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July 2019 What’s Inside? Ministry in Motion: • •

Immigration/Refugees News from our 12 dioceses

Give It a Try - Ask me for a blessing Connections in Communion – Human Trafficking Imagine If… Do You Know? News from the Province: • •

Chuck Perfater Report from Executive Council

Up and Coming – Opportunities, Grants & Resources. From the Province Save the Dates!

Ministry in Motion – Focus on Immigration/Refugees The issues and calls for ministry in the areas of immigration and refugees are not limited to the horrors on our southern border which are being featured in our news. The Episcopal Church has served immigrants new to the U.S. since the late 1800s, when the Church opened port chaplaincies to minister to sojourners on both coasts. In the 1930’s, local parishes collected donations to provide steamship passage for those fleeing Nazi Europe. The work of the Episcopal Migration Ministries has a website with much information: https://episcopalmigrationministries.org/. You can sign up on the website to receive their newsletter. But what is happening in Province II? Where are we called to ministry? Here is one story from the Rev. Diana Wilcox of the Diocese of Newark. My day on Capitol Hill advocating for refugees and asylum seekers


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When I registered months ago for the Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action event in Washington, DC, none of us – the organizers or the participants – could have imagined that our work on behalf of refugees would come during such an explosive news week. Just days prior, our nation grappled with the horror of the image of Óscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez and his 23-month-old daughter, Valeria, lying face-down in the waters of the Rio Grande, having died as they tried to cross from Mexico to the United States. The sin of our government’s policies was displayed for us all to see as I arrived on Capitol Hill to be trained and deployed for meetings with my state’s senators and representatives. The event was organized by Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMM), for which I am the diocesan liaison, and the Office of Government Relations (OGR) of The Episcopal Church. Having grown up in the DC area, and as a former employee of lobbying organizations and contractors for the US government, I was excited to return to my home turf in this new role as an advocate for refugees and asylum seekers. While I had walked the halls of Congress before on behalf of other causes, this felt far more important to me on a deeply personal level. Prior to our arrival, we were required to get up to date on the latest facts on asylum and the resettlement processes. We were also given links to our congressional representatives so that we could research their policy positions and legislative actions prior to meeting with them or their staff. We all met in the United Methodist building located between the US Supreme Court and the Senate office buildings on Maryland Avenue. The first day was jammed with training on advocacy, messaging, and practice for the meetings. We were provided with talking points, policy positions, specific asks and recommendations. I went back to my hotel and crammed for my meetings with the staff of New Jersey Senators Bob Menendez and Cory Booker, scheduled for the next day. EMM and OGR had done their work, it was now time for me to do mine. We were teamed with members of the local staff of either EMM, OGR, EPPN (Episcopal Public Policy Network), or another agency. However, it was made clear that this was our meeting, and that they would only engage as needed. My first meeting was at 10 AM with Alice Lugo, Counsel to Senator Menendez, and my policy expert was Kendall Martin, who serves as the Manager for Communications at EMM. My second meeting was at 1:30 PM with Daniel Smith, Counsel, Committee on the Judiciary, from Senator Booker’s office, and I was teamed with Jen Smyers, Director of Policy and Advocacy with the Church World Service. After the arranged meetings, I headed out to two other offices, both on the House side, which was a long walk past the Capitol in the high heat. First, to my own district’s congressman, Rep. Josh Gottheimer, whose office was closed. Next, at the request of Jen Smyers, to Rep. Chris Smith of the 4th district, a Republican who lobbied to restart the bipartisan Refugee Caucus. I left each office with materials, and met briefly with a staff member in Rep. Smith’s office, thanking the congressman for his courage. I ended the day walking back to my hotel in the blistering heat with sore feet, but a full heart. It is hard to describe the feeling of walking down those hallowed halls, but to have the opportunity to walk through the doors of governmental power to speak the gospel of Jesus to love God and neighbor was both empowering and humbling. It is my fervent hope that the relationships begun on this trip will continue as we work together to uphold the dignity of every human being, no matter where they are from, what language they speak, who they love, what faith they practice, what gender or race they are, for all are children of God, our sisters and brothers. If you want to get engaged, please join EMM's Partners in Welcome. The Rev. Diana Wilcox serves as Rector of Christ Church, Bloomfield/Glen Ridge. In Europe there is an entirely different situation. Operating in the crypt of St. Paul’s Within the Walls Episcopal Church in the heart of Rome, Italy, the Joel Nafuma Refugee Center (JNRC) (http://jnrc.it/) is a day center for refugees and asylum seekers to relax, learn, and receive advice in order to achieve their goals. JNRC works with diverse groups – from refugees to volunteers, donors, and students, providing a variety of 2


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services for guests daily, as well as coordinating and hosting fundraising projects and events throughout the year. From a featured news article: “One of the first stops for some refugees upon arrival in Rome is the basement of an American Episcopal church. Facing an Italian culture in which they’re frequently met with hostility, these people find a safe haven beneath St. Paul Within The Walls.” (http://jnrc.it/refugee-day-center-provides-more-than-safe-haven/) Many of the other congregations in the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe have refugee ministries. All over the province and the entire United States, July 12 saw Lights for Liberty demonstrations. The article in this newsletter from the Diocese of Newark is about participation by congregations throughout that diocese. The Rt. Rev. Dr. DeDe Duncan-Probe, Bishop of Central New York, spoke at the Syracuse Lights for Liberty vigil to end inhumane conditions in US migrant detention camps. “That children are being preyed upon, dehumanized, deprived of basic sanitation, and dying as a result of improper care within American detention centers at our border is not just wrong or embarrassing, it is a sin. “…America, criminalization is not an effective response in a humanitarian crisis. The adults and children at our southern border are not a political agenda or platform, they are humans and beloved children of God.”

Bishop Chip Stokes (NJ) was in Maple Shade, New Jersey, with a group of people participating in Lights for Liberty. The event was hosted by the faithful of St. John's, Maple Shade, as a demonstration against the inhumane conditions facing today's immigrants, especially from Central America. Other events in New Jersey were in Collingswood, Hopewell, Lake Como, Metuchen, New Brunswick, Princeton, Red Bank, Atlantic City, and at the Elizabeth Detention Center. What can you do? This is such a big problem with so many real issues involved that there is no easy answer. Diana Wilcox mentioned something at the end of her story, the Partners in Welcome network hosted by Episcopal Migration Ministries. This online network is a place for folks engaged in ministry to refugees, asylum-seekers, and immigrants to come together and share resources, information, ask questions, and get connected! It’s free to join and offers access to professionals in the field, people running amazing ministries, and people who are simply eager to learn how they help. For more information and to register: www.episcopalmigrationministries.org/partnersinwelcome. Over the past several weeks, The Episcopal Church has responded to the reports of inhumane conditions for children and other asylum seekers in government custody in a number of ways. This response includes calls for donations and goods from Episcopal dioceses on the border, prayers for those seeking safety, efforts to engage in advocacy, and pastoral messages from bishops around the Church. The list of resources for education and support is available on the EMM website at https://episcopalmigrationministries.org/response-to-the-bordereducation-and-advocacy/ and will continue to be updated with ways to learn more and take action. The OGR 3


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and EMM webinar with Bishop Michael Hunn of the Diocese of Rio Grande will be made available on-demand through this website as well.

News from Our 12 Dioceses Diocese of Albany

Healing A Woman's Soul, Inc., a ministry of the Diocese of Albany, helps parishes and individuals prevent domestic violence one woman at a time. We pray for individuals, offer support groups, and guide parishes in active outreach to victims. Secular agencies for the prevention of domestic violence offer physical and emotional aid to victims. However, they cannot provide the ongoing spiritual healing needed. HAWS aims to help parishes fill that gap. We began as a ministry of Christ Church, Coxsackie in 2007 and saw ourselves as a woman's retreat ministry. In summer of 2007, a group of women gathered to vision the future of Healing a Woman's Soul. As a result of that meeting, we kept our emphasis on retreat ministry but added education and training about domestic violence to parishes. Find out more: https://sites.google.com/site/healingawomanssoul/home >

Diocese of Central New York Voices of faith at CNY Pride: “God loves you so much.� Episcopalians and Lutherans traveled to Syracuse from all over Central New York to march in the CNY Pride Parade on Saturday, June 22, 2019. Go see the web page with its photo gallery and compilation of quotes from people answering the questions of why they marched and where they saw God at work in the celebration. Here is the link: https://cnyepiscopal.org/2019/06/voices-of-faith-atcny-pride-god-loves-you-so-much/ >

Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe New Ministry begins in Central Germany - Regular English worship in the Anglican/Episcopal tradition has begun in Weimar, Germany. Services are held in the Lutheran Kreuzkirche. This church was built as the Anglican Church of St. Michael and All Angels in the 19th century and served as a Church of England chaplaincy until 1914, when it was abandoned. The current church is very happy to share in recovering its Anglican heritage. The Rev. Scott Moore, Vicar of St. James the Less (Nuremberg) in cooperation with a local organizing committee and COMC are overseeing this ministry.

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The Episcopal Church in Cuba (July 11, 2019) “Column: Christianity, Capitalism and Cuba” by Greenwich Sentinel By Marek P. Zabriskie (Rector at Christ Church Greenwich) A group of nine of us recently traveled to Cuba for a week-long visit with leaders of three Episcopal congregations, as well as Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio, who will be the guest preacher at Christ Church, in Greenwich, on Sunday, July 28 (https://christchurchgreenwich.org/bishop-of-cuba-to-visit/). She is the first woman consecrated as a Diocesan Bishop in all of Latin America. Although the United States’ government recently cancelled travel visas to Cuba and forbid U.S. cruise ships from visiting, Americans can still travel to Cuba on religious visas, which is what we did, as we were meeting with Cuban religious groups. Read the article: https://www.greenwichsentinel.com/2019/07/11/column-christianity-capitalism-and-cuba/

Diocese of Haiti Haiti Temporary Protected Status (TPS) Extended Until January 2020! As a result of excellent legal developments in Ramos in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California: 1) TPS for Haiti, Sudan, Nicaragua, and El Salvador will extend into 2020 at least; 2) Those extensions are automatic without anyone with TPS from one of these four countries having to do anything or pay anyone anything at all; employers and the DMV must respect the Federal Register notices embodying these extensions. 3) Those who used to have TPS but who didn’t re-register under Trump in 2017 or 2018 out of fear, confusion, or other good cause are strongly encouraged to consider re-registering late now, because DHS has agreed to give “presumptive weight” of validity to such “late-for-good-cause” applications! (Importantly, such late applications should be filed only after consulting and with the help of an experienced and competent immigration attorney, whether free, low-cost, or otherwise, to make sure that doing so is appropriate given the facts of each person’s own particular legal situation.) This development is good news for thousands of Haitians who let their TPS lapse in 2017 or 2018. More information: https://www.ijdh.org/2019/02/projects/excellentlegal-news-haiti-tps-will-extend-into-2020-at-least-2/

Diocese of Long Island From fear and worry to celebration: ‘Green Light NY’ through the eyes of an immigrant, as reported online by https://riverheadlocal.com/ . This is a story from the community in Riverhead about the struggle of undocumented immigrants and the issues they face. A bill had been introduced recently in the State Assembly, and local immigrant advocates wanted to inform the community about that proposal and the Father Gerardo Romo, coordinator of the Episcopal campaign around it, Rural Migrant Ministry outreach Church North Fork Hispanic Ministry prays during the coordinator Noemi Sanchez explained. Read the whole story: vigil Monday night. Photo: Maria Piedrabuena https://riverheadlocal.com/2019/06/19/from-fear-and-worryto-celebration-green-light-ny-through-the-eyes-of-an-immigrant/

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Diocese of Newark On Friday evening, July 12, Lights for Liberty: A Vigil to End Human Detention Camps brought thousands of people to detention camps and other sites across the country and the world to protest the inhumane conditions faced by refugees at the southern border of the U.S. Afterwards, organizers stated there had been more than 800 registered Lights for Liberty vigils on five continents. At least 23 of these vigils were held in New Jersey, many attended, or even hosted, by members of the Diocese of Newark. Read the whole article here and see the photo gallery: https://dioceseofnewark.org/content/diocesan-members-attendlights-liberty-vigils-across-northern-new-jersey . ELIZABETH: Lights for Liberty vigil outside the immigration detention center. NINA NICHOLSON PHOTO

Diocese of New Jersey

Somerville, NJ (June 2019) – For ten days in July, Bridgewater resident William Hoffman will join a dozen riders from local New Jersey churches on a 300-mile bicycle trek through the African country of Malawi. Read the story: http://www.province2.org/diocesan-news-stories/cycling-for-african-children-njbike-riders-trekking Phyllis Jones, of the Diocese of New Jersey, is also a member of the team from local NJ churches who are on this 300-mile bicycle trek. Proceeds support UrbanPromise International http://www.urbanpromiseinternational.org , a non-profit organization dedicated to helping children and young adults both in NJ and around the world. Take a look at Phyllis’ chronicle of the event. https://upiteammalawi2019.com/

Diocese of New York Angelique Piwinski, a proud member of Saint Johns Episcopal Church in Yonkers and former member of the Vestry, was appointed by Governor Andrew Cuomo to represent New York State and the City of Yonkers as a Worldpride2019 Ambassador. The Governor appointed 11 people in total to represent different areas of New York State. Piwinski chose Yonkers. The importance of this is that each ambassador can talk up that place and tell people across the world who are visiting New York to come and explore. #News12Westchester did a story on this that ran Saturday night and all day Sunday. http://westchester.news12.com/story/40725244/yonkers-native-selected-as-ny-ambassador-for-world-pridecelebrations In the video entry submission that she did, one of the major places Piwinski said she would bring people would be to St. John’s, a church that welcomes all and a church that elected Angelique unanimously to the Vestry as the first openly transgender Vestry member in the church’s 325 year history in the city of Yonkers! Actions always speak louder than just words!

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Diocese of Rochester Hands of Hope Kitchen - The Rev. Richard Krapf, Deacon at St. Peter's Bloomfield and his team "walk the walk." The things many of us profess on Sunday, Richard and his volunteers make a point of doing. Rev. Krapf serves as the Director of the Hands of Hope Kitchen in Bloomfield, NY. What's surprising is that the main reason folks gather for a free lunch isn't financial... See the video: https://vimeo.com/348223308

Diocese of the Virgin Islands July's news from the Virgin Islands (http://episcopaldiocesevi.weebly.com/the-latestnews/archives/07-2019) includes: ➢ The celebration of 49 years of ministry for St. Peter Episcopal Church, St. Croix - Under the theme, “Nurturing the lambs of Christ; spiritually and physically..” the Vestry, Rector and Congregation of St. Peter Episcopal Church, St. Croix in the Diocese of the United States Virgin Islands, celebrated their forty-ninth anniversary of service to the people of God. The celebration spanned the period June 23 to 30 with a number of activities punctuating the normal routine. ➢ The young people have been active, as well. The Diocese of the Virgin Islands was represented at the Diocese of Alabama’s Camp Sawyerville by Timothy Malone, who volunteered as a counselor for the second consecutive year. Six other young people and two leaders from the diocese also attended Senior Camp at Camp McDowell in Alabama. ➢ Director of the Center for Faith and Opportunities Initiatives of the Department of Homeland Security, Kevin Smith, visited St. Thomas, U.S.V.I. on June 26th to meet with faith-based and non-profit leaders. ➢ The Episcopal Deanery Choir of St. Croix, led by Choir Director Monica Jacobs (center), outdid itself again!! This time, it was the Centennial Tea Party. Over 100 persons wearing fashionable hats, gloves, bow ties and polka dots gathered at the D.C. Canegata Recreation Center to sip tea, nibble on delicacies, and enjoy a Sunday afternoon of singing, dancing, skits, laughter and more laughter. ➢ St. Paul Sea Cow’s Bay – Worship on Land and Sea:It was worship with a difference on June 30th for St. Paul Sea Cow’s Bay, as members and friends set sail for the island of Jost Van Dyke. Accompanied by guitars, cowbell, congo drum, squash, and triangle the adventurers sang praise and worship songs as they sailed along a section of the archipelago of 60 islands and cays that make up the (British) Virgin Islands.

Diocese of Western New York For the third year, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Jamestown, NY is sponsoring a summer reading camp, Children of the Book (https://childrenofthebook.org/) , from June 26- July 28th, to promote literacy skills for approximately 35 elementary students from Love School and others, who are entering third, fourth, fifth grade or sixth grade. Watch the video: https://vimeo.com/142520362

Give It a Try – Ask me for a blessing You may have seen an article in the Religious News Service (https://religionnews.com/2019/06/27/onmadison-avenue-an-episcopal-priest-blesses-passersby/ ) about the Rev. Adrian Dannhauser, associate rector of the Church of the Incarnation in Manhattan, NY. She stands outside the doors of the church in her 7


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vestments every Tuesday morning for a half an hour with a sign that says “Ask me for a blessing. God’s grace is meant to be shared”. The people passing by are mostly in a hurry to get on with their days, but a few greet Dannhauser and some ask her for a blessing. These are not generally the people who attend Incarnation. Many of them probably do not attend any church. She says in her blog (https://www.askmeforablessing.com/ ) :

“IT'S A SURPRISINGLY INTIMATE EXPERIENCE. COMING BEFORE GOD WITH A COMPLETE STRANGER, UNITED BY A SHARED AND OFTEN FERVENT DESIRE FOR THE HOLY SPIRIT TO MOVE IN THAT PERSON'S LIFE. THERE IS NO PRETENSE ON EITHER SIDE. NO NEED TO IMPRESS. PRAYER CUTS THROUGH ALL OUR SUPERFICIALITY, RIGHT DOWN TO THE HEART OF GETTING REAL ABOUT OUR NEED FOR GOD. THIS IS WHERE GRACE ABOUNDS. GRACE FROM GOD THAT IS MEANT TO BE SHARED BY THOSE WHO GATHER IN GOD'S NAME.” Not every congregation has a busy street right in front of the church, so this particular version of a blessing ministry isn’t tailored to a rural congregation or even to the average suburban congregation. The concept, however, of being present in a community in a public setting offering a blessing, sharing God’s grace, can be adapted. We aren’t called, after all, to fill our church pews, but we have been sent out to share the Good News with everyone.

Connections in Communion – Human Trafficking The Episcopal Church is not the only one working on justice issues. This comes from the Church Club of New York discussing “Fighting Human Trafficking - Will Decriminalizing the Sex Trade Help or Hurt?” On Tuesday, July 23, at 7:00pm, you are invited to be part of a conversation with New York State Assembly Member Richard Gottfried, who has recently proposed a bill that would decriminalize almost all aspects of the adult sex trade. The Assembly Member will offer his reasons behind the bill and speak to its effects on New Yorkers. There is controversy over the bill and representatives from anti-trafficking organizations will join the conversation to express their views on why they believe the bill, as proposed, is problematic. Panelists include: ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ 8

Assembly Member Richard Gottfried, bill sponsor Dorchen Leidholdt, Director of Legal Services for Sanctuary for Families and founder of the New York State Anti-Trafficking Coalition. Marian Hatcher, winner of the 2016 Presidential Lifetime Volunteer Achievement Award and coordinator of the National Johns Suppression Initiative Jessica Raven, Decrim NY Steering Committee member


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Date/Time/Location: Tuesday, July 23, 7:00pm Church of the Incarnation (in the Sanctuary), 209 Madison Avenue at 35th Street, NY, NY The event is open to the public. Please spread the word and share the link to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/conversation-with-assembly-member-gottfried-on-bill-a8230s6419-tickets63913471915 Below is an article written by The Rev. Adrian Dannhauser, Associate Rector of Church of the Incarnation and leader of the Diocesan Task Force Against Human Trafficking. The article was written for the upcoming issue of the Episcopal New Yorker, and it expresses some of the concerns about the bill as currently proposed. Decriminalizing Pimps and Johns - What's at Stake? The worst kind of power is oppression disguised as liberation. This is the power dynamic that undergirds the sex workers' rights movement. Currently, New York is seeing a push to decriminalize nearly all aspects of the sex trade. New York State Assembly Member Richard Gottfried and Senator Julia Salazar recently introduced bill A.8230/S.6419 , which would accomplish just that. On a positive note, the bill would have the effect of decriminalizing those who are bought and sold in prostitution. Prostituted people would no longer be arrested, prosecuted or criminalized. However, the bill's other provisions are much more controversial - they would allow pimping, brothel-owning and sex buying to become legal activities in New York State, provided the persons being sold for sex are over 17 years of age. Sex workers' rights organizations claim that consenting adults should be allowed to do whatever they want with their own bodies - "my body, my choice." But in most cases, prostitution is more aptly described as "my body, his choice." It's not sexual liberation but sexual exploitation. According to Sanctuary for Families, New York's leading service provider and advocate for survivors of gender violence, 90% of people in prostitution in the U.S. are trafficking victims. This means that only 10% of prostituted people have any real choice in what happens to their bodies in the sex trade. Real choice means making an informed decision not based on an addiction to drugs, interpersonal violence, or coercion from a trafficker. It means someone must have the mental capacity to make such a decision and not be suffering from harms routinely associated with prostitution, including PTSD, dissociation, suicidal ideation, and violence endured at the hands of pimps and johns. Finally, true choice means there are real alternatives in an individual's life. A prostituted person is almost always poorer and more vulnerable than the sex buyer. The sex industry is predicated on racial, gender and income inequality. Inequality is the fuel that keeps the sex trade going, which means true progressivism means fighting to end a system that reinforces such inequality. At a time when we are culturally taking a stand against violence and harassment towards women and marginalized groups, creating spaces of inclusion and opportunity, why would we take a step backward by allowing these very groups to be further exposed to the harms of prostitution? Advocates fighting for full decriminalization argue that the problem of human trafficking and violence in the sex trade will be helped by bringing it out of the shadows. However, when prostitution is fully decriminalized as it has been in Germany, New Zealand and the Netherlands - the demand for commercial sex rises and the sex industry expands, creating a surge in human trafficking to fill the supply, along with a secondary illegal market for underage bodies. Perhaps Gottfried and Salazar should heed these words of the prophet Isaiah: " Woe to you who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness." (Isaiah 5:20) Woe to anyone who would sanction the world's oldest oppression.

Imagine if‌ Imagine if all 288,872 Episcopalians in Province II responded to the Rev. Dr. DeDe Duncan Probe’s call to honor our common baptismal covenant: 9

Rt.


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“Regardless of our political opinion, our common ground as Christians is our desire to be faithful to God, fulfilling Jesus’ commandments to love our neighbors, to care for the widow and orphan, and to offer water and basic comforts to those who suffer. And as Episcopalians, we all seek to fulfill our baptismal vows: honoring the dignity of every human being and striving for justice and peace.” (read her whole address: https://cnyepiscopal.org/2019/07/the-humanitarian-crisis-at-the-us-mexico-border-an-invitation-to-prayerand-faithful-action-from-bishop-dede/ ). There are so many opportunities for each one of us to do something. The Episcopal Diocese of the Rio Grande and neighboring dioceses are engaged directly in ministries with migrants and asylum-seekers on the US/Mexico border. Rio Grande's asylum seekers information page (https://www.dioceserg.org/Ministries/asylum-seekers ) has information about how to donate to support ministry on the border, along with regular video updates from Rio Grande Bishop Michael Hunn and other resources. Episcopal Migration Ministries has compiled resources and statements from around the Episcopal church (https://episcopalmigrationministries.org/response-to-the-border-education-and-advocacy ) , including this one-hour webinar (https://vimeo.com/345900279 ) about the current situation at the US/Mexico border. Please explore these resources, learn, and help in all the ways that you can.

Do You Know? Province II’s Yvonne O’Neal, Lay Representative to Provincial Council, is participating in the HIGH-LEVEL POLITICAL FORUM 2019 under the auspices of ECOSOC. The meeting of the high-level political forum on sustainable development in 2019 convened under the auspices of the Economic and Social Council, was held from Tuesday, 9 July, to Thursday, 18 July 2019; including the three-day ministerial meeting of the forum from Tuesday, 16 July, to Thursday, 18 July 2019. The theme was "Empowering people and ensuring inclusiveness and equality". The set of goals to be reviewed in depth is the following: ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

Find out more: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/hlpf/2019

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Chuck Perfater – a loss for the whole church. Charles Henry Perfater (taken from the bulletin at the visitation on July 2, 2019) Charles H. (Chuck) Perfater passed away June 29, 2019. He leaves behind his loving wife of 63 years, June Cooper Perfater; his son, Jeffrey, of Atlanta, Georgia, his daughter, Susan Zitofsky and one grandson Alexander (Sasha) Zitofsky, of Fanwood, NJ. He was predeceased by his father, Charles Henry Perfater and his mother Alice Wimpenny Perfater. He is also survived by his sister, Elaine Haney, her four sons and families. Chuck was a lifelong resident of Ewing Township. Shortly after graduating from Trenton High School in 1953, Chuck went to work for NJ Bell Telephone Company as a splicer's helper/lineman. In 1960, he was selected to enter a competitive, advanced management development program. This opened the door for a rotational management experience in various departments with increasing responsibilities. In 1983, after numerous middle and upper management assignments he was named General Manager, Installation & Maintenance for NJ Bell. Later that year, as a result of the AT&T Divestiture, he transferred to AT&T as Area Vice President for NJ. In 1985, Chuck was named Area Vice President for the state of New York. He retired from AT&T at the end of 1989 as Access Vice President — Eastern Region. During these years, Chuck took numerous bachelor's and master's college courses at Rider, Rutgers, Penn State, and via the AT&T Advanced Management Program. After retirement, Chuck began a second career as an independent management consultant, largely in the telecommunications arena, which he continued for over a dozen years, including a six-month stint in Mexico. His consulting business was interrupted in 1994-1996 when he accepted the call to be the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of the Episcopal Diocese of NJ. In 2003, Chuck was recruited to be the Executive Coordinator of Province II of the Episcopal Church, a position in which he served until April 2017. Chuck was a lifetime parishioner at Trinity Cathedral where he has served in many leadership capacities, including Senior Warden, Junior Warden, Treasurer, Stewardship Chair and Chair of the Trinity Cathedral Community Day Golf Event for ten years. He also served as a lay Eucharistic minister, usher and lay reader. In the late 1980s, Chuck began a long series of activities with the Episcopal Diocese of New Jersey. His initial leadership role was on the Committee for a Unified Budget Exploration, followed by the CFO role in 1994, multiple terms on the Finance & Budget Committee. He has served on the Audit Committee, Board of Missions, Diocesan Council, Episcopal Election Committee, Stewardship Commission and two terms on the Standing Committee. In addition to serving the Diocese, Chuck has contributed to the wider Church as a deputy to its General Convention, where he was assigned to the Standing Committee on Program, Budget & Finance. Chuck and June have maintained a summer home on Long Beach Island, where Chuck had become quite active at St. Peter's at the Light Episcopal Church, including service on the Futures Committee. He was also a multiterm President of the North Beach Taxpayers' Association. For over thirty years, Chuck was very active in the American Heart Association, including election as Chairman of the Board, NJ Heart Association, and Vice President of the Regional and national organization. His hobbies included golf, cooking, travel and until recently, skiing. He had been heavily involved in researching his family genealogy. In fact, he recently confirmed that he is a 4th Cousin of the 34th President of the US, Dwight David Eisenhower. Of little interest perhaps is the fact that Chuck has been an aggressive collector of meaningless items. For instance, his genealogy collection includes 9000 inter-connected familial names. Plus, he has accumulated over 1000 logo golf balls, all of which are displayed; well-over 300 scorecards of golf courses he played; over 1200 matchbooks from public establishments throughout the world; ski trail maps from numerous ski resorts; and hundreds of cookbooks and recipes. In lieu of flowers, contributions in Chuck Perfater's name may be made to Trinity Cathedral, 801 West State Street, Trenton, NJ 08618, or to the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation online at https://app.mobilecause.com/vf/PFFTribute/ChuckPerfater or by mail to 230 E. Ohio Street, Suite 500, 11


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Chicago, IL 60611. More information on Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis may be found at www.pulmonaryfibrosis.org . During the fourteen years Chuck served as Executive Coordinator of Province II, he was an active leader in Provincial Leadership Council. He served under several council presidents and initiated many projects. The memorial page on the Province II website includes tributes from those with whom he served and a slide show including pictures of many of the Provincial Councils with whom he served, as well as a video of his funeral. His passing is a loss to the Province, the Diocese of NJ, and the whole church. http://www.province2.org/chuck-perfater.html At the Province II Synod in April 2018, a resolution honoring Perfater was unanimously approved and presented to him. The resolution reads, in part, Whereas Canon Charles H. ("Chuck") Perfater, a faithful member of the Episcopal Church in the Diocese of New Jersey, has faithfully served his parish, his diocese, and his province in numerous official capacities; Whereas he has coordinated all the activities of Province II for these many years; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that Province II of the Episcopal Church is grateful to Canon Charles H. Perfater for his service and publicly recognizes the outstanding leadership he has provided as the Executive Coordinator. His leadership distinguishes him, honors the Province, and marks a deep commitment to the Episcopal Church.

Provincial Council 2009 Provincial Council 2012

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Report from Executive Council The Executive Council met June 10-13 at the Maritime Institute in Linthicum Heights, Maryland. I was honored to be the deacon at the opening Eucharist along with Suffragan Bishop, Ann Hodges-Copple, from North Carolina. After roll call and announcements by Secretary Barlowe, the Presiding Bishop, The Most Rev. Michael Curry, opened with his remarks. He gave us an update on the Bishops’ meeting in March with regards to the spouses attending the Lambeth Conference. He acknowledged that the Bishops had a vigorous and wholesome discussion on the matter and that some work is on-going. The bishops and spouses will be gathering for their regular fall meeting in September. An update will be given when we reconvene in October. He continued with a shout-out to the staff of The Episcopal Church. He said, "We have a remarkable staff, they are just extraordinary, and it is a privilege to serve with them." Both President Jennings and Secretary Barlowe have shared the same feelings with him. He went on to talk about the recent in-house staff meeting where they really wrestled with how can we more effectively and faithfully equip the Saints for the work of ministry? After a well developed discussion, they concluded that the goals of Evangelism, Racial Reconciliation and Care of Creation really make sense for our church. Then he talked about the community of faith in the church through the lens of Ephesians 4: how our varied gifts exist to equip the saints for work in ministry. "Our job is to equip the church to be the Jesus Movement in the world." He ended his remarks telling us about Bayard Rustin, who orchestrated the March on Washington. He said, “It may be our role as Staff and Executive Council to be the Bayard Rustin for the Jesus Movement, witnessing and walking the Way of Love.” Following the Presiding Bishop’s address were remarks from our illustrious President of the House of Deputies, Gay Jennings. She welcomed us to the Maritime Center, and stated that she is looking forward to our meeting. She welcomed our guests: Dr. Ursuline Bankhead, who led our implicit bias training, and Dr. Mathew Sheep, who recently completed 2 mutual Ministry Reviews with members from the Executive Council in 2016 and 2018. Jennings also spoke about the in-house staff of the Episcopal Church Center. She was glad to speak with them about why their work is essential to the mission of the church. She reflected on the 75th anniversary of D-Day, where Allied troops landed on the beaches at Normandy, beginning the liberation of France which led to victory on the European front of World War II. President Jennings said the reason it’s on her mind now, is that she believes it provides us with an opportunity to consider the role of institutional structures in changing the world. She hurriedly said that she is not a warmonger, nor does she have a rose-colored understanding of America’s imperial past or present, but she is fascinated by the fact that, 75 years on, we are still captivated by the logistical and operational undertaking of landing 156,000 troops on the beaches at Normandy. However, she said, we are deeply suspicious of the kind of institutional structures that made it possible. In the church, every three years, we go to General Convention to debate the budget, and listen to how we should be funding mission, not governance and institutional structures, as though the mission happens by itself. If we intend to be the Jesus Movement, and we do, we have to remember that governance is mission. General Convention’s commitments to creation care, racial reconciliation and evangelism would mean very little without the governing structures of the church that help make them happen. President Jennings continued on, "Many people here today have made significant contributions to making mission happen through governance, and I am grateful to all of you. One of you has done more than anyone I know to help Episcopalians everywhere understand the ministry of church governance. Mary Frances 13


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Schjonberg, Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter, has reported the church’s news for nearly fourteen years as a staff member, and she is set to retire on July 1. We all owe her considerable gratitude for her uncompromising standards." Mary Frances has covered the election and tenures of Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, the story of Bishop Gene Robinson’s election and episcopacy, and the church’s move toward the full inclusion of LGBT people.” At the announcement of her retirement, Mary Frances said, “I have been blessed to have what all journalists hope for: the chance to witness history and be able to write about it,” President Jennings said to Mary Frances, "For your commitment to the governance of our beloved church, for your dedication to transparency and truth, and for your ministry of journalism that has been so essential to the work of the people of God, I am honored to present you with the House of Deputies Medal." Matthew Sheep, who teaches management, organizational behavior and leadership at Illinois State University, provided results of his Mutual Ministry Review. Sheep, told the council that the participants in the most recent review in November 2018 are open to considering a number of “possible futures.” The 2018 review found that participants feel there is a “rebuilt trust” among council members, officers and the church wide staff. The council has an improved organizational climate and the participants are also concerned about sustaining those improvements. Some of the areas that need improvement are the financial cost of governance, further clarification of roles and responsibilities, methods to bring the Way of Love to all levels of the church, and strategies for dealing with tensions as they arise. Sheep encouraged the council’s willingness to look at “possible futures,” envisioning what it might look like to improve these areas “and where it might lead.” We heard a report from Treasurer Kurt Barnes that showed that the 2019 part of the church’s triennial budget is on track. Barnes also noted that the Episcopal Church Center in New York is fully leased. The two newest tenants are a True Value Hardware store, which has taken over the former bookstore space on the street level, and a physical therapy practice. Barnes reported that the church’s Annual Appeal from 38,000 constituents has raised $90,000 towards the $250,000 goal. Additionally, the churches’ effort to raise money to provide future retirement benefits for current and retired clergy in the Episcopal Church of Cuba has raised $730,000 through the end of May. Jane Cisluycis led a discussion on norms, which was described as a kind of covenant of how we are going to live together. Norms followed by previous Executive Councils were distributed, and the Council was given 20 minutes for table group discussion of what we want to see in our norms. Development Officers, Ms. Malm and Mr. Houlihan, gave a presentation to the Executive Council about work of the Office of Development, including priorities and the role of the Executive Council in fund raising efforts and as trustees of a non- profit corporation. Following the Development Office presentation, Russ Randle facilitated a panel discussion on rural ministries. The panel discussed things that dioceses could do to assist small and rural congregations in ways like helping with payroll, and the reality that seminaries are not necessarily training clergy to meet the current needs of the church. A second panel of bishops spoke of challenges and collaborations in their dioceses. Bishop Curry introduced Pastor Will Voss, liaison from the ELCA. Pastor Voss brought greetings from his Presiding Bishop Elizabeth Eaton and also from his own bishop in Nebraska. He mentioned his deep appreciation for our partnership in ministry and announced that this would be his last meeting of Executive Council because his term as liaison ends with General Assembly in August. Bishop Curry presented him with the Presiding Bishop's medal. Dr. Ursuline Bankhead, a New York psychologist led the members in an interactive training on implicit bias. We all became aware of our individual bias through this interactive awareness training. Bankhead explained what implicit bias is and how we can change our automatic preference for certain groups over others. She explained the way it operates and is usually learned and taught. After her presentation we went into our 14


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individual committees to debrief what we had learned. Dr. Bankhead went to all committees to answer any questions. Resolutions approved from my committee, Ministry Beyond the Episcopal Church:

• • • •

Elect the Rev. George Sherrill Jr. of the Diocese of Southern Ohio as a member of the Presbyterian Episcopal Dialogue Committee for a term ending December 31, 2021 Express concern about the ongoing political and humanitarian situation in Burundi Express The Episcopal Church’s continued support for the principles of multilateralism that underpin global dialogue and concerted action in the world Thanks and appreciation to Ursuline Bankhead for her presentation on implicit bias, leading the council into a deeper appreciation of this aspect of our common life as the Beloved Community; state that the Executive Council desires to continue this work Express grave concern and sorrow for the recent rise in easily preventable diseases due to antivaccination movements which have harmed thousands of children and adults.

Respectfully submitted, The Rev. Lillian Davis-Wilson

Up and Coming Grants: Constable Grant Applications for 2019-2012 http://www.province2.org/opportunities/constable-grant-applications-for-2019-2021 This information is now available in English and in Spanish! Check it out and adhere to all deadlines. For an application to Council to be considered it must be submitted via email to djgoldsack.prov2@gmail.com by July 30, 2019. Episcopal Evangelism Grants Now Available https://www.episcopalchurch.org/posts/publicaffairs/episcopal-evangelism-grants-availablelocal-and-regional-efforts-0 Episcopal institutions can now apply for the next round of the Episcopal Evangelism Grants Program, designed to fund local and regional evangelism efforts in the Episcopal Church. The application deadline is October 1. "At its best, evangelism is a response to the deepest needs of our neighbors and communities," said the Rev. Devon Anderson, chair of Executive Council's Episcopal Evangelism Grants Committee. "We aim to catalyze initiatives and experiments that can teach us more about how to spread the gospel in all of The Episcopal Church's diverse contexts."

Opportunities: "Leadership in a Time of Division and Fear" - Oct. 23-25, 2019 | Women in Ministry Conference The Women in Ministry Initiative of Princeton Theological Seminary is pleased to offer a conference for women leaders of the church, both clergy and lay, who work within the church and beyond. We will gather to worship, to study, and to encourage one another. Keynote presentations, sermons, informal discussions, and workshops will provide an opportunity to develop and strengthen talents and skills for leadership in the church and world to which we are called. Register today to take advantage of discounted pricing: 15


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Now - Aug. 1: $175 Aug. 1 - Oct. 18: $195 Registration includes program and meals (2 breakfasts, 1 lunch, 1 dinner, and reception; lodging not included.

More information and registration: https://wimconference.ptsem.edu/ “Earthkeeping: Creation Care in Global Mission“. http://www.gemn.org/2020-conference/ Our 2020 GEMN Global Mission Conference is being planned for April 29-May 1, 2020, in Indianapolis, IN. Join our email list for conference updates, and be sure to save the dates! Conference registration will open January 2020. The Global Episcopal Mission Network (or GEMN) is people working together to discern God’s call to be the face of Christ in the world. GEMN began in 1995 as a consortium of Episcopal dioceses interested in fostering and maintaining a strong missional presence in the Episcopal Church. In recent years, membership has been opened to invite any individual, congregation, seminary, diocese or organization with a passion for mission, within or beyond the Episcopal Church. Find out more: http://www.gemn.org/ Parish Communicators' Monthly Virtual Meet-up Are you a volunteer or staff member who supports communications in your parish? Do you edit the newsletter? Keep social media humming? Oversee the website? Do you want to connect peers in Episcopal parishes all over the Church? A grassroots group of parish communicators has a monthly meeting to share ideas, address common challenges and build relationships. To join the group and get updates on meetings, fill out this form. https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdu-oJ1_jGkkkZExeiVq3wRX2h7B8dgcLrarhn7hHbZcxiJQ/viewform?mc_cid=590c754e4f&mc_eid=aedcc5d7e8

Resources Traveling the Way of Love, Episode 4: Turn, the latest installment of a new video series from The Episcopal Church Office of Communication, is now online. https://www.episcopalchurch.org/twol/turn Episcopal Church digital invitation kits for Back-2-School and Back to Ministry Continuing the invitation to connect The Way of Love, Practices for a Jesus-Centered Life (https://www.episcopalchurch.org/way-of-love ) more deeply to the seasons of the year, The Episcopal Church is developing additional free and downloadable resources for congregations, dioceses, and communities of faith. A Back-2-School Digital Invitation Kit and the Back to Ministry Digital Invitation Kit are available now. Each of these kits includes: a customizable poster and postcard; a social media-ready graphic; and a Facebook cover image. Each kit also includes a video prayer message from Presiding Bishop Michael Curry which can be embedded on a church’s website. These resources are themed both with and without Way of Love graphics. All evangelism resources are available here (https://www.episcopalchurch.org/evangelism-resources/back-toministry ) and here (https://www.episcopalchurch.org/evangelism-resources/back-to-school ). New FREE resource on migration and immigration from Forward Movement Forward Movement invites individuals and congregations to explore the difficult but important issues of migration and immigration in a new, free resource, No Longer Strangers: Exploring Immigration Issues. Available in English and Spanish. Presiding Bishop Curry’s video message on immigration: ‘Who is my neighbor?’ “Deeply embedded in the Christian faith, indeed deeply embedded in the Jewish tradition, which is the mother of the Christian faith, and deeply embedded in the faith and traditions and values of many of the world’s great 16


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religions, is a profound conviction in a sure and certain value and virtue that care for the stranger, the alien, the visitor, is a sacred duty, a sacred vow.� The Presiding Bishop’s video message can be found here: https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/pressreleases/presiding-bishop-issues-video-message-onimmigration-who-is-my-neighbor/

From the Province The approved budget of the Province for 2019-2021 is now available online. http://www.province2.org/budget-2019-2021.html The minutes of the Province II March 2019 Council meeting are here: http://www.province2.org/uploads/7/3/6/7/73676991/2019-03-26_council_minutes_a__1_.pdf

Save the Dates! The Provincial Synod is scheduled for April 22-24, 2021 at The Desmond Hotel, Albany, NY. It is important that deputies from all dioceses attend in preparation for General Convention 2021.

The 80th General Convention of the Episcopal Church will be held in July 2021 at The Baltimore Convention Center, Baltimore, Maryland (Episcopal Diocese of Maryland). Over the next years, the General Convention Office will provide information, materials, educational items and other features about the General Convention, the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland, and Baltimore, MD. Following a decision by the Joint Standing Committee on Planning and Arrangements, the General Convention Office has announced the ten legislative dates for the 80th General Convention of The Episcopal Church: Wednesday June 30th to Friday July 9th, 2021.

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In Prov 2 - July 2019  

The newsletter of Province II of the Episcopal Church, July 2019 edition.

In Prov 2 - July 2019  

The newsletter of Province II of the Episcopal Church, July 2019 edition.

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