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Nokia Brand Magazine The People Issue

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Uusi Contents Issue Two

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Creature Feature Behind the scenes of this year’s Pictoplasma Conference and Festival in Berlin

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Hello/Hei Welcome to The People Issue of Uusi, the Nokia Brand Magazine

Nokia and FvF Productions People make the world go round

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Our New UI Icons A picture paints a thousand words

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Talk This Way Nokia tone of voice is about starting...tarting the conversation and sharing stories

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Really Seeing the World Building a library of compelling worldwide imagery to establish the new Nokia style

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Brand New How we cut through the clutter of an over-saturated marketplace South by Southwest Festival We asked, why are you here?

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Quick Start Tone of Voice

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Our Type of Poster The launch of the new Nokia Pure typeface Play All the latest explorations using our new identity system and showcase of our agencies’ work.

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Richard Crabb Head of Art Direction, Brand Identity at Nokia

revolves around design, art and music. In recent years, there’s been an extraordinary upsurge in public popularity and cultural influence, making my life experiences even more relevant to my professional role. The 1980s were very much about fashion (style over substance). The 1990s about travel (broadening cultural and spiritual horizons). And the early 2000s are about immersing ourselves in cultural appreciation (interest in art and culture, craft). Aapo Bovellan, Director of Brand and Marketing Studio, writes about this shift in mindset and how we can apply this to brand communications in his piece on page 84. One recent wonderful cultural experience really stands out in my mind as I write this editorial. I am lucky enough to live in Brighton, a city that puts on a festival each year to celebrate great art. Hundreds of events –

Hello/ Hei

Welcome back to Uusi, the Nokia Brand Magazine – The People Issue. Since the launch of Uusi Issue One, so much has happened we were spoilt for choice in pulling together the content for the follow-up. We set the agenda in Uusi Issue One – celebrating the big ideas, introducing the basic elements of the identity system and sharing inspiration around our brand. In Uusi Issue Two, we focus on execution and talk more specifically about the brand. We consider how we express our personality, achieve differentiation through look, feel and sound, and create benchmark brand experiences at every touchpoint. It’s no coincidence that this issue is all about the people and personalities who experience our brand, build our brand. And about how the creators and doers make things, come together and connect. You can read all about this in features on the Pictoplasma Festival in Berlin, the South by Southwest Festival in Austin, Texas, and Freunde von Freunden’s Real-Life Personalities project. Summing up Nokia’s marketing goals, Jerri Devard, EVP Marketing Communications, says: “We want Nokia to remain as the most desired mobile phone brand, and we aim to launch products that win the hearts, and minds of the consumer”. In direct response to this rallying call, check out the launch event of our new Nokia Pure typeface featured in this issue. Nokia Pure will play a key

part in the new user experience, helping us win back the ease-ofuse high ground for our UI, a key element of our Nokia brand equity. The launch event itself was a phenomenal success, with over 400 attendees (including many design industry thought leaders) and generated a huge amount of digital earned media. Nokia was at the centre of positive discussions in global design forums, helping to build our credibility in innovation – a key factor in technology brand consumer and customer affinity. As we move things forward in identity execution, the Brand and Marketing Studio team are constantly creating and curating work and brand experiences to bring to the Uusi stage. We look for beautiful design, craft in execution, artistic integrity, authenticity and simplicity. We also look outside the brand and into our lives as consumers. Much of my life

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Image on Device UI: Aung San Suu Kyi painted in Brighton by Dan Kitchener, Snub23 and Sinna1.

from visual arts and film, books and debate, classical and contemporary music, through to dance and circus, theatre and performance – fill the city’s venues and streets for a whole month. This, as you can imagine, is a total audio-visual feast of multisensorial experiences. However, the stand- out performance of the festival for me was The Lady of Burma, Richard Shannon’s celebrated play based on the true story of the Burmese leader Aung San Suu Kyi. A sold-out Theatre Royal sat gripped for 75 minutes as one woman – Liana Gould – told a story against the backdrop of a concrete-walled, prison-cell set. It was a truly emotional experience, an utterly absorbing story delivered with utter simplicity. Human face-to-face storytelling engaging young and old alike. I am reminded of this as Jerri also talks about the importance of telling stories to convey the Nokia strategy: “Every day, in marketing and communications, we are tasked with telling stories. About our products, our services, our strategy. Let me share with you some real-life, real-time stories of loyalty, belief, insight and change, each with its own lesson for us to be inspired by and immediately act on”. Essential in the telling of stories is this issue’s spotlight – tone of voice. Brand and Marketing Studio’s Darryl Pieber shares his thoughts and inspiration, building on the brand principles to start conversations and share stories. He explores how Nokia uses words to convey its unique personality and what makes us more human. We have also included a handy ‘quick start’ guide on the Nokia tone of voice. We take a whistle-stop tour around the world with Kelly Burlace, of Brand and Marketing Studio, who explains the role of our photographic stories in creating affinity with people in different cultures. We see the world through an authentic lens in Beirut, Shanghai, Beijing, Maputo, Johannesburg and Sydney. Finally, in the Play section, we take a look at some of the amazing work people have been making. Based around our brand transformation, we have selected playful, crafted, artful yet diverse pieces which are engaging consumers, customers, partners and industry peers. It’s been a truly memorable few months since we launched our new brand look and feel. And we’ve had great fun working with you all to co-create a refreshed Nokia brand. Until the next issue, I’ll leave the final words to the guy in the SXSW film: “It’s about making stuff... just going out and doing it”. Uusi Magazine — Issue Two — 6


C REATURE FEAT URE Creature Feature Behind the scenes of this year’s Pictoplasma Conference and Festival in Berlin

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Who doesn’t like a character? Cute, mischievous, colourful, intriguing… they represent imagination brought to life, curious walking, talking creatures who animate the more eccentric side of storytelling. And they’re duly celebrated at the annual Pictoplasma Conference and Festival, an event that’s been held since 1999, and is now established as the world’s most foremost gathering place for a growing band of international artists, character creators and producers. The 2011 festival was held over five days in Berlin in April, and comprised of a lively mix of exhibitions, performances, artists’ lectures, animation screenings, panels, workshops – and, of course, parties – bringing all kinds of people from all kinds of disciplines together to explore common ground, and attracting a wide and deeply intrigued audience.

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Clockwise from below: — Illustration by Roman Klonek — Character Walk exhibition: Crim Collective — Pictoplasma Conference venue, Berlin 2011 — Pictoplasma Conference lecture: Guillermo García Carsí / El Senor — Character Walk exhibition: Papp by 3753% Tørdal — Character Walk exhibition: Lisa Hassel/Inkygoodness

Helping everyone get around the festival was a means of reaching out to people in a natural and interesting way

Pictoplasma had been on Nokia’s radar for some time, but our new brand direction made it seem even more relevant and full of possibility. As well as the wider notion of connecting people, the festival also tapped into creativity, passion and quirkiness – qualities with which we have a natural empathy. The recently established Nokia creative team hooked up with the festival organisers early on in the process to consider ways to engage with the Pictoplasma audience, and bring another dimension to the overall experience. It turned out that one of the key elements of the festival was the Character Walk, a collection of 25 selected galleries, project spaces and hidden locations in Berlin-Mitte, which the public were encouraged to wander around and could enjoy for free. “This immediately seemed like a match made in heaven for Nokia Maps,” says Anna Tuomi, of the Nokia creative team. “Helping everyone get around the festival was a means of reaching out to the people in a natural and interesting way”. 9 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

Among these exhibitions were Her Idea, a picture book about ideas and procrastination by Australian picture-maker and storyteller Rilla; the Character Totem by UK collective Inkygoodness, a colourful, walk-through installation of 2m-high totem poles, customised by 35 artists and illustrators from across the UK and Europe; Canis Mortuus Familiaris by Jeremy Dower, a touring exhibition of phantasmagorical pooches, featuring a series of digital archival prints, drawings, laser-cut aluminium sculptures and video; Finnish graphic artist Ville Savimaa’s intricate psychedelic collection Dangerous Bees Are Not Animals; and plenty more besides. But that was just the start. Anna and her colleagues also put together a 10-strong team of ‘scouts’ – a mix of journalists, creatives and Pictoplasma insiders from different parts of theworld. Armed with Nokia N8s, they were trained up and charged with recordingtheir personal experiences of the festival in photographs and on their own blogs and social networking channels. “We didn’t give them much direction, but the results were absolutely gorgeous,” says Anna. “I guess it’s because they were really artistic people, semiprofessionals. And of course the subject matter was great too. ” The scouts’ photo diaries were uploaded to photo streams on Flickr and YouTube, as well as feeding a dedicated Pictoplasma stream on the Nokia blog site. All the images were tagged according to the particular exhibition they covered, building up a compelling visual picture of individual events and the festival experience as a whole. “The branding and engagement was at a very subtle level,” says Jan Bonnevier, an event specialist from the Nokia creative team. “We didn’t have our logo slapped over everything, but all the coverage photos were taken on Nokia N8s, showing the capabilities and possibilities of the camera.”

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It was great fun and really touched people. The team put together some great ideas

The Nokia team also staged an exhibition of their own… featuring artwork by Iosefatu Sua. Sua is a graphic designer by day and an illustrator by night – a rare talent who recently moved to Berlin with his wife and child to work for the Nokia creative team. He was born and raised in New Zealand to Samoan parents, and has lived in the US for over two decades. His personal works are reflections of his experiences as a wandering Polynesian in the Western world. And Sua’s Pictoplasma show was no exception. ‘Savage’ served up a potent visual narrative, charting the adventures of a central character who leaves home in search of a deeper understanding of the world and himself. Paintings and ink drawings colourfully portrayed a story with quasi-mythical overtones of a young man in love with the village chief’s daughter forced to voyage beyond the ends of the earth to defeat a monster, prove his manhood and win his prize. Ten tickets to Sua’s private view party were put up for grabs for Nokia employees, which was well attended by a specially invited guest list of family members, movers and shakers, and organisers. In fact, the various opening parties spilled out on to the streets, merging into one big party, the busiest spots being around Rosa Luxemburg Platz and Rosenthaler Platz. Since then, a collection of downloadable Pictoplasma wallpapers for mobile devices have been put together, including

a specially commissioned set based on the ‘Savage’ show – so far, this has been downloaded more than 30,000 times. “It was great fun and really touched people”, says Jan. “The team put together some great ideas, which all fitted together like a jigsaw. We hope to be involved again next year, when we’ll have an even better understanding of what to add and what to leave out. We’ve collected feedback and will arrange a workshop to see where we can take things from here.” There were certainly plenty of characters at Pictoplasma and it gave us the perfect opportunity to show Nokia’s new character at work.

Clockwise from below: — Illustration by McBess — Character Totem by Inkygoodness — Illustration by Jeremyville — Pictoplasma Conference lecture: Roman Klonek — Rilla with her installation Her Idea

The various opening parties spilled out on to the streets, merging into one big party 13 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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We didn’t give them much direction, vbut the results were absolutely gorgeous

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Friends of friends. A intimate glimpse into the lives of Nokia people. 17 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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Everyone has their own style, outlook and opinions. They are interesting and beautiful in their own way This is something of a specialism for FvF, which stands for Freunde von Freunden – literally ‘friends of friends’. Their revealing online magazine (freundevonfreunden. com) candidly documents the lives of creative professionals in Berlin, capturing them at their most relaxed to give a real impression of who they are and a picture of what drives and excites them. Each profile follows a similar format – a series of half a dozen photos of the interviewee, along with their personal objects and artefacts, an extensive written question-and-answer interview, as well as a video interview.

Nokia and FvF Productions People make the world go round Nokia is all about celebrating real people, their passions and persuasions. Finding out what moves and motivates them, supporting them and helping them take the next step, whatever that might be. But, when we talk about ‘people’ in general, it all seems a bit vague and nebulous. Do they actually exist or are they just the product of some marketeer’s fevered imagination? Who are they and what are they like? Where do they live and what do they do with their time? So we thought we’d find out. We’d put faces, places and stories to walking, talking people. Starting close to home, with individuals who have a strong connection to Nokia – who work for the company, use our devices or services, or perhaps collaborate with us as developers or suppliers. To this end, we commissioned Berlin-based online magazine FvF to meet and spend time with around 20 very different personalities, taking photographs of them in their homes or workplaces, talking to them, delving into their backgrounds and discovering what makes them tick.

Previous page: — Mark Thomas (Nokia Sales and Services) San Francisco, USA Clockwise from left: — Hania and Fahma Rosmansyah (App Developers) Bandung, Indonesia — Jessi Frey (Product Manager) Bristol, UK

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The whole way we approached photos and film needed to be grounded in real–life situations, never staged or phony Uusi Magazine — Issue Two — 20


A further series of personal interviews were then set up in Finland, the UK, New Zealand, India, Indonesia and San Francisco. They included a photographer, a DJ, a gallery owner, a student, a doctor and farmer, a product manager and a supply-chain specialist. Not to mention creative director Richard Crabb, editor of Uusi Magazine. There’s also the amazing story of 12-year-old Indonesian app developer Fahma, who works on ideas together with his seven-year-old sister Hania. His simple ambition is to one day ‘rule a country’. And we also hooked up with SoulSearchers, a group of six cyclists who braved an arduous bike trip from Perth to Melbourne – 3,430 kilometers of desert and 28 days of pure nature, all guided by Nokia GPS Maps.

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Clockwise from above: — Anna-Liisa Haenninen (Chain Supply Management) Salo factory, Finland — Kalle Ojala (Marketing and Sales) Tampere, Finland — Richard Crabb (Creative Director) Brighton, UK

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Bristol, UK

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A deeply textured picture of the many different people affiliated to Nokia in one way or another

Clockwise from below: — Tomas Erhart (Photographer) Berlin, Germany — Nik Jurga (Student and City Guide) Mumbai, India — Mark Thomas (Nokia Sales and Services) San Francisco, USA — Tapio Hakanen (DJ and Sound Designer) Helsinki, Finland

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Mumbai, India

These engaging snapshots of people’s lives provide a fascinating glimpse into their attitudes and aspirations

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Clockwise from right: — Paromita Deb Areng (Freelance Photographer) Mumbai, India — Andreas Schwankl (Software Developer) Berlin, Germany — Jue Feng (Designer) Espoo, Finland 29 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

These engaging snapshots of people’s lives provide a fascinating glimpse into their attitudes and aspirations. The questions varied according to situation and interest, but the following gives you some idea… “Could you imagine spending your life in another city?”, “do you have a definition of aesthetic?”, “do you see yourself as a grownup skate kid?”, “do you have a curiosity about people and their stories?”, “when you were younger, did you have a specific interest in computers?”, “how do you start a working day?”, “do you think your job helped you to develop your imagination?”, “what would you do on a day off?”, “what would you regard as your greatest passion?”. And the answers proved

just as varied – short and sweet, lengthy and involved, amusing and serious. Overall, what you get is a real sense of warmth, insight and involvement. The feeling that everyone is different yet the same, the children of their environments, shaped by their experiences, happy surrounded by the things they love and comfortable in their own skin. Everyone has their own style, outlook and opinions. They are interesting and beautiful in their own way. This super-simple idea is so much more revealing and touching than the alternative – going to an agency, finding a location and fabricating a story around a suitable-looking model. The levels of intensity and truth simply don’t compare. Importantly,

they also show that Nokia isn’t a faceless monolithic corporation, but an organisation made up of thought-provoking, switched-on people, with their own perspectives on life. It’s hoped that the library of interviews will be added to over time, creating a deeply textured picture of the many different people affiliated to Nokia in one way or another. Practically speaking, the photos and stories will be used for all kinds of things – from company reviews and presentations, to press and PR. They will build to an impressive collection of imagery and valuable source material – and become the real face of Nokia.

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Our New UI Icons A picture paints a thousand words That’s why we’ve created a new icon font as part of the Nokia Pure family. Strong, simple iconography provides another key element in our drive for cut-through in a world of visual clutter. Fast-forward to the Play section of this issue to see our Day in the Life, Life in a Day animation, celebrating the birth of the new arrival in the Pure font family. 31 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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Really See ing the World Beir ut Johannes burg Shanghai Maputo Sydney

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Really Seeing The World Building a library of compelling worldwide imagery to establish the new Nokia style The camera never lies, they tell us. But it does, it really does. Since the earliest days of the medium, photographers have used staging, lighting and all manner of darkroom techniques to create particular effects, moods and illusions. Literally, the word photography means ‘writing with light’ – and fiction has proved an enduringly popular style. Brands, too, have become highly adept at using photography to influence and manipulate the way we perceive them. They go to great lengths to create impossibly happy, glossy worlds that have little to do with our everyday experiences. They feed us painstakingly staged scenarios that we can look up to, but never live up to. The advent of digital photography has made this kind of flawlessness easier than ever to achieve. Hair out of place? No problem, we’ll get rid of it. A nasty red spot on the chin? Right, Photoshop to the rescue. And, of course, it just doesn’t ring true. We know that life is full of ups and downs, and that we all have flaws, imperfections, quirks and eccentricities. But these are what make every day and everyone so thrillingly different and unpredictable. Besides, slick, smooth and over-produced is not the Nokia way. Our brand today is all about creating a deep, lasting resonance with people. Something meaningful and tangible that everyone – in any part of the world – can relate to and feel a part of. We’re more about inspiration than aspiration. We want to capture the reality of the every day in our photography.

The premise of all the shoots was to frame a ‘day in the life’ of all kinds of different people in all kinds of different places Beirut, Lebanon

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Eileen and Michelle Best friends Beirut, Lebanon

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Rudy Film Maker and DJ Beirut, Lebanon

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Slick, smooth and overproduced is not the Nokia way. Our brand today is all about creating a deep, lasting resonance with people Johannesburg, South Africa

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‘Gogo’ Leah Grandmother Johannesburg, South Africa

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Wandile Professional Skateboarder Johannesburg, South Africa 49 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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The trip took them to Sydney, Shanghai, Beirut, Johannesburg and Maputo Maputo, Mozambique

And that doesn’t mean the boring or the mundane. But small, beautiful moments… people doing what they love with the people they love. This earthy and exciting approach to photography is central to Nokia’s new-look brand. So much for the theory. The problem is you could hand a written brief to 100 photographers and get 100 different interpretations back. What’s ‘real’, anyway? You end up whizzing round in philosophical and aesthetic circles. Because photographers are visual people, the best way to help them understand is to actually show them powerful yet practical examples of what you want. To this end, Kelly Burlace, Image Making Art Director from Nokia’s Brand and Marketing Studio, along with a producer and the much-in-demand documentary photographer Jane Stockdale, went on a mission. Early in 2011, the team spent three months travelling to the far corners of the world to build a library of compelling photography that would establish the new Nokia style, set the template for future commissions and build a portfolio of global assets. It was also an opportunity to meet likely local photographers and develop a network of creative collaborators around the world. The trip took them to Sydney, Shanghai, Beirut, Johannesburg and Maputo in Mozambique – contrasting places culturally and visually – in an effort to capture the same fundamental photographic essence. 51 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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Abdul Shoemaker Maputo, Mozambique

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Milton’s Family Brothers Maputo, Mozambique

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“There are two ways you can do it”, explains Kelly. “You can hire a couple of models, scout a suitable café and ask them to pretend to be friends while you photograph them. Or you can take some real friends to their favourite café and shoot them enjoying themselves as they do day in, day out. The results will be strikingly different.” Typically, the team would spend around a week in each location, using the first two days to recce with a local producer/fixer in tow before embarking on a five-day shoot. Though they were met with helpful enthusiasm nearly everywhere, capturing spontaneity and natural, offguard moments could prove elusive. Even non-models, it turns out, instinctively start posing and expect a certain amount of art direction. It was only after Jane had spent enough time to build trust and rapport with her subjects that they started to forget she was there and became themselves again. “It was a real eye-opener for me and a really interesting way of doing things”, says Kelly. “Much of the heavy lifting of the art direction is done in the planning stages. Then you need to stand right back and give the photographer a lot of freedom… Choosing the right people [to photograph] is critical too. Jane took literally thousands of shots, so editing and choosing the right images became an important part of the process.”

And that doesn’t mean the boring or the mundane. But small, beautiful moments… people doing what they love with the people they love Shanghai, China

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Tang Ting Photographer Shanghai, China

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Zhang Min Family Mother and child Shanghai, China

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People were positively surprised that Nokia was interested in their lives Sydney, Australia

The premise of all the shoots was to frame a ‘day in the life’ of all kinds of different people in all kinds of different places. To find out what gets them going, visit their favourite places, hang out with their friends, tag along to a local event… and then just wait and see what transpires. Among many others, they got to know a ballet dancer in Shanghai, a prop house manager in Sydney, a DJ and architect in Beirut, schoolchildren in Africa. After a time, the team found they were almost adopted into people’s clans, and granted a real and rare insight into their lives. Jane Stockdale certainly has a knack for putting herself in situations and then anticipating when something interesting is going to happen, and she did this time and time again during the project. Everyone relaxes in a park, sits at a desk or eats in a restaurant… yet, there would always be something – a gesture, an angle, a shaft of natural light – that would instantly suggest warmth, opportunity and spontaneity. “We really wanted to get away from anything forced or staged”, says Kelly. “People can tell when emotion is false and things have been set up. Yes, we took things to extremes, but that’s the only way to achieve real authenticity and integrity. People were positively surprised that Nokia was interested in their lives. And I think this new, deeply honest approach to photography shows that we are truly a people’s brand.”

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Ariane Magazine Editor Sydney, Australia

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Pablo Prop House Manager Sydney, Australia

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Illustration: Adam Hayes

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Talk This Way Nokia tone of voice is about starting the conversation and sharing stories When a person walks into a room, the first thing you notice about them is the way they look. Their clothes, their hair, the way they hold themselves, their dimensions and demeanour. You’ll probably make some assumptions about them based on their appearance – they may seem friendly or shy, bookish or outgoing, scrupulous or vivacious. And your first instincts may be right, at least up to a point. But it’s only when they start talking that you get a true understanding of what they’re like and make a deeper connection with who they really are. For person, read brand or company. Big brands know exactly how to present themselves. When they stride confidently into that metaphorical room, they’ll be dressed and accessorised with flair, rigour and consistency. They’ll flash you a friendly smile via their highly sophisticated handling of typography, photography, illustration and composition. And this may be enough – for a small moment, at least. These days, however, looks aren’t everything. People want lasting, meaningful relationships with the brands they carefully choose to identify with. They want to feel the association is natural, fitting and reflects well on them. Which means the most switched-on brands are those with substance and something to say. And that doesn’t just mean the dry facts. Increasingly, it’s not just what you say, it’s the way in which you say it which matters. Your words should not only feel inviting and engaging, but also relevant, real and in character – brands need to get their tone of voice spot-on.

So what is tone of voice? It’s simply the way a brand or company uses words to reflect its personality and connect with its audience. A brand must first have a strong idea of what it stands for and what makes it unique. Then, it must figure out how best to convey this particular character in a distinctive, recognisable style of speaking and writing. Tone of voice needs to be credible and authentic – if your dear old mother suddenly started speaking down-and-dirty street slang, alarm bells would start to ring. You’d immediately think something was wrong. Tone of voice should also feel appropriate – you’d probably want your accountant to sound capable and professional rather than ditzy and forgetful. However, speaking differently from the competition can be an effective way to stand out from others… You might feel more comfortable with an accountant who speaks informally and wears jeans rather than red braces, or a doctor who’s jovial and tells bad jokes rather than one who is clinical and dispassionate.

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Illustration: Adam Hayes 73 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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Illustration: Supermundane

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Illustration: Supermundane

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Finally, tone of voice needs to be used with clarity and consistency, so that people become familiar and comfortable with your voice, developing a trust and affection for it. The ultimate test is this… if you removed the logo, corporate colour and typeface, could you tell what the brand was by the plain, bald words? Actually, the word ‘persona’ derives from the Latin ‘per sona,’ which means ‘through sound’. This originally referred to the masks worn by classical actors which obscured their faces and, therefore, their expressions. The audience had to rely on the words alone to understand what was going on. But, of course, the great thing about words is that they are so infinitely versatile, capable of expressing confidence or compassion, authority or rebelliousness, heritage or the here and now. In fact, whatever your brand has to say, there is undoubtedly a believable and engaging way to express it. For example, the UK-based babyand-toddler chain Mothercare has developed a personable yet empathetic way of talking to customers which sounds like one parent talking to another. The sign at the entrance of their Oxford Street store in London reads: “For that wonderful, frustrating, hilarious, serious, exhausting, rewarding process called parenting”. According to its online guidelines, British Airways aims for a tone of voice that is “straightforward, sophisticated, progressive and empathetic”, while arch-rival Virgin communicates in a far more youthful, playful, even countercultural, voice. Both are using tone of voice to create differentiation

and appeal to specific types of people. BA is a smart, pinstriped businessperson with a shiny briefcase, Virgin a floppy-haired ex-hippy with entrepreneurial streak (now, where on earth did that idea come from?). You make your choice based on which character or personality you most relate to. These examples show how verbal expression can be used to reinforce brand personality and character or values, to complement and counterpoint the various other elements that combine to make up your identity. In the holy grail of total branding, the style in which words are delivered is a crucial first piece in the jigsaw around which the rest of a brand can be built. There are certainly plenty of variables you can modify: your accent, the pitch of your voice, your turn of phrase, the rhythm of your speech, the volume at which you speak, for example. It’s important that you are aware of your audience and make sure they are hearing what you intend them to hear. Tone can be subtle, working at an almost subconscious level and if you’re too close to the subject, or haven’t accounted for cultural differences, the nuance may be lost. People assume a certain tonality of language because they can hear it in their heads. But, actually, when you write out a phrase or a sentence, a lot of the original emphasis can disappear. Often, you need to insert additional words to create a tone. But, unless you spend a lot of time working with words, this isn’t so obvious. It may also be worth creating a check-list of attributes to ensure your tone of voice answers each point and is getting through loud and clear. Tone of voice isn’t something that just sprouts naturally from the corporate top-soil, it needs to be defined, nurtured and then confidently executed. While a brand’s voice may evolve with maturity and experience, it should stay true to itself, regardless of the whims of current market fads. Ideally, it should be evident in every verbal manifestation of the company, from a simple SMS to the grand annual report, from posters and exhibition signage to the way people answer their phones. It should be embroidered into the very fabric of the company or brand. Yes, that takes time and money but, in the end, setting the right tone will get people talking about your brand.

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Illustration: Adam Hayes

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Illustration: Kate Moross

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Once upon a time If tone of voice is how we speak, storytelling is the way we reach out and touch our audiences. Our stories inform, entertain and engage people. They help us make new fiends and stay close to old ones. And, of course, they’re told in our unique voice, expressing our personality and point of view. Storytelling is as old as the hills and engrained in every culture. From fireside fables, to novels, movies and TV shows, everyone responds deeply and instinctively to tales of human experience however they are conveyed. We naturally empathise with the protagonists, follow them through their moments of tragedy and triumph, and happily live in their worlds a while. Luckily, stories don’t have to be Dickens-long. Challenged to write a six-word story, Ernest Hemingway came up with this gem: “For sale: baby shoes, never worn”. These half dozen words hang heavy with pathos and intrigue. We fill in the gaps with our imagination. The Economist has brought a similar witty succinctness to its advertising, with lines like “ ‘I never read the Economist’, Management Trainee, aged 42” and “Get fired every Friday” (the day the intelligent weekly magazine comes out). So, even when space is at a premium, you can see why storytelling is a powerful way for brands to connect with people and get their messages across. Do you want the mundane minutiae of outdoor camera settings, or would you rather hear a story about someone who climbed his favourite tree to take a picture from the top of it?

While presenting facts and figures is sometimes unavoidable (particularly when dealing with technology products), weaving them into a narrative or building a story around them is far more compelling. People may gloss over numbers on a page but, by giving them context and colour, you can bring clarity, meaning and emotion to complex messages. Not surprisingly, then, we’ve put storytelling right at the heart of the way we write at Nokia. It works hand in hand with tone of voice, informing the way we approach language and verbal identity. Our stories are about real people doing real things, finding something extraordinary in the course of their everyday lives, fun, quirky optimistic stories that people can relate to and have a chuckle about. Because stories are the perfect way for us, make sense of and celebrate our world. And the best thing of all about great stories is that they spread like wildfire.

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Illustration: Kate Moross

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Illustration: Kate Moross

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How we cut through the clutter of an over saturated marketplace 85 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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WE’VE ALWAYS BEEN AN AUTHENTIC, PEOPLE–FOCUSED BRAND Brand New How we cut through the clutter of an over-saturated marketplace People still feel warmly towards us. There’s a certain glow for Nokia as the original mobile brand but, in recent times, we’ve lacked clarity and conviction. Our advertising was way too complex and inconsistent. It was confusing and tried to put across too many ideas at once. Ads in Bangkok looked totally different to ads in Berlin or Boston. We needed a stronger sense of our identity and a direct yet compelling way of expressing it. So, while various rival technology brands have dressed themselves using the trappings of science fiction or a flashy, glossy lifestyle, we’ve gone back to basics. At heart, we’ve always 87 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

been an authentic, peoplefocused brand, and this is the territory we need to inhabit. We want to reach out to people in real, meaningful ways they love and can relate to. And, to this end, we’ve put far greater emphasis on the ‘authentic’ and ‘global’ aspects of our brand character. That’s the thinking behind our strikingly simple new brand identity system. It feels contemporary, perfectly in tune with the times, and allows us to focus on the innovative things that real people like you, me, your friends and people everywhere in the world can do with Nokia. We’re a ‘people brand’, which means we have a democratic outlook, catering for the entire market and known for our quality and integrity.

You could say the same for worldwide brands like adidas, VW, Coca-Cola and Levi’s. They’re aspirational without being pretentious, mass-market without being down-market, ever popular without being the flavour of the month. We’ve also looked to our Finnish roots, taking a tip from classic Finnish design houses like Iittala and Arabia, and the architects Alvar Aalto and Reima Pietilä. This has pointed us in the direction of a pared-down, minimalist aesthetic, revealing the elegance of simple forms and beautiful essentials. This uncomplicated visual style starts from the user interface of our devices and works outwards, extending to every manifestation of the brand – from posters and collateral, to physical and digital environments. Uusi Magazine — Issue Two — 88


And, talking of Finland, Nokia Blue is back. In a big way. We’d slowly diluted our colour palette, but now, we’re unapologetically blue again. Backgrounds, packaging, photography – we see the world through a blue lens, making the colour our own, as much as Coca-Cola is associated with red or easyJet with orange. By using it consistently, even insistently, the colour becomes a subliminal underline, or an effective shorthand for our brand values. We’ve made other fundamental changes too, like our new typeface, Nokia Pure. This is a pleasing sans serif based on the idea of seamless, fluid motion. The generous, rounded characters seem almost to flow into each other, as if there’s no beginning and no end. Its shapes are open, inviting and friendly, reflecting the Nokia heritage in approachable, human design, and acting out our new spirit of openness and honesty. We’ve kept the iconic Nokia logo, but paired it with a ‘Connecting people’ strapline in the new-look typeface – a younger companion which helps keep it looking fresh, relevant and engaging.

NOKIA BLUE IS BACK, IN BIG WAY. BY USING IT CONSISTENTLY, EVEN INSISTENTLY, THE COLOUR BECOMES A SUBLIMINAL UNDERLINE


WORK IS GENUINE, ENERGETIC AND HAND–CRAFTED


WE NEED TO STRIKE OUT AND BE CREATIVELY BRAVE

Elsewhere in this magazine, there’s an article which explains our new approach to photography. It strives to capture real people in real situations, once again emphasising the honesty and authenticity of the brand – nothing staged, nothing bogus, nothing that deceives the eye. Alongside the photography, we’re championing illustrators whose work is genuine, energetic and hand-crafted. We’ve also totally reconsidered and realigned the way we package our products, fit out our stores, and present ourselves at events, conferences and other places where we meet the public and influential industry types whose opinions matter. Working together, all these changes will help put us where we belong again – in the pantheon of truly great brands making a difference to peoples’ lives across the globe.


However, to get to where we want to be, we need to challenge certain internal attitudes and historical legacies. We need to strike out and be creatively brave. Nokia built its business as a rational engineering company and has predominantly focused on activities to do with the left-brain area – analytical, systematic, logical. To connect with increasingly savvy audiences and achieve thought leadership, we need to be engaging the right side of the brain, which is all to do with creativity, intuition and holistic thought. In the past, we have had a ‘pack shot’ mentality, always harking back to technical specifications and presenting the product as hero. But the new Nokia isn’t about us, it’s about the people who have let us into their lives. We need to realise that, to achieve truly jaw-dropping creativity, we don’t even have to show the product to promote the brand. Just look at Cadbury’s Gorilla commercial, one of the most successful of recent times, which showed no chocolate at all, just a man in a gorilla suit drumming to Phil Collins’ track

In The Air Tonight. It quickly became an internet sensation, won countless creative awards, boosted year-on-year sales by 9% and improved the brand’s approval rating by 20%. Other progressive brands, including Wonderbra, T-Mobile and PlayStation, also cleverly make a virtue of leaving out the product, concentrating instead on their effects or simply creating a positive feeling around the brand. Marketing driven by the right brain isn’t simply frittering away time and money on quirky, experimental projects. It’s as carefully calculated as featuredriven marketing – just the metrics are different. Switchedon brands are increasingly looking for more effective ways to spend their money – opportunities to engage with people through carefully targeted sponsorships and initiatives, pin-pointing events and activities they know will appeal their audiences. We need to accept that the rules and market have changed dramatically, that we need to salute real people, real stories and real art. It won’t be easy. But it will be worth it.

NOKIA ISN’T ABOUT US, IT’S ABOUT THE PEOPLE WHO HAVE LET US INTO THEIR LIVES

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SX

SW South by Southwest Festival We asked, why are you here? Once a year, usually in March, all roads seemingly lead to Austin in Texas. It’s the perhaps unlikely setting for the South by Southwest Festival, widely acknowledged as the biggest international melting-pot for new ideas in technology, film and music. “Nokia needs to be connected as well as connecting people”, says Philip Hickey, Global Digital Marketing Manager at Nokia. “There’s a hungriness and determination about South by Southwest that sits well with the challenger brand we have become. It’s a really important place to be, to be listening to happening people and having our ear firmly to the ground.”

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Around 50,000 expectant people excitedly descend on the city

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The festival is certainly a treat for the ears. For a few heady days, SXSW becomes a buzzing hub for hundreds of international music acts appearing on more than 80 stages across the city. It also hosts a film festival with a programme presenting the newest and edgiest documentaries and features. And, if this wasn’t enough, there’s also a huge and extremely impressive bill of cool digitalfacing events, featuring movers, shakers and money makers from emerging technologies. At SXSW Interactive, you rub shoulders with the kind of developers, entrepreneurs and visionaries who already have one foot in the future. A real who’s who of previous speakers includes Thomas Dolby, Malcolm Gladwell, Bruce Sterling, Philip Glass and Mark Zuckerberg.

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producer Michael Richards. “We had no agenda, just let the individual stories emerge.” Though the feel of the film is deliberately spontaneous and all about capturing the moment, plenty of prep work took place beforehand. SXSW’s music festival producer opened many doors and helped pin-point suitable acts to feature. Local contacts like production company Marmalade Sky and well-connected fixers were used to secure meetings and interviews. The team were particularly after bands on the break rather than more established names, as well as unusual, gritty characters like the winsome burlesque dancer, who would add a distinct visual signature to the film. Probably the most recognisable faces are filmmaker Duncan Jones (the son of David Bowie) and hotly tipped UK bands The Vaccines and Summer Camp. “We had to be really flexible and work at speed, more like a photo assignment”,

The film has really captured the pulse of the place

In 1987, the festival’s inaugural year, 700 seriously in-the-know types hooked up for what was back then a somewhat underground event. Since then, it’s exploded. Now, an estimated 50,000 expectant people excitedly descend on the city – talent and talent spotters, wannabes and networkers, fans and almost-famous. There’s a palpable buzz in the air and an impromptu performance on every street corner; in this non-stop party atmosphere, any dream seems possible and everyone has half an eye out for the next big thing. Austin is no typical Texas town, as you can tell from its unofficial slogan ‘Keep Austin Weird’. In recent years, it’s become a magnet for the creative counter-culture, attracting a bohemian mix of artists, musicians, university

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students and interesting people who don’t particularly fit in elsewhere. There’s also a rapidly growing hi-tech community, accounting for the area’s Silicon Hills nickname. All in all, SXSW seemed the perfect spot for Nokia to explore, enjoy and make friends and contacts. We wanted to be part of what was going on, but also to capture some of the raw energy, inspiration and the incredible spirit of opportunity and optimism that’s evident all around the place. So, we despatched documentary director David Masters and his team to Austin for ten days to create a short film which conveys the creatively charged atmosphere and controlled chaos of the event. And he duly delivered four minutes of utterly compelling

footage titled ‘In Austin’, which has already been nominated for two prestigious awards. “It works on a really subtle level, but basically it’s a piece of brand exploration”, explains David. “We found people with real human stories to tell, stories of chutzpah and opportunity, people coming together for ten days to make the best of what they can. It’s a youthful, optimistic place, a personable, connected place. Actually, it was incredibly inspiring and really makes you want to do more with your life and work.” Rather than interviewing people in the traditional way, they were simply asked a single question: “Why are you here?”. This provoked a more natural, off-the cuff response, in keeping with the fast-moving, free-flowing spirit of the piece. “It’s just a simple idea to hang the film on”, explains

says David. “We used a combination of digital SLR cameras and 16mm film to keep things light and unobtrusive. The idea was to be almost invisible, but not covert.” The evocative collage style was pushed further in the edit, but it was important to keep the narrative intelligible and reasonably lucid. “There is a dream-like quality to it”, says David. “We were looking at Austin through the lens of the weird and quirky – architecture, artists, street culture. To be honest, there was so much going on that the difficult thing was deciding what to leave out.”

The town’s unofficial slogan is ‘Keep Austin Weird’


It’s about making stuff... just going out and doing it

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“The film has really captured the pulse of the place”, says Philip Hickey. “The mood is great, a perfect execution of the new brand identity, without being too corporate or obvious. ‘In Austin’ is like a mini brand documentary and could mark the start of a series of Connecting People films.” ‘In Austin’ has been posted online on YouTube, Vimeo and the Nokia NSeries blog, and is building a considerable following. In the UK, it was picked up by the Guardian and NME, which sent view counts through the roof. And Hickey believes there will be a further upsurge in interest leading up to next year’s festival.

We’ll leave the last word to one of the film’s perceptive talking heads: “It’s about making stuff… going out and doing stuff, whether interactive or film or music or whatever. It’s going out and doing it, not talking about it… being a doer”. He’s talking about SXSW, but it could just as easily be Nokia.

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Our Type of Poster Launching the Nokia Pure font, with a smile on our face When you read a book, or film titles or a poster, you’re probably not even aware of the typeface it’s been set in. But, subconsciously, the shape and style of the letters will have made a real difference to your perception of the words and influenced the meaning you take from them. The noted Dutch Max Kisman typographer explains this effect in a really succinct and charming way: “The letters of the alphabet, the characters of a typeface, are building blocks. Besides being symbols to construct a written language, they can be used to compose any visual impression imaginable… A new expression. A new impression. A new corner of the mind is opened. How exciting!”. 109 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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For a brand, then, choice of typeface is hugely important – not only a signal of intent, but the genesis of every piece of visual communication. That’s a big deal. A typeface is like the blood pumping through the veins and arteries of the brand – you may not be entirely aware of it doing its work, but you couldn’t live without it. And that’s why the Nokia brand team worked with Swiss typographer Bruno Maag, of Dalton Maag, for so many long months, honing and perfecting what would become Nokia Pure – a new typeface fit to usher in a new era of Nokia history. Creating a bespoke typeface from scratch is an arduous and painstaking process. Particularly one that needs to work across so many languages and scripts, from Greek and Cyrillic to Arabic, Hebrew, Devanagari and Thai. So, when Nokia Pure finally saw the light of day in early 2011, there was only one thing to do… celebrate! DesignStudio – a Londonbased consultancy which has worked closely with Nokia over several years – was charged with conceiving and curating a suitable launch event to introduce the typeface to the wider world. They picked their spot carefully – the Tramshed Gallery in Rivington Street, Shoreditch, an area of London jam-packed with designers and arty types, much sought-after for private views and gallery openings. “We saw this as a real opportunity to change people’s perspectives about Nokia”, says DesignStudio’s Ben Wright. “We wanted to reach out to the design world and proudly show people what Nokia has been up to lately. The event was to be about sharing and openness, not guardedness and secrecy. Design plays a massive part in Nokia, and it was time to remind people.”

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For a brand, then, choice of typeface is hugely important – not only a signal of intent, but the genesis of every piece of visual communication

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DesignStudio started out by commissioning a group of ten hand-picked designers to create limited-edition posters using the new typeface. There would be just 20 of each poster, and proceeds from their sale would go to charity. Contributors included much-admired names like Cartlidge Levene, Bond, Build and Alex Trochut, chosen particularly because they have a real feel and flair for type, combined with a creative streak. Though the selected designers’ work covers a broad range of styles and attitudes, one thing they have in common is a certain disciplined, modernist sensibility which, it was felt, would showcase Nokia Pure to best effect.

Creating a bespoke typeface from scratch is an arduous and painstaking process

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So, after a short background session on the thoughts and influences behind the typeface, the designers were sent on their way. “The brief was very open”, confirms Paul Stafford of DesignStudio. “It was just to reflect the Finnish purity of the typeface in some way.” Bond’s poster references Marilyn Monroe, taking its cues from the female form. The driving idea was to undress the font and show some of its most beautiful aspects by creating a series of ‘Nokia nudes’ – blondes, brunettes and redheads. Zak’s approach was altogether more cerebral, featuring a blue word-search puzzle in the Nokia Pure font to conceal 18 relevant words. The designers give the viewer a head start by pointing out Nokia, ‘brand’ and ‘mirror’ for us. Build’s poster is also somewhat enigmatic, featuring an original poem by the studio’s Nicola Place, titled Pure Imagination. A foil-blocked QR-code is linked to an animated version of the full poem, which can be read on your mobile.

We saw this as a real opportunity to change people’s perspectives about Nokia

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The launch party itself was packed and enthusiastic, with around 400 supportive friends, curious designers, Nokia people and design press

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Cartlidge Levene played with the medium, creating a series of posters using only wood veneer. So, there was no ink, paper or print process involved – just the purity of removing material to render the font. Their words listed Finland’s ten most common trees in English and Finnish. And Morag Myerscough went one step further, using ‘pure’ white Alvar Aalto 60 stools, on which she applied her own somewhat provocative interpretations of the word ‘pure’. Alongside the posters, design agency Build was commissioned to create a lasting, tangible piece of the Nokia Pure typeface for the event. This involved recreating its digital letters as wooden and metal type forms and, then, printing using traditional letterpress techniques – all of which was documented in a ‘making of’ film.

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The launch party itself was packed and enthusiastic, with around 400 supportive friends, curious designers, Nokia people and design press – the interested and the influential rubbing shoulders, taking in the artworks and enjoying the refreshment supplied by Finlandia Vodka. Bruno Maag was in his element – typographers don’t often get the chance to enjoy the limelight, and he was making the most of it. Nokia Pure is officially out there and has already put a stake in the ground. As Max Kisman would have it, the building blocks are in place and now it’s time to set them to work and start making an impression.

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Our chosen charity All proceeds from the Nokia Pure launch were donated to the British Dyslexia Association (BDA). Given the high percentage of dyslexic designers and the fact that our new typeface will be used to spell out words, we felt this was highly appropriate.

Here are a few facts about the condition: — Dyslexia is the most common cause of difficulties with reading, writing and spelling. Very often, dyslexic people think in images and pictures. — Dyslexic people use the left and right front parts of their brains to read, while nondyslexics use the left front and right back parts. — A dyslexic person will often confuse right and left, and may find it difficult to find their way around strange places. — People who are dyslexic often have poor hand-eye coordination, which can make them clumsy. — Dyslexic people can have poor short-term visual and auditory memory, and trouble remembering sequences. — Dyslexia doesn’t discriminate – it affects males and females equally, as well as people from different ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. — Dyslexic people often have above-average intelligence and can have exceptional sports ability or creative talent. — Children suffering from dyslexia can have problems at school, leading to behaviour problems. — Famous dyslexics include Virgin’s Richard Branson, Apple’s Steve Jobs, architect Richard Rogers, newspaper columnist AA Gill and the prolific musician Damon Albarn. — 10% of the British population are dyslexic, 4% severely. — Dyslexia is identified as a disability as defined in the Disability Discrimination Act 2005. — The BDA runs a free helpline on 0845 251 9002, which receives up to 20,000 calls a year. British Dyslexia Awareness Week runs from 31 October to 6 November this year.

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All the latest explorations using our new identity system and showcase of our agencies’ work. 123 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

Visit https://brandbook.nokia.com to see all the latest movies and best-practice executions. Please submit your work through NokiaBrandClinic@nokia.com to be included in the latest issue of the magazine.

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360° Concept and video: DesignStudio 125 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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Nokia Type Launch Documentary Production: DesignStudio 127 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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PureReversal Film production and direction: Build Original music: J-VEN 129 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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In Austin Directed by: David Masters 131 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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Day In The Life, Life In A Day Film production and direction: DesignStudio 133 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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New Global Shoot Image Bank Production: Nokia Brand and Marketing Studio 135 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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Dot Production: Aardman Animations Agency: Wieden+Kennedy 137 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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Dragonfly Love Music: Kap Bambino Director: Thomas Hilland 139 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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Pocket Dance Agency: Arnold KLP 141 — Uusi Magazine — Issue Two

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Uusi Credits Magazine Content Editor Richard Crabb

Print Avenue Litho are Carbon Smart accredited and are proud to have the full FSC printer certification.

Design DesignStudio wearedesignstudio.com Key Contributors totalcontent Aapo Bovellan Kelly Burlace DesignStudio Thomas Markert Content Contributors Deanne Cheuk Jeremy Dower Freunde von Freunden Jessi Frey Anna-Liisa Haenninen Adam Hayes Adam Laycock David Masters Kate Moross Kalle Ojala Jane Stockdale Supermundane Mark Thomas Nokia Brand and Marketing Studio Aapo Bovellan Director, Brand and Marketing Studio Kelly Burlace Image-Making Art Director Richard Crabb Head of Art Direction Panu Kuusela Marketing Manager Darryl Pieber Verbal Identity Art Director Rami Salminen Online Art Director Costas Syrmos UX and Brand Innovation

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Paper Cyclus Offset 250gsm/100gsm Cyclus Offset is 100% recycled from post-consumer waste. 9lives 55 Gloss 115gsm 9lives 55 Gloss is 55% recycled from post-consumer waste.


Nokia Brand Magazine 2