Issuu on Google+

Midland-Odessa Marvels | Vancouver: Beyond the Olympics | Colorado Winter

magazine

priceless: please take one January | February 2010

CHICO California

green at heart

Chico Green at Heart Operated by SkyWest Airlines


Introducing a

E‹N

new website!

Disco

americasbest

1. 2. 3. 4.

Read what others have shared about their favorite places, adventures, events.

Discover Home Page

Share your experience.

America’s best places

You’re the expert. You’ve bee

Cast your vote.

Tell us your best experiences. Learn from Winners to be featured in America’s Be

Encourage others to do the same.

Discover americasbestplaces.com Home Page

Discover

Share

Vote

America’s best places

Your favorite spots

To express yourself

Search

Vote Best Ski Destination

America’sB est places

Current open polls include:

Best National Park | Best Ski Destination | Best Zoo | Best “Ad See All Polls

Current open polls

Park B est National VOTE NOW!

DO YOU KNOW AMERICA’S BEST PLACES?

Destination B est Ski VOTE NOW!

B est Community Population under 25,000

VOTE NOW Population 25,000-50,000 VOTE NOW Population 51,000-100,000 VOTE NOW Population over 100,000 VOTE NOW

B est Zoo VOTE NOW! B est Adrenaline Rush Experience VOTE NOW!

More quiz fun plus amazing photos from America’s upand-coming photographers.

Enjoy witho Photo Challenge Top Cities List

City Nicknames Photo Contest

AMERICA’S BEST BUCKET LIST

All polls are open! VOTE NOW! Home

Photo Gallery

People

Local Artists

Copyright 2009 Go! Publications Inc.

Experiences you must do in your lifetime!

A list of America’s “must-do experiences” along with where to do them and who can help! click here to view list.

Check winter

Home

|

About Us

|

A

Copyright 2010 Go! Pub

America’sB est

places.com


It’s fun. It’s interactive. It’s adventure!

over

B est

Enter your experience. Winners to be featured in our annual publication.

tplaces.com Share

Vote

Your favorite spots

To express yourself

en there. You’ve done that.

Search

YOUR OPINION MATTERS

Receive a monthly poll and results

m others. Cast your vote. st Places—2010.

Go!

email address

Fun and rewarding! A chance to win movies, documentaries, Travel DVDs and discounts from destinations and attractions.

K<JKPFLI KI8M<CJD8IKJ

Learn about unique places and their special offers Discover Discover

:C@:B?<I< KFGC8P Home Page

drenaline Rush” | Best Community

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Home

Own a Piece of IDAHO

4 acres in McCall, Idaho

y unique places off the beaten path out breaking the bank!

americasbestplaces.com

our best . . .

About Us

americasbestplaces.com Discover Share

Vote

America’s best places

To express yourself

Best Experiences

Your favorite spots

Best Happenings

Best Communities

Search By Category

Search

Search By Map

search

Go!

Budget Friendly Getaways

CALIFORNIA Sycamore Mineral Springs Resort Where the “Beach Meets the Vineyards,” voted Best Getaway and Spa on the Central Coast. An authentic California resort since 1897 rests atop hot mineral springs and spans more than 100 acres just two miles from Avila Beach. Each guest room features a private balcony spa. Guests enjoy daily yoga classes. Experience our secluded hillside mineral springs hot tubs, renowned Spa & Wellness Center and award-winning Gardens of Avila Restaurant. 800 234-5831

COLORADO StayAndSkiFree.com Yes, you read that correctly! Winter vacations are more affordable with free lift tickets from November 25 through December 16, 2009 when you book lodging and skiing at Crested Butte, Colorado’s last great ski town. Rest assured you won’t need to skimp on comfort, rewarding experiences and great service! Our 1800s Western and Victorian Rocky Mountain towns will take care of that.

SKIING

Click Here

snowmobiling

GOLF SEASON’S BEST

OREGON Eagle Crest Resort Fall is a beautiful time to visit Central Oregon and enjoy Eagle Crest Resort’s incredible $99 Unlimited Golf and Lodging Package. Eagle Crest offers three great courses at one amazing price. Rates include lodging and unlimited golf at any of the three courses. Rates are based on two people at the Inn or four people in a vacation rental. Weekend rates start at $109/person. This offer goes through November 15th. Some restrictions may apply. 866-976-6152

MOUNTAIN BIKING Home

Photo Gallery

People

Local Artists

Copyright 2009 Go! Publications Inc.

WATER SPORTS

k out where to play in the snow this r. Great ski packages are available! Click Here

Advertising

|

and more . . . :c`Zb?\i\

Contact Us

blications Inc.

America’sB est

places.com


January | February 2010

Green at Heart Page 8 | Wide skies, open farmlands, a ring of mountains and one of the nation’s largest city parks combine to inspire an eco-conciousness in the citizens of this college town. As a result, a friendly, laid-back community spawns an array of environmentally friendly businesses.

MIDLAND/ODESSA, TX

20 | Oregon Adventures

22 | Beyond LAX

25 | ArtWatch

26 | Annual Education Spotlight

Unexpected Oil Country Adventures Page 14 | Replicas of Stonehenge and Shakespeare’s Old Globe Theater are among the quirky attractions visitors encounter in Texas’s oil-rich Permian Basin. Other more location-centric must-sees include President George W. Bush’s childhood home, the football stadium made famous in Friday Night Lights and the eclectic Museum of the Southwest.

30 | Colorado Winter

32 | Budget Friendly Vacations

34 | America’s Best Events

VANCOUVER, BC Olympic-Sized Fun All Year Long

36 | Crossword Puzzle

Page 16 | This hip oceanside community attracts international attention as the site of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games. With a moderate climate and recreation options that stretch from sea to sky and include the possibility of summer snow skiing, this bustling cosmopolitan city emerges a worthy destination in every season.

38 | It’s Our Journey, Too

On the Cover

45 | About Our Aircraft

Chico, California artist Dolores Mitchell captures the vitality of the area’s fertile landscape in Radiant Fields. The oil painting depicts a typical February scene in the almond orchards surrounding Mitchell’s eco-minded hometown. To see more about the artist see page 25.

46 | Airport Maps

42 | Behind the Scenes

48 | Travel Quiz

Web Extras!

If you like this magazine you will love our new affiliate-website www.americasbestplaces.com. See preceding pages for details.

operated by SkyWest Airlines

Chico Bag Monster: Gregg Segal

CHICO, CA

contents


Welcome Aboard

Dedication to Safety and Service—Always Dear Passenger: The beginning of a new year prompts many of us to evaluate our progress, redefine our goals or simply solidify the commitments we’ve already made. At SkyWest Airlines, that process isn’t reserved for any specific date; rather, we renew our commitment to overall excellence each day. And there is no commitment we take more seriously than our commitment to your safety. It’s evident in everything we do.

At SkyWest, we know attracting the best and brightest aviation professionals is a critical component of our safety commitment. But recruiting the best is only the beginning. While our current training programs exceed federal requirements and industry standards, we are not content to rest on those laurels. To remain at the forefront of aviation safety, we continue to modify our programs to ensure we are proactive in addressing all industry and aircraft updates. Our training, programs and processes are all in place to ensure that the industry’s best people have the tools they need to take care of you, the passenger. Whether it’s the dispatcher behind the scenes or the crew onboard your aircraft today, highly skilled aviation professionals make up a team diligently working to ensure your flight is a safe one. Three dispatchers planned and now monitor your flight, and several administrative personnel have tracked the maintenance of this aircraft and its crew. A minimum of three mechanics inspected your plane before it departed. A gate agent checked you in if you were at a SkyWest-operated station, and five or more rampers loaded your bags. And finally, there are at least three crewmembers on your flight—four if you’re in a CRJ700. At minimum, there are 35 highly trained aviation professionals dedicated to ensuring this single flight operates safely. They are all part of a legacy of exceptional service and safety—a heritage that spans nearly four decades. At SkyWest, all 10,556 of us are dedicated to making your trip a safe, exceptional experience from start to finish, whether you’re flying for business or pleasure. So, on behalf of this extraordinary team of aviation professionals, it’s my pleasure to welcome you aboard SkyWest United Express. On each of our nearly 1,500 daily flights, our performance is a testament to our safety commitment. I invite you to relax and enjoy your flight, and I thank you for sharing your journey with us.

Russell “Chip” Childs President and COO SkyWest Airlines


WAITING FOR A FLIGHT? SEE THE SIGHTS. Take a FREE shuttle and a tour of historic Temple Square—in less than two hours. Pickups at Terminal 1 (door 1), Terminal 2 (door 12).

When you come to Utah, be sure to visit

TEMPLE SQUARE in the heart of Salt Lake City

Tours are available in more than 30 languages

Н

Many venues to choose from, and all are free

© Busath.com

Your tour group can:

Listen

to the glorious music of the famed Mormon Tabernacle Choir, rehearsing and performing in the Tabernacle on Temple Square. They also perform in the 21,000-seat Conference Center. See visittemplesquare.com for details.

Discover

your roots

in the FamilySearch Center, where helpful volunteers can assist in retrieving family history information from the world’s largest repository of genealogical records.

Meander

through

two upscale visitors’ centers that include the Christus statue by Danish sculptor Thorvaldsen. Visit the interactive map of ancient Jerusalem (kids love it!) and much more.

For information on these and many other fascinating venues on Temple Square, go to visittemplesquare.com, lds.org/placestovisit, or call 1-800-537-9703. © IRI. PD50021647


ramblings and recommends

Counting Through the Bonds of Time and Space

Go!

P U B L I C AT I O N S I N C O R P O R A T E D

Dear Reader:

OK. It’s a new year in a new decade in what I still consider the new millennium. Time to push across a new personal frontier. I finally get it. Cyber communication allows us to slip the confines of time and space. Facebook and Twitter mean we can stay in touch all the time. Or at least whenever you, dear reader, want to check in. Even when you’re not paying attention, I can delight in telling you all the things I don’t have room for in this column in hopes that you’ll take a leisurely peek at my ramblings. Together we can explore the wonders of places I wish I could write about if space allowed, events I’d love you to know about—even if I get the news long after the appropriate issue has gone to print. I can pontificate about all of the travel gadgets and gizmos and good reads currently spilling around my desk vying with each other for a mention in this column. There’s good stuff here: Cinda B’s washable travel bags, with matching curling iron cover are fasionable and oh-so-practical. The biography of Conrad Dobler, once dubbed the meanest man in football, presents his soft side, in a book gridiron fans will appreciate. Gotta Go Mitts, disposable gloves that keep kids’ hands sanitary in public places make total sense to anybody who’s traveled with little ones. Social media also means I can keep you better informed of ways to combat health risks such as deep vein thrombosis—get up, walk around, drink water, not soda, wear support stockings. Hey, I can even tell you about the stuff that has no connection with travel but makes for a quirky bit of news . . . the toilet tank aquarium comes to mind.

There’s just one small hurdle to overcome. Twitter and Facebook have their own limitations. Facebook allows 450 characters per post. Twitter accepts 140 per tweet. Instead of counting words to fill up a page, I must now become accustomed to counting letters and spaces. (The last sentence comes in at 139. The limit also takes into account my first name, which by the way—or should I say BTW—totals a whopping 7 characters. (Attn: grammar mavens. I know. Typical magazine style requires that I spell out “seven,” but I’m practicing for the condensed version, OK?) Then there’s the address, America’s Best Places—another 19 characters. Oh dear. Eighteen percent of our communiqué is immediately given over to my identity. I will not be deterred. Frequency can compensate. Maybe that’s why one of my friends recently explained that he is “connected” more than 14 hours each day, continuously tweeting and posting, building a social network of friends he’s never met. To save space I am also reverting to a nickname neglected since college. Call me CJ. So, be a Facebook friend to CJ Maile, or follow me on Twitter: cj@americasbestplaces. As soon as I find time to blog, I can revert to my verbose ways. I’ll let you know—if we’re friends—when that will be. In the meantime, if you’ve got ideas for a blog name, send me a message, the old fashioned way. Email: colleen@skywestmagazine.com.

president Kelly D. Coles editor in chief Colleen Birch Maile colleen@gopubinc.com art director Janie W. Budell janie@gopubinc.com copy editor Bethany Maile proof readers Anna Bierman Tatro | Quincy Budell contributors Tony Banning | Anna Hobart | Lou Jurassic Tamara Lee | Connie Naylor | Erin Vaughen

director sales and marketing Teena J. Wright l 208-333-9990 teena@gopubinc.com advertising managers AZ, NM, TX, WY, ND, SD: Keith Sauls l 208-354-5400 keith@gopubinc.com MT, OR, UT, WA, Canada: Wendy Rivers l 406-586-0439 wndyrivers@theglobal.net CO, NV, Northern and Central CA: Susan Vernier Garcia l 970-927-9599 susan@gopubinc.com for all other locations call: SkyWest Magazine corporate office 208-333-9990 l fax: 208-333-9991 205 N. 10th St., Suite B100, Boise, ID 83702 email: info@skywestmagazine.com www.skywestmagazine.com SkyWest Airlines 444 S. River Rd., St. George, UT 84790 435-634-3000 l email: info@skywest.com SkyWest Airlines Stock Symbol: SKYW

SkyWest Magazine (ISSN 1527-4152) is published bi-monthly by Go! Publications, Inc. for United Express operated by SkyWest Airlines. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to SkyWest Magazine are not necessarily those of the editor, publisher or of SkyWest Airlines. Acceptance of advertisements does not imply official endorsement of the products or services concerned. While every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of content, no responsibility can be taken for any errors and/or omissions. No part of this SkyWest Magazine may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher. © 2010 Go! Publications Inc. All rights reserved.

Copies available for $6 each.

Happy Skies,

CJ

This magazine assumes no responsibility for the safekeeping or return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, artwork or other material. This magazine does not reply to queries without SASE.

Colleen “CJ” Birch Maile Editor in Chief

For reprints of articles in this issue of SkyWest Magazine, please call 208-333-9990. Visit us on our website at www.skywestmagazine.com.

6 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express enviroink.indd 1

10/1/08 10:44:38 AM


Own a Piece PG Idaho

in one of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite resort towns Land remains an incredible investment opportunity and there will never be a better value or a better time than now to purchase this 4.25 acre piece of land in downtown McCall, Idaho.

NEW PRICE $675,000 $625,000 s Reduced from 2007 price of $2,970,000. s Lot Size: 4.25 Acres s Property Type: Residential (land) s Zoning Description: 5+ Units

DESCRIPTION HIGHLIGHTS s Located in downtown McCall, Idaho s Less than (5) minutes to McCall Airport s Walking distance to Payette Lake, Restaurants and Shops s Easy access to Golf, Ski Resort and Water Activities s Less than (2) hours from Boise, Idaho s Multiple uses for this Development Opportunity s This lot is partially wooded with gentle slopes allowing for different types of development. s Property is only (8) miles from Brundage Ski Mountain. s Golf courses including White Tail, Jug Mountain Ranch, Meadow Creek, Osprey Meadows and McCall Golf Club are minutes away.

For more information visit www.skywestmagazine.com/mccall

CONTACT Rick McGraw/Broker Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group Cell: 208-880-8889 Email: rickmcgraw@qwest.net


Chico, California

Green at Heart by Connie Naylor

C

hico, California, a college town 177 miles northeast of San Francisco, exacts a strange

hold on people. Wide skies and open farmlands, foothills, creeks and 11-mile Bidwell city park inspires an allegiance that makes this small Sacramento Valley city a bastion of grass-roots ecology. Businesses

pursue

environmentally

sound efficiencies without prodding. Individuals seek to reduce waste voluntarily. Companies are created to help preserve the earth. The local university, Chico State, strives to promote sustainability at every level and offers a degree in environmental economics.

8 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

Waif Mullens painting Foothills Sunset depicts upper Bidwell Park

A love of Chico’s landscape is a common bond. Consider the case of entrepreneur Andy Keller. He came to town to attend Chico State where he was able to combine studies with plenty of recreation. “The outdoors is a big focus in Chico. Camping, hiking, that’s the big lure,” he said. After a stint in LA, he managed to snag a job working for a San Mateo software company that allowed him to telecommute from home. He moved back to Chico. Soon thereafter, a British company bought his employer. He had the option of moving to San Francisco or being unemployed. “I didn’t want to leave Chico. So I took the risk and said goodbye to the job. I was trying to decide what to do next when one afternoon I finished some yard work and took a load of clippings to the local landfill. It was late in the day and what I saw was just visually disgusting. Plastic bags everywhere. I made a pledge, on the spot, to stop using disposable bags. Then I started thinking, ‘I wonder if I could come up with a reusable bag that I wouldn’t forget to take with me, something that would help me kick my habit and give me a job.” Keller bought a thrift store sewing machine and went to work. Less than a year later, on Earth Day 2005, ChicoBag was born. Today the


ANDY KELLER: Thomas Del Brase

company distributes reusable shopping bags to more than 3,000 American retailers. Keller emphasized that his company practices their pro-environmental philosophy in every aspect of the business. “We have a zero waste policy.” All factory scraps are stored for use in products currently in the design phase. “At the end of a bag’s life we encourage our customers to send them back to us. If it’s in reasonable shape it’s donated to a food bank. If truly worn out we give them to a women’s shelter that shreds them and weaves them into doormats and rugs. Also, we realized that much of our waste had to do with employees eating lunch. So we give everyone a Klean Kanteen and a reusable takeout container in exchange for a pledge to support lunch establishments that are friendly towards our re-use practices.”

Andy Keller created the first ChicoBag on a thrift store sewing machine five years ago.

Klean Kanteen is another green Chico business with a long reach. The producer of stainless beverage bottles is owned by Chico natives, siblings Jeff Cresswell and Michelle Kalberer. Their Kanteen, a toxin-free, non-leaching replacement for plastic water bottles, was invented by another Chicoan, Robert Seals. Klean Kanteen and ChicoBag work together to promote their products and sustainability. “Chico is very much a small world. There’s a lot going on that gives you opportunity to run into people you know,” Keller explained. “Bidwell Park is a crown jewel, a great place to go mountain biking or hiking. You always see someone you know. The business community is also very friendly. We do a lot with Klean Kanteen. Professionally, we do some trade shows together. Regarding sustainability, we both try to encourage restaurants to support our practices.” Helping restaurants and institutions make good use of leftover cooking oil served as impetus for another Chico upstart business Springboard Biodiesel. Like Keller, Chico State grad Galen Bowen had an acute interest in a green, renewable lifestyle. After graduation, he put his mechanical engineering degree to use working for a solar equipment company. After attending a workshop on homemade biodiesel fuels, he enlisted his brother Daniel, a Chico State physics graduate, and together they created a personal-scale biodiesel processor built to industrial quality standards. Compact and multi-functional, it’s about the size of a refrigerator. In addition to converting restaurant and food service waste into fuel, the processors are also popular with farmers who plant specific crops for immediate transformation into diesel fuel to run their equipment. The units are currently sold throughout the nation and around the world. “Our primary market is still the United States, but we’ve sold in every continent except Antarctica,” Bowen said. “As far as I am aware, we have the only highquality product for consumers.” The brothers and their cousin Aaron Arnold, who was also involved in the product’s development, are still in their 20s. In 2008, they sold the company to Mark Roberts, an investment banker. “That was a great move for us,” Bowen said. “Now we can focus on design and engineering. We have a lot of R and D going on, developing equipment for larger scale production as well as uncovering ways to make fuels from lower quality oils. If you’re 9

skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express |


Discover Chico!

Coming Sp

ring 2010:

Gateway Science Museum ! gatewayscie nc

e.org

Chico, California...

Home to world-renown Janet Turner Print Museum (3,000 fine art prints spanning six centuries & more than 40 countries), University Art Gallery, Museum of Anthropology, Chico Museum and more! To request a brochure, call the Chico Chamber of Commerce at 800-852-8570 or visit www.chicochamber.com Ad funded in part by the City of Chico


Bowens: Springboard Biodiesel. LLC

recycling the garbage oil Bidwell Park, recogand making it into good nized as one of the fuel, that’s really making nation’s largest city parks, a difference. ” is revered by Chicoans The new owner East as a source of pride and Coast native Mark Robrecreation. It encompasses erts, his brother Matt, more than 11 miles of their wives and children greenspace, including all made the move to creeks, lakes, swimming Chico after the purchase. holes, and a bounty of “I love it here,” Matt Springboard Biodiesel’s Galen Bowen, left and Daniel Bowen trails. “There are lots of Roberts, who serves as Springboard’s marketing VP, towns in the North Sacramento Valley, but Chico is really said. “I moved here from New York. My brother came unique,” Bowen said. “I really didn’t want to leave. There from San Francisco. “It’s a quieter, higher quality of life. are a lot of sustainability-oriented companies here. Sierra I wouldn’t call it culture shock. It’s more like culture Nevada Brewery uses our bio-diesel processor, but it’s calm. It’s been a great move for all of us.” just one piece of their sustainable infrastructure. They Galen Bowen noted that the university’s presence pursue heat reclamation, use solar. It’s a very green gives Chico a cultural dimension uncommon in most operation. And they have good food and beer, too.” The places of its size. (The “metro” population hovers around brewing company is among Bowen’s favorite places to 80,000.) “There’s a beautiful facility on campus, Laxson take out-of-towners. In addition to the company’s Auditorium. It hosts all kinds of performers and musi- Taproom Restaurant and Big Room performance hall, cians, from John Cleese to Wynton Marsalis. And, of Bowen recommended the brewery tour for insight into course, there’s Bidwell.” Sierra Nevada’s commitment to all things green.

11

skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express |


P. James Nugent, M.D.

Richard Blanks, M.D.

Laura Duncan, N.P.

Christine Helsby, N.P.

Geralyn Sheridan a Chico-based metalsmith agreed that the brewery is a must for visitors. “They’re a very environmentally concerned company. They recently built a solar cover over their parking lot,” she said. The award-winning solar effort is just part of the company’s plan to achieve 100% sustainable energy production. Those efforts are part of the reason Sheridan said she loves living in Chico. “It’s such an amazing green town. I’ve been here almost 20 years. I was a city girl,” she said. “I came for love. My husband’s parents were here. It’s a wonderful place to raise kids. Really laid back, yet because of the college there is so much culture and art all around town.”

Russell Biggers, D.P.T.

Impressive

Placed in EVERY seat on EVERY flight to 125 cities nationwide EVERY DAY!

Your #1 advertising vehicle in 2010 The LARGEST circulated regional in-flight magazine in the country with the LOWEST advertising rates reaches America’s MOST AFFLUENT audience.

:<;8II8G@;Js=I<JEFs>LEE@JFE$:I<JK<;9LKK<sLK8?s:<EKI8CFI<>FE

Our numbers are impressive. Your advertisement placed in front of: 41,000 travelers each day | 287,000 travelers each week 1.25-million travelers each month | 2.5-million travelers each issue 15-million travelers each year

dX^Xq`e\

8JOUFSHFUBXBZT

Visit www.skywestmagazine.com for advertising rates 12 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

Sheridan became part of the local art scene seven years ago when she began making jewelry. She too brings a strong environmental awareness to her day-to-day pursuits. Sheridan uses only recycled gold and silver. “I found suppliers—American suppliers for recycled metals. That’s also very important to me. Some people also bring me their own pieces and I’ll recraft them. I love the idea of keeping the old gold and creating something new that still preserves the sentiment of the piece. I want to be able to bring that extra value to my customers. “That’s one of the great things about Chico. People seem to want to do the right thing for each other. Being socially responsible is a big part of life here,” she said. n

GERALYN SHERIDAN: Brianne Sheridan

in EVERY way


Globe Theatre

Ellen Nöel Art Museum

White-Pool House

Memorial Park

Jackalopes Hockey

Midland International Airport

Now more than ever, Odessa, Texas is the right place in Texas to live, work and play. Following the discovery of oil in the Permian Basin in 1926, Odessa became the hub for service, equipment and manufacturing. Since that time, Odessa has diversified significantly, but it is still considered one of the major oil field technology and manufacturing centers in the world. Odessa’s quality of life offers a unique blend of small and large town benefits as a vibrant, energetic city in West Texas where the sky, literally, is the only limit. While you are here, enjoy our wonderful accommodations and our unique restaurants. Odessa is a dynamic city that boasts fresh air, awe-inspiring sunsets and the friendliest people you’ll ever find. Odessa Convention & Vistor’s Bureau www.odessacvb.com 800-780-HOST

Odessa Development Corporation www.odessatex.com 877-363-3772

13

skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express |


Texas Oil Country’s

by Tony Banning

T

exas’ Permian Basin boasts three major claims to fame: the largest oil field in the contiguous United States, the nation’s most celebrated high school football team—Odessa’s Permian Panthers—and the Midland home where presidents George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush lived long before politics beckoned. It is also the site of some very unexpected travel treasures—attractions every Anglophile, theater lover or history buff will want to see. The presence of oil underscores most facets of life here—including an intriguing bit of sandhill incongruity: the presence of a downright decent representation of Shakespeare’s Globe Theater on the campus of Odessa College. The Globe of the Great Southwest, billed as the world’s most authentic replica of the Bard’s 1598 playhouse when it opened more than 40 years ago, is slightly less than bona fide. Concessions to patron comfort come in the form of cushioned seating, excellent acoustics, air conditioning and indoor plumbing. It was the life work of Odessa high school English teacher

14 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

Marjorie Morris, a woman adept at obtaining funds from the local oil barons. In an all-American display of grit and determination, she spent 20 years raising money and wrote a master’s thesis about Shakespeare during the process. The 450-seat theater she rallied her neighbors to build serves the community from February through November with a full and varied playbill. This year’s lineup includes (but is not limited to) the opera Carmen opening February 26, the spoof I Hate Hamlet playing in spring and an annual Shakespeare Festival that brings professional actors to the Globe’s stage every September. Next to the octagonal-shaped theater a library devoted to the playwright is part of The Anne Hathaway House, a replica of Shakespeare’s wife’s home. It also includes a small performance space and meeting rooms. Visitors in the mood for another brush with English icons need look no further than The University of Texas’ Permian campus, where a representation of Stonehenge looms. Constructed in just six weeks from local limestone, it


Quirky, Quixotic Attractions

Stonehenge: Billy Hathorn

The almost-authentic Stonehenge replica, located at the University of Texas Permian Basin, is as wide as the original but not as tall.

captures the essence if not the exact dimensions of the original. While the width is spot on, the height is 14% shy of the prehistoric monument’s height. Created as a tourist attraction, it’s a worthy way to spend an afternoon—especially if you have a good imagination or appreciate the fact that no transatlantic travel is required to marvel at this rendition of one of history’s mysteries. The petroleum business brought the Bushes to town more than a half-century ago. The family’s home at 1412 West Ohio Street in Midland has been restored and furnished with 1950s period pieces. It opened to the public in 2006 and tells the story of the Bush family’s early days in Texas. A self-guided driving tour, available at the Midland Chamber of Commerce, takes visitors on an expedition to homes once inhabited by either or both presidents Bush. Celebrated sports writer H.G. Blissinger elevated the Permian Panthers to legendary status with Friday Night Lights, a chronicle of that high school team’s bid for the 1988 Texas State High School Football Championship. His story later became a movie that utilized Odessa’s Ratliff Stadium. Now, a TV series of the same name presents a fictional version of the Panthers. Folks take their high school ball seriously in Texas. Some local hotels offer special autumn packages that include two tickets to a Panthers game. The stadium, one of the largest in the Lonestar State, seats 19,300 people and is home field for both the Panthers and their arch rival Odessa Bronchos.

Every visit to the Midland-Odessa area should include an encounter with history. A variety of options make this easy. The Petroleum Museum helps visitors understand how “black gold” transformed Texas. It includes a thorough explanation of the creation, discovery and processing of oil. Life-size murals, ancient artifacts, antique drilling equipment and colorful memorabilia combine with interactive exhibits for an experience that is as educational as it is entertaining. For a more cultural experience visit The Museum of the Southwest, housed in the historic and architecturally interesting Turner Mansion. The building serves as further testimony to the affect of petroleum on these parts. In 1934, the Great Depression tortured the national economy. In West Texas, things were different. Independent oil prospector Fred J. Turner, Jr. had just won a Supreme Court case establishing his rights to more than 500 acres of oil-rich land. When his first well began pumping more than 150,000 barrels a day, it became apparent his family could move beyond their twobedroom bungalow. Turner had an architect design an opulent amalgam of Colonial, Revival, Mediterranean and Tudor styling. Today, the mansion and surrounding park-like grounds serve as a multi-purpose cultural center. Its art museum features a collection emphasizing the art and archeology of the Southwest. It also hosts a broad range of traveling exhibitions. The experiential Children’s Museum makes learning fun for the whole family and a Planetarium offers a chance to experience the heavens. n skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express |

15


Vancouver B.C. An Olympic Experience— This Winter and Beyond by C.J. Birch Maile

V

ancouver, B.C.—the hip seaside community in the shadow of the North Shore Mountains—attracts the eyes of the world this winter. British Columbia’s largest city struts its stuff as approximately 2,000 athletes representing more than 80 nations converge for the Olympic Winter Games. In excess of 2-million spectators are expected to swarm the various venues. Millions of television viewers will vicariously get in on the fun. Amid the competitive thrills and international pageantry, Vancouver emerges as a worthy destination no matter the season or the reason for a visit. Noted for its densely populated modern city center and recreational opportunities that stretch from “sea to sky,” Vancouver possessed an international vibrancy long before the Olympics hit town. The city still reflects its historic ties to the Old English Empire. The Victorian era—Vancouver style—lives on in Gastown. This is the oldest part of Vancouver. The streets are still paved with cobblestone and adjoining brick buildings, adorned with Classical facades, date to the turn of the last century. Its original focal point was Vancouver’s first saloon, owned by one Gassy Gastown’a steam-powered clock Jack Deighton, and the neighborhood is still chock-a-block with pubs and clubs. The nightlife is legendary. Just west of Gastown, remnants of Vancouver’s first upscale residential neighborhood still exist. In the West End, elegant Edwardian structures and formal gardens mingle with 16 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

modern high-rises. This is a best of all worlds area. Eclectic architecture, fine restaurants, upscale shops and urban bustle are all set against a backdrop of sea and mountain. Ethnic neighborhoods contribute much to Vancouver’s sophisticated charm. The city’s Chinatown has long been renown. With Hong Kong’s 1997 transformation from British Crown Colony to Chinese Administrative Region, the city’s Chinese population swelled giving Vancouver’s diversity quotient an extra boost. The presence of tens of thousands of these residents in downtown neighborhoods and nearby Richmond provides the Chinese district with an air of authenticity and makes it a great place to eat, shop and wander. In South Vancouver, Little India, a Chinatown four-block area reminiscent of a Punjabi bazaar, centers on 49th Avenue and Main Street. This is the place to find all things Indian—spices, silk, incredible edibles and high-content-gold jewelry that puts our 18-karat alloys to shame. Equally beguiling is Little Italy on Commercial Drive in East Vancouver, the Greek district on West Broadway in the chi-chi Kitsilano neighborhood and the Persian shops along Lonsdale Avenue in the city’s northern reaches.


Snowboarder Chris Dufficy

Snow boarder and Skier: Dice K Maru/Camp of Champions

Visitors must also save time for Granville Island, one of North America’s most interesting amalgams of humanity. The former industrial site is a jumble of public market, street performers, arts and crafts fair, theaters, special events, restaurants and more conventional retail. It attracts more than 10-million people annually—even in non-Olympic years. Beyond its urban core, Vancouver boasts Olympic-size fun all through the year. Vancouver’s mild climate makes it easy to enjoy its many beaches and public parks. The mountains are within a half-hour by car. North America’s largest ski area and Olympic venue Whistler/Blackcomb is a lovely two-hour drive along the scenic Sea-to-Sky Highway. All of its 8,171 acres will be open to skiers and boarders before and

Skier Sean Pettit

after the games. More than 90% of the mountain will be open during the Olympics. For those who’d like to revisit the Winter Game experience and enjoy Vancouver in summer, Whistler presents a rare opportunity to train like a pro and play in the summer snow. Six private and public ski and snowboard camps offer intermediate to advanced skiers and boarders the opportunity to work on a tan while improving their abilities. The largest and most elaborate, Camp of Champions includes the world’s largest private terrain park and was designed by Steve Petrie, who built the Olympics’ half-pipe. Its founder, snowboarding pioneer Ken Achenbach, has been pursuing the sport for 30 years. The camp also includes mountain biking and lots of extra-curriculars, from paintball to a zipline. Just one more reason there’s always a world of fun waiting in Vancouver. n

Important Dates: Cultural Olympiad, January 22 – March 21 Winter Olympic Games, February 12 – 28 Winter Paralympic Games, March 12 – 21 Crossing the Border: U.S. citizens need to know that whether you’re attending the Olympics or planning to spend your summer in Whistler’s snow, a passport or other proof of citizenship is required when crossing between nations. Granville Island public market

17

skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express |


With more than 122 regularly scheduled departures each day, SkyWest United Express connects Chicago with an abundance of dynamic communities. Here’s insight into some special places just one outbound flight from O’Hare.

| Duluth, MN

S

kyWest’s new United Express service between Chicago and Duluth connects two fabulous lakeside cities and offers easier access to some of the nation’s most intriguing wilderness adventures. Minnesota’s pristine Arrowhead Region and Lake Superior’s North Shore present year-round opportunity for outdoor fun. In winter, hundreds of miles of groomed trails create a paradise for snowmobilers, cross-country skiers and snowshoers. Sled dog enthusiasts enjoy the area, too. Each year, the nation’s top mushers congregate in Duluth for the John Beargrease Sled Dog Marathon— one of the longest and most challenging events of its kind. Despite its “marathon” moniker, this is no 26-mile sprint. The event spans 411 miles, attracts 80 teams of up to 14 dogs and traverses some of the nation’s most daunting terrain from Duluth to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area in the Lake Superior National Forest. The race is named for John Beargrease, a Native American who helped European settlers inhabit the harsh territory by becoming the region’s first mail carrier. Severe weather, dense forest and rocky precipices made it hard to access the early settlements—especially in winter, when life-threatening storms were as commonplace as they are today and modes of transportation far more primitive. From 1879 to 1899, John Beargrease made a

160-mile weekly, round-trip trek between Two Harbors and Grand Marais, carrying up to 70 pounds of mail and supplies to remote North Shore outposts. In warmer weather he used boats, horses and canoes to conquer the route. A sled pulled by just four dogs was the only winter option. Modern mushers marvel at Beargrease’s accomplishment. The annual North Shore race is counted among the world’s most difficult dogsled competitions and is a qualifier for Alaska’s long-distance Iditarod. Spectators can get into the spirit of the event by attending the official start and a host of affiliated activities including a Cutest Puppy Contest. Visitors with a literary bent or an interest in history may want to cozy up with the recent biography John Beargrease: Legend of Minnesota’s North Shore. Written by St. Paul author Daniel Lancaster and published by Duluth’s Holy Cow! Press, it provides great insight into the Ojibwe culture and tells the intriguing story of how one illiterate Native American—John Beargrease—helped forge a bridge between his people and the newcomers who would forever change their world. n

America’sB est Events

John Beargrease Marathon | January 27 Race week begins with a series of events including Meet the Mushers and a Cutest Puppy Contest. For more information visit www.americasbestplaces.com

18 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

Beargrease : holy cow! press

Celebrating John Beargrease and an Unvanquished Land


| Asheville, NC

River Arts District a Must-See

Art Gallery: Ashville Convention and Visitors Bureau

A

sheville’s natural beauty inspires superlatives. Western North Carolina’s largest city is the gateway to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park—America’s most oft visited public preserve. Just beyond Asheville’s city limits, the country’s largest private home, the 175,000 sq. ft. Biltmore Estate sprawls amid 75 acres of formal gardens and adjoins an 8,000-acre “backyard.” Literary super-stars Thomas Wolfe, Carl Sandburg, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Charles Frazier have all found a muse in the scenic majesty of Asheville’s environs. After you’ve toured the massive Biltmore, visited the house that inspired Thomas Wolfe’s Look Homeward Angel and motored along the scenic Blue Ridge Parkway, spend some time enjoying the culture of this vibrant city. The River Arts District is an absolute must-do experience. Asheville’s historic warehouse district along the French Broad River now houses the studios of approximately 100 artists. They pursue virtually every imaginable form of visual expression in spaces that can only be described as eclectic. Sculptors work in old refrigeration units. Painters, potters and a flute maker pursue their crafts in a former cotton mill. Quilters and ceramicists, woodworkers and glass blowers are part of the mix, too. Buskers add to a festive atmosphere. Trolleys shuttle visitors throughout a district that’s also punctuated by retailers and restaurants. Barbecue fans will want to try a taste at 12 Bones Smokehouse. This is real-deal local cooking. Collard greens, jalapeno grits and mac ‘n’ cheese round out the pork-centric menu. Prices are reasonable, ambience minimal and the barbecue sensational. Add it and the entire River Arts District to Asheville’s growing list of superlatives. n 19

skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express |


SkyWest United Express connects Oregon and the world beyond with daily flights to and from Portland, Eugene, Medford, Bend, Klamath Falls and Coos Bay/North Bend. Each distinct community offers events, activities and opportunities that make for the quintessential Oregon Adventure.

| Klamath Falls, or

For the Birds and Those Who Love Them

A

visit to Klamath Falls, gateway to Crater Lake, is always a great opportunity for lots of outdoors adventures. In winter, the quaint town’s position on the Pacific Flyway makes it an especially appealing place for a getaway. There are six national bird refuges within an hour’s drive. Klamath’s feathered friends seem to know where they’re most welcome. From December through February, the Klamath Basin is home to the largest population of Bald Eagles in the lower 48 states. It’s anticipated that more than 500 of the birds will congregate in the area. They’re joined by plenty of other winged creatures—golden eagles, red-tailed and rough-legged hawks are among the raptors gathering in the area. The

number of waterfowl also increases, especially in February when Klamath Falls serves as a crossroads for wintering birds and those heading back to more northern climes. Lower Klamath and Tule Lake refuges traditionally attract the greatest eagle populations. It’s reportedly possible to see 50 birds in a single viewing. While America’s national bird may find Klamath Falls relatively balmy, winter weather is cool by human standards. Daytime temps typically hover in the 40s and it often falls below freezing at night. So bundle up, bring your best binoculars and expect a bird watching bonanza. n

America’sB est Events Winter wings festival | February 12 - 14 Bird Lovers will enjoy Klamath Falls’ annual salute to eagles and waterfowl. Each Valentine’s weekend this festival offers field trips, vendors, live bird exhibits and displays offering family fun. Photographers hone their wildlife skills at a workshop sponsored by Canon USA. For more information: www.americasbestplaces.com

Business Profile

Gamma Knife – a revolution in neurosurgery Fresno may not be well- known as a tourist destination, but world-class technology like the Gamma Knife—available at Saint Agnes Medical Center—has put Valley health care on the map. Saint Agnes, a 436-bed acute care medical center in the heart of the San Joaquin Valley, is proud to be one of only 200 institutions worldwide, including Johns Hopkins Hospital, Mayo Clinic, and UCSF Medical Center, using Gamma Knife; and is among a select handful using the newest and most precise version – the Perfexion. Considered the “gold standard” in radiosurgery, Gamma Knife is the most effective noninvasive treatment available for brain tumors and other abnormalities in the brain and upper neck previously considered inaccessible or inoperable. Contrary to its name, Gamma Knife does not use a knife at all. There are no scalpels 20 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

involved and no incisions made. Instead, 192 highly focused beams of radiation—delivered in a single high-dose—converge on the specific area where the tumor or abnormality resides. With the help of a computer and the latest imaging technology, physicians can identify the exact spot with pinpoint accuracy. This promising alternative to traditional surgery offers superior outcomes, fewer complications and quicker recovery times, giving Valley residents one more reason to be proud of the community they call home. For more information about Gamma Knife, call: 1-800-ST-AGNES | www.samc.com


21

skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express |


With more than 105 regularly scheduled departures each day, SkyWest United Express is among LAX’s busiest carriers. Many of those passengers find rest, relaxation and a world of opportunity less than an hour away—flying time that is. Here’s news you can use—just beyond LAX.

| Palm Springs

Desert Modernism

by Erin Vaughen

D

Palm Springs Holiday by Peter Moruzzi takes the reader on a vintage tour of Palm Springs including its modernism treasures. From Gibbs Smith Publishers $30.00.

After a cultural decline in the 1970s, Modernism found new fans in the 1990s. Widespread remodeling of favorite structures created a groundswell of support and contributed to a renewed appreciation for the movement. Suddenly grassroots organizations, such as the Palm Springs Modern Committee, sprang to the rescue of antiquated neighborhoods, cultivating a sensibility that homeowners are stewards of their cultural gems. Indeed, wealthy patrons now comb retro neighborhoods, like Las Palmas, for the chance to buy and restore. Cultural enthusiasts seek coveted “vintage modern” furnishings, and a new generation of boutique hotels flourishes. A date with Modernism is now part of every quintessential Palm Springs experience. n

America’sB est Events houses continue to pepper the city. Many date to the 1950s and 60s, (now known as the beloved Retro Era), a time when legends such as Bob Hope, Frank Sinatra and his Rat Pack and even Elvis Presley sought glamorous refuge from the Hollywood limelight in the playful desert city.

22 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

Fifth Annual Modernism Week | February 12 - 21 Gaining the momentum that only a cultural phenomenon can muster, this year’s Modernism Week features new events and activities including a special tribute to renowned Modernist architect Albert Frey, tours of movie star homes in and around Palm Springs, a Mod fashion show featuring vintage fashions, an architecture film festival, a symposium, lectures and more. Visit www.americasbestplaces.com.

Art Yard: Palm Springs Bureau of Tourism

espite a faltering economy, visitors flock to sunny Palm Springs for lots of reasons—golf, tennis, casino gaming and retail therapy. In increasing numbers they also come to support and appreciate the community’s iconic retro architecture. The 1920s introduced Modernism to the Coachella Valley, and the ’30s and ’40s saw the international trend develop a unique desert personality. Structures merged Modernism’s industrial textures and spatial design with colors conscious of the desert light and landscape. During the post-World War II era, with all its optimism, the Desert Modernism trend exploded and Palm Springs expanded in a “Modernly” dressed suburban sprawl. Geometrically eclectic properties ranging from public spaces to spec-


| Monterey County

Steinbeck Center Displays More Than Author’s Work

M

onterey County was good to John Steinbeck. The author found much inspiration in the broad landscape of his native Salinas and drew quirky characters from the inhabitants of the rough and tumble fishing village that was the Monterey of his youth. Steinbeck’s been good for the county, as well. Decades after his death, tourists crowd his old haunts. They’ve been gentrified of course. Restaurants, wineries and one of the nation’s most impressive aquariums are top draws along the Cannery Row Steinbeck made famous. Salinas preserves his childhood home amid a historic Old Town district and celebrates the author and his favorite settings in the worldclass, $15-million National Steinbeck Center.

February 12 - 21, 2010

ParadeHomes.com

435-674-1400

Browsers: National Steinbeck Center

Browsing at the Steinbeck Center

You don’t have to be a Steinbeck fan to enjoy the facility. Its interactive qualities and presentation of the agricultural process and related topics make it of broad interest. The author’s annual birthday celebration, February 27, a Saturday this year, poses extra reason to visit with reduced pricing and a host of special activities. Children’s book author Kathryn Otoshi and Daniel Jeanette, art director of the recently released Where the Wild Things Are, are featured presenters. Performers include The SpectorDance Company, a nationally acclaimed troupe headquartered west of Salinas in Marina, California. They’ll present original works based on Steinbeck’s novels that blend music, the spoken word, visual media and dance. n

23

skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express |


Beyond LAX

| Paso Robles

A Place of Wine, Waters and Wonderful Scenery

I

n the San Luis Obispo County town of Paso Robles rejuvenating water, spectacular wine and wonderful scenery make for a laidback getaway. Nestled in the foothills of the Santa Lucia Mountains, the historic community became known for its healing hot springs during California’s mission period. The first hot springs hotel opened in 1868 and modern-day facilities continue to count natural spas among their assets. The area’s vineyards have an equally impressive heritage. Grapes were first planted here more than two centuries ago. Today, more than 200 wineries add to the local entertainment options while vineyards enhance the already lovely landscape. Artists congregate here, eager to capture the area’s beauty. Laurel Sherrie, a member of San Luis Obispo Outdoor Painters for the Environment

24 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

Laurel Sherrie’s Villicana End of Summer, 9” x 12” oil. Her art—including this piece—is currently displayed at the Villicana Winery.

(SLOPE), said that painting the vineyards and hills of the county she calls home allows her to spend time in her favorite studio. “Outdoor work fosters an intense involvement with the landscape,” she explained. “I am hoping that my work will inspire people to save what we have.” Sherrie’s work is currently on display at the Villicana Winery, a small family-owned operation that produces small batches made from estate fruit. Get there via SkyWest service to San Luis Obispo airport, a lovely half-hour drive away.

n


Art Watch

Cover Artist | Dolores Mitchell

D

Delores Mitchell: Maria Phillips

olores Mitchell, the artist responsible for this edition’s cover, was working on her PhD in London when offered a position teaching art at Chico State University. The Chicago native and self-described city person had lived in New York, studied in Los Angeles and wondered if she could adapt to Artist Dolores Mitchell small-town life. The answer was soon a resounding “yes.” Chico has been her home for more than 30 years. “I’ve come to love everything about Chico, the landscape, the weather, the culture,” she explained. “We’re in the Sacramento River delta. The soil is so rich. It supports so much life. I love the orchards and the rice fields.” Almond orchards burst into bloom each February. Their blossoming is the subject of the cover painting Radiant Fields. “I was driving,” she explained, “and was so struck by the green of the fields I had to pull to the side of the road and do a quick sketch. It was such a vibrant scene as if all those plants so wanted to live. I love the idea of nature being such a vital force with an urge to unfurl. That’s the idea I’m trying to get across with this painting.

Rice Silos, oil on canvas

“Chico is just magical,” she said, “friendly, progressive, rich in landscape and culture. I’m a part of Avenue 9 Gallery. We have ‘paint-outs’ all the time. The work is sold to help preserve the environment. Nature always gives us unexpected gifts. We try to give back.” Mitchell also commended Chico’s performing arts community and noted that Chico is a great travel bargain. “The art here is far less expensive than it would be in larger markets. I’d like to encourage people to come visit, buy some artwork and enjoy one of our many performing arts groups.” The Avenue 9 Gallery exhibits Dolores Mitchell: Rice Fields and Orchards February 12 – March 20. For more information about the artist and her work visit www.avenue9gallery.com. n

Feature Artist | Waif Mullens

A

sk Tennessee native Waif Mullins the best thing about being an artist in Chico and the response comes quickly. Bidwell Park and the weather. photo coming The artist responsible for Foothills Sunset the oil painting illustrating the story on page eight explained that he has been drawing inspiration from the college town’s Artist Waif Mullens diverse landscape for most of his adult life. “I spent two years in the Bay Area with the fog every morning and the wind and fog every evening. Most outdoor painting is done in the early morning or late evening when the sun is traveling through lots of atmosphere and picks up a lot of color. Light is of course very important to what I do. It gives you a sense of the season. Coming back to Chico made me really appreciate the benefits of the moderate climate and the opportunity to paint outdoors.” Mullins first arrived in Chico as an art student in 1967. He holds both bachelor and master’s degrees from Chico State and has gained a national reputation for his work—especially his ability to paint water. Bidwell Park affords him ample opportunity to ply his craft. Foothills Sunset is derived from a scene in the upper portion of Bidwell Park. “The upper portion is quite primitive and undeveloped,”

Sycamore Pool, pastel, also depicts Bidwell Park in Chico, California.

Mullins said. “This is a view from the early part of a washboard road as you head north. The sun was setting and there were interesting cloud formations. The upper park has been described as a mini-Grand Canyon. That’s pretty accurate. There’s a lot of subject matter. You can paint canyon walls as seen from the road, or climb down where there’s water and huge volcanic boulders. Very dramatic stuff.” The lower park, he noted, is tamer with paved pathways suitable for joggers and cyclists. Creeks attract swimmers. Mullins also paints the people of Chico enjoying the park’s natural attributes. “Bidwell Park is a real treasure,” he said. For more information visit www.waifmullins.com. n 25

skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express |


Education Report

Outdoor Recreation:

a Priceless Campus Asset

C

hallenging times require positive action. Confronted with a still-wobbly economy, Americans are heading to college classrooms in record numbers. Student bodies take on a more diverse appearance as individuals from every walk of life look to higher education as a means of sharpening old skills and gaining new ones. Last year a record 11.5-million Americans ages 18 to 24—40% of that demographic—were enrolled in college. Add to their numbers older students who are adding or completing degrees and it’s no wonder that “educator” ranks high on the list of “recession-proof” careers. Colleges and universities are not immune to the country’s communal budget crunch. However, in the midst of having to do more with less, some lucky institutions benefit from a student amenity that remains priceless— ready access to spectacular outdoor recreation. In many of these fortunate places students have always plied blue ribbon trout streams to unwind, or climbed the nearest mountain to test their personal mettle. Now, campuses are shining a spotlight on these intangible benefits with highly organized programs.

26 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

by Anna Hobart

Boise State University is one such school. Once primarily a commuter school that still caters to a high percentage of non-traditional students, this urban campus is surrounded by Rocky Mountain foothills, only 20 miles from the Bogus Basin Ski Area. The school found broad exposure thanks to a Cinderella football team and quirky blue-turfed stadium. Its Recreation Center offers a Student Outdoor program that includes mountaineering, rock climbing, camping, caving, backpacking, mountain biking, rafting, kayaking and canoeing. Montana State University in Bozeman has an equally impressive outdoor adventure program. The school is also home base for noted paleontologist Jack Horner, considered to be the inspiration for Jurassic Park, and students get to take part in dino-digs. MSU is one of many schools that make the most of their strategic locations with majors that emphasize protection, preservation and cultural awareness of the environment. Even the civil engineering department offers a program in bioresourcing. Students inclined to expand their minds and their outdoor options have lots of school choices. A few are included on the following pages.


Boise State University Boise, Idaho

I

daho’s fastest growing research university is the “New U Rising,” with a reputation for excellence in both the classroom and the laboratory. In fact, Boise State University has been ranked among the nation’s “top up-andcoming schools” in U.S. News & World Report’s 2009 “America’s Best Colleges” issue. New buildings, record enrollment, expanded academic offerings and cutting-edge research are all signs of Boise State’s growing emergence as one of the top public institutions in the Northwest. Boise State is the largest university in Idaho with nearly 19,000 students. About 170 academic programs are offered in the colleges of Arts and Sciences, Business and Economics, Education, Engineering, Graduate Studies, Health Sciences, and Social Sciences and Public Affairs. The campus is home to 11

800-824-7017

|

Idaho Professor of the Year honorees since 1990 and the 2005 national champion student debate and speech team. Campus life provides adventure and activity with more than 200 student organizations. Students live in new residence halls along the Boise River and exercise in the $12-million Student Recreation Center. Downtown is within walking distance of campus, and outdoor activities are endless with skiing, climbing, hiking and mountain biking.

208-426-1000

|

www.boisestate.edu

Fort Lewis College Durango, Colorado

F

ort Lewis College, a selective admission public liberal arts college in Durango, Colorado, emphasizes broad intellectual exploration, followed by specialized study in the arts, humanities, social sciences, sciences, business, and teacher education. Many of Fort Lewis’ academic programs have been shaped by its mountain location, regional economy, and cultural heritage. These include Adventure Education, Mountain Studies, Archaeology, Native American and Indigenous Studies, Tourism & Hospitality Management, Agricultural Business and Environmental Studies.

Fort Lewis ensures the rich mix of perspectives, values and experiences vital to a liberal arts education by actively seeking an intellectually, geographically and culturally diverse student body representing many walks of life.

The transformation from “studying about” to “becoming”—becoming an historian, becoming a scientist—is the hallmark of the Fort Lewis academic experience. Key to this transformation is the opportunity for students to work closely with faculty—experts in their fields, caring and attentive mentors, and crazy amazing teachers.

Getting outside is a way of life at Fort Lewis, located at the foot of the San Juan Mountains and the headwaters for the Colorado Plateau. The Outdoor Pursuits program, which outfits and guides student adventures to nearby mountains, deserts, rivers and canyons, makes it easy and affordable.

877-FLC-COLO

www.fortlewis.edu skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express |

27


Montana State University B o z e m a n , M o n ta n a

M

ontana State University in Bozeman represents the intersection of intellectual pursuits and outdoor endeavors. Expertise in paleontology, filmmaking, alternative energy, snow science, and sustainable food and bioenergy systems has earned MSU a reputation for extraordinary educational opportunities.

MSU has an enrollment of 12,764, a studentfaculty ratio of 16:1 and more than 120 degree programs in agriculture; arts and architecture; business; engineering; education, health and human development; letters and sciences; nursing; and liberal studies.

The research and inquiry-based curriculum inspires exploration and creativity. MSU is designated as one of 96 research universities with “very high research activity” by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. This highest tier classification—out of 4,400 institutions—recognizes the significant opportunities for research, scholarship and creative work. MSU is the only institution in the fivestate region of Montana, Wyoming, Idaho and North and South Dakota to earn this recognition.

888-678-2287

The academic advantages at MSU are equaled only by the area’s recreational opportunities. With three ski resorts within 45 miles, blue ribbon fly-fishing and the culture of a college town, Bozeman is frequently recognized for offering a high quality of life by publications like Outside and National Geographic Adventure magazines.”

|

www.montana.edu

Southern Utah University C e d a r C i t y, U t a h

S

outhern Utah University is uniquely situated amidst several national parks and monuments in southwestern Utah’s Cedar City. The breathtaking scenery of Zion, Bryce and Arches national parks attracts high achieving students and gifted faculty from across the country for a personalized learning environment that rivals the value of many expensive private schools but with a public school price tag. For 112 years this public university has been focused on the student experience.

graduate degree in outdoor recreation in parks and tourism to a graduate degree in accountancy. Beyond the classroom, more than 125 studentrun clubs and organizations help build a rich student life component for SUU’s residential campus. NCAA Division I athletics, a broad menu of performing arts, multiple service learning opportunities, unrivaled outdoor adventures and a safe campus community all add to the total experience of a well-rounded higher education at Southern Utah University.

T

oday, SUU continues to make students a priority by keeping its highest-credentialed faculty available through small classes that address the individual interests of SUU’s 8,000 students. As to academics, with more than 130 areas of study available on its gorgeous campus, the university offers everything from an under-

435-586-7741 28 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

|

www.suu.edu


Washington State University P u l l m a n , Was h i n gto n

T

he phrase “Go Cougs!” embodies the spirit of Washington State University. You may know it as our signature stadium cheer, but it’s also an expression of our commitment to our students—and to the many ways that our world-class academics and research can transform their lives and the lives of people around the world. WSU students learn in a challenging, hands-on environment and can participate in vital research from the very start. Community service and a broad global perspective are two key threads that are woven throughout the student experience. Outside the classroom, campus facilities such as the new LEED-certified “green” residence hall, the award-winning Student Recreation Center, and the spacious student union provide almost every amenity a student might need;

888-GO-TO-WSU

|

complementary services and activities abound in the surrounding communities. Pullman, located just 75 miles south of Spokane (Washington’s second largest city) and designated as a “dreamtown” by Demographics Daily, is WSU’s hometown. True to its small-town atmosphere, students often see their classmates and professors at the movies, in the grocery store, or on the bus. Yet it’s also a place of big opportunities. Visit us and you’ll see why.

888-468-6978

|

visit.wsu.edu

Western State College of Colorado G u n n i s o n , Co lo r a d o

A

t Western State College of Colorado, our students aren’t just faces in a classroom. We are a public, liberal arts college with a private-school feel. Ranked in the top 50 public colleges by Forbes magazine, our classes are taught by full-time faculty—not teaching assistants—and our average class size is 22 students. Our professors know their students by name and also serve as mentors to ensure success both in and out of the classroom. Our location in the heart of the Rockies in Gunnison provides one of the best environments in the country for hands-on learning and selfdiscovery. We offer areas of study in the fine arts, natural sciences, business, outdoor leadership and resort management, environmental studies, exercise science and energy-related fields, as well as pre-professional studies. With more than 50 academic, special interest and sports clubs,

800-876-5309

and NCAA Division II athletics programs, there are numerous ways for students to pursue their passions and be involved on campus and in local communities. We invite you to visit campus and see for yourself everything that Western has to offer. Call our Admissions Office or visit us online to schedule a tour.

|

www.western.edu skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express |

29


Colorado Winter! by Lou Jurassic

300+ INCHES OF SNOW PER YEAR. OVER 1,000 ACRES OF SKIING TERRAIN. You might have to stay a bit longer.

S

ome experts suggest that the altitude takes your breath away in Colorado. I say it’s the scenery. From Denver’s Front Range to the dizzying peaks of more than 20 ski resorts, Colorado’s mountains set the perfect backdrop for any winter excursion. Snowy summits stretch to a heaven of intense blue seldom seen elsewhere. These are the “beautiful for spacious skies” Katherine Lee Bates contemplated when she wrote that old patriotic song, America the Beautiful from a Colorado Springs hotel. This modern visitor wishes he had her way with words. Suffice to say that in Colorado the sun shines more than 300 days out of every year. When storm clouds gather, they deliver a bounty of snow but seldom linger. That means stellar powder for downhill fun. There are plenty of other things to do under those spectacular skies, too—every imaginable form of winter sport— skating, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, even dogsledding and riding in a horse-drawn sleigh! Indoor adventures range from highbrow culture to haute couture. Accessing all the wonders of a Colorado winter is easy with SkyWest service from Denver to every corner of the state.  n

30 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

PHOTO: TOM STILLO

visit GunnisonCrestedButte.com or call 800.323.2453


colorful, unique place Coloradoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true colors shine in Crested Butte, and inspire you with a sense of place that climbs right into your soul.

authentic towns With the vibrant Mt. Crested Butte at the base area, and the historic Town of Crested Butte three miles below, a just-right mixture of new and old make for an unforgettable vacation.

lift tickets for kids

KIDS SKI FREE Enjoy free lift tickets for kids 12 and under when staying at any CBMR Property. 2/22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3/11/2010. Restrictions apply.

(800)600-2857

skicb.com

#2%34%$ "544% #/,/2!$/

@ejg`i\pfligXjj`fe%

TM


Budget-Friendly

S

Vacations

tart the New Year off on a high note and pick your vacation pleasure. From riding tall in the saddle to enjoying a mountaintop experience, a winter break has never been more affordable. Whether you want to make a lasting family memory, get away for relaxation or romance or have a little alone time, economical adventure abounds in some of  America’s best places. Here are some top picks for budget-friendly fun.

The Porches of Steamboat Springs, CO

Discover a place like no other! Begin building your family traditions and memories now in our 3,000-5,000 sq. ft. homes where all generations can gather under one roof. Experience our unparalleled five-star service with a genuine smile and relax in “The Barn,” one of the most elegant, fully appointed clubhouses you have ever enjoyed. Whole and fractional homes available for immediate occupancy. Amazing Vacation Rentals. 866-992-0600 | www.theporches.com

Telluride, CO

Let us be your home on the mountain this season. Our beautifully appointed residences  allow you to experience Telluride’s adventure, relaxation and breathtaking scenery. For reservations, please call 888-728-0355 or visit us on our website at www.fairmont.com/klammerlodge.

Sundance Resort, UT

Founded by Robert Redford in 1969, Sundance is a destination resort, committed to the balance of art, nature and community. Nestled at the base of Utah’s 12,000-foot Mt. Timpanogos, Sundance offers yearround mountain recreation. Enjoy winter recreation that features alpine skiing, snowboarding, cross-country, snowshoeing and night skiing. Then relax in your mountain cottage or enjoy Sundance’s award-winning restaurants. For more information on Sundance, call 877-276-8858 or visit our website, www.sundanceresort.com. 32 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express


Alisal, Guest Ranch, CA

Giddy up for a rugged and refined getaway! Alisal Guest Ranch and Resort is offering an all-inclusive getaway for SkyWest readers. The SkyWest package includes studio accommodation, unlimited golf, horseback riding, tennis, fishing, fitness center access, daily breakfast and dinner at the 10,000-acre working cattle ranch. The package starts at $450 per night for two now through March 31, 2010. Blackout dates, including weekends and holidays, may apply. To make a reservation call 1-800-4-Alisal

Adventure Travel

Going on a ski vacation this winter? Leave your skis at home! Seriously! One small word can maximize your mountaintop experience. “Rent.” Leave cumbersome skis and snowboards at home, and take to the slopes with the latest innovations instead. Renting equipment lessens your baggage hassle, lightens your load and reduces travel stress. It also means more fun once you arrive at the destination. No concerns about cramming all that stuff into a rental car and schlepping it to your lodging. Best of all, renting means a chance to experience new equipment. It’s a liberating adventure, giving your winter getaway an extra measure of peace and pleasure—priceless intangibles available at affordable rates. So, trust SkyWest Magazine’s travel experts and consider contacting the fine ski shops listed at right. They all offer for rent a selection of new, top-of-the-line, freshly tuned skis and snowboards. The sighs of relief are free. n

SKI RENTALS Door 2 Door Ski Rentals (from Christy Sports) Full Service Ski & Snowboard Rental Delivery CO - Steamboat*, Summit County*, Telluride*, Vail, Beaver Creek*, Aspen/Snowmass* ID - Sun Valley WY - Jackson Hole UT - Park City*, Salt Lake City* *Christy Sports locations available for all your retail needs. Mention SkyWest and receive a 10% discount off your family’s ski and snowboard rentals! 866-D2D-SKIS www.d2dskis.com n www.christysports.com

skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express |

33


America’sB est Events vendors and top-quality museums including the University of Arizona’s Mineral Museum, one of the nation’s largest collections, and the Asarco Mineral Discovery Center at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.

|January FRESNO, CA | ONGOING – JANUARY 17 Marc Chagall: The Early Etchings includes 65 early works by the Russian-born master. They depict two popular French literary works and demonstrate the artist’s whimsical side. The exhibit is presented in a low-light, protective gallery setting at the Fresno Metropolitan Museum.

LOUISVILLE, KY | ONGOING – FEBRUARY 15 Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition docks at the Louisville Science Center to draw visitors back to 1912. Participants embark on a chronological exploration of the storied ship— from its construction to the ill-fated maiden voyage and ongoing recovery efforts.

MADISON, WI | JANUARY 2 – FEBRUARY 27 A Year in the Driftless presents the work of watercolor artist Brian McCormick who draws inspiration from the woods, farm fields and prairie surrounding his stone farmhouse retreat in southwestern Wisconsin—one of the continent’s few unglaciated regions. It is displayed at the University of Wisconsin Arboretum Visitor Center.

ASPEN, CO | Feb. 12 – April 4, Mark Bradford / Aspen Art Museum A special curatorial selection of Bradford’s “Merchant Posters” — collage and décollage works on paper created from signs and advertising posters removed the artist’s L.A. neighborhood—not previously considered in isolation. 970-925-8050 or www.aspenartmuseum.org Mark Bradford, Untitled, 2009. Image courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co, New York.

WAUSAU, WI | JANUARY 30 – April 11 Las Artes de Mexico brings more than 100 examples of pottery, painting, folk art and prints to the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum. The works reflect the cultural mosaic that merges Spanish influence with traditional Mexican belief and ritual. Social commentary related to the development of modern Mexico is also represented.

|February SAN DIEGO, CA | February 6 – 7 Whale Watch Weekend and Inter-tidal Life Festival held at the picturesque Cabrillo National Monument on Point Loma Peninsula features presentations, exhibits and films. Rangers help visitors spot whales and explore the park’s amazing tidepools. The newly renovated glass-enclosed observatory is also great for whale watching.

TUBAC, AZ | February 10 – 14 Festival of the Arts showcases the works of hundreds of visiting artists, crafts-people and musicians in this historic community. Founded in 1752 as the first Spanish garrison in what is now Arizona, Tubac’s status as an artists’ colony with a Mexican flair adds to the fun.

CHARLESTON, SC | February 12 – 14 The Southeastern Wildlife Exposition, billed as the largest event of its kind in the nation, brings together more than 500 artists and exhibitors dedicated to promoting wildlife conservation, education and research. In addition to fine artists, experts in a variety of conservation disciplines will be present.

TRAVERSE CITY, MI | February 12 – 15 BILLINGS, MT | JANUARY 15 – 17 The Great Rockies Sport Show brings outdoor enthusiasts and exhibitors from around the globe to the MetraPark. A full gamut of “big-boy” toys is on display including boats, RVs, firearms and fishing equipment. Activities include seminars and demonstrations for hunters, fly-fishers, horsemen and camp cooks.

TUCSON, AZ | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 14 The Tucson Gem Mineral and Fossil Showcase is a citywide event including more than 40 different shows by international

The Cherry Capital Winter Wonderfest, now in its fourth season is a family-friendly celebration of the chilly season and a Special Olympics Michigan fund-raiser. Events are held at the local ski area, resorts and spas and throughout downtown. Kids enjoy special winter games as well as rides on snowmobiles and horse-drawn sleighs.

SANTA FE, NM | FEBRUARY 26 – 28 ARTfeast Santa Fe has become a premier winter celebration in the Southwest’s favorite art town. The event brings together the finest in local art, food, wine, fashions and home décor to benefit artistic programs for area youth.

Do you know America’s Best Places? Test your Travel Smarts at

www.americasbestplaces.com/magazine. 34 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express


Business Class Live, Work and Play in Paradise!

New Location

WWW.DICICCOSCOLORADO.NET

Arvada

0MEF5PXO Arvada 0MEF8BETXPSUI Arvada, CO 

- 3 bdrms/2.5 bath - double 20 ft. fireplace - vaulted cathedral ceilings - custom appliance upgrades - granite throughout - walk-in shower / Jacuzzi tub - double decks / landscaped - minutes from golf course and ski resort - 35 minutes from Jackson Hole, Wy.

The Largest Italian Restaurant in Colorado! Dinner Shows Coming Soon!

OVER 20 DIFFERENT PASTA SAUCES SERVING CHICKEN, STEAK, VEAL & FISH DAILY SPECIALS

Now Open!

Livement! r te n E tain

6701 Tower Rd., Denver, CO Near DIA t

$450,000.00 Call Today: 208-354-5400

Jackson Hole, WY

SkyWest Travel SUN VALLEY, IDAHO

B oi s e , I D a h o

ZION NATIONAL PARK

VACATION HOME available as nightly/weekly rental. 3 BR, 2 BA, sleeps 6-9. Ideal location on a quiet street in Ketchum. Walking distance to everything. 4 blocks from center of town and a one minute drive to River Run Ski Lodge and the new Gondola! Hot tub, pool table, ping pong, drum set and more. $250/nt or $1,500/wk. Holiday rentals available at $400/nt or $2,500/wk. 208-861-5232 or visit www.skywestmagazine/ketchumhome.com.

cottonwood grille has been rated four stars for the finest in contemporary American cuisine, and features a Wine Spectator award-winning wine list. Located on the Boise River with a relaxing outdoor patio and an inviting ski-lodge feel.

Best western zion park inn will provide the comfort and amenities while you enjoy the majestic beauty of Zion National Park. Restaurant, gift shop, convenience and liquor store, hot tub HSIA, Brian Head skiing one hour away. Ask for â&#x20AC;&#x153;SkyWest Package.â&#x20AC;?

208-333-9800

cottonwoodgrille.com

800-934-7275

www.zionparkinn.com

S O U T HE R N U T A H

H o m eaway . co m To advertise in this section, call Teena Wright 208-333-9990 Plan your next getaway with HomeAway.com, the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading vacation rental website - with over 185,000 vacation rentals to choose from!   Own a vacation home?  Download our free guide to renting your home at homeaway.com/freeguide.

Golfing, Hiking, RVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ing, National Parks and Much More! Kane County, UT averages over 320 days of sunshine each year. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 320 days of sunshine and outdoor adventure waiting for you! www.thegrandcanyons.com skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express |

35


crossword

Gear To Go ACROSS 1 Created 4 Military delivery method 10 Highly excited 14 “Home of the brave” 15 Refrain from noticing 16 NBA’s Ginobili 17 Pass over 19 Finished 20 Symbol 22 Skye, Capri and Mann 24 Attach by stitches 25 Small egg 26 Shout 29 Standards of perfection 32 Zeta Puppis star 34 Otherwise 36 Uncooked 38 Prod 40 Monk’s hood 41 Raw for Pierre 43 Spoken 45 Head rest 46 Mortgage 47 Ponder 49 Baking chamber 50 Rectangular pier 51 Futile 53 Taunt 54 Not (poetic) 55 Sewing case 57 Nadirs 59 Bottom-dwelling fish 61 Scent 62 Brisket or jerky meat 64 Summit 68 Jump 71 Equipped 72 Permit 74 Draw off liquid gradually 76 Boredom 78 Roman gathering place 80 Killer whale 81 Snuggler 82 Fast day after Ramadan 83 Slang for the men of MASH 84 Shrek 85 Sustenance 86 Informer

Savvy air travelers know certain items are vital. Answer the clues in bold face to discover some onboard essentials. Solution on page 44 1

2

3

4

14

5

6

7

8

9

15

17

18

22

23

31 36

24

32

43

20

28 33

38 44

34 39

35 40

41

51

60 64

65

53

57

58

61

62

66

67

71

59 63

68

72

73

78

81

49

52

56

77

69 74

79

70 75

80

82

83

85

DOWN 1 Tunes 2 Inquires 3 Every 24-hours 4 Stone, Iron or Bronze 5 Bed ’n’ Breakfast places 6 Cowboy contest 7 Sketched 8 Color for hearts and roses 9 Sneak peek 10 Stroll 1 1 Gladiator helmet 12 Lone 13 Spearmint or Juicy Fruit 18 Hammer head 21 Mire 23 Smack 27 Goofy 28 Isopropyl or Ethyl 30 Shocked 31 Mythological Hindu ocean god 33 Snow runner 35 Female pig 36 Last Russian dynasty 37 Squander

86

39 High spirits 41 Municipal 42 S. African antelope 44 Meadow 46 Lincoln’s cabin material 48 Gem 51 Turkish lute 52 Weep 56 Preeclampsia 58 Bird or grass 60 Band of color 63 Gambling game 65 Pulse, Doppler or FM 66 Large flightless bird 67 Strange and mysterious 69 Verily (archaic) 70 Fruit or nuts 72 Rich soil 73 Rotate 75 Image 76 Duo 77 Unit of energy 78 Keeper of “Most Wanted” list 79 Welcome or bath

Do you know America’s Best Places? Test your Travel Smarts at

www.americasbestplaces.com/magazine. 36 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

42

46 48

50

84

30

45

55

13

21

29

47

54

12

25

27

37

11

16 19

26

76

10


It’s Our Journey, Too

Pilots Cycle Coast-to-Coast for a Cause by Tamara Lee, SkyWest Airlines, Corporate Communications Coordinator

T

hree friends cycle coast-to-coast, logging 75 miles a day, six days a week with one goal in mind—to raise money for breast cancer research. It’s a journey that began six months ago for SkyWest pilots Elvis Khachatryan, Justin Morrissette and Matthew Warrick. “We have a personal connection to this cause. One of us has a mother dealing with it now, [and we have] a girlfriend, and relatives who have dealt with it,” said Justin Morrissette. The avid cyclists put a big plan in motion. Partnering with the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, they set up a website to raise $10,000 in donations in just sixty days. In October, the trio began their trek in Los Angeles. Their final destination, St. Augustine, Florida meant a journey of 3,200 miles by the end of November. “Three guys living, eating, and breathing together 24 hours a day, seven days a week for two months straight. Working together to accomplish this fairly big goal is not an easy task,” Morrissette said. “There’s a huge difference between when you wake up in your own bed, walk down the hall to your own shower, and have food that you want versus setting up a wet tent in the dark and then realizing you have to jump back on your bike to ride four miles into town for food.” Along the way, their journey allowed them to utilize skills learned on the job as SkyWest pilots. “We’ve flown over this country a million times. It’s certainly a very different perspective to ride

38 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

through it at 16 mph versus flying over it at 500 mph,” Morrissette added. Their ability to plan ahead and cope with the demands of overnight travel proved invaluable. “We are probably more accustomed to living out of a suitcase than the average person. The planning and map reading is a lot like what we do at work,” he continued. As they rode across the country, inching closer to their $10,000 goal, they garnered support from family, and friends, and also from people they’d never met but who embraced their important cause. Morrissette said, “Total strangers took us in and let us sleep in their houses or let us post our tent in the front yard. They’d feed us breakfast or get us a hotel room in the town we were going to. The donation of time and resources was so amazing!” While their mission may have lasted only two months, their efforts are part of SkyWest’s continuous commitment to serve the communities all along the route map shown on page 44. These are places employees call home. More than 10,000 SkyWest team members work hard to ensure that each customer is treated to neighborly service and experiences a safe and enjoyable flight. Many, like Khachatryan, Morrissette and Warrick, also volunteer, donate to and support worthy causes throughout SkyWest country. n


San Diego’s New Gateway To The World McClellan-Palomar Airport “The Landings” Restaurant Is Now Open 760-929-0200.

Carlsbad to LAX 7 Times Daily With Convenient Worldwide Connections User fee Customs Service available for international flights 9am to 5pm. Call (877) 848-7766 Parking Fee $3 per day

San Diego County

AIRPORTS

Hertz Rent- A-Car (800) 654-3131 Avis Rent- A-Car (760) 931-1393 Skywest (United Airlines Reservation) (800) 241-6522 http://www.sdcounty.ca.gov/dpw/airports/airskeds.html 2192 Palomar Airport Road • Carlsbad, CA 92011 (760) 431-4646 (phn) • (760) 931-5713 (fax)


Vancouver page 16

Portland

Klamath Falls page 20

Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s are off

Chico

page 8

San Francisco

Monterey

Las Vegas

page 23

San Luis Obispo

page 24 Los Angeles

Palm Springs page 22

www.skywest.com


Duluth page 18

best places the beaten path

Chicago

Denver

Asheville page 19

Midland-Odessa page 14

www.united.com


behind the scenes

Aircraft Safety Comes First at SkyWest Airlines

“Safety First” is more than a mission statement at SkyWest Airlines; it’s a way of life. SkyWest’s impeccable safety record spans more than 35 years, beginning with the highest caliber of trained professionals and extending to a proven fleet of aircraft. The People: Each day, thousands of SkyWest employees are responsible for the safety of hundreds of thousands of passengers. SkyWest’s experienced mechanics, pilots, flight attendants and ground personnel have the know-how and ability to keep their passengers safe. In the Flight Deck: You also have the comfort of knowing you’re flying with some of the most experienced and thoroughly trained pilots the airline industry has to offer. It takes years of training and experience to become a commercial airline pilot, and many come to SkyWest well prepared averaging 1,500 to 2,000 hours of flight time. However, their training has just begun. Before they ever fly a passenger flight, SkyWest spends approximately $30,000 on their training which is geared towards safety. This is a two-month process beginning with three weeks of ground school followed by 50 hours of flight simulator training. The final stage of their training is called the Initial Operating Experience, during which they actually fly one of SkyWest’s aircraft accompanied by a qualified check airman instructor for another 50 hours. All pilots continue their training with mandatory recurrent simulator training for captains every six months and for first officers, every year. Additionally, each year both captains and first officers must participate in a two-day training session similar to ground school. All pilots are also required to undergo a comprehensive medical examination testing their vision and overall physical and mental well-being to determine if they are fit to fly for SkyWest. Captains do this every six months; first officers annually. In the Cabin: At SkyWest, a flight attendant’s first responsibility is your safety. Like pilots, SkyWest’s in-flight team undergoes comprehensive training before they take to the skies. Each SkyWest flight attendant must complete an intense three-week training program emphasizing onboard safety and security. They are well-versed in emergency procedures, 42 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

evacuation protocol and passenger service. While at SkyWest, flight attendants continue their training throughout the year and are required to recertify in First Aid and CPR annually. On the Ramp: SkyWest stresses safety not only in the air, but also on the ground. SkyWest trains its customer service personnel for two weeks, both in the classroom and on the job in ground safety issues. These agents become specialists in aircraft weight and balance. They know the best way to load and unload hundreds of pounds of cargo and luggage without damaging the luggage, cargo, the aircraft or injuring themselves. They are also trained to operate the various ground equipment and park the aircraft once it arrives at the gate. This navigation can often be challenging in airports with busy ramps. In colder climates, they must learn how to properly de-ice an aircraft allowing for a safe take-off and flight. Under the Wing: For every hour one of SkyWest’s aircraft spends in flight, one of their mechanics spends two hours servicing that aircraft. SkyWest maintains a strict maintenance schedule and undoubtedly, an experienced SkyWest mechanic has recently inspected or serviced the aircraft carrying you. All mechanics come to SkyWest with extensive training, including three years of A&P (Airframe and Power) training and certification. Also, every two years SkyWest mechanics undergo three weeks of mandatory training. Each day, all of SkyWest’s aircraft are given attention by a mechanic. Every third day, each plane receives standard service. On the fifth day, a more thorough service and inspection is conducted. Extensive maintenance is scheduled every 54 days with a major inspection every 540 days. Flight Control: This department consists of aircraft dispatchers, system controllers and customer service coordinators located in the Operational Control Center at SkyWest’s headquarters in St. George, Utah. All play an integral role in the airline’s operations. SkyWest dispatch personnel undergo six weeks of intensive training courses, learning in-depth aircraft systems, meteorology and flight planning to become certified by the Federal Aviation Administration. Upon arrival at SkyWest, their training continues with three weeks of classes followed by an average of eight weeks of on-the-job training, culminating with a two-day competency check.


Dispatchers are responsible for preparing the flight release, including fuel planning, route selection, Federal Aviation Regulation compliance and weather analysis, as well as monitoring flights to ensure safety. Before each aircraft leaves the runway, dispatchers and captains share responsibility for the safety of the flight. The system controllers are responsible for all coordination, cancellation, delaying and reflow of SkyWest flights. They ensure optimum coverage of and adherence to flight schedules, economics and utilization of the operation. The customer service coordinators assist the controllers, working closely with the stations to maintain a customer service advocacy, always keeping the passenger in mind. These highly trained individuals work with the rest of the SkyWest team to provide a safe flying experience with incomparable service and quality.

The Safety Department: SkyWest has a department wholly dedicated to the operational safety of the airline. Its team monitors all aspects of safety and ensures that the highest standard of safety is maintained. The safety department coordinates with all the departments involved with ground and flight operations and acts as a compliance liaison between the airline and the Department of Transportation and Federal Aviation Administration. It is also responsible for the safety and well-being of all employees and equipment at the airline. The safety department conducts internal safety audits and evaluations of all operational departments. Additionally, SkyWest’s safety department voluntarily participates in the Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP); a reporting program for pilots, flight attendants and dispatchers to flag potential safety concerns. n

BLAH BLAH BLAH Your advertising doesnʼt have the power it used to. Get it back

www.just1.com/power skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express |

43


Route Map

Edmonton

Saskatoon Calgary Winnipeg Regina

Vancouver Kalispell

Victoria

Spokane

Great Falls

Moses Lake

Seattle/Tacoma

Pasco/Richland/ Kennewick

Missoula

Fargo

Bismarck

Helena

Duluth Quebec

Billings

Bozeman

Ottawa

Portland Redmond/Bend

Eugene

Medford

Gillette

Idaho Falls

Boise

North Bend

Wausau Traverse City Green Bay Appleton

Rapid City Sioux Falls

Cedar Rapids

Crescent City Eureka/Arcata

Rock Springs Hayden/Steamboat Springs

Redding

Aspen

Kansas City

Syracuse

Scranton Allentown Columbus Pittsburgh Dayton Cincinnati Charleston Fort Wayne

Peoria Indianapolis

Denver Grand Junction

Sacramento

Moline

Omaha

Lincoln

Salt Lake City

Chico Reno

Oakland San Francisco Modesto San Jose Fresno Monterey

Saginaw London Grand Rapids Lansing Milwaukee Detroit South Bend Cleveland Chicago

Casper

Klamath Falls

Springfield

Colorado Springs

White Plains

Louisville Wichita

Durango Las Vegas

BakersfieldInyokern San Luis Obispo Victorville Santa Maria Santa Barbara Burbank Ontario Oxnard Los Angeles Palm Springs Phoenix Orange County Carlsbad Imperial/El Centro Tucson San Diego Yuma

Tulsa

Northwest Arkansas

Oklahoma City

Albuquerque

Lexington

Springfield

Nashville

Memphis Huntsville

Little Rock

Birmingham

Dallas El Paso

Knoxville Asheville

Midland

Austin San Antonio

United - Regional Jet

Houston

United - Turbo Prop Seasonal Time Zones

Pacific

Mountain

Central

Eastern

Atlantic

8:00

9:00 (Arizona does not observe Daylight Savings)

10:00

11:00

NOON

EFFECTIVE December 2009 (may not reflect recent service updates)

RUBESŠ

By Leigh Rubin

SKYWEST AIRLINES CURRENT ROUTE MAP DECEMBER 2009 (updated monthly, may not reflect recent service updates)

M U S I C

A S K S V A R U N A

R O M A N O V E

D A I L Y W A S T E

R A T E D W R A O G R

E

A I R D I G N O R P E N D E E S S E W E L L O N A O S E P O K E L P I L L E Y A A O T I E T U I S O D O R T E X N R M E D L I U M F O P I B A E A L I M

Solution to Crossword on page 36 For more of Leigh Rubinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s humor check out his new, 2010 Rubes Zoo in a Box daily desk calendar, available at your favorite neighborhood or online bookstore, visit www.rubescartoons.com or call: 800-850-9453.

44 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

R O P E R D E M O V U A I D L S E C O W L O W H J O S E L O W S B E E E L E E T D R U M I R A M E N T

A M B L E D

G A L E A

C L I O V G I C F A P R A O R D F I

O G N U E M L S T R U E N E N B E O D K S I N C A O C N K


about your aircraft

The Aircraft galley

emergency exits

Lavatory

galley

emergency exits

Lavatory

1

2

3

4

1

2

3

4

Main entrance Main entrance

7

6

7

8

9 10 1 1

12 13

8

9 10 1 1

12 13

emergency exit

galley

emergency exits

Lavatory

galley

emergency exits

Lavatory

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 1 1

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 1 1

Main entrance

12

13 14 15 16 17 18

emergency exit

12

13 14 15 16 17 18

emergency exit

eMB 120 eMB 120

4

5

3

4

5

2

B C

(ForWard gaLLey)

3

(ForWard gaLLey)

6

7

8

9

10

6

7

8

9

10

emergency exits

a

Lavatory

emergency exits

2 B C

Lavatory

galley

emergency exit

a

Main entrance

galley

11 11

a

Main entrance

emergency exit

Main entrance

emergency exits

1 B C B C

eMB 120 (aFt gaLLey) eMB 120

1

2

3

4

5

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10

6

7

8

9 10

emergency exits

Lavatory Lavatory galley

a

SkyWest has safely been flying the EMB 120, commonly referred to as the “workhorse” of the regional airline industry, CrJ700 since 1986. Don’t be fooled by the propellers you see; the same CrJ700 technology that powers jet aircraft actually powers the EMB 120 as well. Like jet engines, the EMB 120 is powered by a gas turbine design, allowing for the superior reliability and power that jet engines enjoy. The EMB 120 is also economically sound, allowing it to serve communities that may not support jet service. Additionally, the EMB 120 possesses state-of-the-art technology allowing for maximum passenger safety. Each SkyWest EMB 120 is equipped with a Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS). GPWS is a warning system designed to alert pilots when the aircraft is not in landing configuration or is getting too close to the ground. GPWS detects terrain ahead of and below the aircraft and warns pilots when there’s an obstruction ahead. Each EMB 120 also has an onboard Global Positioning System (GPS), which uses satellites to calculate an aircraft’s position on the earth’s surface. Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems (TCAS) are also included for your safety. A more advanced radar system, TCAS in the flight deck is similar in theory to the equipment used in air traffic control towers to detect the position of all aircraft in the area.

6

5

(aFt gaLLey) Main entrance

11

emergency exit

Main entrance

galley

11

emergency exit

a

EMB 120 AIRCRAFT

5

emergency exit

a B C dB C d

While SkyWest’s employees are truly what set the airline apart, the equipment used also plays a significant role in passenger safety. SkyWest’s fleet of 280 regional aircraft is one of the industry’s newest. The average age of an aircraft is under seven years. The fleet consists of three different aircraft types: the 30CrJ200 passenger Embraer 120 Brasilia (EMB 120), the Bombardier CanaCrJ200 dair Regional Jet 200 LR (CRJ200), and the CRJ200’s sister aircraft, the Canadair Regional Jet 700 ER (CRJ700).

CRJ AIRCRAFT SkyWest has operated the 50-passenger CRJ200 since 1994. And in 2004, SkyWest welcomed the CRJ200’s sister-aircraft, the nearly identical 66-passenger CRJ700, with a two-class cabin and United’s explusSM service. The CRJ200 and CRJ700 offer a balance of the best economics in their class and outstanding performance with the Collins Pro Line 4 Avionics Systems. This onboard technology allows pilots to better observe the flying environment. Both regional jets have the ability to monitor performance of aircraft systems as well as track nearby aircraft and galley terrain clearances. The aircraft are also Lavatory equipped with a weather radar system which helps pilots see potentially CrJ200treacherous weather long before it is encountered. Passengers can rest easy knowing that the technology onboard 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 SkyWest’s aircraft provides for a safer, smoother flying experience Main entrance emergency exits

emergency exit

for both passenger and pilot. That’s safety first! galley

galley

Lavatory

emergency exits

CrJ700

CrJ200 6

7

8

9 10 1 1

12 13

Main entrance

2

3

4

5

6

emergency exits

7

8

9 10 1 1

1

Lavatory

12 13

2

3

4

7

8

9 10 1 1

12

A B

2

3

emergency exits

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 11

Lavatory 12 13 142 15 3 16 4 17 5 6

eMB 120

UNITED ECONOMY PLUS

1

Lavatory

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 1 1

12

13 14 15 16 17 18

7

8

9

UNITED ECONOMY

(ForWard gaLLey) skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express | a

galley

emergency exits

13 14 15 16 17 18

10

11

Emergency Exit

UNITED FIRST

CrJ700

6

emergency exit

Main Entrance

emergency exit

5

Main entrance

emergency exit

A 1

1

B C d

Main entrance

5

galley Main entrance

45

emergency exit

a

4

B C

3

C D

2

C D

1

galley

Lavatory

Lavatory

emergency exits

200

Lavatory

Emergency Exits

Galley

galley

n

emergency exits


PDX

Airport Maps

Denver (DEN)

Portland (PDX)

DEN

57 59 15

17

19 21 23 25

16

18

20 22 24

27 29 31 33

35

37

39

30 32

34

36

38

26

28

41

43

45 47

40 42 44

46 48

61

49

51

53 55

50

52

54 56 58 60

63 67 69 71 73 75 77 79

CONCOURSE E

CONCOURSE B

C

81 83 85 87 89 91 93 95 94 80 82 84 86 88 90 92

E1 D

E2 E3 E4 E5 E6

B

United Gate Areas

E7

Ticket Lobby

United Express (SkyWest Airlines) A

CONCOURSE C

E

Parking

United Gate Areas

CONCOURSE B

United Express (SkyWest Airlines)

CONCOURSE A

Terminal West

Terminal East

SEA

Seattle (sea)

Los Angeles (LAX) 80

71A 70A

71C-K

64

67B

68A

72 75A

Main Terminal

84 85

N1

88

SOUTH SATELLITE

N8 Parking

N7

NORTH SATELLITE

ay

TERMINAL 7

87

w

69B

76

ad

74

77

N15 N16

N10 N9

D

A

Ro

68B

TERMINAL 6

83

86 75B

69A

N11

way

2

73

N12 N13 N14

C

B

ad

66

70B

Ro

67A 1

3

81 82

71B

N6

N2 N3

NORTH SATELLITE

TERMINAL 8 United Gate Areas

4

5

6

7

8

United Express (SkyWest Airlines)

United Gate Areas

SFO

United Express (SkyWest Airlines)

ORD

Chicago/Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hare (ORD) CONCOURSE F

C

82

80

71

87A 87 85 83 81

89 Star Alliance Bus to Gates 91-102 (departs every 10 minutes during peak periods)

72 73 74 75

CONCOURSE G (Gates G91-G102 )

ne

B

K

3

1

Parking Garage LOT A

L

M Roadway

To Remote Parking

84

lO

2

86

ina

G

H

78A 77B 77A 76B 76A

90

m Ter

E

F

78B 79

TERMINAL 3 CONCOURSE F

88

CONCOURSE E

E15 E13 E14 CONCOURSE C E11 E12 E9 C2 C4 E10 E7 C1 C6 E8 C3 C8 E6 C5 C10 E4 C7 C12 E3 C9 C16 E2A C11 E2 CONCOURSE B F2 E1A C15 C18 E1 F1 B3 B4 C17 C18A B2 Terminal Two B1 B5 C20 B6 C19 C22 B7 C24 C21 B8 C26 C23 C28 C25 C30 C27 C32 B9 C29 C31 B10

F14 F12 F11 F10 F9 F8 F7 F6 F5 F4 F3

San Francisco (SFO)

United Gate Areas United Express (SkyWest Airlines)

B11 B12 B14 B15 B16 B17 B18 B19 B20 B21 B22

F

3

G

1

A

B

United Gate Areas United Express (SkyWest Airlines)

46 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

68 70 69


Now you can use your miles in more ways than ever before.

ALL MEMBERS CAN REDEEM MILES FOR:

Easily redeem your miles for hotels and cars. Mileage Plus now lets all members turn miles into hotel stays ®

• Hotel stays • Car rentals

and car rentals. Visit united.com/hotelandcarawards now to book your travel.

• Air travel awards

© 2009 United Air Lines, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Terms and conditions: Hotel and car awards are available to all Mileage Plus members. United reserves the right to revise member eligibility at any time. Each member must have sufficient Mileage Plus miles in his or her account to complete the entire transaction. Redemptions may only be made from a single account per transaction. Redemptions for hotel stays and car rentals are non-refundable. Additional taxes and fees may apply. For full terms and conditions visit united.com/hotelandcarawards. Miles redeemed under the Mileage Plus Hotel and Car Awards Program are subject to the rules of the United Mileage Plus program. United Saver Awards are currently redeemable at 25,000 miles within the U.S. (excluding Hawaii) and Canada, United Standard Awards are currently redeemable at 50,000 miles within the U.S. (excluding Hawaii) and Canada. Taxes and fees related to award travel are the responsibility of the passenger. United, its subsidiaries, affiliates and agents are not responsible for any products and services of any participating companies and partners. United and Mileage Plus are registered services marks. For complete details about the Mileage Plus program, visit united.com. ®


| Parting Shot

Test Your Travel Smarts

The location pictured above has made its way to the silver screen in films ranging from Richie Rich to Forest Gump. Be among the first 20 readers to correctly identify this place and we’ll send you a recently released DVD. This edition’s offerings include Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, based on the popular children’s book by Judi and Ron Barrett, Couples Retreat starring Vince Vaughn and educational offerings from Scholastic: So You want to Be President and March On: The Day My Brother Martin Changed the World and More Stories About African American History. To win, visit americasbestplaces.com and be among the first 20 visitors to register the correct answer to this Travel Challenge. If you are successful, we’ll send you a great recently released DVD. 48 | skyWest Magazine January/February 2010 united express

Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs: Sony Pictures Animation

It may look like an opulent European castle or a vestige of the British Empire, but this manor house was built on American soil. Need a hint? It is a mere 2.5 miles from one of the destinations featured in this magazine. While you’re contemplating the possibilities, also consider the wonders of regional air travel. Service to our nation’s mid-sized cities and small-resort markets makes it easy to embark on extraordinary adventures. Exploring new places adds so much to a rich and full life. Share your travel experiences at www.americasbestplaces.com. While you’re at it, check your answer. You could win a recently released movie. See details below. n

Couples Retreat: Universal Studios Home Entertainment

Can you identify this impressive location?


866.552.2683

www.abovealladvertising.com

Above All Advertising, Inc.

Custom Advertising That Works For You. Above All Advertising, Inc. delivers signage solutions, grand and large format printing, and inflatable advertising to many of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading brands and most demanding marketers. Flex Bannerâ&#x201E;˘ Skyâ&#x201E;˘ !DVERTISING&LAG $

169

Flex BladeÂŽ Skyâ&#x201E;˘ !DVERTISING&LAG $

189

s4ALL

s4ALL

&"!.6,4'

&",$6,4'

$

X-Banner

$

249

169

svXv

sv4ALLXv7IDE

8".2'

!34$2%6'

Get Noticed! * Multiple Banner Stands Available

Air Dancer

Custom Inflatable

Inflatable Costume

Pop-Up Tent

s4ALLW&AN Art Not Included

s4ALL

s4ALL

Includes 1 Valence Print sX

$599

$

2899

$

2295

#534'

#/34'

$

!0.!'

399

Above All Advertising, Inc.

REV4- Retractable Banner Stand

8-&4'

Best Buys

Pop-Up Backwall

Curved Backwall

Convertible Table Throw

Aluminum A-Frame

sX Includes Print

sX Includes Print

s&ITS 4ABLE Includes Print

sv4ALLXv7IDE Includes Print

CRVWLLG

4",'

ASNAPG

$1399 POPWLLG

$1699

$

169

$

159

General production times range from 24 hours to 21 business days. Times vary depending on productâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ordered.

6980 Corte Santa Fe San Diego, CA 92121

www.abovealladvertising.com


Aspen’s best locations, at some of its very best prices. NEW LISTING

Quintessential Colorado Log Home Perfectly sited on 12.5 acres, this brand new luxury log home offers flawless design details, custom chef’s kitchen, 4 en-suite bedrooms, 3 fireplaces, and stunning southern views of the Snowmass Ski Area. At just under 5,000 sq. ft., this property rests in scenic Old Snowmass – an unrivaled setting that is just minutes from the Roaring Fork Golf Club, seconds to gold medal fly-fishing, and 15 minutes from downtown Aspen and its four ski areas. Simply put, this impressive log property provides a year-round outdoor paradise coupled with cosmopolitan convenience. Only $4,450,000

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

Majestic Mountain Home

Mountain Contemporary

Deluxe Duplex

Fractional Ownership

Five-bedroom home with dramatic back yard waterfall, endless views from elevated patios, and only 5-minutes to downtown. Stunning great room, easy and liveable floorplan, and access to skier shuttles. Ideal for entertaining friends and family. $6,995,000

Over 3,700 sq. ft. of living space in Aspen’s exclusive West End. Views of Aspen Mountain, gracious floor plan with hardwood floors, wood-burning fireplace, office, multiple living/media areas and garage. $4,200,000

Warm and inviting new listing! At over 3400 sq. ft., this 4 bd/ 4.5 ba is classic in style, with wonderful entertaining space, and a private & pleasant setting. Surprising views, large yard, fire pit, & 2-car garage. It is priced to sell at $3,900,000.

The Residences at the Little Nell, St. Regis Club, Ritz-Carlton Club and Hyatt Grand Aspen offer extensive vacation ownership options. Membership provides access to these exclusive Aspen properties as well as access to other coveted destinations. Starting at $129,000

TRACY HAISFIELD EGGLESTON

BUBBA EGGLESTON

970-948-7130 tracyaspen@yahoo.com www.tracyaspen.com

970-309-9291 bubbaegg@yahoo.com www.bubbaaspen.com

Iej^[XoÀi?dj[hdWj_edWbH[Wbjo_iWb_Y[di[ZjhWZ[cWhajeIej^[XoÀi?dj[hdWj_edWbH[Wbjo7\Èb_Wj[i"?dY$7d;gkWbEffehjkd_jo9ecfWdo$;gkWb>eki_d]Effehjkd_jo$;WY^e\ÈY[_i_dZ[f[dZ[djboemd[ZWdZef[hWj[Z"[nY[fje\ÈY[iemd[ZWdZef[hWj[ZXoDHJ?dYehfehWj[Z$


SkyWest Magazine January/February 2010