column inch Open Rate

2 ads per week $7.25 $6.52 $6.07 $5.73

Weekly Frequency Rates 4 Weeks 13 Weeks 26 Weeks 52 Weeks

National Rate (Commissionable 15

$10.70

Pickup Rate Any ad that publishes at

$6.85

1-7 Tabloid Pages Open Rate — $83 13 times — $78 26 times — $72 52 times — $67

Our publications are the source of news in Moffat County. Our newspapers are read throughout Moffat and Routt Counties and beyond. The Craig Daily Press is distributed Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Press run is 3550. Saturday Morning Press press run is 9500.

ASK ABOUT ADVERTISING IN OUR OTHER PRODUCTS:

2011 EDITION | A COMPLETE HUNTING GUIDE FOR NORTHWEST COLORADO | $5.00

8-32 Tabloid Pages Open Rate — $122 13 times — $116 26 times — $111 52 times — $104

percent to advertising agencies)

open rate in a Steamboat or Craig newspaper — Craig Daily Press, Saturday Morning Press, Steamboat Today or Steamboat Pilot & Today — may be picked up for one or more additional days in any of those newspapers within seven days for $6.85 per inch.

33-48 Tabloid Pages Open Rate — $166 13 times — $160 26 times — $155 52 times — $150

Annual Bulk Rates 129-388 inches 389-1249 inches 1250-3000 inches 3000+ inches

$8.75 $7.91 $7.30 $6.46

Community Service Organizations

$6.30

Must run contracted inches in twelve months. Signed contract agreement required. Unfulfilled contracts will be short-rated to appropriate earned level at end of contract term.

Partial run and limited zoning available for 30% surcharge. Call for current circulation figures.

COLOR RATES

Open Rate 28 Consecutive days: 1x1.5

$10.27 $6.97 Contract Rate $9.03 $8.40 $7.78

13 Weeks 26 Weeks 52 Weeks

Signed contract required. Unfulfilled contracts will be short-rated to the appropriate earned level at the end of the contract term.

REALTOR CLASSIFIED DISPLAY RATES

LEGAL PUBLICATION RATES

Open Rate 28 Consecutive days: 1x1.5

Publicly Supported Legals First Insertion Subsequent Insertions Privately Supported Legals All Insertions

HUNTING FAMILIES

Large Space Color Rates (18-70 column inches) Open 4 weeks 13 weeks 26 weeks 52 weeks $52 $38 $34 $32 $30 Spot Color $165 $120 $108 $100 $95 Full Color Small Space Color Rates (1-17 1-17 column inches, per column inch) Open 4 weeks 13 weeks 26 weeks 52 weeks Spot Color $3.78 $2.74 $2.46 $2.29 $2.17 Full Color $12.94 $9.38 $8.44 $7.85 $7.41

IN-COLUMN CLASSIFIED DISPLAY RATES

$4.75 $3.31

13 Weeks 26 Weeks 52 Weeks

$10.27

$10.27 $6.97 Realtor Rate $6.72

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Northwest Colorado:

THE STATE’S PREMIER HUNTING DESTINATION 1

Craig Daily Press P.O. Box 5 • Craig, Co 81626 – 466 Yampa Ave., Craig, CO 81625 970-824-7031 • fax 970-824-6810 www.craigdailypress.com

PLEASE PLACE YOUR AD BELOW CATEGORY______________________

Gotta have the paper!

C R A I G D A I L Y P R E S S 466 YAMPA

Rates are per thousand inserts

Signed agreement required. Unfulfilled contracts will be short-rated to the appropriate earned level at the end of the contract term. Four inch minimum size. A minimum of two identical ads must run each week.

Advertisements greater than 13.5" deep will be billed at the full page depth of 14"

EDITOR

PRE-PRINTED ADVERTISING INSERTS

CDP $10.00 SMP $10.50

STOP IN TODAY (466 YAMPA AVE) OR CALL AMY AT 824-2600

JOSHUA ROBERTS

}

Committed to a Community Partnership Since 1891 | Published Monday through Saturday.

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Craig Daily Press P.O. Box 5 Craig, CO 81626

Visit us online to view our product line and request a quote.

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T 970.875.1791 CRAIG, COLORADO 81625 F 970.824.6810

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Governor John Hickenlooper and Senate President Bill Cadman share a laugh before the 17th Annual Colorado Press Association prelegislative forum began Dec. 14, 2012.

January 2013 Colorado Editor  

Monthly publication of the Colorado Press Association

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