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Digital Design - Module 01 Semester 1, 2018 Janine Foo Shu Yin (917900) Samuel Lalo + Studio 11


Week One

Reading: Zeara Polo, A. 2010. Between Ideas and Matters.

According to Zeara-Polo, the diagram does not play a representational role in the design process but provides an organisational and can have a performative quality depending on how it is deployed. Explain how Diagram is different from Signs and Symbols?

The Diagram is an instrument that explains relationships and establishes operations in space. It always has a specific and spatial relationship to space and is relative to activities occurring in three-dimensional space or other aspects of reality. However, Signs and Symbols are direct representations of dynamic objects, and their relationship between shape and content is completely unpredictable and irrelevant. Unlike Signs and Symbols that are representational in nature, the Diagram provides links between material and conceptual forms or understanding in a systematic manner.

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Week One

Precedent Analysis

Roof plan

Isometric view of columns

Baan, Iwan. 2009. The 2009 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion / SANAA. Photograph. https://www. archdaily.com/28672/the-2009-serpentine-gallery-pavilion-sanaa.

Undulating roof

Ground and Plexiglass walls included

Using a plan image as reference, I started by tracing the outline of the roof, followed by modelling the individual columns according to their varying heights and placing them at their exact locations. I then used points from each of the columns to create the undulating roof form. I modelled the floor as well as the Plexiglass walls thereafter.

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WEEK 2 - PRECEDENT ISOMETRIC Week Two

Reading: Hertzberger H. 2005. The in-between and The Habitable Space Between Things, from Lessons for Students in Architecture. Herzberger discusses how design should not be extreme in its functionality. Use your precedent study to explain how the pavilion allows for an appropriation of use.

Herzberger’s argument ties in with the design intention behind my precedent study, the Serpentine Pavilion (2009) by SANAA. Architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa designed the pavilion as a floating structure resembling a cloud or pool of water, supported by many thin columns and no walls – this allows a clear view across the park and enables free access from all around. The subtly undulating roof provides shaded spaces for various appropriation of uses to the public, such as a café and auditorium, and low-rise spaces for the amusement of little children and entertainment for adults to play and sit.

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Week Two

Isometric

Serpentine Pavilion by SANAA The Serpentine Pavilion (2009) was built by architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA. The design intention and key concept behind the pavilion was to blend the structure seamlessly with its surroundings. The pavilion is constructed out of reflective aluminium metal, resembling a floating cloud or pool of water supported by many thin and elegant columns. The roof structure is subtly undulating, curling itself around the surrounding trees whilst reaching upwards and sloping downwards in certain areas - almost as if it is constantly moving. During the modelling process, I noticed little subtleties within the structure that contributed to its overall design. The many columns that support the structure vary in height, contributing to the undulating roof form that - at first glance - looks deceptively flat from afar. The SANAA pavilion pushes the concept of Threshold by doing away with walls - even the plexiglass walls merely create a subtle division between the the interior and exterior space, allowing a semi-private space for public activities. The columns are deliberately thin and delicate, enabling clear view across the park and access from all around.

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Week Two Diagrams

Circulation Diagram

Threshold (Permeability) Diagram

The lightest grey area indicates the primary circulation space, where the public is able to freely move around and within the structure. The medium shade of grey demonstrates popular spaces for activity whilst the darkest grey highlights a key space for play and amusement for children where the roof is sloping low. Plexiglass walls in light

The design of the pavilion challenges the concept of Threshold by having no walls - the thin columns enables one to enter the structure from all around except spaces that are fenced by plexiglass walls. Even the plexiglass walls are see-through, providing only a subtle division of space and demonstrating a sense of permeability which

blue guide circulation paths and provide semi-private spaces for 6 public activity.

exposes activity occuring within.


Appendix

Process

Using a plan image as reference, I started by tracing the outline of the roof, followed by modelling the individual columns according to their varying heights and placed them on their exact locations on the image. Using the Patch command on Rhino, I then used points from each of the columns to create the undulating roof form. I modelled the floor as well as the Plexiglass walls thereafter. After that, I used Make2D and exported the images onto Adobe lllustrator.

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Appendix Process

After exporting my Make2D images from Rhino into Adobe Illustrator, I adjusted the lineweights and added arrows to indicate circulation and movement.

I later added colour for different elements using both Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop.

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Appendix

Process

For the Threshold Diagrams, I split the structure according to three dimensions - the roof, columns and ground plane i.e. ground and plexiglass. After adjusting the lineweights, I added dotted lines to depict where the columns are placed on the ground plane and connected to the roof.

I then added colour on Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop.

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Final Isometric

After exporting make2D of the entire model on Rhino, I adjusted lineweights on Adobe Illustrator and inserted lines to portray the grid pattern on the roof. Colours were added afterwards.

917900 janine foo shu yin dd module01 journaltemplate  
917900 janine foo shu yin dd module01 journaltemplate  
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