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Uusi Contents Issue Four Hello/Hei A warm and exciting welcome to the Craft Issue of Uusi.

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On the eve of the launch of the Nokia Lumia 800 in October 2011, Nokia staged an exhibition at the Design Museum in London titled People Made – Nokia Phones that Changed the World. / This will form the basis for a larger / event in Helsinki as part of the city’s World Design Capital celebrations in 2012. Here we take a look at some of the iconic, breakthrough phones featured in the show, and consider why they made such a huge impact when they were released. /

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It was a functional approach which served us well, and mirrored the simple beauty of our product design. But today the Nokia brand wants to be as warm and approachable as possible. So ahead of the launch of our new device ranges in November 2011, we decided that friendly, straightforward names would be the way forward.

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Improving Reality There’s a mobile phone app called Streetmuseum by the Museum of London that’s beguiling as well as intriguing. You simply hold your cameraphone up to the London street scene in front of you, and it automatically superimposes historical images of that very same location on your screen – a window through time. You could see families hurriedly making their way to an Underground shelter during the Blitz; 1960s groovers hanging out on Carnaby Street; the Great Fire of 1666 mercilessly devouring anything that stood in its path. Streetmuseum is an example of what the science fiction writer Bruce Sterling terms ‘atemporality’, a cultural condition where the past, present and future collide to reveal something new. And it’s ideas about blurring the line between perception and reality like this which inspired ‘Improving Reality’, a one-day conference organised by Lighthouse, a digital culture agency based in Brighton, UK last year.

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‘Improving Reality’ attracted diverse speakers and audience – players from the art and design world, filmmakers, games designers, technology gurus and futurologists. In other words, people interested in furthering the debate on technology and creativity, questioning the established paradigms, exploring new ways of making and doing things. Of course, given the provocative title and subject matter, Uusi simply had to join the debate and assess the opportunities for our brand in these new territories.

“It’s about taking back control, after all, these billboards are in a public space, so it’s asking ‘do we have to accept this?’.” Honor Harger

Going one step further is Oliver’s Newstweek, a device for manipulating news read by other people on wireless hotspots. Built into a small, innocuous wall plug, this allows art pranksters to remotely edit news coming in on wireless devices without the reader knowing what’s going on. Newstweek alters reality, but also makes a point about the way we are manipulated by the media, and often accept the information we are fed at face value. Uusi Magazine — Issue Four — 71

‘ONE DAY’ IS A NEW BOOK THAT CAPTURES A SINGLE DAY PLAYED OUT IN DIFFERENT CORNERS OF THE GLOBE. IT TAKES NOKIA PHOTOGRAPHY OUT OF THE CORPORATE CONTEXT TO SHOW IT IN A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT LIGHT.

Jessica Colaho

Valentine Njorge

Mark W Kaigwa

In just 20 or so years, mobile technology has become inherent to the way we live. It has shaped the way we communicate, changed our expectations, behaviour and language. In a way, our mobile devices have become extensions of ourselves – they help us express our hopes and fears, to be what we want to be. They are an umbilical cord to our personal network, a direct line to what’s happening at work, inside our circle of friends, or even on the other side of the world.

Leo Conradon Jonathan Immer

Ruha Reyhani

Marcelo Gluz Andrea Bauer

Roman Hansler

Jam da Silva

Teddy Bears and Talking Drums

Hawa Essuman

Mutua Matheka Heleno Bernardi

Sahil Khan

Rio

Shamim Rafat

Gurudatt Bhobe

Nairobi

The first session, ‘Reality Hacking’, looked at how digital media artists can subvert the way we look at the world. As John Lennon put it, “reality leaves a lot to the imagination”– what we actually see, what we think we see, or what we choose to see, are just as real as each other. And a perceptive artist can play with these fine distinctions and contradictions. A good example of this is speaker Julian Oliver’s mischievous creation, ‘The Artvertiser’. This is a software platform for replacing billboard advertisements with art in real time. It works by teaching computers to ‘recognise’ individual ads so they can be replaced with alternative content, like images and video. You view these through a pair of special ‘Artvertiser’ binoculars, and if you’re in WiFi range, you can publish the results on online galleries like Flickr and YouTube. A new platform for public art, ‘The Artvertiser’ questions what kind of visual backdrop is appropriate for our cities.

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Directed by David Betteridge, a new fi ve-minute Connecting People film called ‘Teddy Bears and Talking Drums’ explores how mobile technology is empowering

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BEHIND THE SCENES AT THE TURNER PRIZE

The sold-out event was split into three parts: Digital Art, Cinema and Gaming or “three easy-to-comprehend chapters,” as Honor Harger, director of Lighthouse and curator of the event explains. In spite of this clear demarcation, there were plenty of overlapping themes.

“It’s about taking back control,” says Honor. “After all, these billboards are in a public space, so it’s asking ‘do we have to accept this?’.”

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Mumbai

Marc Wood, a well-travelled designer who works with Anglo-Finnish agency Command Associates, was tasked not only with expressing the brand essence in the branding and spatial design of the space, but also bringing some humanity and originality to the party. His response was to go back to his roots – well, his old art college actually – and commission an eclectic collection of art pieces to lighten, brighten and counterpoint the overall branded environment. “It was such a big space,” he says, “so we had to find a way of breaking it up… punctuating it with more quirky points of interest.”

Consolidating the library under the auspices of a single studio makes total sense – we can build expertise in this area, taking the depth and excellence of Nokia product imagery to another level. We’ll be able to fully get to grips with the finer points of colour, form and user interface, and then spread our knowledge. We can evolve a bank of cool cover art, bookmarks for websites, wallpapers and icons.

Available through Marco Polo, Nokia’s new baseline assets project gives agencies around the world instant access to approved, high-quality images of our latest products.

Teddy Bears and Talking Drums Let’s face it. You wouldn’t leave home without your mobile phone any more than you’d leave home without your keys.

Every Nokia event is painstakingly stitched together by an invisible thread, a narrative theme that brings a sense of unity to the major ideas, events and announcements. For Nokia World 2011, the central concept was ‘new now’. This was underpinned by our brand essence, with executions designed to create an impression of ‘adventure everywhere’.

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Mobile technology and the Internet is shaping the way we think about and understand the physical world around us. Challenging, forward-looking digital artists, games designers and filmmakers are questioning accepted norms and looking for new ways to create and distribute content.

To give you some idea of the task in hand, we are looking at well over 2,000 product and screen shots needed to fuel Nokia’s global marketing effort over the next 12 months.

A kit of parts

Gargantuan events spaces like the ExCel are a huge blank canvas. Often these kinds of spaces can be cavernous and utilitarian, and quite soulless unless they’re handled with expertise and imagination. They need dressing and drama on a grand scale, but most of all, they’re crying out for small touches of warmth and individuality. Otherwise, people can start feeling overwhelmed – like lost, inconsequential sheep.

In any given year, the staging and organisation of a massive public-facing event like this is a test of strategy and stamina. The eyes of the world are upon you, watching your every move. The programme needs to be run with military precision, a sea of carefully orchestrated peaks, encouraged by an undercurrent of momentum. Delegates need to feel constantly stimulated – mentally and visually. The most successful events are an opportunity to connect with old and new peers, colleagues and friends – people with something to say and people hungry to hear all about it. And that’s something Nokia know more about than most.

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The Asset Test As you can probably imagine, product image making for a huge global brand like Nokia is a complex and gargantuan task. That’s why Brand and Marketing Studio is busy creating a rationalised online library of global consumerfacing baseline assets. We love a challenge, and this resource is set to become an essential part of our ever-evolving brand identity.

Jay Cousins

A breath of fresh art On 27 October 2011, thousands of developers, media commentators and die-hard Nokia fans descended upon the ExCeL Exhibition Centre in London’s Docklands in a state of super-anticipation. Nokia World 2011 was set to be one of the company’s most significant conferences in years, as the Finnish mobile technology giant fought back on all fronts, with the launch of its new Nokia Lumia and Nokia Asha phones.

The Asset Test

Berlin

What does ‘adventure everywhere’ look like? We found out by commissioning series of intriguing original art and design pieces that were used to brighten and punctuate the wide open spaces of Nokia World 2011.

Previously, we’d favoured a combination of letters and numbers to tag our devices. Some significant, others less so. The world’s first widely available GSM phone, the Nokia 1011, for example, was named after 10 November, the auspicious date it was launched in 1992. Later, we used N to denote our premium phones, and E to signify more business-oriented devices.

Hyperion is the first in a line of extraordinary new cameraphones featuring Nokia PureView Pro technology. ‘Emotional’ product renders were art directed by DesignStudio and Nokia Brand Studio to emphasise the device’s revolutionary lens and camera functions, including its distinctive ‘bump’ silhouette. Rendering was completed using Maya software in an ultra-high resolution that will stay crisp up to A2 size.

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What’s in a Name? You may have noticed something subtly different about recently released Nokia phones. Nothing to do with product design, operating system, or any of the many innovations they bring. No, it’s that the new Lumia and Asha ranges have names, which breaks with a 20-year-old convention.

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Harry Woodrow

We Made This A film about the making of the Nokia N9, which took YouTube by storm.

I N 2 0 11, T H E T U R N E R P R IZ E wA S H E l D o U T S I D E lo N D o N Fo R T H E F I R S T T I m E AT T H E B A lT I C C E N T R E Fo R Co N T E m P o R A Ry A RT I N g AT E S H E A D. T H E H I g H P R o F I l E A RT E v E N T P R ov I D E D T H E P E R F EC T o P P o RT U N I T y To C E l E B R AT E T H E l AU N C H o F T H E N o k I A lU m I A A N D E N g Ag E w I T H A R Eg I o N A l AU D I E N C E .

young urbanites in Berlin, Rio, Mumbai and Nairobi. Interspersed with atmospheric cutaway location shots, the footage shows articulate, culturally savvy interviewees responding to questions about how mobile tech is connecting and changing the world in exciting and unpredictable ways. “The idea behind the project came from ‘In Austin’, which was the first Connecting People film [and featured in Uusi #2],” explains Brand and Marketing Studio’s Darryl Pieber, who commissioned ‘Teddy Bears …’. “In effect, the brand essence is being conveyed through the mouths of our target audience. The end result turned out way beyond my expectations – you couldn’t have scripted it better. It expresses a hugely different and inspiring attitude to life.”

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Behind the scenes at the Turner Prize The Turner Prize is one of the UK’s most prominent art initiatives, and for the first time in 27 years, the highly anticipated, often controversial event was presented outside London and Tate’s galleries. The BALTIC Centre in Gateshead worked in partnership with Tate to host the exhibition and awards night, a perfect match as both institutions are dedicated to fostering public debate around the meaning of contemporary art. BALTIC is a former flour mill on the south bank of the River Tyne, lovingly reimagined as a home for one of Europe’s finest contemporary art galleries and a creative educational hub for the local community. Art is all about making connections – emotional, spiritual, intellectual. A well-worded statement in the entrance to the magnificent BALTIC building sums up this credo: “Art is for everybody. We believe art transforms lives. We engage more than 400,000 people every year in our learning programmes, on and offsite, inspiring audiences across the globe. Contemporary art is about contemporary life. Our learning programmes help children, parents and grandparents alike to find personal meaning and connection with the artworks.” “Whether it’s rolling up your sleeves in an artist-led workshop or listening to an artist about their work, we help audiences make sense of what they see: to explore different lenses on the world and understand new ways of thinking. From the young to the old, art buff to bluffer, everybody has access to engage and participate in some of the most inspiring contemporary art in the world.”

Inspiring and inclusive stuff, and exactly why Nokia got involved sponsoring the Turner Prize towards the end of last year. As John Nichols, Head of Marketing for Nokia UK and Ireland puts it: “As part of the Nokia Lumia launch, the Turner Prize gave us a unique opportunity to support something that really brings our brand essence of ‘amazing everyday’ to life. Art is, after all, an interpretation and celebration of the amazing things all around us. On top of this, it was fantastic to take our message to an audience outside of London, and showcase the superb design of Nokia Lumia in an iconic landmark like BALTIC.” Uusi was there on an ice-cold night in December 2011, as crowds crossed over the blinking, neon-lit Millennium Bridge and queued in frostbreathed anticipation to find out who’d won the coveted £25,000 prize. The Turner Prize was launched in 1984, and is awarded to a British or Britain-based artist under 50 for an outstanding exhibition in the previous year. Notable past winners have included Gilbert & George (1986), Rachel Whiteread (1994), Damien Hirst (1995), and Grayson Perry (2003).

“FRom THE yoUNg To T H E o lD, A RT BUFF To BlUFFER , E v E Ry B oDy HAS ACCESS To ENgAgE A N D PA RT I C I PAT E IN SomE oF THE m oS T I N S P I R I N g Co N T E m P o R A Ry ART IN THE woRlD.” BAlTIC mANIFE STo

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Photo Call When you’re working for a global brand like Nokia, of course there have to be certain guidelines and parameters to make sure our brand identity is consistent and recognisable. But on the other hand, too many rules can dampen creativity. So when we started to think about how we might convey our latest ideas and guidance on photography to agencies and internal teams, we decided on a lateral (rather than literal) approach. Last year, Nokia Art Director Kelly Burlace travelled the world with photographer Jane Stockdale to document the lives of real people in Beirut, Johannesburg, Shanghai, Maputo and Sydney. We wrote about their experiences and some of the people they met back in Uusi #2. The team came back with thousands of images, to inspire, inform, and set the benchmark for future commissions. “We’d already staged an exhibition,” explains Kelly. “Now we thought a book would be another good vehicle. We’d be able to reach more people and show that brand photography can be beautiful… even a form of art. If you take image making out of a corporate context, it makes people look at it differently and value it more.”

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Play All the latest creative explorations and a showcase of our agencies’ work.

L u M I a a N d a S h a a r E T h E L aT E S T a d d I T I o N S T o T h E N o k I a fa M I Ly. W E Loo k E d Lo N G a N d h a r d fo r N a M E S T h aT T r I P o f f T h E T o N G u E T h E W o r L d o v E r , a N d P E r f E c T Ly E N c a P S u L aT E T h E I r r E S P E c T I v E char ac TErS.

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A Breath of Fresh Art

Behind the Scenes at the Turner Prize How Nokia used contemporary art to connect with a regional audience. The Book A new book shows Nokia photography in a completely different light.

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The idea is based around creating a network of friends, acquaintances and colleagues to feature on Nokia devices in all visual manifestations of the brand – advertising, point of sale, online, packaging, and so on. By tapping into what really happens in their lives, reflecting their various interests, observing the way they look, talk and use their phones, we can present a much more believable scenario coming from the example screens we show.

Teddy Bears and Talking Drums People around the world reveal how mobile technology has affected their lives. Improving Reality Digital artists are questioning the boundaries between fiction and reality.

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Life Stories The difference, they say, is in the details. At Nokia, every brush stroke is an essential part of the bigger picture, so we need to make sure nothing looks out of place, and even the smallest flourish is adding to the visual narrative we present. This was the thinking behind our new ‘personas’ user interface programme, a concept we introduced in the previous issue of Uusi.

The Asset Test A new centralised library of images and assets for worldwide campaigns. A Breath of Fresh Art Original art and design brought spice and adventure to Nokia World 2011.

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A new Connecting People film explores how people in Berlin, Rio, Mumbai and Nairobi are empowered by mobile technology. They may come from different countries and have different interests, but the headspace they occupy is strikingly similar.

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Hello/ Hei

Staying true to his art, craft and traditional processes’ he finds himself as much in demand as ever in this rapid-fire, here today, gone tomorrow, digital world. His work is a testament to how trends and culture constantly shift, and sometimes end up back where they came from.

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Designs of the Times /

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Life Stories So who are the faces you see on UIs in our marketing imagery?

“I’ve been around letterpress since I was apprenticed at 15,” says Alan. “What’s changed is my approach. To me, the real challenge of creating letterpress is how you can design using fixed sizes of type and spacing materials and make an expressive composition in response to the requirement of the brief. The golden rule is there are no golden rules – you have to feel it, to experiment and get to know what it can and can’t do. Over the past decades, I’ve tried to keep the tradition and possibilities of the medium alive through small courses and workshops at the Royal College of Art and here at the Typography Workshop in Kennington.”

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Designs of the Times A loving look back at Nokia’s most iconic product designs. What’s in a Name? We called our latest devices Lumia and Asha. But how did we get there?

Yo u n g g r a d u at e s fro m d& a d’ s n e w Bloo d e d u c at i o n n e t w o r k a n d Br i g h ton u n i v er si t Y ’s i l l u s t r at i o n c o u r s e w e r e B r i e f e d t o u s e t h e i r c r e at i v i t Y to Br i n g a n e w moBi l e t ec h n o lo g Y to l i fe . t h e 3 4-secon d fi l m t h e Y p r o d u c e d i s n o t o n lY a viBr ant showc a se of their c r a f t, B u t p e r f e c t lY captures the spirit of n e a r f i e l d c o m m u n i c at i o n .

This issue, we are extremely privileged to work with a real craftsman – Alan Kitching. He’s a highly respected, established artist, with his own unique hands-on approach to letterpress-executed graphic design. Alan has created our special Craft Issue cover as only he can – it’s a true, original one-off. Here, he explains why he so loves his chosen medium.

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New-Found Craft Recent illustration graduates bring NFC to life in a new quick-fire film.

Richard Crabb Head of Art Direction, Brand Identity at Nokia Hello again and welcome to Uusi #4, the Craft Issue. The stories and projects featured in this issue embrace the spirit in which we are tackling our ongoing business challenges as a brand – head on, with passion and wholehearted commitment. You’ll find articles covering extreme consumer focus, innovative thinking, intense attention to detail. And above all, craft in execution.

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Last year, a short, behind-the-scenes film showing the Nokia N9 being pieced together at Nokia’s assembly plant in Salo, Finland, became an internet sensation. Read on to discover the secret of its success. 92 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

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Nokia Lumia 800

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Core brand identity What is baseline assets?

Quick Start Baseline Assets

Visit https://brandbook.nokia.com to see all the latest movies and best-practice executions.

A collection of new creative projects that showcase our agencies’ work. 102 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

Please submit your work through NokiaBrandClinic@nokia.com to be included in the latest issue of the magazine. Uusi Magazine — Issue Four — 103

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Richard Crabb Head of Art Direction, Brand Identity at Nokia Hello again and welcome to Uusi #4, the Craft Issue. The stories and projects featured in this issue embrace the spirit in which we are tackling our ongoing business challenges as a brand – head on, with passion and wholehearted commitment. You’ll find articles covering extreme consumer focus, innovative thinking, intense attention to detail. And above all, craft in execution.

Hello/ Hei

This issue, we are extremely privileged to work with a real craftsman – Alan Kitching. He’s a highly respected, established artist, with his own unique hands-on approach to letterpress-executed graphic design. Alan has created our special Craft Issue cover as only he can – it’s a true, original one-off. Here, he explains why he so loves his chosen medium.

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“I’ve been around letterpress since I was apprenticed at 15,” says Alan. “What’s changed is my approach. To me, the real challenge of creating letterpress is how you can design using fixed sizes of type and spacing materials and make an expressive composition in response to the requirement of the brief. The golden rule is there are no golden rules – you have to feel it, to experiment and get to know what it can and can’t do. Over the past decades, I’ve tried to keep the tradition and possibilities of the medium alive through small courses and workshops at the Royal College of Art and here at the Typography Workshop in Kennington.” Staying true to his art, craft and traditional processes, he finds himself as much in demand as ever in this rapid-fire, here today, gone tomorrow, digital world. His work is a testament to how trends and culture constantly shift, and sometimes end up back where they came from.

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Its success shows the deep cultural interest in real stories around design, craft values, and openness. ‘What’s In A Name?’ explores the importance of naming. What should we call the devices that help people talk, text, love, laugh, cry, explore, discover and live their everyday lives? ‘Life Stories’ is all about consumercentric detail – the rich stories we create on our UI screens for marketing. ‘Teddy Bears and Talking Drums’ paints a rich narrative picture from global consumers and what it means to live adventure everywhere. And finally, ‘The Book’ is a beautiful visual record of our brand image making.

Alan Kitching at work on the Uusi front cover image at his Typography Workshop in Kennington, London.

I asked Alan how he sees the role of print today: “There’s still a real appetite for traditional print, but it’s at the higher end of the market now – almost on the cusp of art. People have come to appreciate the tactility and craft of authentic letterpress. The process is evident in the artefact itself, you’re holding something beautiful in your hand… you can actually see the indentation where the block has pressed into the paper, and the ink has set slightly different on every print. Every print is unique, that’s what so precious and exciting about the medium.” The magazine you’re holding in your hands is effectively a limitededition art print. Its cover was lovingly reproduced from Alan’s original by fine art publishers Advanced Graphics London. Bob Saich and his team worked closely with Alan, using hand screen-printing techniques to create a faithful copy. In our first story, ‘New Found Craft’, we delve into the creative spirit, to look at the lifeblood of our industry – emerging talent from the world of illustration. I urge you check out the film… it’s an absolute treat. We all remember the student days, and here’s a simple reminder of why we started. It’s all about tackling the brief, the power to express ourselves and engage others, and what makes us tick as creative individuals. 4 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

We also look at the power of contemporary art. Towards the end of last year, Nokia UK & Ireland Marketing supported the prestigious Turner Prize as part of the Nokia Lumia 800 launch campaign. For the first time, this was held in the north of England at the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Arts in Gateshead. Here’s BALTIC’s agenda: “Art is for everybody. We believe art transforms lives. We engage more than 400,000 people every year in our learning programmes, on and offsite, inspiring audiences across the globe. Contemporary art is about contemporary life.” It made perfect sense for us to get involved and connect regionally as a brand.

Let’s end on an anecdotal note, my New Year’s Day visit to the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, a place like no other. It’s a collection of open-air sculpture by some of the world’s finest artists, set in a rolling, northern landscape. I found this sign tucked away behind the leaves at the entrance of one of the displays: The creative habit is like a drug. The particular obsession changes, but the excitement, the thrill of your creation lasts. The words are Henry Moore’s, a sculptor described as ‘radical, experimental and avant-garde’, one of the most influential artists of his generation. His work introduced Modernism to a wide public, and helped contribute to a seismic shift in culture.

Like our cover designer Alan Kitching, he maintained a singleminded focus, feeding his creative habit throughout his long career: “You have to be true to yourself and follow what you believe in. I’ve been saving and reviving supposedly redundant technology for years and finding exciting new ways to express myself with it. Back in the 1980s, I made sure the RCA hung on to their letterpress equipment and helped students find their direction by working within its particular technical constraints. Together with my partner, Celia Stothard, I rescued an incredible collection of theatrical wood type from the Somerset village of Wrington, which brought a new dimension to my work. Digital technology has moved on apace, but I’ll continue to plough my own furrow – I’m always learning and making new discoveries. I wouldn’t have it any other way.” He’s right. Sometimes you just have to go out there alone with courage, passion and faith, believing you’ll find the right time and place. 2011 was the year Nokia came back, and our time is now. Let’s make 2012 another year to remember, and create yet more beautifully crafted pages of the Nokia history book, together.

By contrast, we look at how artists and filmmakers are exploring the frontiers of digital technology, and ideas about blurring the line between perception and reality. This was the inspiration behind ‘Improving Reality’, a one-day conference organised by Lighthouse, a digital culture agency based in Brighton. With a title so provocative, and our brand’s critical role in technology and culture, we simply had to join the debate. In other stories, we go back to basics. ‘Designs of the Time’ celebrates the history of Nokia’s most iconic products. While ‘We Made It’, looks at, the making of these products through the ‘Nokia N9 Journey’ film. This was a huge hit on YouTube, taking viewers behind the scenes into the factories and our homeland, Finland. Uusi Magazine — Issue Four — 5


Young graduates from D & A D ’ s N ew B lood education network and B righton U ni v ersity ’ s I llustration course were briefed to use their creati v ity to bring a new mobile technology to life . T he 3 4 - second film they produced is not only a v ibrant showcase of their craft, but perfectly captures the spirit of N ear F ield C ommunication .

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New-found Craft Technology is only as interesting as what you can do with it. People are happy enough to reap the benefits or enjoy the fun, but their eyes tend to glaze over when you explain the ins and outs. That was the hurdle Nokia faced with introducing NFC (Near Field Communication), a concept that has been around for some time, but will soon be something we take for granted in the way we use mobile technology. With NFC, you can use a mobile to collect data from another device or NFC tag at close range. It’s like a contactless payment card integrated into a phone. Kind of similar to Bluetooth, but instead of syncing two devices to work together, with NFC they can just touch to make a connection. There are all sorts of possible applications – from travel cards and gaming, wireless printing and sharing contacts, to health care and social media.

ABOVE W O R K O F S A M FA L C O N E R , O N E O F T H E I L L U S T R AT O R S F E AT U R E D I N T H E N F C A N I M AT I O N

“ N ew B lood is a great way of bringing together real clients with the e xceptional talent that comes out of leading courses in the U K .”

But how could we articulate this idea in a really compelling, zappy way? A way that catches the attention and imagination, yet clearly sells the benefits of using the technology? We liked the idea of giving the brief to young creatives who, like the early adopters of technology innovations, would go out there and grab it with both hands. So we went along with London design agency Build to find some likely recent graduates from D&AD’s New Blood and Brighton University’s Illustration course graduate shows. They’d be asked to contribute to a 34-second film, which put across the feel and spirit of the NFC technology. D&AD is the UK’s leading design and advertising institution, and its New Blood initiative is all about giving fresh new talent a chance. Amanda Moorby, D&AD’s Partnership Director explains: “New Blood is a great way of bringing together real clients with the exceptional talent that comes out of leading courses in the UK. We get clients to set real briefs, so it’s a fantastic opportunity.”

AMANDA MOORBY PA RT N E R S H I P D I R EC TO R D&AD (LEF T)

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The resulting film uses rapid-fire cuts of images and words to get across the speed and wide-ranging possibilities of NFC. “We wanted the editing to be really fast, to suggest there’s so much going on,” explains Build’s creative director Michael C Place. “We thought it would be great for people to re-watch and re-watch to catch all the bits that perhaps they didn’t see in the first viewing, and hopefully send it on to friends.” The main thrust of Build’s storyboard was built around the initial letters NFC. These formed the basis for a series of disparate three-word slogans, which become increasingly surreal and nonsensical as the film goes on. So you get strange word triplets like ‘Nice fruity cocktails’, ‘Non-furry cats’, ‘Nancy fancy crop’, ‘No flipping coins’, ‘Nouveau-riche Ferrari collection’, and so on. These were used to give the seven chosen illustrators a jumping in point, something to react to and interpret.

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“There are loads of crazy hidden messages, in there,” says Michael, “a lot of quick-fire humorous slogans that slot together and reflect the technology.” These are stitched together and interspersed with seven very disparate illustration styles – from Nina Cosford’s angular leopards in felt tips, to Sam Hawkins’ offbeat flat-colour surrealism, to Hannah Rowlands’ charmingly naïf unfinished line drawings. The visuals are accompanied by fast, bleepy electronic music from sound designer and regular Build collaborator J-VEN. “It’s the craft of those hand illustrations mixed in with that human quirkiness that really humanises the technology,” adds Michael.

“I t ’ s the craft of those hand illustrations mi x ed in with that human q uirkiness that really humanises the technology” M ichael C P lace build (B E LO W )

The effect is rich, complex and decidedly manic. It’s at once intriguing and infuriating, because it all happens so fast – you know you’ve missed some good stuff, and feel compelled to rewind and pause, rewind and pause until your curiosity is sated.

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THE I llustrators T H I S PAG E L eft from top : T om E dwards S am F alconer N I N A COSFO R D A aron V ohra O P P OSI T E PAG E : H annah rowlands

“ I really like drawing and making up stories … the world can be a q uite dark place , so it ’ s nice to surround yourself with things that look nice and make you happy.” H annah R owlands I llustrator

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Build also filmed the craft and story behind the piece, featuring interviews with the illustrators, where they talk about their approach to their work, as well as inspirations and aspirations. “I thought the Nokia [NFC] film was an interesting use of illustration,” says Patrick Burgoyne, editor of Creative Review. “You don’t see illustration used much in moving image projects, and certainly not in that way. A lot of brands have started to see the value of illustration for print advertising or online, but not very many use it in moving-image projects, so that was quite surprising to see it used in that context.” “It’s not a typical advert you would expect from a phone company like Nokia,” says Hannah, one of the contributing illustrators. “I haven’t seen anything like this before, so I think that’s really progressive.”

“A lot of brands hav e started to see the value of illustration for print ad v ertising or online , but not v ery many use it in m o vin g - ima g e pr o jects .” P atrick B urgoyne E ditor C reative R eview ( B elow )

W ATC H T H E V I D EO http : // vimeo . com / 3 3 2 7 5 6 7 7

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Designs of the Times /

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On the eve of the launch of the Nokia Lumia 800 in October 2011, Nokia staged an exhibition at the Design Museum in London titled People Made – Nokia Phones that Changed the World. / This will form the basis for a larger event in Helsinki as part of the city’s World Design Capital celebrations in 2012. Here we take a look at some of the iconic, breakthrough phones featured in the show, and consider why they made such a huge impact when they were released. /

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This was the first phone to incorporate Nokia Navi-key™, a breakthrough two-way scroller, which made browsing the phone’s 99 number phonebook fast and efficient. Combined with two softkey select buttons and a Simplex user interface, it established Nokia’s reputation for easy-to-use phones.

So how did it happen? They say a group of Nokia engineers often visited a bar near the factory and they’d habitually place their phones on the table. However, by the end of the evening, the friends were often confused as to whose was whose. That was until some bright spark came up with the idea of painting them in different colours.

Interchangeable Nokia Xpress-On™ covers really took off with the Nokia 5110 in 1998. Colour and personalisation had entered the once-monochrome world of mobile phones; at a stroke, they became lifestyle products rather than communication tools.

Compact and utilitarian, the Nokia 2110 was introduced in 1994 as the direct successor to the Nokia 1011. Much smaller than other phones on the market at the time, its popularity snowballed, with an astonishing 20 million units sold over two years (compared to the predicted 400,000).

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The Nokia 1011 was a real game changer. People didn’t have to find a fixed phone to make a call, they could carry one around with them. Nokia had freed the phone forever, ushering in a new era of communication.

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1996 / Built for business / Nokia 9000 Communicator / By the mid-90s, email was changing the business landscape. But you were still tied to a desk or laptop if you wanted to use it. The Nokia 9000 Communicator, launched in 1996, aimed to change all that. Featuring a full QWERTY keyboard, and running a GEOS operating system on an Intel i386 processor, it was a pocket computer by any other name.

/ The Nokia 1011 was the first widely available GSM mobile phone. A real game changer, it ushered in a new era of communication. /

As it turned out, the Nokia 9000 Communicator proved too expensive to catch on with anyone but hard-core business users. But the keyboard-based form factor has continued in products like N97, N900 and today’s E7.

0/ 511

The Nokia 1011 was named after 10 November, the date it was launched in 1992. This was the world’s first widely available GSM mobile phone. You could receive text messages, but not send them.

Another first was the now familiar Nokia ringtone which is reckoned to be heard 20,000 times a second.

9000 C o m m u n ic a to r /

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/ Nokia instantly became the largest manufacturer of digital cameras on the planet when the Nokia 7650 launched in 2002. /

1999 / The Internet in your hand / Nokia 7110 /

2000 / Never lets you down / Nokia 6310 /

Launched in 1999, this was the world’s first WAP (Wireless Application Protocol) phone, which meant you could surf a ‘light’ version of the Internet. And it came with another innovation too – a ridged, tactile scroller called the Navi™ Roller. This was inspired by the Microsoft mouse, perfect for scrolling down long, text-based websites. Its predecessor (the Nokia 8110) had appeared in cult sci-fi movie The Matrix with special modifications – notably a cool spring-loaded cover. Our designers were blown away, because coincidentally they had been developing a similar feature for the Nokia 7110. The phone’s green finish is also a nod to The Matrix.

A no-nonsense business workhorse, the Nokia 6310 emerged in 2000, totally geared up for a hard life on the road. Most significantly, it had a phenomenal battery life – moderate users could expect standby time between charges of 10 days to a fortnight. This meant it was not only hugely reliable, but also had a small energy footprint.

1999 / Ruggedly handsome / Nokia 3210 /

Small, tough, and chock full of character, the Nokia 3210 was one of Nokia’s first truly iconic phones. Launched with an ad campaign aimed at a younger audience in 1999, this was the first phone with internal antennas, so it felt cute, compact and fitted even the tightest of pockets.

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2002 / A new camera angle / Nokia 7650 /

Released in 2002, the Nokia 7650 looked very different from what had gone before, setting the agenda for what was to come. Among other innovations, it featured Nokia’s first full colour screen and two built-in cameras.

Though the camera was basic by today’s standards, it changed the way people interacted with their phones. Instead of a ‘heads down’ experience, phones became more about capturing the moment around you – as new gestures and behaviour emerged. As a ‘slider’ phone, with the keypad hidden away when you didn’t need it, the Nokia 7650 made the screen the star, anticipating today’s full-screen smartphones. Oh, and Nokia also instantly became the largest manufacturer of digital cameras on the planet.

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Built like a battleship, the Nokia 3210 could withstand the knocks, bumps and general rigours of everyday life in style. It featured interchangeable Xpress-On™ covers, and an industrydefining icon-based interface. It also introduced the now-familiar ‘smiling face’ – the upturned contrast fascia just under the screen, positioning Nokia as the friendly face of mobile technology.

The Nokia 6310 featured slender, pocket-friendly proportions, superb keypad ergonomics, and a low-power backlit display, readable even in the murkiest conditions. Wonderfully fit for purpose, the phone built up a loyal following, won over by its uncompromising utilitarianism.

/

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Launched in 2003, mainly to meet the needs of key emerging markets like India, Africa and Russia, the Nokia 1100 represented a major step in the democratisation of the mobile phone. It had to be affordable, durable and relevant – and available in many language variants. Focusing on people’s real needs, the stripped-back phone featured a large, easy-to-read monochrome screen, a discreet flashlight, and a radio. But the Nokia 1100 was also designed with sustainability in mind. It was simple to pull apart, so bits could be replaced or repaired, giving the phone a longer lifespan. Its distinctive, one-piece silicon keymat was cheap to produce and easily adapted to different languages. What’s more, it had a long standby time, easier on the environment, and just what you need in places where power sources are thin on the ground.

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2006 / All in one / Nokia N95 /

The Nokia N95, released in 2006, proved to be one of Nokia’s seminal products. By now, the mobile phone market had matured and people expected a great deal more from their devices. The Nseries represented the most advanced phones on the market, and this was the best of the best. A genuine technical marvel, the Nokia N95 managed to pack in Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, Infrared, GPS, a 5MP camera with Carl Zeiss optics, video, an MP3 player, and internal flash memory. It had a double slider which meant you could use either a regular keypad or quick access media keys.

For starters, it was metal, notoriously tricky in mobile phone engineering terms, but brilliant for structural integrity and recyclability. Then we developed stamping techniques to combine catches and clips into the metal which reduced parts counts, as well as manufacturing and assembly time. We found ingenious new ways of reducing power consumption and preserving battery life. All parts were either recyclable or could be repurposed. And being metal, it was virtually impossible to break. Elegant, progressive and responsible, the Nokia 6300 represented a new holistic approach to design.

/ Elegant, progressive and responsible, the Nokia 6300 became a symbol of our trailblazing approach to sustainability. /

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2003 / One for all / Nokia 1100 /

Clothed in a premium-feel brushed-chrome body, the Nokia 8800’s design cues came from jewellery, watchmaking and highend automobiles. In their pursuit of originality and desirability, our designers pulled together and mastered the most unlikely materials and techniques, including stainless steel, metal injectionmouldings, fine-pitch sapphire glass and ball-bearing mechanisms.

In 2007, Nokia launched a discreet, wonderfully poised product that became a symbol of the company’s trailblazing approach to sustainability.

6300/

Not so much ring-ring as bling-bling. The Nokia 8800 set the trend for the mobile phone as object of desire back in 2005. By bringing a taste of luxury to the mass market, this little gem developed the idea that a piece of technology could transcend the functional, to become a precious artefact in its own right.

C3/

2007 / A phone for the planet / Nokia 6300 /

2005 / A taste of luxury / Nokia 8800 /

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2008 / The keys to success / Nokia C3 /

/ The sleek Nokia N9 is like a ship in a bottle: beautifully simple, but deceptively complex to achieve. /

In 2008, there were plenty of keyboard-based phones around, aimed mainly at the hardcore business user – but they were expensive and gradually being usurped by touch-screen smartphones. But research showed us that QWERTY phones were still sought-after in emerging markets, particularly with younger people wanting them for social media and text messaging. The problem was simply the price.

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Through clever use of anodised aluminium, bold colour and some inspired tweaks to form, our designers skillfully turned a high-value proposition into an affordable package. Bundled with an Internet browser and email client, we’d created an exciting, fully fledged social networking device, which managed to breathe new life into QWERTY.

/

2010 / Best of both / Nokia X3-02 /

2011 / Simply beautiful / Nokia N9 /

Released in 2011, the Nokia N9 is an exercise in aesthetic and technological minimalism. Taking a first-principles approach to smartphone design, our designers and engineers worked closely together to determine what could be left out, as much as what should be included. The gently tapered uni-body is made from a single piece of injection-moulded polycarbonate, with colour running right through it, so it can take scratches in its stride. Details and openings were machined to minuscule tolerances, using advanced techniques usually reserved for metals. Moulded, inky-black glass provides the purest possible window into the user interface. The Nokia N9 is like a ship in a bottle: beautiful to behold, simple to understand, but deceptively complex to achieve.

The Nokia X3, which came out in 2010, was all about listening, learning and reacting. Its genesis was an immersive, worldwide research project to glean insights into the relationships people have with technology and to understand their behaviour patterns. Our designers uncovered a real appetite for touch-screen technology - though, of course, without the price tag and perceived complexity of high-end smartphones. Fortunately, they were able to hitch their findings to a new technology that was in development – a hybrid touch-and-type interface. Nothing had been done like this before, so it proved a bumpy ride. But the Nokia X3 designers’ perseverance paid off. Thin, sleek and colourful, it offered the best of both worlds– flexibility and aspiration – and a radical new way of interacting with your phone.

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/ People Made – Nokia Phones that Changed the World ran from 28 October to 2 November 2011 at the Design Museum in South East London. / Arranged by Nokia Design and Nokia Brand Studio, the event was curated by Stephen White and designed by a team led by Lisbet Tonner, both of Nokia Design. /

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/ People Made Nokia Phones that Changed the World 1992 – 2012 / Craft and Process / 3210 8800

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L umia and A sha are the latest additions to the N okia family. W e looked long and hard for names that trip off the tongue the world o v er , and perfectly encapsulate their respecti v e characters .

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What’s in a Name? You may have noticed something subtly different about recently released Nokia phones. Nothing to do with product design, operating system, or any of the many innovations they bring. No, it’s that the new Lumia and Asha ranges have names, which breaks with a 20-year-old convention. Previously, we’d favoured a combination of letters and numbers to tag our devices. Some significant, others less so. The world’s first widely available GSM phone, the Nokia 1011, for example, was named after 10 November, the auspicious date it was launched in 1992. Later, we used N to denote our premium phones, and E to signify more business-oriented devices. It was a functional approach which served us well, and mirrored the simple beauty of our product design. But today the Nokia brand wants to be as warm and approachable as possible. So ahead of the launch of our new device ranges in November 2011, we decided that friendly, straightforward names would be the way forward.

/

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“ I t ’ s bringing humanity and technology closer together . I f you hav e something you cherish, you name it.” C hris G eorge H ead of B rand A rchitecture

There was a practical consideration too, as Chris George, Head of Brand Architecture in London explains. The number of Nokia products on the market had become so great that “even we were becoming confused by our naming. It’s about bringing humanity and technology closer together. If you have something you cherish, you name it.” Chris was part of a team charged with coming up with names for the new Nokia Windows Phone and Series 40 devices. But of course, that’s easier said than done. It’s fine for there to be millions of Johns or Zhangs in the world, but that’s certainly not the case for consumer products, whose nomenclature is jealously and litigiously guarded. Many of the 36 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

most appropriate, catchy names are already accounted for, while others are too parochial to have universal resonance and relevance in different countries and cultures. Every day and everywhere, an avalanche of new consumer products are launched – from cars and pharmaceuticals, to drinks and cosmetics. And of course electronics is now the most prolific sector of all. According to a recent article in The New Yorker magazine, in 1980, there were fewer than 10,000 registered hi-tech trademarks in the US alone. Now there are more than 300,000. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg – with China tightening its grip on world markets, more and more Western names are being trademarked in the East.

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Because of the complexities involved, the name-generation process is often trusted to a third party with expertise in this area. Using free-association techniques, the agency produces hundreds of tangential words – some more usable than others, but all fuelling the naming debate. It’s the equivalent of a jazz singer’s scat, improvising around a central notion until you happen upon an interesting take or juxtaposition that fits. The best brand names work like truncated poems, compressing meaning and resonance into a word or combination of words that have a pleasing sound.

“From an initial list of nearly 200 names [that the agency presented] only a handful made it through this stage for what was eventually Lumia,” confirms Chris. Then the really hard work begins. Experts in 84 dialects started checking for any negative associations in different languages and assessing how easy they are to say. Some letters like J, L, R and V are difficult to pronounce in certain countries. Some languages don’t have certain letters in their alphabet (like Q in Polish).

T he best brand names work like truncated poems , compressing meaning and resonance into a word or combination of words that hav e a pleasing sound .

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W e were after a name that sounded great when u sed t o g ether with ‘ N o k ia’, and ended with a v owel so it worked phonetically

We were after a name that sounded great when used together with ‘Nokia’, and ended with a vowel so it worked phonetically. A shortlist was presented to the Nokia Leadership team and Lumia came out on top. Lumia has particular meaning in Finland where lumi means snow, and lumia means snow in plural (the Finns know their wintery weather all too well).

It goes without saying that responses to names are highly subjective – we all have different associations with and feelings towards certain words, which means agreement can be hard to come by. Google could easily have been called BackRub. Orange finally won out from a shortlist that included Pecan and Kite. Naming is an incredibly arbitrary activity, but that’s what makes it so fascinating.

The Nokia Asha range has more multi-cultural connotations. In the knowledge that the Series 40 phones were heavily sold in emerging markets, the Nokia team worked through a different range of name possibilities. Asha is the Hindi word for hope: it sounds good, and it is brimful of meaning.

What you have to realise is there’s no such thing as the ‘perfect’ name. In itself, a name can only convey so much. The rest of the story – straplines, advertising, corporate identity, and other stuff – helps build the resonance and significance, feeding back into the name to transform it into a valuable nugget.

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You have to remember too that brands and products can ‘grow into’ their names. In these cases, meaning and association work from the inside out. The name is defined by the experiences people have around these brands or products rather than the connotations of the word itself. And the name Nokia, what’s the story there? Well, it’s quite simple really. In the 19th century the company started out as a wood pulp mill and later expanded into making rubber boots. This all happened in the Finnish city of Nokia. Which has a certain ring to it, doesn’t it?

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Life Stories The difference, they say, is in the details. At Nokia, every brush stroke is an essential part of the bigger picture, so we need to make sure nothing looks out of place, and even the smallest flourish is adding to the visual narrative we present. This was the thinking behind our new ‘personas’ user interface programme, a concept we introduced in the previous issue of Uusi. The idea is based around creating a network of friends, acquaintances and colleagues to feature on Nokia devices in all visual manifestations of the brand – advertising, point of sale, online, packaging, and so on. By tapping into what really happens in their lives, reflecting their various interests, observing the way they look, talk and use their phones, we can present a much more believable scenario coming from the example screens we show.

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The latest ‘personas’ initiative was overseen by London branding consultancy DesignStudio, and involved setting up a strenuous ten-day shoot in Los Angeles, California in December 2011. Why LA? Well, mainly on account of the weather at that time of the year, and the rich cultural diversity of the local population. The initial task was to find ten people who met very specific criteria, to fit the redefined Nokia core target market. First off, they needed to be 22 to 28 years old and live in greater Los Angeles. There needed to be a 50-50 male-female split, and a mix of ethnic backgrounds. Preferably they should have creative jobs (though not modelling or acting), a positive outlook on life, plus the energy and ambition to make things happen around them. Fed by street-casting agencies in London and LA, DesignStudio first waded through hundreds of test shots and profiles. Art director Luke Alexander then travelled over to the US with photographer Adam Laycock, his assistant and a producer. They met 90 potential candidates in person – an important part of the process – before settling on the final ten. Finally, the shoot could begin in earnest. Luke takes up the story: “We’d tend to meet up with one of them in the morning at their home, spend a few hours with them to get a real face-to-face sense of their interests and personality beyond what we already knew. Then we’d perhaps take them off to meet with one of the others at a café, art gallery or bookshop. It was quite an organic process, usually led by the cast’s interests and suggestions for locations. The days were very full and always packed with surprises.”

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A couple of the cast were childhood friends (one had recommended the other) but apart from that, the chosen ten were complete strangers to start with. However, the group built a rapport remarkably quickly, and developed a natural chemistry. DesignStudio constructed a spider’s web-like ‘relationships map’ showing how each person was supposedly connected to the next, a particularly useful tool for the scriptwriter who was charged with writing incidental material – texts, emails, tweets and status updates, based on dialogue within the network. “The relationships aren’t entirely explicit,” explains Luke, “they work at different levels, so it was really useful to see where the crossovers were to develop the themes and interrelationships.”

The friends were captured at their usual haunts, and a few day trips were organised by a local fixer – a barbeque, hiking in the hills, hunting for bargains at a local flea market. These provided the backdrop around which more specific personal anecdotes could be created, providing the kind of content you’d find on people’s facebook pages, twitter feeds or cameraphone libraries. For Adam, the photographer, one of the major issues was taking shots through the eyes of the cast. After all, the whole point of the exercise was to see LA through a local lens, rather than his own. He took literally thousands of images on the shoot, but these were carefully edited down to 50 of each character and curated as a working set to “give a cohesive look and feel, ready to use across advertising and marketing materials on all Nokia devices over the next two or so years,” explains Luke. The creation of what is in reality a virtual network of friends certainly makes for a far richer, more credible story being played out on the UIs. Over time, the faces and places will become familiar and we hope strike a subconscious chord. “There was a real balance that needed to be struck,” says Luke, “Dipping into people’s real lives for believability, yet constructing this vivid imaginary world around them.”

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Hyperion is the first in a line of extraordinary new cameraphones featuring Nokia PureView Pro technology. ‘Emotional’ product renders were art directed by DesignStudio and Nokia Brand Studio to emphasise the device’s revolutionary lens and camera functions, including its distinctive ‘bump’ silhouette. Rendering was completed using Maya software in an ultra-high resolution that will stay crisp up to A2 size.

The Asset Test The Asset Test As you can probably imagine, product image making for a huge global brand like Nokia is a complex and gargantuan task. That’s why Brand and Marketing Studio is busy creating a rationalised online library of global consumerfacing baseline assets. We love a challenge, and this resource is set to become an essential part of our ever-evolving brand identity. To give you some idea of the task in hand, we are looking at well over 2,000 product and screen shots needed to fuel Nokia’s global marketing effort over the next 12 months. Consolidating the library under the auspices of a single studio makes total sense – we can build expertise in this area, taking the depth and excellence of Nokia product imagery to another level. We’ll be able to fully get to grips with the finer points of colour, form and user interface, and then spread our knowledge. We can evolve a bank of cool cover art, bookmarks for websites, wallpapers and icons.

A kit of parts

Available through Marco Polo, Nokia’s new baseline assets project gives agencies around the world instant access to approved, high-quality images of our latest products. 46 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

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EA hub 60 days remaining EA hub 16 days remaining EA hub time expired EA game front page EA game Tetris Browser home RedBull browser Lock dual sim Home Facebook Favourite contacts Apps & games Name list Browser favourite Browser history Email homescreen Email inbox Yahoo Email inbox Gmail Email inbox Hotmail Social homescreen Social Facebook Social Twitter Chat Nokia store Music & radio Media player Sim manager Lock single sim Home Facebook Single sim Nokia 202 dual sim browser hero image Nokia 202 dual sim games hero image Nokia 202 dual sim games hero image

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The asset library will be a one-stop shop at the core of our identity, a crucial step towards total brand cohesion.

“Every asset will be available in one place – an archive server with restricted access and high security,” explains Chris Chan, Global Senior Marketing Manager, Brand Studio. They will also act as a benchmark for quality standards and consistency throughout our image portfolio. What’s more, we will create human stories through the UI (as opposed to a typical screen-grab cut and paste) based on the virtual personas for marketing showcased in Uusi #3. The business case is compelling too, helping to create accountability, efficiency, productivity and responsibility. Instead of a simple tool kit taking four to six months to put together, it will now take just three to four weeks. The asset library will be a one-stop shop at the core of our identity, a crucial step towards total brand cohesion. “This is another great example of how we look for authenticity in everything we do as a brand,” says Aapo Bovellan, Director, Brand and Marketing Studio. “It’s a resource that fits with our simple identity recipe, starting with the UI and working outwards. Even at baseline asset level, we’re looking for consistency and purity of execution.”

To give you some idea of the task in hand, we are looking at well over 2,000 product and screen shots needed to fuel Nokia’s global marketing effort over the next 12 months. Uusi Magazine — Issue Four — 49

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A Breath of Fresh Art

Harry Woodrow This page

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What does ‘adventure everywhere’ look like? We found out by commissioning a series of intriguing original art and design pieces that were used to brighten and punctuate the wide open spaces of Nokia World 2011.

A Breath of Fresh Art On 27 October 2011, thousands of developers, media commentators and die-hard Nokia fans descended upon the ExCeL Exhibition Centre in London’s Docklands in a state of super-anticipation. Nokia World 2011 was set to be one of the company’s most significant conferences in years, as the Finnish mobile technology giant fought back on all fronts, with the launch of its new Nokia Lumia and Nokia Asha phones.

Gargantuan events spaces like the ExCel are a huge blank canvas. Often these kinds of spaces can be cavernous and utilitarian, and quite soulless unless they’re handled with expertise and imagination. They need dressing and drama on a grand scale, but most of all, they’re crying out for small touches of warmth and individuality. Otherwise, people can start feeling overwhelmed – like lost, inconsequential sheep. Every Nokia event is painstakingly stitched together by an invisible thread, a narrative theme that brings a sense of unity to the major ideas, events and announcements. For Nokia World 2011, the central concept was ‘new now’. This was underpinned by our brand essence, with executions designed to create an impression of ‘adventure everywhere’. Marc Wood, a well-travelled designer who works with Anglo-Finnish agency Command Associates, was tasked not only with expressing the brand essence in the branding and spatial design of the space, but also bringing some humanity and originality to the party. His response was to go back to his roots – well, his old art college actually – and commission an eclectic collection of art pieces to lighten, brighten and counterpoint the overall branded environment. “It was such a big space,” he says, “so we had to find a way of breaking it up… punctuating it with more quirky points of interest.”

In any given year, the staging and organisation of a massive public-facing event like this is a test of strategy and stamina. The eyes of the world are upon you, watching your every move. The programme needs to be run with military precision, a sea of carefully orchestrated peaks, encouraged by an undercurrent of momentum. Delegates need to feel constantly stimulated – mentally and visually. The most successful events are an opportunity to connect with old and new peers, colleagues and friends – people with something to say and people hungry to hear all about it. And that’s something Nokia know more about than most. Uusi Magazine — Issue Four — 53


Anton Sucksdorff This page

David Lane Opposite page

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Fortunately for us, Marc is an alumnus of Central Saint Martins, one of the most progressive and influential colleges in the UK. These days, he’s a visiting lecturer, so he was able to set second-year BA Graphic Design students a special summer brief for Nokia World. He also called upon his network of former classmates and friends, many of whom have gone on to become celebrated designers since making their way in the world. “My brief to them all was very open,” explains Marc. “To create an art and language piece that reflected their personal take on ‘adventure everywhere’. As a curator, I wanted pieces that were dangerous, quirky and youthful. I also gave them some key words to play with – ‘pure’, ‘blue’, ‘quirkiness’, ‘Finnish’.”

But Marc’s obstinacy paid dividends, the gutsy brief garnering audacious results. What came back was an accomplished, pleasingly diverse collection: from the surreal to the graphic, the obscure to the direct, in two dimensions and three dimensions, installations and photography, illustration and digital. Some were mounted on strategically placed easels, others required more bespoke housings. They complemented other unexpected twists in the overall design programme, and provided a contrast from the more corporate imperatives of an event like Nokia World.

With 18 working designerartists and 18 students to chivvy, support and encourage, Marc had his work cut out. “I had to be determined about it,” he admits. “A project like this needs someone to get behind it and drive it, otherwise it can simply fizzle out.”

Lauren Michelle Pires Opposite page

“My brief to them all was very open, to create an art and language piece that reflected their personal take on ‘adventure everywhere’. As a curator, I wanted pieces that were dangerous, quirky and youthful.” Marc Wood Designer Command Associates

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Gary Wallis This page

Tony Erapuro Opposite page

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Rana Salam Opposite page

Maria-Lee Warren This page

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Highlights include Rana Salam’s poster, which evokes the spirit of everyday street ephemera found in Beirut, Lebanon. It’s a homage to ‘Shahr el Asal’ (The Honeymoon), a 1950’s Egyptian movie poster based on wonderful Arabic calligraphy that forms the shape of a heart. Rana’s poster has been reinterpreted in two contemporary colours, and by deliberately misprinting the image out of register. Tony Erapuro, meanwhile, produced an abstract canvas by applying paint with his fingers in the same way he would using a touch-screen phone. “These simple adventurous actions keep me connected and entertained everyday for hours on end,” he explains. Negotiating her way through a maze of health and safety regulations, student Maria Lee-Warren managed to set up a one-off ‘tipi photo booth’ outside the main building. Delegates were encouraged to don accessories and costumes from a dressing up box, and the results were posted online. http://tinyurl.com/cojhngy

Award-winning design studio Praline set up a website where visitors were posed the question ‘What should I do now?’. They could submit answers wherever they happened to be, or using a dedicated laptop on site. These flashed up randomly in different vibrant colours on a large LED display, which attracted plenty of attention. Suggestions ranged from the curious to the bizarre, like these: “Follow that cab”; “Kiss Mike Ramsdale”; “Go bald”; “Sing as Joselito”. The website www.whatshouldidonow.eu is still active, if you want to catch some more. Photographic highlights included Gary Wallis’ disarming picture of a beach shrouded in mist, with people in the far distance stoically enjoying the water despite the rather drab atmosphere. And student Lillian Squires’ close up of some Wellington boots splashing in a ‘digital’ blue puddle made up of pixel-like rectangles. A spooky piece of serendipity given that she had no idea that once upon a time Nokia had been a manufacturer of rubber boots.

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Jessica Colaho

young urbanites in Berlin, Rio, Mumbai and Nairobi. Interspersed with atmospheric cutaway location shots, the footage shows articulate, culturally savvy interviewees responding to questions about how mobile tech is connecting and changing the world in exciting and unpredictable ways. “The idea behind the project came from ‘In Austin’, which was the first Connecting People film [and featured in Uusi #2],” explains Brand and Marketing Studio’s Darryl Pieber, who commissioned ‘Teddy Bears…’. “In effect, the brand essence is being conveyed through the mouths of our target audience. The end result turned out way beyond my expectations – you couldn’t have scripted it better. It expresses a hugely different and inspiring attitude to life.”

A new Connecting People film explores how people in Berlin, Rio, Mumbai and Nairobi are empowered by mobile technology. They may come from different countries and have different interests, but the headspace they occupy is strikingly similar.

Ruha Reyhani

Roman Hansler

Leo Conradon Jonathan Immer

Directed by David Betteridge, a new five-minute Connecting People film called ‘Teddy Bears and Talking Drums’ explores how mobile technology is empowering

00:00:00

Valentine Njorge

Marcelo Gluz Andrea Bauer

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In just 20 or so years, mobile technology has become inherent to the way we live. It has shaped the way we communicate, changed our expectations, behaviour and language. In a way, our mobile devices have become extensions of ourselves – they help us express our hopes and fears, to be what we want to be. They are an umbilical cord to our personal network, a direct line to what’s happening at work, inside our circle of friends, or even on the other side of the world.

Teddy Bears and Talking Drums

Mark W Kaigwa

Hawa Essuman Jam da Silva Shamim Rafat

Sahil Khan

Mutua Matheka Heleno Bernardi Jay Cousins

Gurudatt Bhobe

Rio Berlin

Mumbai

Nairobi

Teddy Bears and Talking Drums Let’s face it. You wouldn’t leave home without your mobile phone any more than you’d leave home without your keys.

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“Social networks and mobile technology provide some sort of spiritual home.”

“Our identity is like technology, where we change constantly. I also don’t think it’s a bad thing at all.”

“There’s so much that is happening right now that it’s impossible to ignore. You walk down the street and you can tell that things are different.”

To reflect global trends, and highlight similarities and differences across the continents, the shoot involved extensive travel, with three days each in Kenya, Brazil and Germany, and two days in India during the late summer of 2011.

The quotes and opinions that emerged were often insightful and profound. Jessica Colaho, a researcher and bass guitarist from Nairobi, commented on the sheer ubiquity of such a young technology: “The mobile phone has become part of the ecosystem, it has become the default device”. Ruha Reyhani, a campaigner and creative innovator from Berlin noted how mobile devices are democratising opinion: “Everybody can be their own journalist, with real time interaction and a real time voice you can affect politics on a day-to-day basis”.

Ten days of pre-location research

Ten days of pre-location research for suitable interviewees started on Google and moved on to Twitter and LinkedIn. Through this ‘crowd sourcing’ approach the team managed to hook into a vibrant network, finding key players and then gradually unearthing a rich seam of characters. “It was amazing how many of the people we ended up using knew each other,” says Paul. “As one of them said, it used to be six degrees of separation, now it’s just two.”

While the original plan was to feature just two or three stories per country, one introduction led to another, and another, until there were over 30 interviews in the can. Some were short vox pops, others were full 40-minute interviews. In Kenya, a group of friends were invited to a barbeque and just encouraged to talk among themselves as the crew wandered around with a camera.

“The identity of self is as important as the identity of the network or the people that you identify with and who you connect with.”

Paul Albert of London agency Hugo & Cat is the film’s producer: “There’s a real appetite for using smartphones in a different, entrepreneurial way,” he explains. “People are really evangelical; they see the technology as a business opportunity, not just an everyday tool.”

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“[The filmmakers] did a great job of weaving everything together,” says Darryl. “Though the people in the film were in different countries and had different interests, it’s telling that they all occupy the same headspace.” And in case you’re wondering where the title comes from, it refers to a quote by Mark Kaigwa, a video game maker and social media commentator from Kenya, one of the many erudite talking heads in the film. “To this generation, the mobile phone is our teddy bear,” he says. In other words, a source of comfort and companionship. Something you wouldn’t leave home without, any more than you’d forget to don your trousers.

00:04:19

“I hope that by the feeling of being connected that the people can actually realise that in reality we are connected.”

It took three weeks of continual and agonising slicing to get the footage down to the right length to sit on its intended destination, www.nokia.com. “[The final edit]

ended up almost like a trailer, a film of soundbites,” says Paul. “There were whole interviews we had to leave out which were great, but just wouldn’t have been right in this context. We’re really hoping they can be used for something else in the future.”

“Where will this all lead to I don’t know. And that’s the exciting thing about it.”

35 hours of film footage

The team returned to the UK with 35 hours of film footage mainly shot on handheld Canon 5D cameras, and featuring a mix of insight and observations from artists, musicians, bloggers and entrepreneurs – “bright, motivated, interesting people”, as David puts it. “We were after a fast-moving, global feel. It had to be loose, spontaneous and energetic, not too considered and corporate.”

“The traditional sense of I will go to school, come out and look for a job is not as strong as I will go to school and then create a job based on what I’m interested in and what I’m good at.”

brandbook.nokia.com/ blog/view/item67213

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There were some fascinating sub themes too. For instance, that people don’t seem to have the same yearning for stability that previous generations had. In fact, they positively thrive on change and movement, with mobile technology giving them enough grounding and connection to feel confident and free. And that people have developed a more fluid sense of identity, less to do with location or nationality, than the ideas and virtual networks they share.

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Mobile technology and the Internet is shaping the way we think about and understand the physical world around us. Challenging, forward-looking digital artists, games designers and filmmakers are questioning accepted norms and looking for new ways to create and distribute content.

Improving Reality There’s a mobile phone app called Streetmuseum by the Museum of London that’s beguiling as well as intriguing. You simply hold your cameraphone up to the London street scene in front of you, and it automatically superimposes historical images of that very same location on your screen – a window through time. You could see families hurriedly making their way to an Underground shelter during the Blitz; 1960s groovers hanging out on Carnaby Street; the Great Fire of 1666 mercilessly devouring anything that stood in its path. Streetmuseum is an example of what the science fiction writer Bruce Sterling terms ‘atemporality’, a cultural condition where the past, present and future collide to reveal something new. And it’s ideas about blurring the line between perception and reality like this which inspired ‘Improving Reality’, a one-day conference organised by Lighthouse, a digital culture agency based in Brighton, UK last year. ‘Improving Reality’ attracted diverse speakers and audience – players from the art and design world, filmmakers, games designers, technology gurus and futurologists. In other words, people interested in furthering the debate on technology and creativity, questioning the established paradigms, exploring new ways of making and doing things. Of course, given the provocative title and subject matter, Uusi simply had to join the debate and assess the opportunities for our brand in these new territories.

The sold-out event was split into three parts: Digital Art, Cinema and Gaming or “three easy-to-comprehend chapters,” as Honor Harger, director of Lighthouse and curator of the event explains. In spite of this clear demarcation, there were plenty of overlapping themes. The first session, ‘Reality Hacking’, looked at how digital media artists can subvert the way we look at the world. As John Lennon put it, “reality leaves a lot to the imagination”– what we actually see, what we think we see, or what we choose to see, are just as real as each other. And a perceptive artist can play with these fine distinctions and contradictions. A good example of this is speaker Julian Oliver’s mischievous creation, ‘The Artvertiser’. This is a software platform for replacing billboard advertisements with art in real time. It works by teaching computers to ‘recognise’ individual ads so they can be replaced with alternative content, like images and video. You view these through a pair of special ‘Artvertiser’ binoculars, and if you’re in WiFi range, you can publish the results on online galleries like Flickr and YouTube. A new platform for public art, ‘The Artvertiser’ questions what kind of visual backdrop is appropriate for our cities. “It’s about taking back control,” says Honor. “After all, these billboards are in a public space, so it’s asking ‘do we have to accept this?’.”

“It’s about taking back control, after all, these billboards are in a public space, so it’s asking ‘do we have to accept this?’.” Honor Harger, director of Lighthouse 70 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

Going one step further is Oliver’s Newstweek, a device for manipulating news read by other people on wireless hotspots. Built into a small, innocuous wall plug, this allows art pranksters to remotely edit news coming in on wireless devices without the reader knowing what’s going on. Newstweek alters reality, but also makes a point about the way we are manipulated by the media, and often accept the information we are fed at face value. Uusi Magazine — Issue Four — 71


Bottom left clockwise: — Lizzie Gillett Copyright Spanner Films/ Charlotte Rushton — Still from ‘The Age of Stupid’ Copyright Spanner Films — Pete Postlethwaite stars in ‘The Age of Stupid’ Copyright Spanner Films

Lizzie Gillett, producer of ‘The Age of Stupid’, which raised its £1 million budget by ‘crowd funding’.

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“In most of the projects we were shown, there are elements of subversion and play,” says Honor. “They are about creating some form of change in the way we see the world around us.”

From there, a revolutionary Indie Screenings model was set up, which enabled over 1300 local screenings organised by concerned individuals from Afghanistan and Argentina, Australia and Alaska.

In the filmmaking section, titled ‘Beyond Cinema’, the medium as well as the message was deconstructed and considered afresh. For example, Lizzie Gillett, producer of the critically acclaimed eco-documentary ‘The Age of Stupid’, explained Spanner Films’ unique methods of financing and distribution for the project. The £1 million budget was raised by ‘crowd funding’, where 228 people and groups (including a hockey team and a women’s health centre) pitched in between £500 and £35,000. In return, they get a percentage of the profits, as do the crew, who worked at reduced wages.

What’s more, ‘The Age of Stupid’ became the genesis for the 10:10 carbon reduction campaign, which now operates in 45 countries (www.1010global.org). The Huffington Post had plenty of reason to claim the film “represents the future of film, film culture and film distribution and marketing”.

Stupid’s global premiere on 21 September 2009, was the biggest live film event ever held: a pack of right-on celebs sauntered down a green carpet at a renewably powered cinema tent in New York, arriving by sailing boat, bicycle, rickshaw, electric car and skates. Moby and Radiohead’s Thom Yorke played live, and the whole event was linked by satellite to more than 700 cinemas and other venues in 63 countries, with a total audience of more than a million people.

Moving on, Professor and radical campaigner Jamie King, director of ‘Steal This Film I’ and ‘Steal This Film II’ tackles a more contentious issue – the case against intellectual property. Jamie has built a huge audience for his films by just giving them away for free. The ‘Steal This Film’ series practices what it preaches, being released via BitTorrent peer-to-peer protocol through sites that allow users to share electronic files, including multimedia, computer games and software over the internet, and asking for donations from viewers. The series has been watched around 5 million times.

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Homing in on the ‘battles’ between old and new modes of distribution, between the pirate and the institution of copyright, Jamie proposes new approaches to sharing, exchange and co-operation across a variety of media. He makes parallels between the impact of the printing press and the Internet in terms of making information accessible beyond a small, privileged group. And he argues that the policing of conventional copyright is now almost impossible.

All in all, the conference vividly demonstrated that the digital media landscape is undergoing a seismic shift. We can expect more blurring of philosophical and psychological boundaries between real and imaginary worlds, more people power, and more creativity in how to get work published or broadcast. There are exciting times ahead, and it looks like they are just around the corner.

Main image: —— Jamie King Director and radical campaigner Additional images: —— Stills from ‘Steal This Film I’

The Internet, he believes, turns consumers into content producers, leading to the sharing, mash-up and creation of content that’s not motivated in the slightest by making money. This has fundamental implications for today’s media company-controlled model. Or as he puts it: “This is the Future – and it has nothing to do with your bank balance”. Finally, the gaming session ‘Gaming for Good’ considered how artists and designers are using digital games and play to morph and shift social and cultural reality. Many examples were based around stories where the player is empowered to become the narrator or get more physically involved in the 2D or 3D space of the game. “The bar is shifting of where interventions by the audience can take place within a game,” says Honor.

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‘Improving Reality’ was part of Brighton Digital Festival – a month-long celebration of digital culture, made up of events, exhibitions, performances, workshops, conferences and meet-ups that took place throughout September 2011. All the presentations from ‘Improving Reality’ can be seen in full here: www.lighthouse.org.uk/programme/ improving-reality-films Uusi Magazine — Issue Four — 75


BEHIND THE SCENES AT THE TURNER PRIZE I n 2011, the T urner P rize was held outside London for the first time at the B A LT I C C entre for Contemporary A rt in G ateshea d. T he high profile art event provided the perfect opportunity to celebrate the launch of the N okia Lumia and engage with a regional audience .

Behind the Scenes at the Turner Prize The Turner Prize is one of the UK’s most prominent art initiatives, and for the first time in 27 years, the highly anticipated, often controversial event was presented outside London and Tate’s galleries. The BALTIC Centre in Gateshead worked in partnership with Tate to host the exhibition and awards night, a perfect match as both institutions are dedicated to fostering public debate around the meaning of contemporary art. BALTIC is a former flour mill on the south bank of the River Tyne, lovingly reimagined as a home for one of Europe’s finest contemporary art galleries and a creative educational hub for the local community.

Inspiring and inclusive stuff, and exactly why Nokia got involved sponsoring the Turner Prize towards the end of last year. As John Nichols, Head of Marketing for Nokia UK and Ireland puts it: “As part of the Nokia Lumia launch, the Turner Prize gave us a unique opportunity to support something that really brings our brand essence of ‘amazing everyday’ to life. Art is, after all, an interpretation and celebration of the amazing things all around us. On top of this, it was fantastic to take our message to an audience outside of London, and showcase the superb design of Nokia Lumia in an iconic landmark like BALTIC.”

Uusi was there on an ice-cold night in December 2011, as Art is all about making connections crowds crossed over the blinking, neon-lit Millennium – emotional, spiritual, intellectual. Bridge and queued in frostA well-worded statement in the breathed anticipation to find entrance to the magnificent BALTIC out who’d won the coveted building sums up this credo: £25,000 prize. “Art is for everybody. We believe The Turner Prize was launched in art transforms lives. We engage 1984, and is awarded to a British more than 400,000 people every or Britain-based artist under 50 year in our learning programmes, for an outstanding exhibition in on and offsite, inspiring audiences the previous year. Notable past across the globe. Contemporary winners have included Gilbert & art is about contemporary life. George (1986), Rachel Whiteread Our learning programmes help (1994), Damien Hirst (1995), and children, parents and grandparents Grayson Perry (2003). alike to find personal meaning and connection with the artworks.” “Whether it’s rolling up your sleeves in an artist-led workshop or listening to an artist about their work, we help audiences make sense of what they see: to explore different lenses on the world and understand new ways of thinking. From the young to the old, art buff to bluffer, everybody has access to engage and participate in some of the most inspiring contemporary art in the world.”

“From the young to the o ld, art buff to bluffer , everyb ody has access to engage and participate in some of the most inspiring contemporary art in the world.” BALTIC MANIFE STO

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S o who were the four contenders for the 2011 title ? H ere ’ s some background from the official catalogue to e x plain :

KARLA BLACK

HILARY LLOY D

Karla Black’s abstract, largescale sculptures explore the nature and limitations of the medium. Her works have an energy, a powerful presence and an aesthetic and sensual appeal that prompt us to consider our relationship to the object, and in turn our relationship to the material world. Aiming to capture something of the raw creative moment, Black’s relationship to her work is direct – a channelling of the sub-conscious, the expression of the primal urge.

Hilary Lloyd has been working with the moving image since the early 1990s. Using slides and carousels, films on monitors and digital video productions. Lloyd investigates perception and asks us to consider how the very act of looking is shaped and constructed. In her work Lloyd draws our attention to surface, to rhythm and to our experience of time.

Her methods are consequently haphazard even homespun. She uses traditional art materials such as plaster, sugar paper, chalk and poster paint pigment, but she is also likely to use whatever is to hand – everyday materials such as topsoil, bath bombs, eye shadow and petroleum jelly. Materials are selected for their physical properties – their texture and colour – not for any metaphorical association. They do, however, evoke recollections of childhood and early experiences of messy play.

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The relationships she choreographs in her installations propose alternative modes of engagement with the moving image – modes that may lead us to ask new and interesting questions about ourselves and about our relationship to the wider world.

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GEORGE SHAW

MARTIN BOYCE

Tile Hill, a post-war housing estate on the edge of Coventry in the West Midlands, is where George Shaw lived until he was 18. Since 1996, Shaw has taken thousands of photographs of this unassuming place, capturing in detail the mundane and inconsequential landscape.

Martin Boyce creates sculptural installations that recall and reference familiar objects and public spaces to form immersive and fragmented landscapes. Using the iconography of modern design and its making process, his work will often take shape as a stylised hybrid of furniture, lighting and architecture. His environments offer a sense of wandering through a long-abandoned garden, or evoke the feeling of crossing through an urban park at night. Viewing these works is like experiencing a suspended narrative; the evidence of our eyes takes in the weathered surfaces and worked metal form, but gives us no suggestion of which temporal register to place them in.

From these photographs he makes paintings. Lots of them. Documenting with a deadpan realism, he captures views of this estate, its streets, and what lies around the back of them, the new houses, the derelict ones, the pub, even the place where the pub once stood.

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If this year’s nominated art lacked the usual outrage, it was left instead to a portly pink-tutu wearing streaker with ‘study this’ scrawled across his stomach, to startle fashion photographer Mario Testino just as he was about to announce the winner. Once he’d regained his composure, Testino confirmed that 44-year-old Glaswegian Martin Boyce had won the coveted prize Godfrey Worsdale, director of BALTIC, who was also one of the judges, said Boyce had led the way among artists who were revisiting modern design. “He creates a very powerful

atmosphere but he makes very physical objects that you can really relate to,” he says. “So in a way I think he’s a complete artist – he has such a breadth of practice but it’s so beautifully coherent.” Picking up his cheque, which will allow him to break even on costs for putting together the Turner prize exhibition show, Boyce thanked his “mum and dad, brilliant wife and gorgeous children”, and paid tribute to his art school, saying: “When education is going through the wringer, it is important to acknowledge the value of teachers.”

T he B A LT I C team duly arranged for a pop - up caf é at popular events and locations around the city

CAFÉ CULTURE The Turner Prize Café initiative kicked off in July 2011, to generate interest in the event itself, British contemporary art in general, and to tell local audiences about the four nominated artists. Before crossing the Millennium Bridge to work, many people from BALTIC pick up a coffee from Mike and Pauline, who run a mobile coffee van service on the north side. They strike up conversations with regulars and strangers all day long, make recommendations on what to see and do in the city, and are a handy barometer of public opinion.

The Turner Prize Café also took various artists to local primary and secondary schools, and encouraged kids to voice their opinions as well as get creative. The next stage was to hand-pick a selection of independent coffee shops in and around the city, and get them involved in the debate – which is where Nokia stepped in. Jasmin Schawalder, Marketing Manager Nokia UK, who led the project explains: “We gave out ten Nokia Lumia smartphones so café staff could film customers sharing their ideas and observations about art over a coffee. Several hours of footage were collected, edited, and shown on screens at a Nokia Lumia-themed Lounge adjacent to the Nokia-sponsored Café on Level 2 of BALTIC, where visitors were encouraged to experience the ‘amazing everyday’, and contribute to a comment wall.”

This struck a chord and sparked an idea. The BALTIC team duly arranged for a pop-up café at popular events and locations around the city – places like the Gateshead Summer Flower Show, South Shields Beach, Eldon Square, “It’s not about us trying to say that everything is fantastic,” says Newcastle Gateshead Bridges Emma Thomas, BALTIC’s Head Festival, and several others. of Learning and Engagement. The temporary café was staffed “It’s about trying to get a range of public opinion and debate on by a professional barista, as well as BALTIC staff armed with photos, what contemporary British art is, so that people would really enjoy exhibition catalogues and short coming back in to see the exhibition films featuring George Shaw, when it arrived at BALTIC.” Martin Boyce, Hilary Lloyd and Karla Black. People who stopped And it certainly had the desired by were encouraged to talk on effect. Local media took up film about how they felt about the story with gusto and contemporary art in general and the Turner Prize artists in particular. the Turner Prize exhibition attracted over 149,000 visitors. Which goes to show that coffee and There were chocolates on the chat is a great way to stir things up. counter with questions printed on the wrappers to prompt conversation and debate. “Why is art important?’, ‘When did you last make art?’ – that kind of thing.

“ I t ’ s about trying to get a range of public opinion and debate on what contemporary British art is.” Emma thomas head of learning & engagement — BALTIC 82 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

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‘One day’ is a new book that captures a single day played out in different corners of the globe. It takes Nokia photography out of the corporate context to show it in a completely different light.

The Book When you’re working for a global brand like Nokia, of course there have to be certain guidelines and parameters to make sure our brand identity is consistent and recognisable. But on the other hand, too many rules can dampen creativity. So when we started to think about how we might convey our latest ideas and guidance on photography to agencies and internal teams, we decided on a lateral (rather than literal) approach. Last year, Nokia Art Director Kelly Burlace travelled the world with photographer Jane Stockdale to document the lives of real people in Beirut, Johannesburg, Shanghai, Maputo and Sydney. We wrote about their experiences and some of the people they met back in Uusi #2. The team came back with thousands of images, to inspire, inform, and set the benchmark for future commissions. “We’d already staged an exhibition,” explains Kelly. “Now we thought a book would be another good vehicle. We’d be able to reach more people and show that brand photography can be beautiful… even a form of art. If you take image making out of a corporate context, it makes people look at it differently and value it more.”

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The result of this thinking is ‘One Day’, a strikingly beautiful, perfectly paced volume that wouldn’t look out of place on the shelves of art and design bookshops like Magma or Koening. Rather than arranging images by city as you might expect, the book’s visual narrative has been shaped by the passing of time – starting early in the morning, progressing through the day, and reaching its conclusion in the darkness of night. In reality, the cities are in different time zones, so this is simply a visual conceit…. however, the effect is surprising and revealing. Flicking through the book, you’re not only struck by the differences of people’s lives thousands of miles apart from each other, but also the similarities. The bright morning light bouncing off surfaces and streaming through windows; daily rituals and

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anticipation; the buzz of people and activity as day comes to life; the afternoon drawing in and succumbing to the streetlights and evening entertainment. The palette and intensity of colour gradually but inevitably changes as the sun arcs and falls. “We spent a day with different people in each city, hence the name,” explains Kelly. “All the stories are intertwined, so there’s a flow and fluidity. The approach and style is global, but at the same time, it’s always locally relevant.” For Kelly, who edited ‘One Day’, and DesignStudio, who provided the understated yet contemporary design, finding the right rhythm and momentum was critical. Within the context of time of day, the order was carefully arranged to suggest loose visual relationships between successive images and places.“

Nokia Art Director Kelly Burlace on her photographic travels.

Flicking through the book, you’re not only struck by the differences of people’s lives thousands of miles apart from each other, but also the similarities.

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we’re not only offered a glimpse of people’s lives, but their perspective of the world around them

In the very back section, the driving idea behind the photographic approach is explained, and there are short descriptive pieces on each of the five cities by Monocle magazine’s travel writer Jonathan Openshaw. Cut down versions have been translated into Mandarin, Arabic and Portuguese – the languages of the featured cities. And there are also interesting lists of books, music and films that flavoured the trip– personal recommendations, snatches of songs on local radio, references and influences from Dr Seuss to Fela Kuti. Not wanting to colour the reader’s first impressions, the cover is an abstract combination of two shots, suggesting something familiar… reflections, light, water or the sky. Branding inside and out has been kept subtle, as Kelly puts it: “‘One Day’ celebrates our new approach to brand photography, and though the Nokia brand is evident, we’re trying to move away from preconceived ideas of what branding should be.” So instead of receiving the traditional brand identity guideline with a long list of dos, don’ts, rules and instructions, Nokia agencies and internal teams will now be getting a handsome copy of ‘One Day’. We’re confident that they’ll want to keep it to hand, enjoy referring to it, find it stimulating and enlightening. Occasionally the point of view shifts, and you’re looking at a teapot, a door sign, clouds in a blue sky, criss-cross shadows, a wall of clocks, the night sky lit up by fireworks, through the eyes of a protagonist. These observational still-life photos add filmic texture and a strong sense of place, we’re not only offered a glimpse of people’s lives, but their perspective of the world around them.

“The intention was always to create something unexpected and intriguing,” says Kelly. “At first glance it appears to be an art book, then a closer look shows it’s by Nokia and about Nokia brand photography. I hope it will capture the interest of photography fans, as well as agencies with a more practical agenda.”

Throughout the book you’ll find occasional tip-ins on different paper stock. These introduce some of the characters and ‘fixers’ that the team met on their travels, or document the week’s photography schedule in a particular city. On the surface, these are interesting editorial snippets, but they also demonstrate how the photo shoots were produced, and how essential the local network was. “The information is all there if you look for it,” says Kelly, “but it’s really more about providing inspiration.” 88 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

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Digital film equipment and online media channels are more accessible than they have ever been, and candid video footage has become a ubiquitous and potent visual currency.

Real to Reel As the ‘One Day’ book goes to show, we have already established a strong photographic style that works across the globe. Now we are taking the next step by producing a series of short video films interweaving interesting movers and shakers with plenty to say for themselves. Living in prominent cities throughout the world, these characters not only provide key insights into emerging outlooks and opinion, they also give us an opportunity to develop a distinctive Nokia documentary style that will set us apart. Digital film equipment and online media channels are more accessible than they have ever been, and candid video footage has become a ubiquitous and potent visual currency. It’s important that we secure a foothold in this area, and our latest batch of films represents a significant step towards this end. Nokia worked closely with leading British design consultancy Seymour Powell to identify suitable subjects for three films collectively titled ‘Real People, 90 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

Real Stories’. SP’s foresight department has been set up specifically to spot worldwide trends and social phenomena, and we were able to tap into their network to find the right people to interview. Filming took place in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Buenos Aires. Further interviewees were buttonholed on the street or contacted through Facebook. “It’s not about being trendy or having the right haircut,” explains Nokia Brand and Marketing’s Costas Syrmos. “It’s about having an attitude and knowing what they want from life. These people are catalysts, they make things happen.” In the four-minute films, the talking heads are asked to respond to the question “what does adventure mean?” The results reveal what Costas calls “valuable brand-based ethnographic insight, while really showing us what each city is about.” Hopefully these films represent the start of an ongoing series. For the moment they will be used internally, but they may be published online in due course. Uusi Magazine — Issue Four — 91


Last year, a short, behind-the-scenes film showing the Nokia N9 being pieced together at Nokia’s assembly plant in Salo, Finland, became an internet sensation. Read on to discover the secret of its success. 92 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

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We Made It Tah-dah! It happens every time. When a magician pulls a rabbit out of a hat, cute though it may be, you’re not actually thinking about the rabbit. The question that’s racing around in your mind is ‘how on earth did they do that?’. It’s human nature to be fascinated by the way things work, to comprehend what’s really going on behind the performance.

“It’s all about finding a beautiful way to look at process, to make the story poetic and engaging.” Nicola Place Build

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We’re pretty sure this kind of innate curiosity accounts for the phenomenal success of the ‘Nokia N9 Journey’ film, which was released to coincide with the opening of Nokia World in November 2011. Conceived by Costas Syrmos of Nokia Brand and Marketing Studio, art directed by London design studio Build, and directed by Elliott Cranmer of ShootMedia, it’s a rare behindthe-scenes look at the Nokia assembly factory in Salo, Finland. We were delighted by the results aesthetically speaking, but we were even more delighted that it became something of an internet phenomenon, registering over 600,000 hits on YouTube alone.

“The driving idea [behind ‘Nokia N9 Journey’] was to celebrate Nokia’s industrial design innovation,” explains Costas. “The Nokia N9 is a really interesting device, a product we could be proud of. It was designed from the user interface outwards – the beautiful curved display and polycarbonate unibody were created specifically to accommodate and enhance the swipe-based UI of the Nokia N9. The result was ingenious, born from pioneering manufacturing techniques. The care in milling, moulding and piecing the components together was astonishing.” Build are best known for their outstanding print portfolio, but they’ve been branching out into moving-image projects recently. They certainly impressed with their recent ‘Nokia Pure Reversal’ film, created specially for the launch of our new typeface in the summer of 2011. This is a wonderfully restrained piece of filmmaking showing the word ‘Pure’ being set up, inked and printed in letterpress. Costas was interested in applying some of the same qualities of simple elegance to the ‘Nokia N9 Journey’ project. Build’s Nicola Place takes up the story: “We thought of it as a companion piece to the ‘Pure Reversal’ film, with similar styling and approach,” she says. “It’s all about finding a beautiful way to look at process, to make the story poetic and engaging rather than tell it in a straight documentary style.”

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Like the N9 itself, it’s the care and attention to detail that elevate the final 2 minute, 50 second edit.

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The project took four months from start to finish, and involved three trips to Finland for recceing, planning and filming. The team amassed nine hours of footage, but like the N9 itself, it’s the care and attention to detail that elevate the final 2 minute, 50 second edit. Set to a mesmeric original score by sound designer J-VEN, every close-up and establishing shot is immaculately considered and framed. Technicians in white lab coats with blue collars go about their business with calm confidence in a gleaming factory setting. Close ups on human details like legs, eyelashes, Disney-like white gloves, and a pocket full of pens remind us that real people are putting these phones together with love and pride. The people shots are set against more graphic, mechanical images – drills, tweezers, screws, perfectly shiny machinery. Objects in multiples, like stickers, plastic scrapings and microchips, create intriguing abstract patterns. Extreme close-ups and unusual angles present captivating shapes and perspectives.

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Nokia N9 is a product of Finnish design heritage, something that’s deeply embedded in Nokia culture. The factory scenes are intercut with flashes of Finnish landscape outside, many of which are taken from a moving vehicle. This serves not only to create context and contrast, but suggests a journey – perhaps the journey of the production process, or the journey the Nokia N9 will make to its eventual owner. It’s also a reminder that the Nokia N9 is a product of Finnish design heritage, something that’s deeply embedded in Nokia culture. “We came to the project and factory with fresh eyes,” says Nicola. “We were looking for the beauty in the everyday, picking out tiny details that spoke of warm, human contact. It’s not a literal A to Z approach showing the production line, but more about capturing the essence of what was around us.” The creative team had a willing and expert guide in factory program manager Lauri Hartonen, who steered them through the assembly process, so they could identify key elements along the line.

“As well as the public interest on the internet, we’ve had a really positive response from the engineering and design community,” says Costas. “The N9 is one of the most beautifully simple smartphones around. When you see it for the first time, you can’t help but wonder how it’s made. The ‘Nokia N9 Journey’ film is a rare insight into factory life, which shows the care and effort that goes into putting a Nokia product together. There aren’t many companies that would be prepared to open their doors like this.”

Watch the video: www.youtube.com/ watch?v=pwoGxrLZlAk 100 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

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Nokia Lumia 800

PLAY

Visit https://brandbook.nokia.com to see all the latest movies and best-practice executions.

A collection of new creative projects that showcase our agencies’ work. 102 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

Please submit your work through NokiaBrandClinic@nokia.com to be included in the latest issue of the magazine. Uusi Magazine — Issue Four — 103


Nokia Lumia 710

Nokia N9 Journey Agency: Build 104 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

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Nokia Lumia 800

Teddy Bears and Talking Drums Agency: Hugo and Cat 106 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

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Nokia Lumia 800

ImageMakers Agency: Build 108 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

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Nokia C7-00

Making of the Cover Agency: DesignStudio 110 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

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Nokia Lumia 710

Real People, Real Stories Agency: DesignStudio 112 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Four

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Uusi Credits Magazine Content Editor/Art Director Richard Crabb Design DesignStudio www.wearedesignstudio.com Writer Jim Davies www.totalcontent.co.uk Content Contributors Paul Albert David Betteridge Aapo Bovellan Kelly Burlace Patrick Burgoyne Chris Chan DesignStudio Chris George Honor Harger Alan Kitching Adam Laycock Amanda Moorby Darryl Pieber Nicola Place Michael C Place Hanna Rowlands Jasmin Schwalder Bob Saich Robbie’s Brown Shoes Costas Syrmos Emma Thomas Lisbet Tonner Stephen White Marc Wood Nokia Brand and Marketing Studio Aapo Bovellan Director, Brand and Marketing Studio George Chevalier-Lewis Senior Manager of Brand Imagery Richard Crabb Head of Art Direction Gernot Pestlemayer Brand Guidelines Design Darryl Pieber Verbal Identity Art Director Rami Salminen Online Art Director Costas Syrmos UX and Brand Innovation

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Print Pureprint Group is a CarbonNeutral® company, has ISO14001 and is registered to EMAS, the Eco Management and Audit Scheme, and also holds the Queen’s Award for Enterprise: Sustainable Development.

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