Page 1

Colorado Springs, CO | Helena, MT | Tucson, AZ | Medford, OR

priceless: please take one MARCH | APRIL 2010

America’s

Best Places Operated by SkyWest Airlines

magazine


Klamath Falls, Orego n Medford, Oregon

North Bend, Oregon

A change in perspective


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March | April 2010

America’s Best Places Page 8 | Don’t let your vacation itinerary exhaust you. Relax in friendly towns with easy to navigate airports and once-in-a-lifetime adventures. Check out 10 top-spots for laidback fun such as the Arizona River Runners’ raft trip through the Grand Canyon depicted on our cover.

contents 18 | Spotlight: Helena, MT

23 | SkyNews

24 | Beyond LAX

Colorado Springs, CO

26 | O’Hare Outbound

Free Fun in Colorado Springs Page 10 | Think you can’t afford a vacation this year? Think again. Colorado Springs’s scenic location, healing waters and ample outdoor adventures have lured tourists for more than a century. It’s a big city now with food and lodging options for every budget. Once you’re there, the fun is free. Consider these ten priceless pursuits.

28 | Budget-Friendly Vacations

30 | Fool-Proof Bucket List Adventures

Medford’s Golden Attractions Page 14 | Medford sits smack dab in the middle of the Rogue River Valley an area long known for fruit orchards, wineries and artisan food products. Now it’s establishing a new claim to fame as a retirement haven where taxes and cost of living are low, and the recreational options plentiful.

38 | America’s Best Events

40 | Crossword Puzzle

42 | Behind the Scenes

Tucson, AZ

44 | Route Map

Top Tucson Temptations Page 20 | There’s more to Tucson than clear desert skies, staggering mountain views and a bone-warming climate. This trendy college town with a Mexican-American vibe is home to some of the nation’s most unique experiences. Here are seven things every Tucson visitor should see and do.

45 | About Our Aircraft

46 | Airport Maps

Web Extras!

If you like this magazine you will love our new affiliate—website www.americasbestplaces.com. operated by SkyWest Airlines

cover: Vivian Ogier- Arizona River Runners’ passenger

Medford, OR

Mission: Courtesy of the DeGrazia Foundation

37 | It’s Our Journey, Too


Waiting for a flight? SEE thE SightS. Take a FREE shuttle and a tour of historic Temple Square—in less than two hours. Pickups at Terminal 1 (door 1), Terminal 2 (door 12).

When you come to Utah, be sure to visit

TEMPLE SQUARE in the heart of Salt Lake City

Tours are available in more than 30 languages

Many venues to choose from, and all are free

© Busath.com

Your tour group can:

Listen

to the glorious music of the famed Mormon Tabernacle Choir, rehearsing and performing in the Tabernacle on Temple Square. They also perform in the 21,000-seat Conference Center. See visittemplesquare.com for details.

Discover

your roots

in the FamilySearch Center, where helpful volunteers can assist in retrieving family history information from the world’s largest repository of genealogical records.

Meander

through

two upscale visitors’ centers that include the Christus statue by Danish sculptor Thorvaldsen. Visit the interactive map of ancient Jerusalem (kids love it!) and much more.

For information on these and many other fascinating venues on Temple Square, go to visittemplesquare.com, lds.org/placestovisit, or call 1-800-537-9703. © IRI. PD50021647


Welcome Aboard

Dedication to Safety and Service—Always Dear Passenger: At SkyWest Airlines, every flight we operate is about exceptional service, including the one you are on right now. Once a small airline with only one daily flight, nearly 38 years later SkyWest proudly operates more than 1,500 flights across the United States, Canada and Mexico. Our humble beginning has evolved into an industry-leading product and an effort to play an active role in the communities in which we live and work. From hosting the industry’s premier charity race each March to contributing to numerous causes throughout the year, we encourage our employees to participate in their communities. Each year, SkyWest’s Mini Indy raises money for The United Way and for SkyWest scholarships— contributing to the higher education of our own people and their families. This March marks a decade of Mini Indy, where teams from international and local businesses, community leaders, various civic groups and some of SkyWest’s finest, race miniature Indy-style cars through a twisting course to claim the checkered flag. Though it’s adults in go-karts, it’s a fun way to recognize our people and of course, give back to our community— the race has raised nearly one-million dollars for charity (and counting). You can read more about Mini Indy on page 37. But that’s not all. Employees throughout the SkyWest system are encouraged to contribute to any cause that speaks to them. During the holidays, our Colorado Springs employees joined with the airport, United Express and local charities to fly underprivileged children to the “North Pole.” After a brief flight they met Santa Claus and his elves, who presented them with a feast and gifts of the season. In February this year, our employees came together once more contributing accrued hours and money to those devastated by the earthquake in Haiti. From donating thousands of dollars to find a cure for breast cancer to walking with fellow employees in the fight against AIDS, our employees go above and beyond their job descriptions at SkyWest. I’m proud of their efforts in trying to help improve the lives of others. It’s part of the way we conduct business, making SkyWest first and foremost a people company. It’s how we treat each other and you, our valued passenger. And it shows from when you check in at the ticket counter to the time you spend onboard our flights. Today and beyond, we look forward to providing the exceptional service our passengers have come to expect onboard a SkyWest United Express flight.

Welcome Aboard!

Russell “Chip” Childs President and COO SkyWest Airlines


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ramblings and recommends

So What Does “Best” Really Mean?

Go!

P U B L I C AT I O N S I N C O R P O R A T E D

Dear Reader:

Our nation is awash in superlatives. A variety of publications use myriad methods to determine top-drawer locales for everything from rock climbing to retirement communities. Sometimes the honors get divvied up on the basis of population or geography or some other criteria: Best big city for singles . . . Best small towns in the Midwest . . . Best pedestrian-friendly community in the Southwest . . . Best rural areas for families . . . Best public golf course ranked by price . . .Best mid-size community for mountain bikers. You get the idea. Press releases flood my email announcing all the accolades. I have no quibble with receiving good news. That’s what this publication is all about. I know that shining a spotlight on things that are lovely and admirable and fun does more than inform. It uplifts the soul and builds confidence in the fact that America is a pretty terrific place. But after a while, I sort of want to scream. “Is every place the best?” Hey, I do words for a living. I know “best” means exceeding all others. It’s more than good. It’s the acme, the pinnacle, the mountaintop of “whatever.” I also understand that multiplying categories and narrowing their scope makes it easier to include more places in these feel-good rosters. It helps to boost more egos, giving more Americans a reason to stand tall and be proud of their hometowns. While that’s all fine, it makes me wonder. Are all these lists, all this happy-talk, the communal equivalent of handing a five-year-old a soccer medal just for showing up? Then I got an email from Kaili Shewmaker of Long Beach, California who

reported that she’d just flown SkyWest to Fargo, North Dakota for a radio gig and wanted to share her best local find: beer cheese soup at Bertrosa’s Chicago Café on Broadway in downtown Fargo’s Black Building. Who would have known? Besides the folks of Fargo that is? Our mission took on increased clarity. We share good news about great places. Often that means ferreting out the best things to see and do in more out-of-the way communities. That’s a great privilege—and a responsibility we take seriously. More than two-million airline passengers will have the opportunity to read this edition of SkyWest Magazine. The staff here never forgets that. With every issue we strive to let that massive audience know that there’s a lot to enjoy all along the SkyWest route map. The more I thought about the potential over-use of the word “best,” the more I realized that places are a lot like people. Every single one has some claim to fame. So, when we spotlight “America’s Best Places” in SkyWest Magazine, you won’t find rankings or ratings that deem one town somehow better than another. You will encounter some of the best reasons to visit wonderful places from Muskegon, Michigan to Medford, Oregon, and plenty of spots in between. When it comes to uncovering wonderful activities, events and attractions, we’ll do our best—in this issue and always. That’s a superlative you can depend on. Happy Skies,

CJ

Colleen “CJ” Birch Maile Editor in Chief

president Kelly D. Coles editor in chief Colleen Birch Maile colleen@gopubinc.com art director Janie W. Budell janie@gopubinc.com copy editor Bethany Maile proof readers Anna Bierman Tatro | Quincy Budell contributors Amanda Bjerke | Lou Jurassic Laura Klarman | Connie Naylor | Carlton Tajni

director sales and marketing Teena J. Wright l 208-333-9990 teena@gopubinc.com

advertising managers MT, OR, UT, WA, Canada: Wendy Rivers l 406-586-0439 wndyrivers@theglobal.net CO, NV, Northern and Central CA: Susan Vernier Garcia l 970-927-9599 susan@gopubinc.com for all other locations call: Teena J. Wright l 208-333-9990 teena@gopubinc.com SkyWest Magazine corporate office 208-333-9990 l fax: 208-333-9991 205 N. 10th St., Suite B100, Boise, ID 83702 email: info@skywestmagazine.com www.skywestmagazine.com SkyWest Airlines 444 S. River Rd., St. George, UT 84790 435-634-3000 l email: info@skywest.com SkyWest Airlines Stock Symbol: SKYW

SkyWest Magazine (ISSN 1527-4152) is published bi-monthly by Go! Publications, Inc. for United Express operated by SkyWest Airlines. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to SkyWest Magazine are not necessarily those of the editor, publisher or of SkyWest Airlines. Acceptance of advertisements does not imply official endorsement of the products or services concerned. While every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of content, no responsibility can be taken for any errors and/or omissions. No part of this SkyWest Magazine may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher. © 2010 Go! Publications Inc. All rights reserved.

Copies available for $6 each.

This magazine assumes no responsibility for the safekeeping or return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, artwork or other material. This magazine does not reply to queries without SASE.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter: CJknowsAmerica.

For reprints of articles in this issue of SkyWest Magazine, please call 208-333-9990. Visit us on our website at www.skywestmagazine.com.

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10

Places For

America’s Best Fun!

H

ow huge is your vacation itinerary? If you’ve got massive museums, vast amusement parks or sprawling, high-energy cities on the list, beware. Sometimes fun can be exhausting. Consider a minimalist’s approach to travel this year with these recommendations for fun places without crowds or traffic jams. They include once-in-a-life-

time opportunities that won’t wear you out or send you home wishing you could get a little rest. All are accessed by SkyWest Airlines’ service to some of the nation’s friendliest and most easy-to-navigate airports. It doesn’t get better than that! There is no ranking system because these unique experiences are simply incomparable.

B est Places To:

America’s

Raft through the Grand Canyon with an outfitter such as Arizona River Runners. The Phoenix-based company offers trips ranging from a three-day introductory float from the North Rim of the Grand Canyon to Lake Meade to a 13-day oar-boat adventure that offers an intimate encounter with America’s most spectacular landmark.

Rock Crawl: Moab, Utah’s red peaks and pinnacles show up in plenty of commercials—often with cars perilously perched on their tippy tops. No wonder these cliffs appeal to extreme 4x4 fans. No need to be a gearhead to get in on the action. Anyone can defy gravity here with the help of a Moab Adventure Center guide at the wheel of a modified Hummer. Precision drivers deliver adrenaline-charged thrills. The scenery is a plus. Sunset tours are especially awesome.

Sleep Close to the Stars: Eugene, Oregon’s Pacific Tree Climbing Institute offers a chance to spend the night in the top of an old growth Douglas fir forest. Campers sleep as high as 200 feet above the earth, snug in a tree boat. Most stay two nights. Day climbs are also available. The season extends from April until November.

8 | skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express

Rock Crawl: Moab Adventure Center.com

Get Back to Nature: The Colorado River photo on our cover says it all.

Boy in Tree: Pacific Tree Climbing Institute

fat-tire phenomenon, or so, the locals claim. Crested Butte bills itself as the birthplace of mountain biking and backs up the brag with the Mountain Bike Hall of Fame. Housed in one of the 19th-century-structures that are typical of this old mining town, it exhibits memorabilia, vintage bikes and an overview of the sport’s evolution. Admission is just $3. Trails are free. Novices or those wanting to hone skills can sign up for the Crested Mountain Bike School and learn from experts.

River: Vivian Ogier- Arizona River Runners passenger

Go Mountain Biking: Crested Butte, Colorado’s terrain is so amazing it spawned the


Downhill Ski in Summer: Mount Hood, Oregon includes the Palmer Glacier, where winter is always in season and the public can ski all summer long. It’s easy to combine a summer ski trip with Oregon’s great camping, backpacking or hiking opportunities. Mount Hood is just 70 miles from SkyWest service to Portland.

Scuba Dive in the Mountains: Heber Valley, Utah is just 12 miles from chic Park City and 25 miles from the Salt Lake Airport. It’s home to the Homestead Crater, the only warm-water scuba destination in the continental U.S. The 55-foot-deep mineral pool’s water temperatures are typically 96 degrees. It’s ideal for scuba divers, as well as folks who just want to relax in the therapeutic waters. Come winter, you can scuba dive and sled on the same day!

Have a Date With History: Duluth, Minnesota and Fort Wayne, Indiana both trump Washington D.C. in our book. They are among nine American communities to benefit from Karpeles Manuscript Museums. These facilities take turns presenting portions of the world’s largest private collection of manuscripts and documents. Abraham Lincoln’s original Emancipation Proclamation, John Hancock’s cover letter to the Declaration of Independence, the original U.S. Bill of Rights and handwritten works by luminaries ranging from Christopher Columbus to Mozart to Mark Twain are just part of the significant papers on display at any given time. It’s all free!

Welcome Spring: Carlsbad, California’s Flower Fields erupt into a cavalcade of color when 50 acres of Giant Ranunculus blossom each spring. A tourist attraction for more than 60 years, The Flower Fields feature wagon rides, special events and plenty of photo opportunities. It also benefits from easy access to the Carlsbad Airport and the beach. This year’s season runs from March 1 through May 9.

Encounter 19th-Century Excess: Asheville, North Carolina’s lovely setting and Southern charm beguiled George Washington Vanderbilt, who created the Biltmore, a 175,000-square foot French manor that is still the nation’s largest privately owned home. Artwork, antiques and other trappings of Gilded Age opulence make it as much museum as mansion. The estate encompasses more than 8,000 acres, including 75 acres of formal gardens. It is possible to stay at a hotel located on the premises. The Asheville Airport is just 15 minutes away.

To learn more about these 10 great adventures and other fun-filled experiences visit www.americasbestplaces.com/bucketlist http://www.americasbestplaces.com.

skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express |

9


Free Fun in Colorado Springs: 10 Priceless Pursuits

S

by Amanda Bjerke

ince its 1871 founding as a resort community, tourism has been an important part of Colorado Springs’ life. In the 19th Century, mineral waters, a high, dry climate and proximity to spectacular natural wonders such as the Garden of the Gods and Pikes Peak quickly attracted visitors from throughout America and Europe. As the economy diversified, the city’s boundaries stretched to include neighboring communities. Colorado Springs is now the state’s largest metropolis in terms of area. Within its environs tourists continue to find plenty of fun. The really good news? Much of it is absolutely free. So, pack a picnic, turn on the GPS and explore these priceless diversions:

1. The United States Air Force Academy:

An excursion to this military installation twelve miles north of downtown is sure to fan patriotic pride. The impressive, privately funded visitor’s center includes a video and a variety of exhibits dealing with the academy’s history and cadet life. Pick up a map for the self-guided walking tour, and then take the nature trail to the facility’s most 10 | skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express

Air Force Academy Cadet Chapel

amazing feature—the soaring 150-foot chapel. It’s really an amalgam of five separate places of worship. Protestants, Catholics, Jews and Buddhists all enjoy their own area. Each has its own entrance. A fifth space is reserved for all other faiths. Unless there’s a wedding or other private event, they are all open to the public and sure to inspire.

2.

Art on the Streets: Forty-six permanent public-art offerings pepper Colorado Springs’ 40-block downtown area. Some—sculptures of Zebulon Pike, Katharine Lee Bates, Winfield Scott— tell tales from the city’s colorful past. Others simply spread good cheer. All contribute much to a


downtown walking tour. Maps are available from the Downtown Association. Each year the city updates this artistic environment with a dozen winners of a juried competition. Entries arrive from throughout the nation and represent both emerging and established artists—mostly sculptors.

Olympic Training Center: Colorado Springs Convention & Visitors Bureau

3.

Fine Arts Center Tactile Gallery: This forward-thinking experiential gallery aims to make art accessible for all people—including the visually impaired and those with other disabilities. The result is an engaging experience that encourages all visitors and especially children to “please touch” the art. Displays are situated so that even young kids can reach them. The collection emphasizes sculpture and includes the work of many well-known contemporary artists such as Glenna Goodacre, David Chamberlain and Michael Naranja. Please note that there is a charge for admission to all other Fine Arts Center galleries.

4.

U.S. Olympic Training Center: This is where many of the nation’s crème de la crème hone their athletic skills. A 45-minute walking tour affords visitors the chance to see the practice grounds including gymnasiums, weight lifting and wrestling facilities, shooting ranges and the aquatic center.

U.S. Olympic Training Center

Glimpses of star athletes are common. In the visitor’s center, exhibits and a video are of added interest. It’s open every day of the year. However, Sunday visits aren’t recommended. Even gold-medal hopefuls need to rest. Take I-25 to Exit 143.

5.

America the Beautiful Park: This downtown green space at 136 Cimino Drive commemorates Colorado Springs’ role in the creation of a song that stands as an alternative U.S. national anthem—America the Beautiful. In 1893, Colorado College visiting professor Katharine Lee Bates took a train ride to the top of Pikes Peak and was so captivated by the scenery she returned to her room in the old Antler’s Hotel and penned a poetic tribute to “beautiful spacious skies and purple mountain’s majesty.” The tune came later. Like skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express |

11


Visitors are treated to dozens of horse-drawn carriages including an 1841 model used for William Henry Harrison’s inaugural. The Penroses’ 1906 Renault and 1928 Cadillac as well as several Pikes Peak racecars from the 1920s are still on display.

9.

Balance Rock at Garden of the Gods

seemingly all of Colorado Springs, the park benefits from great views. It also includes a terrific playground with interactive artwork, as well as all the expected apparatus for climbing, spinning, sliding, etc.

6.

Garden of the Gods: Amazing red-rock formations in the shadow of Pikes Peak; a wide diversity of trails; a historic ranch house and homestead; endless photo opportunities; free nature talks and guided walks are all a part of this must-see attraction. In summer the entertainment expands with special evening presentations. There’s also a weekly summer theatrical production detailing the region’s fascinating history. In any season, the garden is a visual delight and a land of many uses. Rock climbers, horsemen and hikers of every ability find much to love here. Take I-25 to Exit 146 and follow the signs.

Manitou Springs:

Colorado’s indigenous people believed that the naturally carbonated waters bubbling through the rocks here contained the breath of Manitou, their Great Spirit. To capitalize on the mineral waters’ healing properties, 19th-century entrepreneurs built a resort between the Garden of the Gods and Pikes Peak. Today, the historic structures remain largely intact and the waters continue to flow. A jaunt to this historic town just four miles west of Colorado Springs should include a tour of the healthful springs. Eleven continue to spout. Every Tuesday and Saturday guided tours leave from the Town Clock. Participants bring their own drinking vessels and sip as they learn the history of each of the natural founts.

7. Red Rock Canyon: Not to be confused with

the similarly named natural amphitheater just west of Denver, this pristine 787-acre preserve features unusual rock formations similar to those found in the nearby Garden of the Gods. Take I-25 to the Cimarron Exit West, turn left onto Ridge Road and follow it to the end. A nice variety of trails includes a very easy, uber-scenic 2.25-mile loop from the parking lot that’s ideal for kids and folks unaccustomed to Colorado’s altitude. It offers views of the city, Pikes Peak, lakes and old structures.

8. Broadmoor Carriage House Museum:

Everything about Broadmoor, a Gilded-Age resort, drips luxury. Established in 1891, the current structures date to 1918. The dining and lodging are rated five-star. The 700 rooms command pricey rates, but strolling the impeccable grounds is free. So is the Carriage House Museum with its collection of antique cars and carriages. Julie Penrose, widow of Broadmoor founder Spencer Penrose, had it built to house the family’s own means of transport.

12 | skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express

Downtown Cripple Creek, Colorado

10.

Cripple Creek: Healthful Colorado Springs and Manitou Springs were known for promoting clean-cut lifestyles. Smoking and drinking were banned. (Alcohol consumption became legal for the first time when the U.S. federal government repealed the 18th Amendment.) Not so in this rough-and-tumble gold camp some forty miles southwest of Colorado Springs. A day trip to Cripple Creek includes a lovely mountain drive around Pikes Peak and a chance to glimpse the wilder side of early Colorado. Take highway 24/67 west. n Colorado Springs enjoys a lofty elevation of more than 6,000 feet. All these attractions are also more than a mile high. When visiting, remember to drink extra water to prevent dehydration in the higher elevation.


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Find what you’ve been looking for in Colorado Springs. The sky’s the limit on the fun waiting in Colorado Springs, where culture, sophistication and natural beauty abound. With dining choices for every taste and budget, more than 100 unique shopping destinations, and exceptional museums, art galleries and performing arts, downtown Colorado Springs is proof positive that “mountain culture” is no longer an oxymoron. And with seven major airlines now serving the Colorado Springs Airport, getting here has never been easier.

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skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express |

13


America’sB est Places

Medford’s Golden Attractions by Carlton Tajni

H

alfway between Portland and San Francisco, the Rogue River Valley (aka Oregon’s banana belt) has long been renown for fruit orchards, wineries and artisan products like cheese and chocolate. Now it’s establishing a new claim to fame as a retirement haven.

“We’re a well-kept secret,” said Brigette Long, a 58-year-old native New Yorker who, with her husband Bill, moved to Medford from California a year ago. “This is actually our second retirement,” she explained. “My husband and I retired from the telecom industry in the Bay Area 11 years ago. We thought we’d get away from the big-city congestion by moving to Ripon in the Central Valley [of California]. At the time it had a population of 13,000. We didn’t realize it was one of the fastest growing areas in the United States.” 14 | skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express

After a decade the couple were looking for what she termed “a second stage” of retirement. “We just didn’t want the flatlands anymore.” As they contemplated where to go next, the Pacific Northwest never crossed their minds. “We thought it was all like Seattle and Portland. We knew we didn’t want cold and humidity.” At the urging of some of their Ripon neighbors who were also contemplating a move, the Longs visited Medford and immediately fell in love. “We’d never really been here before and we’ve traveled extensively. We didn’t realize the weather was so similar to northern California. It may be about 10 degrees cooler in the winter, but we certainly don’t mind. We like having more of the four seasons.” Medford and the surrounding Rogue Valley typically benefit from at least 210 sunny days every year. Temperatures seldom drop below freezing in winter and rarely climb above 90 in summer. “We love the mountains,” Long continued. “We were able to find a spectacular view property up near Roxanne Mountain with hiking


trails galore right outside our door. There are wonderful state parks and of course we’re so close to the great Rogue River. When we have out-of-town guests we always take them on a Hell Gate jet boat tour of the river. We just love to show off the natural beauty of the area. We also like to take them into the wine country for tastings. The wine maker is usually right there pouring his own wine and explaining it to you. Compared to what we have here, Napa is so overrated.” The area’s cultural attractions also appealed to the Longs. “We lived in the Bay Area for a long time and we didn’t have the same selection of restaurants and culture that exists just 15 minutes from our doorstep. Twelve months of the year there is something going on here.” The Britt Festival, a summer performing arts extravaganza set in historic Jacksonville, is among the Longs’ favorites. “We tell all our California friends that it doesn’t get better than sitting outside at the Britt having a glass of Pinot Noir and listening to fabulous entertainment while you gaze up at the stars,” Long said. This year’s festival marks the

Singer Chris Isaak performs on stage at last year’s Britt Festival.

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Britt’s 48th season. It presents outstanding artists in jazz, bluegrass, pop, country and classical music performing in a naturally formed amphitheater on the 19th-century estate of photographer Peter Britt. The entertainment options also appealed to Bill Stewart, an 80-year-old native Californian and retired Marine, and his wife Joy, 75. “My wife is just crazy for live theater,” he explained. “In Medford we have the Oregon Shakespeare Festival right next door in Ashland. It’s a relatively long season running from February until October and we’ve learned that if you go early or late [in the season] you get great discounts. We also have the Ginger Rogers Theater and two other smaller theaters—the Cabaret and the Carousel. There’s always something to do. The Umpqua Bank has the 55-Alive Club and they plan day trips to Portland. We like to go there for live theater as well.”

Medford blooms in spring

Like the Longs, the Stewarts are enjoying a “second retirement.” Bill Stewart explained, “In 1986, we moved up to the gold country near Sonora, California and were both docents in the

16 | skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express

Columbia State Park. We enjoy the outdoors here as well. In the spring the plethora of color is marvelous. The rhododendrons and pear blossoms are just beautiful.” The Rogue Valley is also more economical than California, according to Stewart. “As a federal retiree, I don’t pay any state income tax in Oregon and there’s no sales tax, either,” he said. Stewart, a heart patient, is also a big proponent of the quality of health care available in the area. “The Rogue Valley Medical Center is top-notch,” he said. Brigette Long agreed. “We discovered that the medical facilities are fabulous. There are three major hospitals. The doctors are fabulous. Everything is very well organized. So much better than what we experienced in California. We weren’t concerned about that when we moved here, but then we brought my mom out from New York. When she came she was using a wheelchair. I believe we might have lost her if she hadn’t made the move.” Now, her mother, Gerda Richter, 85, has “been reborn. She walks an hour every day, exercises at night after dinner, goes swimming in the summer, and hikes everywhere. The air quality is fabulous here. We have some of the best water in the country. It’s a healthful place,” Long said. “We’re big travelers,” she continued. “We’ve been to 76 countries and there’s no place we’d rather be. Last year we spent the entire year just enjoying this area. The Oregon Coast is one-anda-half hours away. Portland is a five-hour drive, but we stop in Eugene for lunch; that’s fun. We also go to Bend with its beautiful mountains and to Crater Lake, which is just spectacular. We expect to stay here the rest of our lives.” n


S Go online to discover all 99 Ways to Simplify Your Life at www.VerandaParkLiving.com

implify your life today If you are looking to simplify your life, no retirement community in Southern Oregon offers more value or ways to start living your dreams than Medford’s Veranda Park. Our surprisingly affordable month-to-month rentals (no investment needed) offer you more than 99 ways to simplify your life. Veranda Park Living begins with true restaurant-style open dining, complimentary transportation, a full social program, and your own golf academy. Isn’t it time you enjoyed a new sense of freedom?

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America’sB est Places

Travel Treasures in Historic Helena, Montana

by Lou Jurassic

T

he place we now scenery and a fresh know as Helena, perspective on both Montana benefits nature and history. from a rich landscape. Visitors to this part of It’s a land of many treaMontana would do well sures. Some more visible to become acquainted than others. with Helena’s own fasciLewis and Clark nating past. While many encountered plenty of modern cities trace their unexpected vistas during founding to a mining their Voyage of Discovboom, Helena possesses ery through America’s Gate of the Mountains 20 miles from Helena a gold heritage of mythiWest. Among the most dazzling: a narrow channel cal proportions. In 1864 as the War Between the of the Missouri River about 20 miles north of States ravaged the U.S., prospectors rambled across present day Helena. As their boat rounded a bend, the West hoping to strike it rich. Four miners, canyon walls more than a thousand feet in height frustrated with the hard work and their lack of sucsoared on either side. An awestruck Meriwether cess, were tempted to give up on Central Montana Lewis named the passage “Gate of the Mountains.” and head south. They decided to stake one last That was in the summer of 1805. Explorers have claim at a place they termed “Last Chance Gulch.” been marveling at the sight ever since. Their last-ditch efforts paid off big time with Modern voyagers enjoy two-hour cruises Montana’s largest gold strike. Soon rowdies from departing from the Gate of the Mountains Marina mining camps all over the country as well as Civil just off I-15. While mankind’s footprints have oblit- War veterans were pouring into the burgeoning erated most of the Lewis and Clark land route, the tent city. Lawlessness plagued the mining camp river remains virtually unchanged. Native American that begot present day Helena. To allay the murder pictographs still decorate the rocks. Eagles and and mayhem, a band of vigilantes took justice into falcons continue to soar through the canyon. Otters their own hands. Lynchings became commonsplash along the shore; deer are prevalent. Elusive place. In time, so did millionaires. Gradually the mountain goats and Bighorn sheep can be seen roughshod settlement transformed into a proper from time to time, high atop crags. Guides are city. Over the next two decades, the Last Chance adept at spotting wildlife and provide a wealth of Claim produced gold worth more than $3 billion in information about the area, too. Every cruise takes today’s dollars. a break and puts ashore for fifteen minutes so pasIn 1875 Helena became Montana’s territorial sengers can stretch their legs. Those inclined to capital. The prosperous community retained the linger in the pristine environment can wait an hour position with statehood in 1889. By that time, or so for the next boat to pick them up. There’s a manors lined the rambling streets of a fine, albeit nice picnic spot and a trail to Mann Gulch, the site haphazard, city. Active mining claims interfered of a horrific 1949 forest fire that took the lives of 13 with attempts to survey a proper map grid so downfirefighters. The boat ride also passes by the gulch town blocks grew up in an irregular patchwork that and the tour guide offers details of the tragedy. still exists today. This year’s season begins May 23 and extends Other remnants of yesteryear contribute to to September 20. Times vary. There’s also a dinner Helena’s charm. The main thoroughfare, Last cruise that requires advance reservations. No Chance Gulch, still follows the winding path of the matter when you take the trip, an afternoon spent gold-laden creek. The impressive state capitol at the Gate of the Mountains offers unspoiled building, built between 1899 and 1912, was recently 18 | skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express


restored to its original grandeur and deserves a visit. (Be sure to pay special attention to the ceiling of the rotunda. It features more than 90 stained glass windows.) The Mansion District, as its name implies, still sports elegant residences built by 19th-century gold titans. The more pretentious structures demonstrate a variety of styles—Gothic, Baroque, Italianate as well as Victorian. They’re sprinkled among comGlass ceiling in capitol mon structures in what remains a quaint and charming neighborhood. For a glimpse into the 19th-century’s affluent lifestyle, visit the original Governor’s Mansion, a Queen Anne dandy built in 1888. It’s located at 304 North Ewing Street and open for tours on Saturdays through the end of April. The schedule expands during the summer. Equally impressive is the ornate St. Helena’s Cathedral, a Gothic wonder featuring lofty spires and stained-glass windows imported from Germany. It’s at 530 North Ewing Street, just two blocks from the Governor’s Mansion. Note that St. Helena’s continues to function as a Roman Catholic church. Visitors should be respectful of worshipers. While you’re strolling the streets, shopping in the Last

Chance Gulch retail district, or dining in one of the many nice restaurants, keep in mind that there may still be gold beneath your feet. It’s speculated that veins of subterranean ore are still downtown. For added insight into Lewis and Clark, the history of gold Governor’s Mansion mining and a lot more, pay a visit to Montana’s Museum at 225 North Roberts Street. It’s a repository for facts, artifacts and art about all of Montana, including Helena—the city built on hidden treasure. n IT’S A DATE:

Each year, Helena High School students take the town on a trip back in time with the Vigilante Day Parade featuring floats depicting significant moments in history. The event is April 30 this year and begins at noon on Helena Avenue downtown.

Business Profile

Helena Institute

Nestled in a picturesque valley of the Rocky Mountains is Helena, Montana’s capital city. Helena takes you from your virtual life and lets you live—lets you experience. Helena’s diverse community has banded together to create the Helena Institute. The Institute has taken the classroom to the mountains, to the streams, to the kitchen, to the trails, to the potter’s kiln, to the fireside, to the barn and to everywhere in between. Classes offered by the Helena Institute can teach you how to ride horses on the Continental Divide, teach you how to can and preserve fruits and vegetables just like your grandmother used to do, or

they can teach you how to bike down rocky steep grades at wild speeds. If you’re an aspiring artist, you can enroll in a weekend-long table making class. Discover the art of woodworking, experience the dovetail joint, the art of inlay, create a table. If you’re an outdoor enthusiast, run Helena’s world-class trail system and find out just why it was voted one of the country’s top trail running towns by Trailrunner Magazine. If you’re a culture lover, learn what it takes to be a successful photographer by spending two days exploring Helena’s famous landmarks. To find more classes visit helenainstitute.com and go from e-world to the real world. Helena—Learn to Live skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express |

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7 Tucson Temptations T ucson’s clear desert skies, staggering mountain views and bone-warming climate are enough to monopolize any visitor’s attention. It’s easy to wile away a stay in this historic city by simply reveling in its natural attributes or basking in the metro scene. (Tucson’s urban atmosphere blends a Mexican-American vibe, the University of Arizona’s academic culture and a cowboy mystique.) Tempting as it may be to spend all of one’s days ambling along Fourth Avenue’s trippy shops and galleries or visiting the retailers and restaurants in the upscale northern environs, savvy tourists will make time to enjoy these quintessential Tucson experiences.

Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

1. Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum: It’s a zoo! It’s an art institute! It’s a botanical garden! But, wait. There’s more! It’s a natural history museum, too. This one-stop bastion of local data and lore makes learning about the desert’s peculiar flora, fauna and culture a fun-filled experience for all ages. This is the best place to quickly gain information and insight into Tucson’s fascinating landscape and encounter desert denizens such as mountain lions in a safe, natural environment. The museum’s calendar is chock-a-block with special programs and exhibits making it a great place to spend a day no matter the temperature or time of year. 20 | skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express

2. Sunset: The end of a Tucson day is typically cause for pause. The desert light plays with mountainous horizons to create a breathtaking spectacle. One of the best vantage points is the parking lot at Gates Pass. Go west on Speedway Boulevard until it turns into Gates Pass Road. You’ll see a bevy of cars and bicycles congregating just before sundown. Bring a camera. 3. DeGrazia Gallery in the Sun:

Artist Ted DeGrazia’s talent took him from the rugged Arizona mining camp where he was born to international celebrity status. Throughout a long, and varied career, DeGrazia found inspiration in Tucson. Best known for creating the iconic UNICEF card Los Ninos, DeGrazia was a local icon in life and continues to be a boon to the Tucson arts scene after his 1982 death. His home, workspace

by C


Connie Naylor

DeGrazia Mission interior

4. The Sonoran Hotdog: This ultimate man-food is unique to the Tucson area and should be consumed at least once in every carnivore’s life. Think frankfurter with South of the Border flair. The wiener gets grilled, then wrapped in bacon and topped with everything typically piled on a plate of nachos—tomatoes, cheese, onions, pinto beans, peppers, salsa, chili sauce—plus mustard, ketchup and mayo. Sold on street corners all over town. 5. Old Tucson Studios:

Artist and mission: Courtesy of the DeGrazia Foundation

Late Tucson artist DeGrazia in 1960 with Los Ninos, a best-selling UNICEF card

and chapel now comprise this museum. The facility preserves DeGrazia’s fascinating life story as well as his artwork. The permanent collection includes more than 1,500 works by the man whose abilities stretched across genres and media. Exhibits change throughout the year. Repeat visits are always warranted, especially considering there’s no admission charge!

Tucson, the site of a 17th-century Spanish fort, possesses a rich history under the flags of Mexico, Spain and eventually the United States. You can learn more bona fide facts about Tucson by following the Presidio Walking Tour downtown. For a day of historic make-believe, visit the Old Tucson Studios. Constructed in 1938 for the movie Arizona, starring William Holden, the sets were used in dozens of movies starring big names such as John Wayne and Clint Eastwood. It became primarily a tourist attraction in the 1960s. Today mock gunfights, a pseudo-Wild West ambience and old-time rides and games make for a slightly cornball good time. skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express |

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Room box on display at the Museum of Miniatures

6. Mini-Time Machine—A

Museum of Miniatures: Expect to be amazed at the size, scope and

craftsmanship represented in these collections and the 15,000 sq. ft. state-of-the-art facility that houses them. Ariel, the Museum’s resident fairy, guides guests on an intriguing journey through time and place. The 160 or so miniature houses and room boxes are grouped into three areas. The Enchanted Realm presents fantastic scenes—snow globes, Christmas villages, fairy castles and other bits of whimsy. The Exploring the World Gallery displays miniatures from across the globe. The History Gallery offers insight into the evolution of miniatures and includes one of the nation’s oldest representations. It was built around 1775. History fans, architecture buffs, children and the young-at-heart will all be impressed by this magical experience.

If Tucson’s starshine seems especially vivid credit the city’s anti-light pollution ordinance. Watching the night sky unfold has long been a favorite desert pastime. The nation’s largest collection of research telescopes are at work at Kitt Peak National Observatory in the Quinlan Mountains 55 miles southwest of Tucson. Mount Lemmon Sky Center is 45 miles to the northeast of the city. Both facilities conduct nightly observing programs that require reservations. This is a chance for the average-Joe tourist to experience cutting-edge astronomy first hand. Both experiences include basic instruction introducing participants to the heavens and individual telescope time. Galaxies, planets and moons are all observed. Kitt Peak’s programs are held every night of the week except during Tucson’s rainy season, July 15 – September 1. Mount Lemmon operates throughout the year. Both programs are extremely popular. It’s a good idea to call at least two weeks in advance to reserve a spot. If heading to Kitt Peak, ask when Chuck Dugan is teaching. His energetic instruction adds extra luster to the experience. n

P. James Nugent, M.D.

Richard Blanks, M.D.

Laura Duncan, N.P.

22 | skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express

Christine Helsby, N.P.

Russell Biggers, D.P.T.

room box: Ryan Nitz

7. The Stars at Night:


SkyNews

Rubes Celebrates 25 Years of Giggles $14.99 U.S

.A. ($18.50

and Twis ted World of

Ti me F l ie s Fu n g n i v a H e u’r Wh e n Yo

Rubin

The Wild

“The thing ab you don’t out Rubes is tha t it’s funny expect fun minds of in a lot of ny to be bo . areas wh Leigh Ru wling pins . . . in . . under rocks . ere . . inside bin cracks conversa the tion betw me up.” een gastr opods. —Jerry Sc ott, cocrea tor of Ba by Blues and Zits “Personall y, of milk. Th I like to read my Ru my milk at way, I can take bes every morni ng with all over the a drink, a glass read Rubes wildly. It’s person sit , it during actually quite fun ting across from then spray me a job interv , though I wouldn’t as I laugh iew.” recomme nd —Pat Pe mberton , McClatch y Newspa pers “If there were a No bel Prize would be for a strong contende twisted humor, Leigh Ru r.” bin —Rodge r Nichols , The Dalles Chronicle Canada)

®

© 2010 Leigh Rub in

Printed in China

L

eigh Rubin’s physical address may read Nipomo, California, but he spends most days in a wild and wacky world of his own device. The self-proclaimed “sit-down comedian” has been inking his single-panel cartoon Rubes for a quarter century. The work plumbs the peculiarities of the animal kingdom to comment on the ironies of modern life. Often pun-laden and always good for a grin, Rubes appears in more than 400 publications, including SkyWest Magazine.

produce The Wild Life of Dogs, The Wild Life of Cats, The Wild Life of Pets, The Wild Life of Farm Animals, and The Wild Life of Cows. In his meager spare time, Rubin crisscrosses the continent helping others find their own creative spark. His popular lectures blend humor with inspiration to encourage audience members to wring chuckles out of commonplace experiences. It’s good medicine. That’s why we’d like our readers to take a moment and focus on life with a Rubes twist. Think about your animal friend’s screwball antics. Then, send us a brief note, telling us what wild and wacky G-rated things your pets or other animals do. The best five correspondents will receive a free copy of The Wild and Twisted World of Rubes. Mail your submission to: Wild and Wacky Pet Stuff c/o Go Publications, Inc. 205 North 10th Street Suite B100 Boise, Idaho 83702 This contest runs March 1 through April 30, 2010. It is not open to employees of the airline or this magazine, members of their families or previous winners. Void where prohibited.

Travels with Rubes “I don’t care what all the other kids are doing, you’re not getting your lip pierced.”

To commemorate the 25th anniversary of his brainchild, Rubin recently released a retrospective collection aptly titled The Wild and Twisted World of Rubes. Throughout its pages, his cunning cows, crafty canines and other zany critters continue to deliver fresh laughs no matter how often they’re revisited by readers. This book is sure to provide comic relief for a nation in need of some laughs. It joins an impressive body of “wild” work. Through the years, Rubin has culled his ample archives to

Leigh Rubin will sign his new book and deliver the presentation A Twisted Mind is a Terrible Thing to Waste, at the following locations: Ottawa, KS | March 24 Carnegie Cultural Center, 6:30 p.m. Access Ottawa with SkyWest United Express service to Kansas City, 30 miles away. Kansas City, MO | March 25 Kansas City Public Library – Plaza Branch, 6 p.m. Santa Maria, CA | April 1 Santa Maria Public Library, 7 p.m. skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express |

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With more than 105 regularly scheduled departures each day, SkyWest United Express is among LAX’s busiest carriers. Many of those passengers find rest, relaxation and a world of opportunity less than an hour away—flying time that is. Here’s news you can use—just beyond LAX.

Lady in the Locker Room

Knocks it Out of the Park

N

o doubt about it, LA is a baseball town. The city’s cross-town rivals end the exhibition season with a freeway series. The Angels host the Dodgers April 2. The Dodgers return the favor the following day. With two teams to root for, it’s hard to fathom that there was once a time when going to a ball game in LA meant watching the Pacific Coast Minor League. That was more than half a century ago, before Brooklyn’s beloved Dodgers abandoned Ebbett’s Field in favor of palm trees and sunshine. Their defection was big news in 1958. The story of those early days is still a good one—especially when related by Flo Thomasian Snyder, an eyewitness to history with an exceptional knack for words.

The LA Dodgers’ first employee, Snyder was in her early twenties when she managed to become the only female in the organization. She recounts her 10 years as Gal Friday to the team in a hilarious memoir, Lady in the Locker Room, Madcap Memoirs of the early LA Dodgers. From spring training practical jokes to the thrill of World Series victories, Snyder’s stories show the human side of legends such as Gil Hodges, Pee Wee Reese, Don Drysdale, and Sandy Koufax. (Tommy Lasorda penned the intro.) Every baseball fan will get a kick out of her saga. A bounty of historic photos of players and memorabilia add to the appeal. Snyder went on to become director of the California Office of Tourism and currently resides in Carmel just a short flight away from LAX via SkyWest United Express service to Monterey. She remains a baseball fan. Her favorites, the Dodgers, launch regular-season home-play April 13. n

Give your organization its own publication Customized books and magazines are highly effective marketing tools for developing profitable, long-term relationships with your customers, employees and community. Our award-winning editorial and design is custom-fit for you.

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Call now for more information. Teena Wright, Director, Sales & Marketing 208-333-9990 ext.106 www.gopubinc.com

P U B L I C AT I O N S I N C O R P O R A T E D

creators of SkyWest Magazine custom publishing. imagine it. we’ll create it.

24 | skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express


| Santa Barbara

Always Ready for a Close-Up

Vineyard: JSinclair

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oviemakers have long carried on a love affair with this red-roofed city by the sea. America’s Riviera was the center of filmdom during the Silent Era. Through the years many local landmarks have played a role on the silver screen. Cecil B. DeMille’s Moses led his band of wanderers through the Guadalupe Sand Dunes in the 1923 silent version of The Ten Commandments. Lake Cachuma was featured in the 1946 Lana Turner film The Postman Always Rings Twice. Gloria Swanson had her Sunset Boulevard close-ups at the Santa Barbara mission and Dustin Hoffman as The Graduate’s title character rescued his beloved Elaine from a Santa Barbara church-wedding. The county’s scenic back roads set the stage for a variety of more recent cinema tales from the 1992 remake of Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men to Seabiscuit to Return to Mayberry. And then there’s Sideways. The 2004 film catapulted the city’s nearby wine country to fame and elevated the popularity of Pinot Noir. This year, moviegoers revisit Santa Barbara in the Meryl Streep vehicle It’s Complicated and the

local tourism industry is hoping for another boost from the film’s fans. To make the most of the opportunity, many local hotels are offering It’s Complicated specials through May 28. The deals vary. The Hotel Corque, owned by the Santa Ynez band of Chumash Indians manages to combine the It’s Complicated buzz with the Sideways phenomenon. Its “When It’s Complicated Escape to Wine Country” package includes $120 in food credit at Root 246, a Bradley Ogden restaurant, and $50 free play at their casino. Other It’s Complicated special offerings include reduced rates, or extra niceties such as warm cookies and complimentary wine. n

Wine Weekend While any time is a good time to tour Santa Barbra’s Wine Country, the annual Santa Barbara County Vintner’s Festival adds much to the weekend of April 17. More than 130 members are represented. Food, music and other entertainment are all part of the celebration. The event is held 50 miles west of Santa Barbara in Lompoc’s River Park.

skyWest Magazine March/april 2010 united express |

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With more than 122 regularly scheduled departures each day, SkyWest United Express connects Chicago with an abundance of dynamic communities. Here’s insight into a special place just one outbound flight from O’Hare and some Chicagoland attractions, too.

| Muskegon, MI

SkyWest Brings Direct Access to Four Seasons of Fun

Springtime: Fisher-people take heed. Any time is the right time to ply the ample waters around Muskegon, but springtime is special. The Muskegon River is consistently rated as one of the nation’s top steelhead rivers. The spring run is typically phenomenal and a host of river guides and charter captains are available to help you make the fishing memory of a lifetime. Summer: Warm weather brings a wealth of outdoor activity, including the 10-day Summer Celebration that brings national performers to the waterfront. It’s held June 24 through July 4 this year. All season long, proximity to the Muskegon State Park and the Manistee National Forest makes Muskegon a gateway to wonderful camping, hiking and fishing. Sailors and boaters enjoy the lakes, and the city’s lovely sandy beaches hold particular appeal. Pere Marquette, a 2.5-mile stretch of quartz sand along Lake Michigan, is billed as the Great Lake’s cleanest beach and is a must for every visitor. Autumn: Leaf peeping doesn’t get better than this and the fishing is exceptional, too. Fat salmon move in from the Great Lakes to spawn, and the steelhead come right behind. The outstanding scenery is a plus. 26 | skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express

Special events include the Michigan Irish Festival. It’s held September 17 through 19 this year and brings all things Gaelic to downtown’s Heritage Landing on Muskegon Lake. Winter: Muskegon’s Winter Sports Complex in Muskegon State Park is one of the few American luge courses open to the public. This is the place to feel like an Olympian. Instruction is provided. The less adventuresome can sled down the kids’ tubing hill, cross-country ski, snowshoe, or ice skate. There are both family and hockey rinks. Oh, and there’s winter fishing in Muskegon, too. All Year Long: Fishing isn’t the only Muskegon attraction to transcend the seasons. Among the community’s finest claims to fame, The Great Lakes Naval Museum provides an amazing trek through history. Located near the Pere Marquette Park on Lake Michigan’s shore, it includes tours of the World War II submarine the USS Silversides and the 1927 Coast Guard cutter McLane, which also saw WWII action. The Overnight Encampment program allows guests to spend an entire night on the submarine, sleeping in a berth that was USS Silversides once home to a WWII sailor. Those with less time to spend, can glean a vicarious experience from the exhibits and presentations housed in the museum’s Robert B. Morin building. Be assured, no matter when you fly to Muskegon, you’ll have a great time. n

Submarine: Lt. Scott McIlnay

T

his February, SkyWest initiated direct, regional-jet service between Chicago’s O’Hare Airport and Muskegon, Michigan. That means quick and comfortable access to four-season fun for everyone. Whether you’re a history buff, an outdoors enthusiast or someone just looking for a day at the beach, Muskegon’s calendar is full of can’t-miss experiences. Consider these top things to do in “the Riviera of the Midwest”:


| Chicago, Il

Titans of the Ice Age Make Field Museum Appearance

Lyuba: RIA Novosti

Illustration: Velizar Simeonovsk ©The Field Museum

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ammoths and mastodons, enormous elephant-like creatures, ruled the Ice Age. Their remains have long sparked the human imagination. The beasts so intrigued Thomas Jefferson that he sent William Clark, of Voyage of Discovery fame, on an 1807 mission hunting for mastodon bones. Some of Clark’s finds are now just a small part of a major exhibition, Mammoths and Mastodons: Titans of the Ice Age, presented at Chicago’s Field Museum from March 5 through September 6. The star of the show is Lyuba, a remarkably well-preserved, intact baby wooly mammoth. Discovered by Siberian reindeer herders in 2007, Lyuba had been miraculously preserved in frozen Arctic earth. Her remarkable condition gave researchers rare insight into the prehistoric Lyuba, discovered in 2007 by Siberian reindeer herders world. Scientists were even able to perform DNA analysis and use X-ray tomography to explore her anatomy and physiology. Titans of the Ice Age marks her first showing in the United States. The 7,500 sq. ft. exhibition also brings the Ice Age to life through large-scale projections, walk-through dioramas and virtual experiences. Admission to this special presentation is $23 for adults, $20 for seniors and students, and $13 for children between the ages of three and 11. It also includes basic admission to the museum, which is located at 1400 S. Lake Shore Drive. n

| Lisle, Il

Morton Arboretum Debuts Steel Roots

Sculpture: Kenny Ek

J

ust 25 miles from O’Hare, Lisle, Illinois is a smart and cozy midwestern community, noted for its top 20 ranking among Money Magazine’s “Best Places for the Rich and Single.” It is also home to an attraction sure to entertain visitors regardless of age, bank account or marital status. The 1,700-acre Morton Arboretum is a lavish tribute to plant life and one of the world’s foremost research facilities. Established by the family that gave America both Morton Salt and Arbor Day, the sumptuous collection of gardens is a delight in any season. Beginning April 9, visitors are treated to an added bonus when the arboretum unveils Steel Roots, a unique exhibition of 12 massive sculptures by Philadelphia artist Steve Tobin. It’s set among the arboretum’s 22-acre Conifer Collection and will be on display until the end of the year. n

Morton Arboretum visitors are invited to tactically explore the sculptures’ influence on the natural world by touching, strolling through and even lying beneath the art to appreciate the way it interacts with the sky, clouds and surrounding trees. skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express |

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y l d n e i r F Budget-

MontanaVacations

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ig Sky Country lives up to its name. Between broad horizons, Montana offers spectacular mountains, vivid lakes and forests rich with wildlife. National parks, historic towns, fine food and lodging, and championship recreational opportunities are all part of the mix. No wonder they call it the Treasure State. Montana visitors find extra good fortune this summer. Budget-stretching specials make experiencing the state’s award-winning hospitality as economical as it is easy. Consider these three distinct options when planning your summer holiday.

28 | skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express


Glacier Guides & Montana Raft Co. Glacier National Park is a treasure that begs to be explored. This outfitter is the key to unlocking her secrets. Locally owned since 1983 with remarkably talented guides, they feature hiking, backpacking, whitewater rafting, serene floats, fly-fishing, historic chalets and more. Compare the cost of hotels and dining out, versus spending a night with Guides . . . a magical river, fabulous food, star-filled skies and genuine pampering. For their latest deals call 800-521-RAFT or visit www.glacierguides.com GG is an authorized concessioner of the NPS

#1 on TripAdvisor.com

Laughing Horse Lodge This Big Sky retreat offers a Furry Friend Escape. Escape to the unhurried splendor of Swan Lake, Montana. You and your pup will enjoy a bottle of wine with cookies; two nights lodging for two with breakfast and cookies; dinner each evening with cookies; complimentary kayaks or Hawaiian boards on Swan Lake; and all the peace you can handle—with cookies, of course. Package: $259. Available May 1 through June 20. www.laughinghorselodge.com 408-886-2080

Double Arrow Lodge

Get Away to Get Together at Double Arrow Lodge— Seeley Lake, Montana. Enjoy a real gem in the heart of the Rocky Mountains—The Double Arrow Lodge hosts an 18-hole championship golf course at the base of the Swan Mountain Range. This spectacular course is delicately carved among gentle, rolling hills, towering Ponderosa pines and natural sparkling creeks. Schedule a meeting at the Blackfoot Conference Center, and you have the perfect setting for your next corporate golf rendezvous. Spring packages including Lodging, Meals & Golf starting at $115 per person. 800-468-0777 www.doublearrowlodge.com skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express |

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f Fool proo

Bucket List Adventures – by Colleen Birch Maile

30 | skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express

Team penning fun at Tucson’s Tanque Verde guest ranch.

My quest began with a fly-fishing trip to Sisters, Oregon accessed by SkyWest service to Bend, 20 miles away. Let me tell you, I have stood by my husband in some of the world’s finest trout streams—serving mostly as a noisy and highly ineffective distraction. This was different. It was our debut on the Deschutes River and our first-ever experience with a guide. The knowledgeable staff at the Fly Fisher’s Place in downtown Sisters provided for every need— state-of-the-art waders, river shoes, fishing gear, license, flies and, best of all, the wizardry of fishing magician Steve Erickson. With all respect due my usually longsuffering husband, learning the basics from a professional reduces stress and facilitates communication. It’s Erickson’s job to be patiently encouraging no matter how serious the snag or snarl. His local perspective helped, too. In the world of fish, things change with the seasons, the weather, and conditions of the water. The Deschutes is Erickson’s hometown river. He understands every nuance.

Team penning: www.ziembaphoto.com

I

n my opinion, there are some things everyone should do before they die: find peace in a trout stream; raft a fast river; ride a horse into the sunset. Unfortunately, I’ve always been a do-ityourself kind of adventurer, afflicted with a stubbornness that upends my craving to master these experiences. At my foolish hand, these bravado-fraught dreams readily transform into self-inflicted nightmares. Ergo: I tried to cast for trout but busted my fly rod in frustration. I attempted to conquer whitewater then had to be rescued when my inner tube capsized in a rapid. I yearned to gallop all the way to the horizon and instead got dumped in the dirt by a stink-eyed horse with a loose cinch and a superiority complex. The school of hard knocks isn’t much fun. So, this past year, I vowed to stop the foolishness and master my “bucket list” with expert help. I now attest, with a sincere and jubilant sense of accomplishment, that it’s the only way to go.


The former corpoof frustration, the thrill rate executive-turnedof victory was so very professional fisherman sweet. We fished for took the oars of our hours. With Erickson’s drift boat. As we floated uncanny fish sense we downstream, he offered found a great spot and interesting information the bites kept coming. I about the flora, fauna worked up such an and fish of the Lower appetite that I began to Fly-fishing on Oregon’s Deschutes River Deschutes River. doubt the merits of “It’s a wide and wild river,” he explained. “catch-and-release.” Erickson came to the “You won’t find stocked trout here.” What rescue with a delicious barbecue chicken you do find are two remarkable specimens dinner, served with all the trimmings at the of fish. Deschutes River redsides are rainbow water’s edge. After dining we fished some trout with an added stripe of crimson— more. With expert instruction and hours of distinguished for their beauty. Steelhead are practice I came away confident in my newly noted for their size. Ocean-going members minted skills. That night I fell asleep mutterof the trout family, they average between six ing, “big water, big fish, big fun.” and 12 pounds during the early summer run and get up to 16 pounds or more in autumn. “Big water, big fish,” Erickson said as we anchored the boat. (It’s illegal to fish from watercraft on this river.) He positioned a faux Salmon fly on my line. This orange variety of stonefly is huge—two-inches long or larger—and plentiful. They piled up all around us, mating on leaves and limbs. Hungry redsides wait along the banks hoping that the insects, in their frenzied ardor, will slip into the water and make a Rafting on Idaho’s Payette River nice lunch. “Big water, big fish, big bugs,” I remarked as a Salmon fly dove down my A month later I wound my way north shirt. I grabbed it carefully, admiring the from Boise along Idaho’s Highway 55, aka translucent wings and fiery color. The Payette River Scenic Byway. It took Erickson nudged me back to reality and about an hour to drive from SkyWest service offered tips to improve my puny casting. at the Boise Airport to Cascade Raft and Before long, I had a bite. I couldn’t set the Kayak just north of Horseshoe Bend. It’s a fly, and the fish escaped. No worries. The friendly enterprise run by Tom and Debbi fish were plentiful and with Erickson’s Long, their three sons and daughters-in-law. guidance I was soon wrestling a big one. He The family ranks among Idaho rafting calmly told me how to play the line until at legends. They’ve been running the Payette last the redside was netted. After a decade for more than 25 years. What was once a

skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express |

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Bucket List Adventures –

Wine on the Fly. Wine on the Fly presents a unique event at Colorado’s The High Lonesome and K-T Ranches. Join us from July 14-18, 2010 for three days of prime-time fly-fishing and wine tasting. Two of your favorite passions, world-class Colorado fly-fishing and exquisite California wines. Join some of the best writers and editors in the fly-fishing industry and talk about fishing while savoring some of the best wines to come out of Napa Valley and Sonoma with the wineries pouring the wine themselves. + A Western Sampler: Wade and spring creek fishing on the K-T’s White River. Drift boat fishing on the Roaring Fork. And sight fishing at The High Lonesome Ranch ponds. + Our hosts and sponsors will see that you get over fed and over fished. For more information, wineonthefly.com and TheHighLonesomeRanch.com

The High Lonesome Ranch

DeBeque, CO www.TheHighLonesomeRanch.com 970.283.9420

Granada Tower Residences Unparalleled living in the heart of Santa Barbara! Triplex Penthouse and entire seventh floor units are available.

For information please contact:

Tim Walsh 805.455.5833

Tim@villagesite.com DRE: #00914713 www.villagesite.com 32 | skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express

mom-and-pop operation now employs dozens of expert guides during the Marchto-October rafting season. I signed up for a half-day day trip billed “The Rush.” It promised to be “best for adventurers.” A milder trip was touted as “best for everyone” and said to feature “playful, friendly” rapids. But I wasn’t playing around. I was going for thrills and “The Rush” delivered. After signing waivers, my friends and I hopped a bus for a scenic ride to the launch point deep in the Payette National Forest. Fitted with helmets and life jackets we were given paddles, safety tips and expert instruction. This was not just a ride down a river. We were part of a team, expected to do our part in surmounting those waters. Together we hoisted our boat down to the water and joined a small flotilla of other Cascade rafts benefiting from a pictureperfect day. The air temp was in the 80s, a light breeze gently rustled pines that stretched to a flawless sky. I gazed through the clear, indigo water to the rocks below. My smiling reflection greeted me and I was lulled to contentment by the raft’s graceful sway. My reverie didn’t last long. Distant shrieks pierced the calm. Rafters at the head of our little parade encountered the first roiling wave of churning rapids. Soon our turn came. Before we saw the whitewater, we heard it—roaring in a frenzied basso profundo. Our guide, Chad Long, shouted instructions over the growling river. I paddled madly, sometimes catching nothing but air. At the water’s mercy our craft lifted and spun on end, vaulting skyward. For an instant, we seemed to be perpendicular to the stream. Then we bounced back, skidding across the surface. Anxious cries turned to squeals of delight. We made it. Every one of us accounted for. We raised paddles skyward in victorious


salute. I had one class IV rapid under my belt. The thrills kept coming as we traversed daunting waters with names like Mixmaster, Staircase and Bronco Billy. Periodically, a smooth stretch interrupted the adrenaline rush. Then there was time for a swim or a jump from steep rock walls. But the rapids were the main thing and before long I challenged their authority, perched like a rodeo star at the raft’s bow, jolting, jerking, holding on for dear life. Riding the bull, it’s called. At the end of the day, I took advantage of a catered dinner. The Longs served up a feast of salmon, steak, cheesy scalloped potatoes, citrus green beans and hearty cherry cobbler. I ate as though I’d earned the right, for I—with a lot of help from the Longs—had mastered the river. That brings me to my greatest heart’s desire. I’ve always longed to be at home on the range, out on the lone prairie, getting along to the big corral. I wanted to live every Western cliché ever written. Why? Because when I was a kid somebody told me the world would always look better atop a horse and I knew they spoke truth. Now, I learned a long time ago that a horse is not a big dog eager to do my bidding. No; horses are the animal kingdom’s psychics, able to perceive human timidity, fear, arrogance or stupidity. They seem to respond accordingly. It takes a lot of patience, confidence and humility to crawl inside a horse’s pea-sized brain and build a relationship. But that’s what the wranglers at Tucson’s Tanque Verde Guest Ranch do. All are accomplished horse-people, most with ranch and/or rodeo experience. They understand human frailty as well and deftly bridge the mental and emotional gap between greenhorn and steed. In their capable hands even the most apprehensive rider is assured of a rollicking good time. They seemed to be just what I needed.

“10 BEST TOWNS IN AMERICA”

by Outside Magazine . Measured in acres, not blocks.

PHOTO: JC LEACOCK

GunnisonCrestedButte.com · 800.323.2453

skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express |

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The reward after a breakfast ride

My three-night stay began with a horsemanship demonstration by Lanny Leach— a trainer whose talent and skills exceed those of any cinematic horse whisperer. I watched, amazed, as in less than an hour he gentled a skittish palomino intent on displaying its penchant for jumping fences. Leach had never seen the horse before but soon had it nuzzling for his attention. The cowboy assured guests that in time this wild creature would make a good addition to the ranch’s guest remuda. There are more than 200 horses in Tanque Verde’s stable. It’s believed to be Arizona’s

Discover Authentic Montana

+ FISH THE MAYFLY HATCH ON THE MISSOURI RIVER + SEE THE SUN RISE FROM A CAMPSITE IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS + CANOE THE WATERS OF THE BLACKFOOT RIVER

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275-200 UE Skywest Helena CVB 12.21.09 Fulfill the true montana experience in Great Falls. Your memories will thank you. AD: JR 3.725” x 2.75” gfcvb.com • 800.735.8535 4-color 12/21/09 10:05:15 AM

Don’t just look…”experience” the Grand Canyon from the Colorado River looking up! ARIZONA RIVER RUNNERS has been providing whitewater adventures through one of the seven Natural Wonders of the World since 1970. Choose from our 3, 6, 7, 8 or 13-day packages.

800-477-7238

|

www.raftarizona.com

AUTHORIZED CONCESSIONER OF GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK

34 | skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express

breakfast: Ziemba Photographic

Bucket List Adventures –


The Dude Ranchers’ Association 866-399-2339 • WWW.GUESTRANCH.COM

Bar W Guest Ranch

C Lazy U Ranch

The Bar W is for me - say it out loud! Time will run a little slower, things will seem a little easier, and everyday will feel like Saturday. Check us out!

Experience a vacation to remember! We offer charming accommodations, fabulous meals, and trail rides with unforgettable views. Enjoy true peace and quiet while you embrace each moment of every day.

Whitefish, MT • 1-866-828-2900

Granby, CO • 1-970-887-3344

www.barwguestranch.com

www.clazyu.com

Crossed Sabres Ranch

Greenhorn Creek Ranch

A family oriented guest ranch located near Yellowstone National Park. Offering three and six day all-inclusive dude ranch packages June 21- August 23, 2010. Adults only week August 16, 2010.

Greenhorn Creek Guest Ranch - Serving up the best hospitality in the West, take home a saddlebag full of memories. Life’s not about who gets there first, it’s whether or not you enjoy the ride!

www.crossedsabresranch.com

www.greenhornranch.com

Cody, WY • 1-888-587-3750

Quincy, CA • 1-800-334-6939

The Hideout Lodge & Guest Ranch

Hubbard’s Six Quarter Circle Ranch

Experience the life of a cowboy and end the day with gourmet food, luxury accommodations, and great company. Live Your Dream, Visit The Hideout.

Ride with the cowboys on our 25 square mile cattle ranch, drink fine wines, enjoy gourmet cuisine, be smothered in 600 thread count sheets.

Shell, WY • 1-800-354-8637

www.thehideout.com

Emigrant, MT • 1-406-848-7755

www.hubbardsranch.com

Lazy L & B Ranch

Lone Mountain Ranch

Quality, unlimited riding, fishing, cabins, pool, children’s program, set in a lush cottonwood river bottom, surrounded by wildlife habitat, rivers, alpine meadows and National Forest. Back country trips available.

Discover Montana at historic Lone Mountain Ranch near Yellowstone. Riding, hiking, canoeing, mountain biking, sea kayaking, fly fishing, youth adventures. Cozy log cabins and renowned cuisine.

Dubois, WY • 1-800-453-9488

www.lazylb.com

Big Sky, MT• 1-800-514-4644

www.lmranch.com

Rancho De Los Caballeros

Tanque Verde Guest Ranch

Find your second home on the range at Rancho de los Caballeros, a resort ranch with horseback riding, award-winning golf and a full-service spa.

Your adventure awaits at Tanque Verde Ranch! With scenic trail riding, a superb kids’ program, and a huge variety of activities, there is something for everyone!

Wickenburg, AZ • 1-800-684-5030

www.sunc.com

Tucson, AZ • 1-866-413-3833

www.tanqueverderanch.com

FREE Directory • Over 100 Ranches Listed This ad sponsored by these fine DRA Members.


Bucket List Adventures – Yes, authenticity was the order of the day—with one exception. Many of my fellow guests sported peculiar accents— British, German, Italian. Most of these folks from across the pond were repeat visitors. I guess the whole world wants to be a cowboy and, as I know now, a dude ranch vacation is the place to get ’er done. n

Riding at Arizona’s Tanque Verde Guest Ranch.

36 | skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express

Now About Your List . . . Fulfilling your own bucket list is easy. Outfitters, guides and specialty ranches dot the SkyWest route map. Some retreats offer expert instruction in more than one area or coordinate a variety of experiences. Consider the diverse options at The High Lonesome Ranch outside Debeque, Colorado. Its outdoor playground includes 300 miles of deeded and permitted land in the shadow of the Book Cliffs. All that territory encompasses an amalgam of historic ranches—each with its own character. From vast meadows to mountain trails, The High Lonesome was assembled to provide an exceptional and varied Western adventure. There’s fishing on natural-spring-fed ponds and creeks, hunting for both bird and big game including deer and elk, and of course horseback riding. A sister property, the K-T Ranch in nearby Meeker, offers private access to nearly six miles of fishing on the legendary White River. Together the properties provide a high-country, Rocky Mountain good time that enables guests to fulfill their back-tothe-land dreams. All this old-fashioned, wide-open fun is just 40 minutes from SkyWest United Express service to Grand Junction, Colorado. For more Bucket List adventures, visit www.americasbestplaces.com.

Fishing: Barry and Cathy Beck

largest herd. They come in all sizes, shapes, colors and temperaments. The wranglers know each by name and disposition. There’s one just right for every guest. For the next three days, I effortlessly lived my dream. Sunrise breakfast rides, cow penning competitions, jaunts into Arizona’s Saguaro National Park and yes, the chance to lope into the sunset. Each day I took a break to enjoy some of the many alternative activities—tennis, the indoor and outdoor pools, and the spa. I even got a massage. The accommodations were just right. Comfortable, clean and very 20th century—no TVs, no Wi-Fi (except in the lobby.) The modern trappings are not missed. Tanque Verde is a place for doing things, not watching life go by. It began as a working cattle ranch in 1868 and history and vitality ooze from the walls. Meals were memorable, ranging from a dinner of cruise-ship proportions to a chuck wagon-style barbecue, complete with campfire and a fiddler that knew every Western song. Nothing seemed contrived. I learned this is to be expected from all Western retreats that are members of the Dude Ranchers’ Association.


It’s Our Journey, Too

SkyWest’s Mini Indy

Celebrates a Decade of Charity by Laura Klarman

S

kyWest Airlines strives to be part of the communities it serves and encourages employees to contribute to causes that speak to them all along the airline’s route system and beyond. Across the nation, you’ll find SkyWest employees involved in philanthropic ventures from AIDS Walk to Race for a Cure. And each spring, industry aficionados migrate to St. George, Utah for aviation’s premier charity race: SkyWest Airlines’ Mini Indy. This year’s racers celebrated ten years of charity, competition and camaraderie. The event began in 2000 to bring industry professionals together for a great cause and a good time. The first race, dubbed the Arthritis Mini Grand Prix, featured high-style fiberglass cars with 5-horsepower gasoline engines racing in a series of heats. This year, more than 30 teams took part in the event, which benefited the United Way Dixie and the SkyWest Scholarship Fund. Participants continue to come from all over the world—Brazil, Europe, Canada, Australia, and a host of American cities—to participate in the adrenaline-pumping fun. Their charitable contributions mean even more in today’s difficult economy. The weekend of golf, banquets and go-kart races has raised almost one million dollars for charity since its inception. Fred Reina, field representative for Embraer Aerospace in Salt Lake City and Mini Indy racer since the event’s beginning, said that Mini Indy “is one of the most anticipated events in the aviation industry, if not the most. It’s a great way to support the community.”

Employee recognition is also a key part of SkyWest’s Mini Indy. Employees nominate their peers for membership on the Recognizing A Valuable Employee (RAVE) team. Those selected may participate as part of the pit crew or become a go-kart driver, racing at speeds of up to 30 miles per hour! Larry Deguzman, 2008 RAVE Team member and Monterey ramp supervisor, explained the thrill, “My birthday was during the Mini Indy. I cannot explain how much fun I had. Probably one of the best times of my life! Meeting new people and the 11 other members of the RAVE team was the best birthday present anyone could have.” Employees competing on the RAVE Team represent various cities and different departments (customer service, maintenance, flight operations, in-flight and corporate.) They also share glimpses of specific aspects of the culture at SkyWest. Like all participants they have a wonderful time doing good. Frank Garcia of San Antonio-based Standard Aero explained, “The chance to meet others in the industry and the good cause are what keep us coming back.” Whether it is a national fundraiser, local charity or just a kind act, SkyWest strives to bring good things to the people and communities the airline serves. To find out more about SkyWest’s Mini Indy, or to see the 2010 race highlights, visit www.miniindy.org. n

Celebrating Ten Years in 2010 Ten race teams have participated in each Mini Indy since 2000, and their continued support and contributions have helped raise more than $1 million for charity. They are: 1. AAR Landing Gear Services 2. AVIALL 3. Bombardier Regional Aircraft 4. City of Saint George 5. Dixie State College 6. Embraer 7. Future Aviation 8. GE Aviation 9. Honeywell 10. Standard Aero skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express |

37


America’sB est Events

|March

|April RAPID CITY, SD | APRIL 1 – ONGOING

BOISE, ID | ONGOING Hot Stuff at the Discovery Center of Idaho treats visitors to a sizzling, good time delving into the fascinating world of thermodynamics. Incandescence, heat transfer, convection, focused heat and infrared radiation are among the areas that are explored in provocative and surprising ways. Entertaining education at its best.

The Wind Cave Seasonal Volksmarch begins at the Gordon Stockade Historical Site and rambles along 6.2 miles of scenic pre-marked trails. The leisurely, self-guided tour through Custer State Park affords the opportunity to see a variety of wildlife including buffalo.

GREAT FALLS, MT | ONGOING

Buskers Festival brings a celebration of street performers to the cobblestone thoroughfares of Seaport Village. The annual spring event packs the waterfront with a cavalcade of unusual acts. Jugglers, sword swallowers, contortionists and others adept at an array of peculiar stunts are all part of the festivities.

On the Brink of Change an exhibit at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center traces Isaac Steven’s railroad surveying trek across the northwest fifty years after Lewis and Clark first charted the territory. The rigorous journey comes alive through reproductions of paintings and drawings created by the expedition’s artists and excerpts from the report that spurred westward expansion and sparked creation of the federal government’s reservation system.

SAN DIEGO, CA | APRIL 10 – 11

Aspen, CO | Through April 11 Disembodied / Aspen Art Museum

LITTLE ROCK, AR | ONGOING World of the Pharaohs at the Arkansas Arts Center presents an epic collection of masterpieces from the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. With more than 200 objects representing more than 3,000 years of dynastic history, the exhibition includes many pieces from the Pyramid Age. Together they illustrate the rich and diverse aspects of the ancient civilization.

SANTA BARBARA | ONGOING Delacroix to Monet: Masterpieces of 19th-Century Painting from the Walters Art Museum brings one of America’s finest holdings of 19th-century paintings to the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, the only West Coast venue for the exhibition. Selected for their historic significance and artistic quality the works include major pieces by French, British, Spanish and American artists.

CHICAGO, IL | MARCH 7, 14, 18, 28 Devil in the White City Bus Tour is a treat for fans of the Eric Larson book of the same name. All the murder, magic and madness of Chicago’s 1893 World’s Fair are chronicled in a slide show that retells the saga of America’s first mass murderer. Scenes chronicled in the book are highlighted during the tour.

FORT WAYNE, IN | MARCH 18 Pops on Pipes Grand Page Organ Concert features organist Jelani Eddington at the keyboard of the 1928 Grand Page Organ, the showpiece of the historic Embassy Theater. One of just three instruments of its kind, the Grand Page boasts more than 1,100 pipes and mimics the effects of many other instruments including drums, xylophones, piano and glockenspiel, as well as chattering birds, sleigh bells and a host of other sounds.

Louise Bourgeois, GIVE OR TAKE, 2002. Courtesy Cheim & Read, Hauser & Wirth and Galerie Karsten Greve.

Featuring works by an intergenerational selection of historically significant artists—including Louise Bourgeois, Berlinde de Bruyckere, Robert Gober, David Hammons, and Kiki Smith—known for their incisive artistic investigations into the often complex interaction between mind, body, and identity.

970-925-8050 or www.aspenartmuseum.org

SPRINGFIELD, MO | APRIL 16 – 17 Rock ‘n’ Ribs Barbecue Festival draws cooking teams from throughout the nation to compete in an event sanctioned by the Kansas City Barbecue Society. Visitors sample pork, beef and chicken slathered in an assortment of sauce. Live music, a kids’ zone and a motorcycle show are part of the entertainment. Bibs optional.

SAN ANTONIO, TX | APRIL 20-23 A Night in Old San Antonio enlivens the La Villita National Historic District, an 18th-century, Spanish-flavored downtown neighborhood. The event salutes San Antonio’s cultural heritage through music, games, dance and a panoply of food ranging from gorditas to frog legs. Proceeds benefit the San Antonio Conservation Society.

TRAVERSE CITY, MI | APRIL 21 – 25 The 74th Annual National Trout Festival brings fun for all ages to downtown Kalkaska just 25 miles from SkyWest service to Traverse City. Special breakfasts and dinners, parades, a craft show, flea market, fireworks and trout fishing contests welcome spring and kickoff the fishing season.

Do you know America’s Best Places? Test your Travel Smarts at

www.americasbestplaces.com 38 | skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express


Business Class A Rock ‘n Roll Motivational Keynote

Get Out of Your Own Way

New Location

WWW.DICICCOSCOLORADO.NET

Arvada

Olde Town Arvada 5660 Olde Wadsworth Arvada, CO 303.940.9877

Featuring master storyteller Doug Stevenson and the recorded music of Van Halen, Aaliyah, Tom Petty, Christina Aguilera, The Eagles and more.

The Largest Italian Restaurant in Colorado! Dinner Shows Coming Soon!

OVER 20 DIFFERENT PASTA SAUCES SERVING CHICKEN, STEAK, VEAL & FISH DAILY SPECIALS

Improve morale and boost sales Generate optimism and inspire confidence • Kick off your conference on a high note •

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Livement! r te n E tain

Doug Stevenson will rock your conference with high energy, humor and an uplifting message. His clients include Microsoft, Cisco, Aetna, Century 21, Amgen, Lockheed Martin, UPS, IRS, American Medical Association and many more.

6701 Tower Rd., Denver, CO Near DIA • 303.574.1956

1-719-573-6195 • www.storytelling-in-business.com

SkyWest Travel A shland , O regon

ZION NATIONAL PARK

BOISE, IDAHO

©Christopher Briscoe

A destination for every season…make your next getaway to Ashland, Oregon! Home to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Ashland is the jumping off point for your next adventure whether it be culinary, outdoor or cultural, we look forward to welcoming you! 541-482-3486

www.ashlandchamber.com

Best western zion park inn will provide the comfort and amenities while you enjoy the majestic beauty of Zion National Park. Restaurant, gift shop, convenience and liquor store, hot tub HSIA, Brian Head skiing one hour away. Ask for “SkyWest Package.” 800-934-7275

www.zionparkinn.com

B oise , I D aho

D ana point , C A lifornia

COTTONWOOD GRILLE: Inspired Northwest cuisine in an authentic Idaho setting. Serving local food with a global perspective and featuring an award-winning wine list. Celebrating ten years in business, Cottonwood Grille is offering $10 anniversary share plates, wine flights and more. Come and see us on the Boise River! 208-333-9800 cottonwoodgrille.com

IT’S NO FLUKE – THE WHALES ARE IN THE OC! Grey Whales call Orange County’s warm coastal waters home. Daily tours narrated by seasoned captains. Whale or dolphin sightings guaranteed. Great family fun. Sportfishing and charters also available. Purchase tickets online 24/7. 800-590-9994 www.danawharf.com

The Boise Valley, winner of numerous “quality of life” and “best places to do business” awards, welcomes new businesses and offers their employees affordable living. Find out what we can offer your business today. Contact the Boise Metro Chamber or Boise Valley Economic Partnership (BVEP) today at 208-472-5200. www.boisechamber.org www.bvep.org

SOUTHERN UTAH

photo by mokitom.com

Golfing, Hiking, RV’ing, National Parks and Much More! Kane County, UT averages over 320 days of sunshine each year. That’s 320 days of sunshine and outdoor adventure waiting for you! www.thegrandcanyons.com skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express |

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crossword

Signs Of The Season ACROSS 1 Matured 4 April’s precip’ 10 With 86 across, sport of the season 14 Metal-bearing mineral 15 Toxin 16 Computer operator 17 OT false god 19 Agitates 20 Gross individual 22 Embed 24 Monetary unit of Japan 25 Freedom from war 26 Obstacle 29 Grouchy 32 Confound it! 34 Kiln for drying hops 36 Wrath 38 Dull 40 Not a hit 41 Fish eggs 43 Highway 45 Dutch bulbs 46 Knot in wool or wood 47 Beige 49 Among 50 Stringed instrument 51 Wicker work material (pl) 53 Garden water conduit 54 Volcanic dust 55 Waist cinch 57 Vex 59 Carew, Strickland or Steiger 61 Notion 62 Prom companion 64 Judged 68 Underground mammal 71 Mountaineer’s spike 72 Obese 74 Gentle push 76 Having no distinct feet 78 Spring flyers 80 Incline 81 Lather 82 Breathe in 83 Extinct flightless bird 84 Let it stand 85 Convent 86 Sphere

Answers to clues in bold relate to Springtime. Solution on page 44. 1

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DOWN 1 Redbreast 2 Iraq neighbor 3 Chimes 4 Distress signal 5 Opposite of misses 6 Willow 7 Wearied 8 Village in the Netherlands 9 Chooses 10 Pertaining to the cheek 1 1 Gray 1 2 Perceive with the eyes 1 3 Sin 18 Ground 2 1 Opener for ring or drum 23 Unit of linear measure 27 Singer Brooks 28 Whitman’s candy collection 30 Ceded 31 Blossom heralding the season 33 19th letter of the Greek alphabet 35 Bro’s sib’ 36 Emerald Isle 37 The Good _____, by Buck

70 75

82 86

39 Blighted 41 Gossip morsel 42 Prayer (Middle English) 44 Owing 46 _____ humbug! 48 Quran religion 51 Advanced in years 52 Drive out 56 Phantom 58 English public school 60 Surrounded by (Middle English) 63 12th month of the Jewish calendar 65 Lyric poem 66 7th letter of the Greek alphabet 67 Wash 69 Dropsy 70 Open to bribery 72 Helsinki native 73 Rip 75 Jail 76 Donkey 77 Place 78 Relatives 79 Wily

Do you know America’s Best Places? Test your Travel Smarts at

www.americasbestplaces.com 40 | skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express

59

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behind the scenes

Aircraft Safety Comes First at SkyWest Airlines

“Safety First” is more than a mission statement at SkyWest Airlines; it’s a way of life. SkyWest’s impeccable safety record spans more than 35 years, beginning with the highest caliber of trained professionals and extending to a proven fleet of aircraft. The People: Each day, thousands of SkyWest employees are responsible for the safety of hundreds of thousands of passengers. SkyWest’s experienced mechanics, pilots, flight attendants and ground personnel have the know-how and ability to keep their passengers safe. In the Flight Deck: You also have the comfort of knowing you’re flying with some of the most experienced and thoroughly trained pilots the airline industry has to offer. It takes years of training and experience to become a commercial airline pilot, and many come to SkyWest well prepared averaging 1,500 to 2,000 hours of flight time. However, their training has just begun. Before they ever fly a passenger flight, SkyWest spends approximately $30,000 on their training which is geared towards safety. This is a two-month process beginning with three weeks of ground school followed by 50 hours of flight simulator training. The final stage of their training is called the Initial Operating Experience, during which they actually fly one of SkyWest’s aircraft accompanied by a qualified check airman instructor for another 50 hours. All pilots continue their training with mandatory recurrent simulator training for captains every six months and for first officers, every year. Additionally, each year both captains and first officers must participate in a two-day training session similar to ground school. All pilots are also required to undergo a comprehensive medical examination testing their vision and overall physical and mental well-being to determine if they are fit to fly for SkyWest. Captains do this every six months; first officers annually. In the Cabin: At SkyWest, a flight attendant’s first responsibility is your safety. Like pilots, SkyWest’s in-flight team undergoes comprehensive training before they take to the skies. Each SkyWest flight attendant must complete an intense three-week training program emphasizing onboard safety and security. They are well-versed in emergency procedures, 42 | skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express

evacuation protocol and passenger service. While at SkyWest, flight attendants continue their training throughout the year and are required to recertify in First Aid and CPR annually. On the Ramp: SkyWest stresses safety not only in the air, but also on the ground. SkyWest trains its customer service personnel for two weeks, both in the classroom and on the job in ground safety issues. These agents become specialists in aircraft weight and balance. They know the best way to load and unload hundreds of pounds of cargo and luggage without damaging the luggage, cargo, the aircraft or injuring themselves. They are also trained to operate the various ground equipment and park the aircraft once it arrives at the gate. This navigation can often be challenging in airports with busy ramps. In colder climates, they must learn how to properly de-ice an aircraft allowing for a safe take-off and flight. Under the Wing: For every hour one of SkyWest’s aircraft spends in flight, one of their mechanics spends two hours servicing that aircraft. SkyWest maintains a strict maintenance schedule and undoubtedly, an experienced SkyWest mechanic has recently inspected or serviced the aircraft carrying you. All mechanics come to SkyWest with extensive training, including three years of A&P (Airframe and Power) training and certification. Also, every two years SkyWest mechanics undergo three weeks of mandatory training. Each day, all of SkyWest’s aircraft are given attention by a mechanic. Every third day, each plane receives standard service. On the fifth day, a more thorough service and inspection is conducted. Extensive maintenance is scheduled every 54 days with a major inspection every 540 days. Flight Control: This department consists of aircraft dispatchers, system controllers and customer service coordinators located in the Operational Control Center at SkyWest’s headquarters in St. George, Utah. All play an integral role in the airline’s operations. SkyWest dispatch personnel undergo six weeks of intensive training courses, learning in-depth aircraft systems, meteorology and flight planning to become certified by the Federal Aviation Administration. Upon arrival at SkyWest, their training continues with three weeks of classes followed by an average of eight weeks of on-the-job training, culminating with a two-day competency check.


The dispatchers are responsible for preparing the flight release, including fuel planning, route selection, Federal Aviation Regulation compliance and weather analysis, as well as monitoring flights to ensure safety. Before each aircraft leaves the runway, dispatchers and captains share responsibility for the safety of the flight. The system controllers are responsible for all coordination, cancellation, delaying and reflow of SkyWest flights. They ensure optimum coverage of and adherence to flight schedules, economics and utilization of the operation. The customer service coordinators assist the controllers, working closely with the stations to maintain a customer service advocacy, always keeping the passenger in mind. These highly trained individuals work with the rest of the SkyWest team to provide a safe flying experience with incomparable service and quality.

The Safety Department: SkyWest has a department wholly dedicated to the operational safety of the airline. Its team monitors all aspects of safety and ensures that the highest standard of safety is maintained. The safety department coordinates with all the departments involved with ground and flight operations and acts as a compliance liaison between the airline and the Department of Transportation and Federal Aviation Administration. It is also responsible for the safety and well-being of all employees and equipment at the airline. The safety department conducts internal safety audits and evaluations of all operational departments. Additionally, SkyWest’s safety department voluntarily participates in the Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP); a reporting program for pilots, flight attendants and dispatchers to flag potential safety concerns. n

Business Profile

Gamma Knife – a revolution in neurosurgery Fresno may not be well-known as a tourist destination, but world-class technology like the Gamma Knife—available at Saint Agnes Medical Center—has put Valley health care on the map. Saint Agnes, a 436-bed acute care medical center in the heart of the San Joaquin Valley, is proud to be one of only 200 institutions worldwide, including Johns Hopkins Hospital, Mayo Clinic, and UCSF Medical Center, using Gamma Knife; and is among a select handful using the newest and most precise version—the Perfexion. Considered the “gold standard” in radiosurgery, Gamma Knife is the most effective noninvasive treatment available for brain tumors and other abnormalities in the brain and upper neck previously considered inaccessible or inoperable. Contrary to its name, Gamma Knife does not use a knife at all. There are no scalpels

involved and no incisions made. Instead, 192 highly focused beams of radiation—delivered in a single high-dose—converge on the specific area where the tumor or abnormality resides. With the help of a computer and the latest imaging technology, physicians can identify the exact spot with pinpoint accuracy. This promising alternative to traditional surgery offers superior outcomes, fewer complications and quicker recovery times, giving Valley residents one more reason to be proud of the community they call home. For more information about Gamma Knife, call: 1-800-ST-AGNES | www.samc.com. skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express |

43


Route Map

Edmonton

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Medford

Gillette

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Boise

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Redding

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Eagle County Aspen

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Scranton Allentown Columbus Pittsburgh Dayton Cincinnati Charleston Louisville Fort Wayne

Indianapolis

Denver

Las Vegas

San Luis Obispo Santa Maria Santa Barbara Burbank Ontario Oxnard Los Angeles Palm Springs Phoenix Orange County Carlsbad Imperial/El Centro Tucson San Diego Yuma

Moline

Omaha

Lincoln

Syracuse

Charleston

Midland

Austin San Antonio

United - Regional Jet

Houston

United - Turbo Prop Seasonal Time Zones

Pacific

Mountain

Central

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8:00

9:00 (Arizona does not observe Daylight Savings)

10:00

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EFFECTIVE February 2010 (may not reflect recent service updates)

SKYWEST AIRLINES CURRENT ROUTE MAP FEBRUARY 2010 (updated monthly, may not reflect recent service updates)

R O B I N

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E R S N E S L E P E A S C R A S T M I S S P S L I E R S R I L E D A T B M O A T N T E S H A L E E R Y

Solution to Crossword on page 40 For more of Leigh Rubin’s humor check out his new, 2010 Rubes Zoo in a Box daily desk calendar, available at your favorite neighborhood or online bookstore, visit www.rubescartoons.com or call 800-850-9453.

44 | skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express

B U C C A L

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about your aircraft

The Aircraft Galley

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SkyWest has safely been flying the EMB 120, commonly referred to as the “workhorse” of the regional airline industry, CRJ700 since 1986. Don’t be fooled by the propellers you see; the same CRJ700 technology that powers jet aircraft actually powers the EMB 120 as well. Like jet engines, the EMB 120 is powered by a gas turbine design, allowing for the superior reliability and power that jet engines enjoy. The EMB 120 is also economically sound, allowing it to serve communities that may not support jet service. Additionally, the EMB 120 possesses state-of-the-art technology allowing for maximum passenger safety. Each SkyWest EMB 120 is equipped with a Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS). GPWS is a warning system designed to alert pilots when the aircraft is not in landing configuration or is getting too close to the ground. GPWS detects terrain ahead of and below the aircraft and warns pilots when there’s an obstruction ahead. Each EMB 120 also has an onboard Global Positioning System (GPS), which uses satellites to calculate an aircraft’s position on the earth’s surface. Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems (TCAS) are also included for your safety. A more advanced radar system, TCAS in the flight deck is similar in theory to the equipment used in air traffic control towers to detect the position of all aircraft in the area.

6

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While SkyWest’s employees are truly what set the airline apart, the equipment used also plays a significant role in passenger safety. SkyWest’s fleet of 280 regional aircraft is one of the industry’s newest. The average age of an aircraft is under seven years. The fleet consists of three different aircraft types: the 30-passenger Embraer 120 Brasilia (EMB 120), theCRJ200 Bombardier CRJ200 Canadair Regional Jet 200 LR (CRJ200), and the CRJ200’s sister aircraft, the Canadair Regional Jet 700 ER (CRJ700).

CRJ AIRCRAFT SkyWest has operated the 50-passenger CRJ200 since 1994. And in 2004, SkyWest welcomed the CRJ200’s sister-aircraft, the nearly identical 66-passenger CRJ700, with a two-class cabin and United’s explusSM service. The CRJ200 and CRJ700 offer a balance of the best economics in their class and outstanding performance with the Collins Pro Line 4 Avionics Systems. This onboard technology allows pilots to better observe the flying environment. Both regional jets have the ability to monitor performance of aircraft systems as well as track nearby aircraft and terrain clearances. The aircraft are Galley Lavatory also equipped with a weather radar system which helps pilots see potentially CRJ200treacherous weather long before it is encountered. Passengers can rest easy knowing that the technology onboard 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 SkyWest’s aircraft provides for a safer, smoother flying experience Main Entrance for both passenger and pilot. That’s safety first! n Emergency Exits

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United Red Carpet Club United First International Lounge

Airport Maps

United Arrivals Suite International Arrivals Suite

Denver (DEN) Concourse C US Airways

Inter-Terminal Shuttle Bus Stop

PDX

United Arrivals Suite

United Easy Check-in

International Arrivals Suite

Medical Center

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Pedestrian Tunnel B9

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Shuttle runs between Gates C9 and E3.

Concourse M

Shuttle runs between Gates C9 and E3.

46 | skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express

TERMINAL 1

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Concourse B Continental US Airways


Miles that stretch further, and bend in more ways.

Introducing One-Way Awards and Miles & Money Awards. NEW TO ALL MEMBERS:

• Miles & Money Awards

Now all members have more ways to redeem their miles than ever before. Mileage Plus

®

gives you the freedom to redeem One-Way Awards for half the miles of a roundtrip, and †

the flexibility to use Miles & Money Awards to combine your miles with cash for travel.

• One-Way Awards

You can also use your miles on the road for hotel awards, rental car awards, and more.

• Hotel & Car Awards

Mileage Plus. The loyalty program that keeps adding new ways to reward you. To learn more, visit mileageplus.com.

Terms and conditions: †Miles & Money will be available on select roundtrip Saver Awards in United Economy class. Miles redeemed under the One-Way Awards or Miles & Money Awards programs are subject to the rules of the Mileage Plus program. Taxes and fees related to award travel are the responsibility of the passenger. The Mileage Plus program, including accruals, awards and bonus miles offers, is subject to change without notice. United, its subsidiaries, affiliates and agents are not responsible for any products and services of other participating companies and partners. United and Mileage Plus are registered service marks. To learn more, visit mileageplus.com. (MPG M10) © 2010 United Air Lines, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ®

®


Travel Challenge

Test Your Travel Smarts

Can you identify this impressive location?

Be among the first five readers to correctly identify this place and we’ll send you a copy of the recently released dramedy It’s Complicated starring Alex Baldwin, Meryl Streep and Steve Martin. To win, visit www.americasbestplaces.com and register the correct answer to this Travel Challenge. If you are successful and remember to send us your mailing address, we’ll send along the DVD. While you’re at the site, share your own travel experiences at www.americasbestplaces.com This contest runs March 1 through April 30, 2010. It is not open to employees of the airline or this magazine, members of their families or previous winners. Void where prohibited.

48 | skyWest Magazine March/April 2010 united express

It’s complicataed: Universal Studios Home Entertainment

No, it’s not Monaco, or Portofino, or Capri. This harbor hugs an American coastline. Here’s a huge hint. There’s a story about this magical spot in this issue of the magazine. While you’re contemplating the possibilities, also consider the wonders of regional air travel to lovely places like this one. Service to our nation’s mid-sized cities and small-resort markets makes it easy to embark on extraordinary adventures. Exploring new places adds so much to life. It makes memories and creates a personal travelogue and is as educational as it is entertaining. Your travel smarts could earn you a recently released movie. See details below. n


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we’d be golden. 1st: Morris & Fyrwald/Sotheby’s $425.4 million

2009 Sales

2nd Place Company: $275.2 million 3rd Place Company: $220.7 million

Offices in Aspen, Basalt & Carbondale | 970.925.6060

ASPENSKIHOMES.COM

Source: ABOR, All sales, January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2009. Does not include listings from Residences at the Little Nell.

If they gave medals for real estate sales,

SkyWest Magazine March/April 2010  

Inflight magazine for SkyWest Airlines,United Express

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