Issuu on Google+

8/29/12

Transit hotels: How to get to sleep during your stopover | CNNGo.com Register  Sign In

CNN International

Follow

LATEST   DESTINATIONS   SPECIALS   iREPORT   CONTESTS   MOBILE   TV

Transit hotels: How to get to sleep during your stopover

Like

276k

Switch to 한국어

Gone are the days of curling up on a bench and splashing around in the airport sink. Transit hotels are the new transfer lounge By Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung) 

Like

Send

21 October, 2011

87 people like this. Be the first of your friends.

0

Tweet

499

The Eaton Smart transit hotel at New Delhi Indira Gandhi International Airport is surprisingly stylish.

Globe­trotters know what it's like trying to sleep coiled up on a hard plastic airport seat for hours while they await their next flight. But it doesn't have to be that way. Transit hotels are making long, multi­flight trips tolerable. These short­stay hotels are located within security checks in airports and close to terminals. Passengers can walk off the plane and check into a room to refresh between long flights. No visa is required to stay over in a given country.  Read more on CNNGo: World's biggest airport planned (http://www.cnngo.com/search/apachesolr_search/airports)

Rates at transit hotels vary but are often cheaper than at regular hotels. Minimum required stays average about six hours. Standard amenities include a bed, desk, toilet, shower and Internet access, but many premium transit hotels include gyms and spas, as well. 

Transit hotel hot spots Because business depends on a heavy flow of onward­bound passengers, transit hotels are nearly exclusive to busy transfer hubs, especially in Asia. One of the most popular transit hotels is at Singapore's Changi, (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/singapores­changi­airport­worlds­favorite­airport­according­secret­report­ 937772)  one of the world's busiest (http://www.cnngo.com/bangkok/visit/bangkok­edges­top­10­list­worlds­ busiest­airports­774335) airports and a frequent layover spot for flights to and from Asia.

Amsterdam Schiphol Airport is one of the busiest airports in Europe ­­ its compact and clean "Yotel" hotel pods do good business.  Read more on CNNGo: Singapore's Changi Airport the world's favorite (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/singapores­changi­airport­worlds­favorite­airport­according­secret­report­ 937772)

You won't find in­airport transit hotels in Melbourne Tullamarine Airport or Sydney Airport’s international terminal ­­ Australia is not a common midway point for journeys.

Good for business, but good business? Nigel Summers, director of the world’s largest hospitality consulting firm, Horwath HTL

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/transit-hotels-around-world-712461

1/4


8/29/12

Transit hotels: How to get to sleep during your stopover | CNNGo.com

(http://www.horwathhtl.com/hwHTL/) , says that transit hotels can be a tricky investment for hoteliers.

“You don’t have to give people much [because it’s a very short stay], but it can be difficult to predict the flow of people," Summers says. Read more on CNNGo: World's busiest airports announced

Yotel pods, Schiphol Airport, Amsterdam.

(http://www.cnngo.com/bangkok/visit/bangkok­edges­top­10­list­worlds­busiest­airports­774335)

“For example, if there is a major closure at an airport, it can be hard to plan how much food to prepare and how much staff to keep on.” The success of transit hotels also depends on the efficiency of the airport, with more efficient airports being less suitable for hotel business. “If it is easy to clear customs, say at Hong Kong, people are probably less likely to stay inside the airport for their layover," explains Summers. Read more on CNNGo: New Delhi overtakes Mumbai (http://www.cnngo.com/mumbai/life/busiest­ airport­new­delhi­overtakes­mumbai­385674)

"But if it’s harder, somewhere like New Delhi (http://www.cnngo.com/mumbai/life/busiest­airport­new­delhi­ overtakes­mumbai­385674) , people are more likely to find accommodation inside the airport.” Here are a selection of transit hotels around the world that could make your next journey a little more comfortable:

Transit hotels around the world Ambassador Transit Hotel, Singapore Changi Airport, Singapore Single rooms from S$58 (US$48) before tax, for six hours. TV, en suite bathroom, complimentary tea and coffee, wake­up call. Located at Terminals 1, 2 and 3, Changi Airport, Singapore; 75 Airport Blvd., Singapore; +65 6542 5538; www.harilelahospitality.com (http://www.harilelahospitality.com) . Kuala Lumpur Airside Transit Hotel, Kuala Lumpur International Airport, Malaysia Standard rooms from MYR140 (US$45). Includes: fitness center, shower, sauna. Located next to the Satellite building, next to Gate C5, KLIA Sepang, Selangor; +60 3 8787 4848; www.klairporthotel.com (http://www.klairporthotel.com/airside­transit­hotel) Incheon Airport Transit Hotel, Seoul Incheon International Airport, South Korea Standard rooms from US$45 for six hours. Includes: Internet, air con, TV, phone. Located opposite boarding gate 10. Incheon International Airport, 43 272 Gonghangno, Jung­gu, Incheon; +82 32 743 3000; www.airgardenhotel.com (http://www.airgardenhotel.com/english/accommodation/a_standarddb.php)

Louis Tavern, Day Rooms and CIP lounges, Suvarnabhumi Airport, Bangkok, Thailand Standard single room 2,200 baht (US$65) for four hours. Internet access, television, telephone, flight­information monitor, mini­bar. Located on Level 4 Concourse G of Suvarnabhumi Airport; +66 2 134 6565 6; www.dayrooms­ciplounges.com (http://www.dayrooms­ciplounges.com/contact.html) Airport Hotel, Abu Dhabi International Airport, United Arab Emirates  Standard rooms start at US$185 for day use between 6 a.m. and 7 p.m. High­speed Internet, king­ sized bed, separate living room, massage chair, gym, shower. Located in Sheikh Rashid Terminal of Terminal 1 and Concourse 2 of Terminal 3; +971 2 5757 377 ; www.dih­dca.com (%20http://www.dih­dca.com/dihnew/default.aspx)

Yotel, Schiphol Airport, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Standard cabin €45 (US$61) for four hours. Large single bed, monsoon­power shower with body wash and towels, TV, work station, free Wi­Fi. Located in the main terminal in Lounge 2 near Pier D. Vetrekpassage 118, Schiphol Airport. Amsterdam, The Netherlands; +31 20 7085 372; www.yotel.com (http://www.yotel.com/) Hotel Tranzit 2, Prague Airport, Czech Republic

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/transit-hotels-around-world-712461

2/4


8/29/12

Transit hotels: How to get to sleep during your stopover | CNNGo.com

Standard cabin one night (24 hours) from €119 (US$162) for double room. Also available for day use. Packages for three, six or 10 hours ­­ single use three hours, €35 (US$48). Shower package ­ ­ €24 (US$38). Includes: Free high­speed Internet, satellite TV. Located between Terminal 1 and Terminal 2. Prague Airport, Letiste s.p., Praha, Czech Republic; +420 236 161 222; www.pragueairport.co.uk (http://www.pragueairport.co.uk/hotel­tranzit­two.htm) Dayrooms Flughafen Zürich AG, Zurich Airport, Switzerland Standard room CHF$49 (US$55) for three hours or less. Includes: Wake­up service, TV, shoe­ cleaning machine, Internet access, air conditioning. Located in Transfer zone D. Postfach, Zürich­ Flughafen, Switzerland; +41 43 816 21 08; www.zurich­airport.com (http://www.zurich­ airport.com/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid­154)

Evergreen Transit Hotel, C. K. S. International Airport, Taoyuan, Taiwan Standard room rates NT$2,800 (US$92) for one night. Includes: Parking, baby­sitting, pool, gym, sauna, hair dryer. Located in Terminal II.; Taoyuan County, Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport Terminal II 4th Floor; +886 (0)3 383 4510; www.evergreen­hotels.com (%20http://www.evergreen­ hotels.com/branch/Index.aspx?checkcode=IEGPU&tempdbsn=50&debug=1)

Eaton Smart, Indira Gandhi International Airport, New Delhi, India Standard room rates five hours at Rs 3,000 (US$65). Includes high­speed Internet access, LCD TV with cable satellite channels and in­room dining options. Located in Terminal 3, Level 5, Indira Gandhi International Airport, New Delhi; + 91 11 452 52000; newdelhiairport.eatonhotels.com (http://newdelhiairport.eatonhotels.com/index.html)

Click to the next page to read an interview with Vikram Khetty, general manager of India’s first transit hotel at New Delhi’s Indira Gandhi International Airport.  Tags: 

You might like:

Paid Distribution

(http://www.cnngo.com

America's most /explorations/life/ameri sinful cities

cas­most­sinful­cities­ (http://www.cnngo.com 021551) /explorations/life/ameri

(http://www.cnngo.com

(http://www.cnngo.com

(http://www.cnngo.com

7 sexy skinny dips

/explorations/escape/a (http://www.cnngo.com sias­7­sexiest­skinny­ /explorations/escape/as

12 overlooked /explorations/escape/1 islands worth 2­overlooked­islands­ visiting

Indochina's top /explorations/none/ind must­see ochinas­top­10­hot­ destinations

dips­675401) ias­7­sexiest­skinny­

worth­visiting­454538) (http://www.cnngo.com

destinations­064669) (http://www.cnngo.com

cas­most­sinful­cities­

dips­675401)

/explorations/escape/12

/explorations/none/ind

021551)

(CNNGo)

­overlooked­islands­

ochinas­top­10­hot­

(CNNGo)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

worth­visiting­454538)

destinations­064669)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

explorations/escape/asi

(CNNGo)

(CNNGo)

explorations/life/americ

as­7­sexiest­skinny­

(http://www.cnngo.com/

(http://www.cnngo.com/

as­most­sinful­cities­

dips­675401)

explorations/escape/12

explorations/none/indo

­overlooked­islands­

chinas­top­10­hot­

worth­visiting­454538)

destinations­064669)

021551)

(javascript:void(0)) (http://www.redbull.co

m/cs/Satellite/en_INT/ THE MAN OF ARAN | ARTEM Article/red­bull­cliff­ SILCHENKO diving­on­inis­mor­ WINS CLIFF 021243242777624? DIVING p=1242745960019) COMPETITION ON INIS MOR (http://www.redbull.co m/cs/Satellite/en_INT/ Article/red­bull­cliff­ diving­on­inis­mor­ 021243242777624? p=1242745960019)

(Red Bull) (http://www.redbull.com /cs/Satellite/en_INT/Arti cle/red­bull­cliff­diving­ on­inis­mor­ 021243242777624? p=1242745960019)

[?] (javascript:void(0))

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/transit-hotels-around-world-712461

3/4


8/29/12

Forget luxury, economy hotels to take over Asia | CNNGo.com Register  Sign In

CNN International

Follow

LATEST   DESTINATIONS   SPECIALS   iREPORT   CONTESTS   MOBILE   TV

Like

276k

Forget luxury, economy hotels to take over Asia A boom in Asia­Pacific business travel means more affordable accommodation for everyone By Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung) 

Like

Send

28 October, 2011

Joyce Li and 120 others like this.

5

Tweet

39

Economy hotels offer "everything you need, and nothing you don't," according to InterContinental Hotels' David Anderson.

Sure, luxury (http://www.cnngo.com/bangkok/sleep/5­super­luxury­resorts­120215) accommodation in Asia takes the headlines, but what about us regular folk who just want a decent bed before hiking in Berastagi? Big hotel chains such as InterContinental (http://www.ichotelsgroup.com/h/d/6c/280/zh/home) , Swiss­ Belhotel International (http://www.swiss­belhotel.com/)  and Accor (http://www.accor.com/en/group/accor­ company­profile.html)  have recently announced plans to build more than 350 economy and express hotels in various parts of Asia including China, India, Singapore, Malaysia, Philippines and Indonesia by the end of 2012.  Don’t call the new breed budget hotels or hostels, which are usually in cheaper areas. High­end hotel companies that have “economy” brands are often higher quality, cleaner, chicer and closer to city centers. Read more on CNNGo: Transit Hotels: How to get sleep during your stopover (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/transit­hotels­around­world­712461)

Post­recession business travelers are being more responsible with their money and hoteliers say young executives on the move are demanding high­quality hotels with fewer trimmings like business centers or rooftop pools. “Business tourists prefer two­ to three­star facilities because it’s convenient ­­ they don’t want to waste money on facilities they won’t use,” says Gavin Faull, president of Swiss­Belhotel International (http://www.swiss­belhotel.com/) . International Air Transport Association and Smith Travel Research also anticipated higher growth in business travel compared to leisure travel in the upcoming year, according to a report from Ernst & Young (http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/Global_hospitality_insights_Top_Thoughts_for_2011/$File/Top­ thoughts­for­2011.pdf)  ­­ "Global Hospitality Insights: Top Thoughts for 2011."

Read more on CNNGo: Hangzhou airport's best budget deals (http://www.cnngo.com/shanghai/life/explore­hangzhou/hangzhou­airports­best­budget­routes­258718)

Global business travel spending is projected to grow 34 percent in four years, from US$896 billion in 2010 to US$1.2 trillion by 2014, with Asia, Latin America and the Middle East expected to grow faster than the current recovering economies of the United States and Europe, according to Ernst & Young's report.

Fewer frills, more savings Much of the growth will be driven by the increased demand for economy hotels, which cost less

www.cnngo.com/explorations/escape/forget-luxury-economy-hotels-are-taking-over-asia-992505

1/3


8/29/12

Forget luxury, economy hotels to take over Asia | CNNGo.com

than full­service hotels because guests pay only for basic amenities (bed, shower, no room service, Wi­Fi). For example, a one­night weekend stay in November at a standard Holiday Inn Express (http://www.hiexpress.com/hotels/us/en/reservation) in Hong Kong costs 20 percent less than a room at the full­service Holiday Inn Golden Mile, Hong Kong. “[Express hotels are] everything you need and nothing you don’t,” says David Anderson, vice president at InterContinental Hotels (http://www.ichotelsgroup.com/h/d/6c/280/zh/home) .

Adjustable pillows ­­ this is no Motel 6.

And the strategy for no­frills, but decent, rooms is working. Revenue per room grew 15 percent in Asia­Pacific during 2010, while the United States saw about 7 percent growth, as reported

(http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/Global_hospitality_insights_Top_Thoughts_for_2011/$File/Top­ thoughts­for­2011.pdf) by Ernst & Young. 

“This growth [in the Asia­Pacific travel industry] is a complete reflection of domestic economy strength,” says Evan Lewis, Accor's VP for Asia­Pacific communications. Read more on CNNGo: Let the Bangkok hotel battles begin (http://www.cnngo.com/bangkok/sleep/let­bangkok­hotel­battles­begin­497941)

For the regular non­business folk in Asia who just want to hit the beach on a nearby island over a weekend, this means more economy chains located in downtown cores. So while the roach­infested hovels with views over the sewer will still be there for those who like to slum it, there are now cheap places in good areas to toss your luggage and explore the city –­ without forcing yourself to use the pool or gym you didn’t ask for.

Selected economy hotels Holiday Inn Express, 33 Sharp St. East, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong, +852 3558 6688, www.hiexpress.com (http://www.hiexpress.com/) Hotel Ibis Shanghai, 858 Panyu Road, Xuhui, Shanghai, China, +86 21 6283 8800, www.ibishotel.com (http://www.ibishotel.com/)   Swiss­Inn Batam, Komplek Villa Idaman Baloi Batam 29432, Batam, Indonesia, +62 778 457 500

 (/author/jane­leung)

Jane Leung is a Hong Kong­born Canadian who has dabbled in the mixed media bag of film and television production, the professional sports industry and magazine publishing. 

Read more about Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung)

Tags: 

You might like:

Paid Distribution

(http://www.cnngo.com

(http://www.cnngo.com

arch/Philippines) (http://www.cnngo.com

20 of the world's /explorations/life/20­ most iconic most­iconic­ skyscrapers

(http://www.cnngo.com

10 of the world's World's most /explorations/life/10­ /explorations/escape/c om/slideshow/? most loved airports expensive cities for Bucket List: 14 Amazing Trips most­loved­airports­ ostliest­hotels­list­ group=1186) (http://www.cnngo.com a hotel room

/search/apachesolr_sea

skyscrapers­343149) (http://www.cnngo.com

981939) /explorations/life/10­

637685) (http://www.cnngo.com

rch/Philippines)

/explorations/life/20­

most­loved­airports­

/explorations/escape/co

(CNNGo)

most­iconic­

981939)

stliest­hotels­list­

(http://www.cnngo.com/

skyscrapers­343149)

(CNNGo)

637685)

search/apachesolr_sea

(CNNGo)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

(CNNGo)

rch/Philippines)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

explorations/life/10­

(http://www.cnngo.com/

explorations/life/20­

most­loved­airports­

explorations/escape/co

most­iconic­

981939)

stliest­hotels­list­

200 Results for /search/apachesolr_se "Philippines"

(http://www.cnngo.com

skyscrapers­343149)

(javascript:void(0)) (http://www.frommers.c

(http://www.frommers. com/slideshow/? group=1186)

(Frommer's) (http://www.frommers.c om/slideshow/? group=1186)

637685)

www.cnngo.com/explorations/escape/forget-luxury-economy-hotels-are-taking-over-asia-992505

2/3


8/29/12

Johan Svanstrom: The customer as travel agent | CNNGo.com Register  Sign In

CNN International

Follow

LATEST   DESTINATIONS   SPECIALS   iREPORT   CONTESTS   MOBILE   TV

Like

276k

Johan Svanstrom: 'Ultra­aware' customers are the future of travel The MD of Hotels.com lays down a few predictions and suggests we'll be using minute details such as which way the gym faces to choose our hotels By Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung) 

Like

Send

10 January, 2012

57 people like this. Be the first of your friends.

1

Tweet

15

(mailto:?subject=Johan Svanstrom: 'Ultra-aware'

omers are the future of

l&body=http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/interview-

n-svanstrom-future-travel-planning-838912)

For every 10 stays at a Hotels.com hotel, guests receive one night free as part of their Welcome Rewards program.

"Consumers are putting on the travel agent uniform themselves." That's one of Johan Svanstrom's key observations after almost seven years as the vice president and managing director for Asia of hotel booking site Hotels.com (http://hotels.com) .  From a small telephone service in the United States 20 years ago, the company has grown into a worldwide online booking site with around 140,000 properties in its books. Currently operating 85 country sites worldwide, Svanstrom started 2012 with a bang ­­ by announcing a new loyalty program (http://www.hotels.com/customer_care/pillar/welcomerewards.html) that gives customers one free hotel night for every 10 they book through Hotels.com.  But it's the next five to 10 years that Svanstrom thinks will really see the travel booking process turned on its head.  "[Travel planning is going] from comprehensive catalogues to quick comparisons," he continues, "This feeling of power in self­service online supersedes the extra time spent doing it."  Customers are going to get increasingly finicky about their travel details, going down to some hair­ splitting specifics.  "Before, knowing it was a four­star downtown was maybe all you could get. Today users are going from 'unengaged aware' to 'ultra­specific aware' of what a hotel offers or not. "You can know whether the gym has windows facing the morning sun (gotta get your yoga in, of course) or whether the reception desk has a fast check­in lane for more expensive room types." He also predicts that bookings through mobile apps will increase from 10 percent of the total today to 30 percent in five years.  We asked him what else the future of travel planning had in store. More on CNNGo:  (http://www.cnngo.com/singapore/visit/5­jakarta­hotels­under­us100­143623) Forget luxury, economy hotels are taking over Asia (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/escape/forget­luxury­ economy­hotels­are­taking­over­asia­992505)

CNNGo: Name one big change you expect to see in travel booking over the next few years. Svanstrom:  Ultra­personalized engines.

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/interview-johan-svanstrom-future-travel-planning-838912

1/3


8/29/12

Johan Svanstrom: The customer as travel agent | CNNGo.com

If I like urban, modern hotels with a good bar and not more than half a mile from a park, then my computer will automatically trawl the web and find exactly those experiences based on like­minded travelers and the best spot price at any given hour. More on CNNGo: Hangzhou's best hotels (http://www.cnngo.com/shanghai/visit/explore­hangzhou/hangzhou­ best­hotels­924744)

CNNGo: Will Hotels.com ever offer tour packages or other hospitality sectors?

Svanstrom also serves as a member of the board of directors at NASDAQ­listed eLong, China's second­largest online travel agency.

Svanstrom: We will offer in­destination sightseeing and attraction services, but not flights or full packages.

CNNGo: Do you ever foresee a day when human concierges and front desk staff become  obsolete? Svanstrom: There are already self­serve hotel experiments in a few places. I think it’s a trend that will

continue. I don’t need to pass any desks or people when I check out. However, for high­end properties and luxury stays, personal service and human interaction will still be wanted. If it’s done well, it adds to the experience, same as today.

CNNGo: What are the best innovations you’ve come across in hotels? Svanstrom: The best innovations are more around service and experience, rather than technology. At the Opposite House (http://www.theoppositehouse.com/) in Beijing, someone just walks up to you in the lobby and checks you in on a wireless device. This is a great concept, a guest can sit on a nice sofa, even have a drink, and don’t have to experience that feeling of queuing up at the desk. More on CNNGo: Mumbai's 10 best business hotels (http://www.cnngo.com/mumbai/visit/city­essentials/mumbais­best­ business­hotels­463806)

CNNGo: What has been your worst hotel experience and why? Svanstrom: Once in the outskirts of Beijing I stayed at a local hotel. I arrived late and had an important meeting early the day after. I asked to get an iron and board to my room.

"Thanks for the itinerary, but I'm afraid I've met someone else online."

They told me I could only get the iron if I gave them RMB 300 in deposit, in cash. I didn’t have cash, couldn’t go out middle night to get it, and the hotel refused to take a credit card as deposit for the iron.

So I had to attend the meeting in a wrinkled shirt. Not the end of the world, but I was quite taken aback by their policy; they clearly thought I was really a risky guest keen on stealing their iron.

CNNGo: If more people use online booking systems, will hotel prices continue to lower?  Svanstrom:  Yes. Transparency drives competition. Always has and always will, regardless of what industry or product you look at. More on CNNGo: Best city hotel rooms with a view (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/escape/best­ city­hotels­view­290637)

CNNGo: How do mobile apps affect the planning process? Svanstrom: With smartphones, user behavior seems to be moving from planning to promptness. There is a shorter booking window before the trip with mobile booking. Around 30 percent of bookings in China are made on the same date. People will leave Shanghai and book in Beijing later that day. Hotels.com is further developing our mobile apps on different platforms like iPhone, Android, iPad, Nokia and MeeGo. Tags: 

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/interview-johan-svanstrom-future-travel-planning-838912

2/3


8/30/12

Kayak and snorkel in Hoi Ha Wan | CNNGo.com Register  Sign In

CNN International

Follow

LATEST   GUIDES   HONG KONG ESSENTIALS   iREPORT   CONTESTS   MOBILE   TV

East of Eden: With kayak and snorkel to far­flung Hong Kong

Like

276k

切換到繁體中文

A corner of sunny solitude exists in Hong Kong, if you're willing to paddle for it By Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung) 

Like

Send

13 June, 2011

Paul Leung and 91 others like this.

1

Tweet

14

Hong Kong's hidden Utopia.

There are two reasons to run fully clothed at speed into Hoi Ha Wan's waters: to feel the crisp, clean ocean splashing in your face and to relieve the Satanic burn of 23 mosquito bites on your left calf. The itchy sprint into the water is my introduction to Hoi Ha Wan, a dazzling marine reserve just north of Sai Kung Country Park, about an hour and 45 minutes by road from Central. I’ve come to paddle the reputed (http://www.urban­outdoors.com/hoi­ha­wan­best­kayaking­site­hong­kong/) “best kayaking spot in Hong Kong” and snorkel in its World Wildlife Foundation (http://www.wwf.org.hk/en/whatwedo/conservation/marine/protectedareas/) ­protected waters, where 39 of 50 local stony coral species flourish. First stop is a rental shop called Wan Hoi. It’s located on Sandy Beach five minutes' walk from the bus stop in front of the tiny village of Hoi Ha, which is backed by fung shui woods.

It’s on the short walk to the shop that I discover that the ticks and mosquitoes are vicious in this forested part of Hong Kong. Cursing myself for not remembering to bring repellent, I detour into the water for some quick relief.

An inspiring view from Wan Hoi kayak rentals.

Inside Wan Hoi, the elderly shopkeeper ­­ with the toned physique of a 25­year­old ­­ hands me a mask and snorkel and finds me a narrow, one­seater kayak. Minor bumps and scratched green paint show the kayak’s age, but the vessel appears sturdy enough, even for a beginner like me.

“Keep your legs shoulder­width apart or you’ll tip over,” is all the shopkeeper tells me before pushing my craft unceremoniously into the water.

Cool temps, coral explosion, colorful new friends Paddling away from shore, I feel the humidity begin to drop. It’s as if someone turned off the giant oven that bakes summertime Hong Kong. My body settles into relaxed vacation mode and the sun becomes like a welcome fire on a cool night.

www.cnngo.com/hong-kong/visit/kayaking-under-sea-hoi-ha-wan-279964

1/3


8/30/12

Kayak and snorkel in Hoi Ha Wan | CNNGo.com It’s tough to believe a vacation destination exists this close to home. Roughly 300 meters from shore, I hover directly above a coral community in shallow water near a pier. I steer into a no­motorized­boat zone and hitch the kayak to a buoy so as not to risk damaging the precious corals. I slip out of the kayak and into the water. While I’m not the best swimmer, I am excellent at doggy paddle and that is the most valuable kayaking and snorkeling survival skill.

Nemo's Chinese cousin, Ng­mo?

Just a few meters from the rocky shore, I plunge my face underwater. Beneath the emerald surface lurk magnificent hard and soft brainy corals, stony coral, sponges, sea cucumbers and a color­burst of tropical fish.

A glint from three Chinese demoiselle (purple and yellow fish) catches my eye, but when I try to photograph them a school of black and yellow fish lock into my frame. They end up being brighter and much more photogenic.

Hong Kong or New Zealand?

Back above the surface, the endless horizon of mountain and ocean are reminiscent of the temperate climates of New Zealand or British Columbia, but the hue and saturation of colors couldn’t be anywhere other than Hong Kong. The sand on every beach looks like cornmeal, the signature green water matches the hulls of Star Ferries and the mountains are thick with vegetation ­­ not lush, more like big, green scouring pads.

On the way to urchin island.

After my photo session with the fish, a raw­looking beach filled with shells, pebbles, and flat slabs of rock looks perfect for a rest. Three gaunt cows on shore appear unperturbed as I paddle toward their beach.

The water becomes shallow and even clearer as I near the shore, slowly revealing a thick black carpet of spiky sea urchins on the seabed beneath me. The thought of tipping over into hundreds of urchin daggers puts me in a mild panic. I take a breath, position my legs at shoulder­width and balance the kayak. That one­sentence lesson from the shopkeeper turns out to be the most valuable tip of the day. I like Hoi Ha Wan, but I don't want to die here, and certainly not as a felon, damaging protected marine life while getting punctured by underwater mace flails.

Sea Urchin: underwater barbed wire.

The demonic globes with their long black spikes ­­ which turn out to protect their anuses, of all things ­­ are a vivid reminder that Hoi Ha Wan remains a rare treasure in Hong Kong.

A genuine nature preserve where the wildlife rules and the only human contact you get is not only brief and sensible, it also leaves you blessedly cool and dry.  For the most comfortable paddling temperatures, it’s best to visit Hoi Ha Wan (http://www.afcd.gov.hk/english/country/cou_vis/cou_vis_mar/cou_vis_mar_des/cou_vis_mar_des_hoi.html)

between May and September. How to Get there: Hoi Ha Wan, Sai Kung Peninsula. From Central take the MTR to Diamond Hill, exit C2. Then take the 96R bus to Sai Kung on weekdays and Saturdays, or the 92 bus on Sundays. In Sai Kung Town board the number 7 green minibus to Hoi Ha Village. Private vehicles are not allowed access without permits, which must be arranged in advance. Rentals from Wan Hoi shop, +852 2328 2169. Snorkels and masks HK$30 all day, single kayaks HK$100.

www.cnngo.com/hong-kong/visit/kayaking-under-sea-hoi-ha-wan-279964

2/3


8/30/12

Kayak and snorkel in Hoi Ha Wan | CNNGo.com

Other kayaking sites: Cheung Sha Beach Water Sports Centre. 29 Lower Cheung Sha Village, Lantau Island, Hong Kong +852 8104 6222 www.longcoast.hk (http://www.longcoast.hk) Wong Shek Water Sports Centre. Wong Shek Pier, Sai Kung, New Territories, Wednesday­ Monday 8:30 a.m.­5 p.m., +852 2328 2311  wswsc@lcsd.gov.hk Tek Mei Tuk Water Sports Centre. Main Dam, Plover Reservoir, Tai Po, +852 2665 3591, Thursday­Tuesdaym 8:30 a.m.­5 p.m.

Jane Leung is a Hong Kong­born Canadian who has dabbled in the mixed media bag of film and television production, the professional sports industry and magazine publishing. 

 (/author/jane­leung)

Read more about Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung)

Tags: 

You might like:

Paid Distribution

Half­naked, all /hong­ smiles: kong/shop/abercrombi Abercrombie & e­340592) Fitch opens in Hong Kong

(http://www.cnngo.com

88 things to do /hong­kong/play/88­ this summer in things­do­summer­ Hong Kong

(http://www.cnngo.com

All Hong Kong /hong­kong/all/article) Articles | CNNGo. com ​

(http://www.cnngo.com

(javascript:void(0)) (http://www.readersdig

654587) (http://www.cnngo.com

(http://www.cnngo.com

est.ca/travel/world/15­ 15 Hilarious Signs From Around the hilarious­signs­around­ World world)

/hong­kong/play/88­

/hong­kong/all/article)

(http://www.cnngo.com

things­do­summer­

/hong­

654587)

(CNNGo Hong Kong)

kong/shop/abercrombie

(CNNGo Hong Kong)

­340592)

(CNNGo Hong Kong)

(http://www.cnngo.com/ hong­kong/all/article)

(http://www.cnngo.com/ hong­kong/play/88­

(http://www.cnngo.com/

things­do­summer­

hong­

654587)

(http://www.readersdig est.ca/travel/world/15­ hilarious­signs­around­ world)

(Reader's Digest) (http://www.readersdige st.ca/travel/world/15­

(http://www.cnngo.com

Hong Kong's best /hong­kong/eat/best­ grilled meat

grilled­meat­922997) (http://www.cnngo.com /hong­kong/eat/best­ grilled­meat­922997)

(CNNGo Hong Kong) (http://www.cnngo.com/ hong­kong/eat/best­ grilled­meat­922997)

hilarious­signs­around­ world)

kong/shop/abercrombie ­340592)

[?] (javascript:void(0))

1 comment

0 Stars

Leave a message...

Discussion

Community

Camoneal

a year ago

Hoi Ha was okay until the ecologists constructed the most un-ecological concrete-built viewing- platform and which is only open for organised visits.For some reason, the powers that be in HK are only satisfied when something, eg hiking trails, open harbours in Lamma, are smothered in cement. 0

Reply

Share ›

www.cnngo.com/hong-kong/visit/kayaking-under-sea-hoi-ha-wan-279964

3/3


8/30/12

Ryanair's 5 'cheapest' money-saving schemes - CNN.com

SET EDITION:  U.S. TV:  CNN

Home

CNNi

INTERNATIONAL CNN en Español

TV & Video

NewsPulse

MÉXICO

ARABIC

Sign up

Log in

HLN

U.S.

World

Politics

Justice

Entertainment

Tech

Health

Living

Travel

Opinion

iReport

Money

Sports

Ryanair's 5 'cheapest' money­saving schemes By Jane Leung, CNNGo updated 12:02 PM EDT, Mon October 17, 2011

NewsPulse Most popular stories right now

Thousands being rescued as waters rise Ryan speech energizes convention crowd Body parts found in auctioned storage unit Soldiers strip for Prince Harry

Bergen: Nonsense about Obama and Osama Explore the news with NewsPulse »

Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary is known for his attention­getting ideas.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS Ireland's budget airline has made a profitable habit out of incensing passengers Carrier says it will remove some lavatories from its planes to make room for extra seats Ryanair has not announced a date to implement the plan Previous announcements: charging for lavatory use, standing­room­only option

(CNNGo) ­­ Any publicity is good publicity for Dublin­based budget airline Ryanair. The no­frills airline recently announced plans to cut down to just one toilet per aircraft (see below), and that had us wondering: are announcements like their toilet fee and "fat tax" tasteless marketing ploys, or is Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary just really cheap? Despite wanting to strip their passengers of basic comforts like toilets and seat pockets, Ryanair is doing good business. Comparing September 2011 with September 2010, Ryanair reported a 6 percent hike in passenger numbers, from 6.84 million to 7.25 million. Through September 2011, the airline carried 76.8 million passengers, reported the airline. The airline's website also claims that in 2010, profits rose 26 percent to more than €401m (US$551m) despite higher fuel prices, the global recession, and volcanic ash disruptions in the spring. Ryanair's high booking fees and ancillary charges include: £30 (US$41) to check in a bag, £10 (US$14) to pay for flights with a debit or credit card (excluding Visa Electron) and £60 (US$83) to check in sports or music equipment, according to the Telegraph.

Ryanair plans one toilet per plane

CNNGo: World's 50 best beaches So, to honor the success of the self­proclaimed "world's favorite airline" let's take a look at some of its most ingenious money­saving tactics. 1. One toilet per aircraft In October 2011, Ryanair expressed its intolerance for people with bladders. The budget airline announced that it would remove two or three toilets from its aircraft to make room for six extra seats. Up to 200

www.cnn.com/2011/10/17/travel/ryanair-money-saving-schemes/index.html

1/3


8/30/12

Ryanair's 5 'cheapest' money-saving schemes - CNN.com passengers and six crew would share a bathroom during the flight, reported the Daily Mail. O'Leary said, "We very rarely use all three toilets on board our aircraft anyway." But apparently he is doing us all a favor. The move "would fundamentally lower air fares by about 5 percent for all passengers, cutting £2 (US$3) from a typical £40 (US$63) ticket." What a steal. Currently, there is no legal stipulation for an airline to provide toilets on its aircraft, but Ryanair has not announced a date to implement the plan. CNNGo: 10 of the world's best hotels for pets 2. Charging £1 for toilets The toilet removal wasn't a surprise to passengers and critics because O'Leary announced in 2010 that Ryanair would charge £1 or €1 for passengers to use the toilet. Stephen McNamara, spokesperson for the airline, told TravelMail: "By charging for the toilets we are hoping to change passenger behavior so that they use the bathroom before or after the flight," according to the Daily Mail. But as of 2011, O'Leary said the plans to "charge a pound to spend a penny" have now been dropped. 3. Standing room only Looking more and more like cheap suburban public transport, Ryanair announced in July 2010 it was preparing for standing­ room­only seats at the back of its 250­strong fleet. A spokesman for Ryanair said that Boeing had been consulted over refitting the fleet with "vertical seats." Passengers would be strapped in while standing up, and tickets for these seats would cost between £4 (US$6) and £8 (US$13). Here's a video of their design. However, a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Authority said the plans would struggle to meet safety requirements. The unnamed spokesman said: "It's aviation law that people have to have a seat belt on for take­off and landing so they would have to be in a seat. I don't know how Mr. O'Leary would get around that one. During turbulence passengers also have to have a seat belt on." In response to criticism for the idea, technological determinist O'Leary suggested haters were a bunch of Luddites who couldn't groove with the changes. "People are always slow to accept the changes that face the aviation industry, even though it is already almost unrecognizable from 20 to 30 years ago," said a Ryanair spokesman, as reported by the Guardian. CNNGo: 10 adventures for chocoholics 4. Charging for overweight passengers Backpackers around the world put down their Italian gelato when they heard about Ryanair's "fat tax." The airline asked passengers on its website whether or not they should charge for "very large passengers." "Over 100,000 passengers logged on to ryanair.com to take part in our competition and almost one in three (over 30,000) think that very large passengers should be asked to pay a fat tax. The revenues from any such 'fat tax' will be used to lower the airfares for all Ryanair passengers yet further," Ryanair's McNamara said. This time the plan did not go ahead, not out of ethical

www.cnn.com/2011/10/17/travel/ryanair-money-saving-schemes/index.html

2/3


8/30/12

Ryanair's 5 'cheapest' money-saving schemes - CNN.com considerations but because it would be hard to collect the money and would make boarding much slower. 5. Charging extra £40 to print boarding passes Ryanair currently charges passengers £40 (US$63) to print their boarding pass at the airport. The charge was intended to speed up the check­in process. In January 2011, a passenger took the budget airline to court over the charge in Spain. In October 11 2011, the Barcelona Appeal Court ruled that Ryanair's boarding card was perfectly legal in accordance with Spanish and EU law. The airline's smug response to the verdict on their website was that "less than 1 percent of passengers pay this boarding card reissue penalty which applies only in those rare cases where passengers fail to comply with their agreement, given at the time of booking." Passengers can avoid the reissue penalty by checking in online before leaving for the airport.

© 2011 Cable News Network Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Loading weather data...

Home  |  Video  |  NewsPulse  |  U.S.  |  World  |  Politics  |  Justice  |  Entertainment  |  Tech  |  Health  |  Living  |  Travel  |  Opinion  |  iReport  |  Money  |  Sports Tools & widgets  |  RSS  |  Podcasts  |  Blogs  |  CNN mobile  |  My profile  |  E­mail alerts  |  CNN shop  |  Site map

© 2012 Cable News Network. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Terms of service | Privacy guidelines | Ad choices

 | Advertise with us | About us | Contact us | Work for us | Help

www.cnn.com/2011/10/17/travel/ryanair-money-saving-schemes/index.html

CNN en ESPAÑOL | CNN Chile | CNN Expansion | ‫ﺍﻟﻌﺭﺑﻳﺔ‬ | 한국어 | 日本語 | Türkçe CNN TV | HLN | Transcripts |

3/3


8/29/12

10 hostel mates you meet in hell | CNNGo.com Register  Sign In

CNN International

Follow

LATEST   DESTINATIONS   SPECIALS   iREPORT   CONTESTS   MOBILE   TV

10 hostel mates you meet in hell

Like

Send

276k

切換到繁體中文

The moocher, the clinger, the snob. You've probably bunked with at least one of these irritating roommates on your travels By Jordan Burchette (/author/jordan­burchette)  , Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung) 

Like

3 November, 2011

Tim Cheng, James Durston and 916 others like this.

16

Tweet

86

Hostels are great places to cultivate friendships and share your experiences abroad. It's just a shame you can't always choose your neighbors. No matter where you are, you'll yearn to be any place else. Meet the 10 people you never want to find sleeping above or below your bed.  Also on CNNGo: World's best tourists (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/worlds­best­tourists­ 026319)

1. The one­man eating band

If it doesn't crunch or crinkle, he won't eat it.

How to identify: He dines on only the most pungent, debris­yielding, noisily packaged foodstuffs ... at all times. His bunk is no more a sleeping quarters than an ogre's lair of gnashed pork byproducts and discarded nut husks. Reason to hate: Once the crumbs fall from his beard and bounce off his shirt, they inevitably land on the floor, inviting exotic foreign insects to crawl under your skin at night. Redeeming quality: After misinterpreting your death stare for interest, he offers you a yogurt granola bar. Also on CNNGo: 10 resorts for every kind of traveler (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/10­great­ resorts­every­traveler­256092)

2. The top­bunk bladder

At least he waits till he gets down to do it.

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/10-hostel-mates-you-meet-hell-425328

1/8


8/29/12

10 hostel mates you meet in hell | CNNGo.com

How to identify: Up and down that bunk ladder like he’s on night duty, this leaky faucet can't remain still for more than 90 seconds before having to clamber back down from his bunk in the noisiest fashion possible for a 29th trip to the bathroom or smoking area. Reason to hate: Right when you’re dozing off, he uses your bed as a step, crushing your left arm. Redeeming quality: Considerately refrains from smoking or peeing on top of you.

3. The personal hygienist

"Clip, clip, clip." The most subtle horror movie soundtrack ever conceived.

How to identify: He's got an inexhaustible supply of uncut toe­ and fingernails, and the world is his day spa. You know he's aboard before you're even round the corner, with the distinctive snap of his clippers scattering shards of thick, brittle keratin all about the cabin. Reason to hate: You'd rather be caught in the teeth of a Sarlacc pit than roll onto one of his sharp discarded nails, but you do, anyway. And it’s even grosser than you thought. Redeeming quality: After he sees your own unkempt vacation gargoyle claws, he offers his clippers. Also on CNNGo: Essential travel clothes for girls on the road (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/10­clothing­items­every­backpacker­girl­needs­200634)

4. Carmen Sandiego

"So weird, I was on a yacht in Capri then my old roommate from Belgium brought me the book I left in my Cape Town hotel."

How to identify: She will identify you. As someone who cares. She has been to every corner of the earth and will casually mention to you and everyone within earshot how well traveled she is. She will undoubtedly brag about Nepal or Myanmar, as Carmen Sandiegos think these Buddhist destinations make them more enlightened than you. Reasons to hate: Despite saving every penny you’ve ever earned, you’ve never been or never will be in any of the places she mentions because your mother does not work for Cathay Pacific. Redeeming quality: Will offer up her collection of used Lonely Planet books.

5. The Stage 5 clinger

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/10-hostel-mates-you-meet-hell-425328

2/8


8/29/12

10 hostel mates you meet in hell | CNNGo.com

Drinking games? How about hide­and­go­seek?

How to identify: The clinger will find any reason, any reason at all, to break the ice and never let it melt. “Is that a Timex watch? I had one in college, when I was studying international business. Now I’m a trader, what do you do?” Reason to hate: You can’t escape the clinger. Once they've got you talking, they will never leave your side. They will assume all activities, cooking, sightseeing, laundering, will be done together. Redeeming quality: Will ask you to help cash in on their two­for­one meal deals. Also on CNNGo: World's 20 most iconic skyscrapers (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/20­most­ iconic­skyscrapers­343149) Tags: 

You might like:

Paid Distribution

(http://www.cnngo.com

(http://www.cnngo.com

/explorations/life/2012­

(http://www.cnngo.com

world­airline­awards­

/explorations/life/less­

956445)

porn­please­im­airbnb­

(CNNGo)

hostess­470596)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

(CNNGo)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

explorations/life/2012­

(http://www.cnngo.com/

explorations/escape/co

world­airline­awards­

explorations/life/less­

stliest­hotels­list­

956445)

porn­please­im­airbnb­

637685)

The world's best Pushy guests and /explorations/life/2012­ /explorations/life/less­ airline for 2012 is . porn: Confessions porn­please­im­airbnb­ .world­airline­awards­ ​ .​ ​ of an Airbnb 956445) hostess­470596) (http://www.cnngo.com hostess

(http://www.cnngo.com

(javascript:void(0)) (http://www.redbull.co

World's most /explorations/escape/c m/cs/Satellite/en_INT/ expensive cities for THE MAN OF ARAN | ARTEM ostliest­hotels­list­ Article/red­bull­cliff­ a hotel room SILCHENKO 637685) diving­on­inis­mor­ (http://www.cnngo.com WINS CLIFF /explorations/escape/co 021243242777624? DIVING stliest­hotels­list­ p=1242745960019) COMPETITION 637685) ON INIS MOR (CNNGo)

hostess­470596)

(http://www.redbull.co m/cs/Satellite/en_INT/ Article/red­bull­cliff­ diving­on­inis­mor­ 021243242777624? p=1242745960019)

(Red Bull)

(http://www.cnngo.com

7 great alternative /explorations/escape/b Spring Break est­usa­ destinations

travel/alternative­ (http://www.cnngo.com /explorations/escape/b spring­breaks­700719) est­usa­ travel/alternative­ spring­breaks­700719)

(CNNGo) (http://www.cnngo.com/ explorations/escape/be st­usa­ travel/alternative­ spring­breaks­700719)

(http://www.redbull.com /cs/Satellite/en_INT/Arti cle/red­bull­cliff­diving­ on­inis­mor­ 021243242777624? p=1242745960019)

[?] (javascript:void(0))

61 comments

3 Stars

Leave a message...

Discussion

Community

fuzzynormal

10 months ago

If you've never met one of these people on the list, chances are that's because you are that person. 23

Reply

Scott Hall

Share ›

10 months ago • parent

So true, there was only one I hadn't met, and then I realized it was me. :P 1

Reply

Share ›

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/10-hostel-mates-you-meet-hell-425328

3/8


8/29/12

Essential travel clothes for girls on the road | CNNGo.com Register  Sign In

CNN International

Follow

LATEST   DESTINATIONS   SPECIALS   iREPORT   CONTESTS   MOBILE   TV

Essential travel clothes for girls on the road Like

Send

276k

切换到简体中文

Overpacking is travel suicide. Tote these versatile threads to leave room for souvenirs By Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung) 

Like

23 September, 2011

Zhang Menghui and 183 others like this.

2

Tweet

28

That dream you have to see the world with nothing but a notepad, pencil and small cloth sack will probably never come true. Let's face it, only the most ascetic of travelers can happily get robe­and­waterpot simple. But there are ways to make the most of a little when on a trip.  Here's how to combine cute, comfy and functional in 10 packable items.  

1. Pashmina Superior to plain old knit scarves, pashminas have the power to turn a sloppy backpacker in a sundress into a respectable visitor. You’d be surprised how big your pashmina opens up when it’s not around your neck. It's the perfect width for covering shoulders or heads when visiting mosques or temples in conservative countries like Pakistan or Malaysia.

Even Hollywood messiah Angelina Jolie comes prepared.

Wound up in a fancy­ish restaurant? Wrap a pashmina around your chest or shoulders to smarten up that ratty tank top if you want decent service.  Buy pashminas at www.mypashmina.co.uk

(http://www.mypashmina.co.uk/)  or just go to any street market in the world and someone will try to sell

you one.

2. Boyfriend’s T­shirt No, this isn't just for smelling because you miss him so much. A large T­shirt makes a great pillow case if you’re ever caught in a dodgy (or dirty) hostel that charges for linen. Despite your efforts to be loyal, you might wind up in a co­ ed dorm room and nothing says “Don’t watch me sleep” like a girl in a man’s shirt. Cheap Monday Zahl V­Neck Solid Tee; US$35; www.urbanoutfitters.com No boyfriend? Wash the mustard stains out of dad's tee and you're set.

(http://www.urbanoutfitters.com/urban/catalog/productdetail.jsp? id=22536635&color=010&itemdescription=true&navAction=jump&search=true&isProduct=true&parentid=M_TOPS)

3. Oversized button­up Oxford shirt Avoid buying this shirt in a wrinkly material like linen. If you’re daring, try chiffon because it dries quickly, doesn’t wrinkle easily and breathes well. Worn with a belt, this works as a smart dress. Tucked in, it can make you look professional ­­ useful for that waitress gig you'll need if you run out of money. Get it in white and it makes a great straitjacket get­up if you're unexpectedly invited to a costume party. Oh, and it makes a great beach cover­up.

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/10-clothing-items-every-backpacker-girl-needs-200634

1/3


8/29/12

Essential travel clothes for girls on the road | CNNGo.com Chiffon oversized button­up; US$58; store.americanapparel.net (http://store.americanapparel.net/rsa0324.html)

Chiffon oversized button­up US$58. Sexy pout not included.

(http://store.americanapparel.net/rsa8339.html#i)

4. Thigh socks If you’re flying to a hot country, it’s a pain dragging around those pants you wore just for the air­conditioned plane. Especially since those itchy napkin­sized blankets aren’t doing your feet any favors. So, save space and roll up a pair of purse­friendly thigh socks under your skirt or shorts to keep your legs warm.

Sexy, coquettish schoolgirl? Wrong. Thigh­ warming jet setter.

If returning home with too much stuff, these act as huge elastics, so they are useful for tying on extras to your backpack ­­ or if you find yourself at a crime scene and need mittens. Long Ribbed Angora Mix Sock; £10 (US$16); www.asos.com

(http://www.asos.com/ASOS/ASOS­Premium­Long­Ribbed­Angora­Mix­Sock/Prod/pgeproduct.aspx? iid=1297914&SearchRedirect=true&SearchQuery=thigh%20socks)

5. Cargo shorts There are two annoying things about sitting in a bar when traveling: worrying about where to put your purse so it won’t get stolen, and getting hit on by creepy men. Cargo shorts are a two in one, because they don’t scream “look at me!” when you’re drinking at a bar, especially when you’ve stuffed your pockets full of passport, lipstick, gum, or whatever else we put in our purses, making your butt look like a Florence flask (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_flask) . Put some trash in your pockets to add some junk to your trunk.

True Religion cropped shorts US$77; www.shopbop.com (http://www.shopbop.com/jenna­loose­cropped­cargo­ shorts/vp/v=1/845524441894717.htm?fm=search­viewall­ shopbysize)

Tags: 

You might like:

Paid Distribution

(http://www.cnngo.com

World's 10 most /explorations/life/10­ loved cities

most­loved­cities­ (http://www.cnngo.com 068149) /explorations/life/10­ most­loved­cities­ 068149)

(CNNGo) (http://www.cnngo.com/ explorations/life/10­ most­loved­cities­

(javascript:void(0)) (http://filmtrailers.net/fil

(http://www.cnngo.com

Why you should m/planes­trains­and­ /explorations/life/10­ Planes, Trains and never take a Automobiles automobiles) things­not­bring­your­ Kinder Egg into (http://filmtrailers.net/f holiday­396838) the United States

(http://www.cnngo.com

(http://www.cnngo.com

12 overlooked /explorations/escape/1 islands worth 2­overlooked­islands­ visiting

7 great alternative /explorations/escape/b Spring Break est­usa­ destinations

ilm/planes­trains­and­

worth­visiting­454538) (http://www.cnngo.com

travel/alternative­ (http://www.cnngo.com

(http://www.cnngo.com

automobiles)

/explorations/escape/12

/explorations/escape/b spring­breaks­700719)

/explorations/life/10­

­overlooked­islands­

est­usa­

things­not­bring­your­

worth­visiting­454538)

travel/alternative­

holiday­396838)

(CNNGo)

spring­breaks­700719)

(CNNGo)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

(CNNGo)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

explorations/escape/12

(http://www.cnngo.com/

(Film​ Trailers) (http://filmtrailers.net/fil m/planes­trains­and­ automobiles)

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/10-clothing-items-every-backpacker-girl-needs-200634

2/3


8/30/12

Jane Leung: Tired of not being 'Chinese enough' | CNNGo.com Register  Sign In

CNN International

Follow

LATEST   GUIDES   HONG KONG ESSENTIALS   iREPORT   CONTESTS   MOBILE   TV

Like

276k

切換到繁體中文

Jane Leung: Tired of not being 'Chinese enough' A Canadian­Chinese stakes her claim on the native land By Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung) 

Like

Send

12 April, 2011

Charlene Fang, Paul Leung and 407 others like this.

0

Tweet

31

“Banana’s here! Poor thing. Illiterate and can’t speak properly.” This was not the welcome I expected from family friends when I arrived in Hong Kong from Canada. I had grown up as the token Asian, but now I had become the token white girl, a.k.a. the “gwai mui.” I am Chinese. I look Chinese. I was born in Hong Kong. I have had Confucian principles bred into me from birth. I put career and good grades above life itself and believe that whatever I can’t achieve through talent I can make happen through hard work and self­discipline. Yet, if I listen to friends and family here in Hong Kong, I am no more Chinese than lemon chicken. I was raised in a Western community in Canada and speak basic Cantonese, but can’t read or write it, which apparently means I am a sell­out, a banana (yellow on the outside, white on the inside) with no right to associate with locals or their higher Chinese values. It is apparent to me that some Chinese feel “more Chinese,” thus superior to those who aren’t fluent in the language. But from Liverpool to Melbourne, Paris to San Francisco, don’t you ever wonder why there are so many Chinatowns all over the world? It’s because more than 18 million Chinese have left China since the 1970s. That number represents just half of the approximately 35 million Chinese who live outside of China, making the Chinese the most visible diaspora on Earth, according to professor Peter Kwong in Yale Magazine (http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/chinese­migration­goes­global) . Global Chinese migrations have created hyphenated nationalities such as Chinese­Canadian or Chinese­Indonesian. In order to socially and economically survive in new societies, first generation immigrants often adapt to their new countries' languages, at the expense of mastering the character strokes or the native tongue of Chinese.

Embarassing hyphens So why are they put to shame for not being fluent in the language of a country where they didn’t grow up? I wasn’t raised in a Chinese community such as Richmond or Burnaby, British Columbia. I grew up in a “white community” next to a pig farm in the small town of Port Coquitlam, B.C. My single working mother didn’t have time to teach me or my brother how to read or write Chinese, and by necessity I was more concerned with excelling in school and dealing with regular teen problems such as fitting in with the cool white kids. This is not unusual. Everyone has issues growing up that prevent them from being the best they can be.

What makes me Chinese? Never doubting that I am one.

Despite my illiteracy in Cantonese, I made the move to Hong Kong equipped with hardcore “Chinese” values that I believed everyone would appreciate. I would no longer be the “token Asian.” For the first time, I would finally be one of "them."

www.cnngo.com/hong-kong/life/jane-leung-banana-speaks-out-382737

1/10


8/30/12

Jane Leung: Tired of not being 'Chinese enough' | CNNGo.com

When I arrived, it was the complete opposite. During my first internship in Hong Kong, a Chinese guy passed me a note written in Chinese characters. I said to him, “I can’t read this.” He cackled, “That’s the point! You’re illiterate!” A few weeks later, my father introduced me to one of his co­workers, who ended the conversation with, “You know, it embarrasses your father that little children can speak better Cantonese than you. You’re not really Chinese.” These are just two of many Hong Kong incidents that irked me. Nonetheless, I am not ashamed. The reason other “bananas” shouldn’t feel ashamed is because the charge doesn’t fit the crime.

Ching­chong is Chinese Being raised in Chinese­speaking places such as Hong Kong (or Richmond) doesn’t make you Chinese. If you’re proud to call yourself Chinese and were brought up with Chinese values, then you’re Chinese. As for the older Chinese generation who pick on us, their superiority complex is actually a cover­up for their own insecurity in their ability to remain competitive members of a rapidly changing workforce. Back when the British ruled Hong Kong, there was more segregation between whites and Chinese. Now, the economic boom in China is attracting expats who need to work alongside locals, often speaking fluent Chinese, resulting in more of a melting pot. Not everyone is ready to adapt. On the other hand, I stepped out of my comfort zone to relocate my entire life to better understand where my family came from and practice my Canto. I made my first monoglot Cantonese friends here, I watch Chinese movies, I chill with grandma to force myself to practice and I’m not ashamed to say I bought a children’s Chinese textbook. For locals who can’t adapt to multiculturalism accepted in other countries, the only way they think they can tangibly confront this issue is by picking on what they believe is the living embodiment of something they fear: Westernized Chinese kids. Being a hyphenated Chinese is often hard because traditionalists have so much pride in what they are that they will bluntly remind others to be more Chinese. Oddly enough, that’s one of the things I’ve come to unconditionally love about my culture. So what makes me Chinese? Never doubting that I am one.

The opinions of this commentary are solely those of Jane Leung and do not reflect the views of CNNGo.

 

 (/author/jane­leung)

Jane Leung is a Hong Kong­born Canadian who has dabbled in the mixed media bag of film and television production, the professional sports industry and magazine publishing. 

Read more about Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung)

Tags: 

You might like:

Paid Distribution

(http://www.cnngo.com

(http://www.cnngo.com

Half­naked, all /hong­ smiles: kong/shop/abercrombi Abercrombie & e­340592) Fitch opens in Hong Kong

88 things to do /hong­kong/play/88­ this summer in things­do­summer­ Hong Kong

(http://www.cnngo.com

things­do­summer­

/hong­

654587)

kong/shop/abercrombie

(CNNGo Hong Kong)

­340592)

654587) (http://www.cnngo.com /hong­kong/play/88­

(CNNGo Hong Kong)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

(http://www.cnngo.com/

things­do­summer­

hong­

654587)

hong­kong/play/88­

(javascript:void(0)) (http://www.redbull.co

m/cs/Satellite/en_INT/ Disney Pixar’s Eight Greatest Article/Eight­great­ Moments | Movie moments­from­Brave­ Feature

creators­Disney­ (http://www.redbull.co 021243242545573? m/cs/Satellite/en_INT/ p=1242745950170) Article/Eight­great­ moments­from­Brave­ creators­Disney­ 021243242545573? p=1242745950170)

(Red Bull)

kong/shop/abercrombie

(http://www.redbull.com

­340592)

/cs/Satellite/en_INT/Arti

(http://www.cnngo.com

Hong Kong's best /hong­kong/eat/best­ rice

(http://www.cnngo.com

rice­257998) (http://www.cnngo.com

How to be a Hong /hong­kong/life/how­ Kong local: 10 tips be­local­10­tips­faking­ on faking it

/hong­kong/eat/best­

it­316802) (http://www.cnngo.com

rice­257998)

/hong­kong/life/how­

(CNNGo Hong Kong)

be­local­10­tips­faking­

(http://www.cnngo.com/ hong­kong/eat/best­

(CNNGo Hong Kong)

rice­257998)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

it­316802)

hong­kong/life/how­be­ local­10­tips­faking­it­ 316802)

cle/Eight­great­

www.cnngo.com/hong-kong/life/jane-leung-banana-speaks-out-382737

2/10


8/29/12

In-flight myths, busted | CNNGo.com Register  Sign In

CNN International

Follow

LATEST   DESTINATIONS   SPECIALS   iREPORT   CONTESTS   MOBILE   TV

6 in­flight myths, busted

Like

Send

276k

切換到繁體中文   Switch to 한국어

Why do you always get sick on a flight? Why do we "brace?" Why do flight attendants talk like that? We have the answers By Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung) 

Like

5 January, 2012

Joni Freeman, João Paulo and 615 others like this.

18

Tweet

231

From the moment you enter an aircraft you are pummeled with instructions: turn your phone off, put your window blind up, put your seat upright, eat this slop. How often do you stop to question why? Airlines aren’t trying to make travel painful. There’s a good reason for nearly every in­flight burden.   

(mailto:?subject=6 in-flight myths,

ed&body=http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/flight-

1. Why flight attendants talk like cyborgs Myth: Flight attendants are bossy robots.

eries-explained-085800)

Fact: Flight attendants need you to listen and cooperate. Does your flight attendant remind you of “Seven of Nine (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JckeeSxe6Rc) ” from “Star Trek ­­ Voyager”? Flight attendants often take on the hot Borg’s direct and robotic demeanor to make passengers listen. 

She, and flight attendants, know how to make you listen.

They “will go ahead and put your seat in the up­right position” and they’re going to “need you to take your seat.” A recently published article (http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffbercovici/2011/11/23/ever­wonder­

why­flight­attendants­talk­that­way/)  at Forbes (http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffbercovici/2011/11/23/ever­wonder­ why­flight­attendants­talk­that­way/) , written by staffer Jeff Bercovici (http://blogs.forbes.com/jeffbercovici/) ,

took an inquisitive look at the assertive vocabulary used by flight attendants. The article (http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffbercovici/2011/11/23/ever­wonder­why­flight­attendants­talk­that­way/) found that the extraneous words like “will go ahead” are linguistic techniques to catch the passenger’s attention early in a sentence so the request doesn’t have to be repeated, which is especially handy in an emergency. More on CNNGo: 9 easy ways to make a flight attendant go insane (http://www.cnngo.com/bangkok/visit/9­easy­ways­make­flight­attendant­go­insane­609432)

2. Why we open window blinds and put seats upright Myth: We do this to “reset” the plane for the next round of passengers. Fact: It's a subtle safety feature. Pulling up the blinds makes us alert to potential hazards.

"I'll just make do for the last 30 minutes."

Elin Wong, corporate communications manager for Cathay Pacific, explains, “We ask all passengers to pull up the window shelf before landing, so that any abnormalities outside the aircraft can be duly observed by the cabin crew or passengers and be reported to the cockpit crew if necessary.” 

As for that stiff 90­degree seated incline, it's all about reducing impact. A former Air Canada flight attendant tells us that shifting those few centimeters forward reduces the distance from your head to the seat in front of you.

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/flight-mysteries-explained-085800

1/5


8/29/12

In-flight myths, busted | CNNGo.com

It also makes it easier for the passenger behind to evacuate.

3. Why we get sick from planes Myth: Re­circulated air in a plane makes us sick. Fact: Re­circulated air is actually very sanitary; we get sick from what we touch. According to Boeing (http://www.boeing.com/commercial/cabinair/) , cabin air is

constantly being replaced by pressurized fresh air from outside. That air also passes through filters that remove 99.97 percent of any airborne pathogens like bacteria and viruses. That arm rest is dirtier than what's going through that mask.

But frequently used surfaces like tray tables, pillows, seat arms, seats, toilets and sinks are less sanitary, often contacted by hundreds of passengers in a single day. 

Popular science and technology blog iO9 (http://io9.com/5862234/why­flying­on­planes­can­make­you­sick­ +­and­how­to­stop­it) consulted microbiology experts who explained that one toilet per 50 passengers is a far more likely reason you'll fall ill than the air. The answer ­­ don't bother with the facial mask, opt for disinfectant wipes and hand sanitizer instead. More on CNNGo: In­flight wishlis (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/flight­wish­list­how­would­you­ make­air­travel­fun­823209) t: How would you make air travel fun? (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/flight­wish­list­how­would­you­make­air­travel­fun­823209)

4. Why airline food tastes bad Myth: Airline food is disgusting because it's cheap and pre­processed. Fact: Airline food actually tastes OK; it's the noise from the engine that distracts us.  It’s hard to comprehend at first, but the University of Manchester research article, “Effect of background noise on food perception

Silence makes the taste grow fonder. (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950329310001217) ” published by the BBC (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science­environment­11525897) , reported that if background noise is too loud,

it might draw attention away from the taste of food and towards the noise. In the article, researcher Andy Woods fed various foods to people while they were listening to nothing or noise through headphones. He found that noisy conditions caused the subjects' perception of saltiness and sweetness to lower, and their perception of crunchiness to increase. So the loud and constant noise from an aircraft's engines could have the same effect, he explains.

5. Why we brace during an emergency Myth: We brace to make us feel like we have a chance of surviving; we brace to ensure we are still and calm during an emergency; we brace to preserve our dental records so coroners can identify us after a crash. Fact: The Australian Government Civil Aviation Safety Authority (http://www.casa.gov.au/scripts/nc.dll? WCMS:STANDARD::pc=PC_91469)  clarifies, “It has been proven that passengers who assume the brace position sustain substantially less serious injuries than other passengers.” A proven position for injury minimization.

Furthermore, the Federal Aviation Administration

(http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance_Library/rgAdvisoryCircular.nsf/0/2026259a7a7247f986256d7a00508

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/flight-mysteries-explained-085800

2/5


8/29/12

In-flight myths, busted | CNNGo.com

ba7/$FILE/AC121­24C.pdf) regulatory guideline says bracing is meant to reduce secondary impact, by

positioning the body (particularly the head) against the surface it would strike during impact.  The other reason to brace is to reduce flailing around. And we all know that flailing ­­ in any situation ­­ will get you hurt.

6. Why we turn off cell phones Myth: Cell phone signals interefere with aircraft electronics. Fact: Airlines are adhering to aviation guidelines that restrict the use of personal electronic devices (PEDs), even though evidence that they interfere with aircraft systems is lacking. Airlines aren’t actually 100 percent sure that phones will interfere with aircraft systems. After all, a recent study (http://press­office.holidayextras.co.uk/2011/12/confession­actor­is­ "Words With Friends" can get you, and your airline, into trouble.

just­one­of­6­5­million­to­admit­to­using­a­mobile­in­flight/)

 claimed nearly 6.5 million people in 12 months left their phones on while they flew in and out of the United Kingdom without any problems. 

But most aviation authorities, such as the Federal Aviation Administration (http://www.faa.gov/news/fact_sheets/news_story.cfm?newsid=6275)  (FAA), prohibit the use of cell phones and other PEDs unless it can be proved they definitely do not interfere.  To get approval to use a mobile, the airline would have to test every single model of phone with every single model of aircraft to make sure it doesn’t interfere with both the plane and ground networks ­­ which would be just a little too time consuming and expensive. It's far easier just to ask people to turn their phones off. More on CNNGO: All­time best in­flight celeb dramas (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/how­ get­kicked­plane­rock­star­551701)

 (/author/jane­leung)

Jane Leung is a Hong Kong­born Canadian who has dabbled in the mixed media bag of film and television production, the professional sports industry and magazine publishing. 

Read more about Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung)

Tags: 

You might like:

Paid Distribution

(http://www.cnngo.com

(javascript:void(0)) (http://www.readersdig

Which country has /explorations/eat/world 13 Things You est.ca/travel/tips/13­ the best food? Didn't Know s­best­food­cultures­ things­you­didnt­know­ (http://www.cnngo.com About Strange 453528) about­strange­ /explorations/eat/world International s­best­food­cultures­ international­laws) Laws 453528)

(CNNGo) (http://www.cnngo.com/ explorations/eat/worlds­ best­food­cultures­ 453528)

(http://www.readersdig est.ca/travel/tips/13­ things­you­didnt­know­ about­strange­ international­laws)

(Reader's Digest) (http://www.readersdige st.ca/travel/tips/13­

(http://www.cnngo.com

World's most /explorations/escape/ beautiful towns

(http://www.cnngo.com

(http://www.cnngo.com

worlds­most­beautiful­ (http://www.cnngo.com towns­580013) /explorations/escape/w

Pushy guests and /explorations/life/less­ porn: Confessions porn­please­im­airbnb­ of an Airbnb hostess­470596) hostess

orlds­most­beautiful­

(http://www.cnngo.com

towns­580013)

/explorations/life/less­

(CNNGo)

porn­please­im­airbnb­

(http://www.cnngo.com traveling­648608) /explorations/life/faceb

(http://www.cnngo.com/

hostess­470596)

ook­confirms­what­

explorations/escape/wo

(CNNGo)

weve­known­years­

rlds­most­beautiful­

(http://www.cnngo.com/

people­show­about­

towns­580013)

explorations/life/less­

traveling­648608)

porn­please­im­airbnb­

(CNNGo)

hostess­470596)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

things­you­didnt­know­ about­strange­ international­laws)

Facebook confirms /explorations/life/faceb what we've known ook­confirms­what­ for years ­­ people weve­known­years­ like to brag about travel people­show­about­

explorations/life/facebo ok­confirms­what­weve­ known­years­people­ show­about­traveling­ 648608)

[?] (javascript:void(0))

15 comments www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/flight-mysteries-explained-085800

3 Stars

3/5


8/29/12

6 outrageous transportation boondoggles | CNNGo.com Register  Sign In

CNN International

Follow

LATEST   DESTINATIONS   SPECIALS   iREPORT   CONTESTS   MOBILE   TV

Like

276k

6 outrageous transportation boondoggles The most wasteful, badly planned, extravagantly reckless examples of man's failed attempts to get somewhere quicker By Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung) 

Like

Send

27 June, 2011

J Mark Lytle Hiratsuka, James Durston and 352 others like this.

0

Tweet

16

From France’s Panama Canal debacle to this year’s Chinese high­speed train scandal, transportation projects seem to bring out the best/worst in civic overreach.

6. Alaska’s 'Road to Nowhere' (2006­2008) Location: Ketchikan, Alaska, United States The dream: Build a bridge to replace the ferry linking the coastal city of Ketchikan (population 7,515) to its airport on Gravina Island. The reality: Construction of the bridge was halted after pressure from citizens who deemed the project an unnecessary luxury and symbol of government waste. Too bad by the time the idea was scrapped, the ink had already dried on the contract to build a US$25 million road leading to the bridge (http://articles.cnn.com/2008­09­ Like a bad tattoo you got when you were high on life.

24/politics/palin.road.to.nowhere_1_mccain­palin­sarah­palin­ alaska­gov?_s=PM:POLITICS) . Workers went ahead and built

the road (completed in 2008), knowing that it would amount to an extravagant dead end.

Projected cost: US$400 million Actual cost: US$26 million for the road (but no bridge) Outcome: A hilarious photograph of a “road to nowhere” and a fiasco that became a minor issue in the 2008 U.S. presidential campaign for Alaska governor and Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin. Also on CNNGo: 24 of the world's greatest bridges (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/none/24­ worlds­most­amazing­bridges­062644)

(http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/none/24­worlds­most­amazing­bridges­062644)

5. Melbourne’s Myki System (2005­present) Location: Melbourne, Australia The dream: Develop a high­tech, fare­ and time­saving touch­card payment system��to be used on Melbourne public trains, trams and buses. Contracted in 2005, the project should have been completed in 2007. The reality: Poor planning, mismanagement, human error and computer errors resulted in huge delays and a maddeningly inconsistent system. 

Painful to the touch.

Getting Myki's bumbling reputation off to a terrible start, many new cards were mistakenly sent to dead people, among then, deceased military veterans as reported by The Herald Sun (http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/the­myki­ mess­times­30000/story­e6frf7jo­1225817527742) .

In 2010, Melbourne's Transport Ticketing Authority admitted it had been forced to recall more than 30,000 "smartcards." On Myki’s first full day of operation, a number of cards failed to scan (http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/still­not­perfect­but­myki­makes­full­debut­­at­last­20100725­10qkw.html) ,

resulting in hellish commuter lines. Other cards over­ or under­charged users.

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/6-worst-transportation-boondoggles-656455

1/3


8/29/12

6 outrageous transportation boondoggles | CNNGo.com

Computer glitches (http://www.theage.com.au/national/commuters­get­167000­windfall­in­myki­shemozzle­ 20100202­na3c.html) led to A$167,000 accidentally being deposited into three lucky commuters’ smartcard accounts.  Locals ended up losing money by being overcharged and paying taxes to support continuing upgrades to the system. Projected cost: A$494 million Actual cost: A$844 million Outcome: Although the authorities have contemplated scrapping Myki altogether, for now the ticketing system is in operation and improvements are being slowly implemented. Also on CNNGo: 10 greatest taxis of the world  (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/worlds­best­ taxis­013358) Tags: 

You might like:

Paid Distribution

(http://www.cnngo.com

World's most /explorations/escape/ beautiful towns

worlds­most­beautiful­ (http://www.cnngo.com towns­580013) /explorations/escape/w orlds­most­beautiful­ towns­580013)

(CNNGo)

(http://www.cnngo.com

(http://www.cnngo.com

(http://www.cnngo.com/

(CNNGo)

explorations/escape/wo

explorations/eat/worlds­

(http://www.cnngo.com/

rlds­most­beautiful­

best­food­cultures­

explorations/escape/co

towns­580013)

453528)

stliest­hotels­list­

(http://www.cnngo.com/

(javascript:void(0)) (http://www.redbull.co

Which country has World's most /explorations/eat/world /explorations/escape/c m/cs/Satellite/en_INT/ the best food? expensive cities for THE MAN OF ARAN | ARTEM s­best­food­cultures­ ostliest­hotels­list­ Article/red­bull­cliff­ (http://www.cnngo.com a hotel room SILCHENKO 453528) 637685) diving­on­inis­mor­ (http://www.cnngo.com /explorations/eat/world WINS CLIFF /explorations/escape/co 021243242777624? s­best­food­cultures­ DIVING stliest­hotels­list­ 453528) p=1242745960019) COMPETITION 637685) (CNNGo) ON INIS MOR

637685)

(http://www.redbull.co m/cs/Satellite/en_INT/ Article/red­bull­cliff­ diving­on­inis­mor­ 021243242777624?

(http://www.cnngo.com

Insider Guide: Best /explorations/escape/d of Moscow estinations/insider­ (http://www.cnngo.com guide­best­moscow­ /explorations/escape/d estinations/insider­ 768517) guide­best­moscow­ 768517)

(CNNGo) (http://www.cnngo.com/ explorations/escape/de stinations/insider­guide­ best­moscow­768517)

p=1242745960019)

(Red Bull) (http://www.redbull.com /cs/Satellite/en_INT/Arti cle/red­bull­cliff­diving­ on­inis­mor­ 021243242777624? p=1242745960019)

[?] (javascript:void(0))

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/6-worst-transportation-boondoggles-656455

2/3


8/29/12

What to tip: How to tip like a local | CNNGo.com Register  Sign In

CNN International

Follow

LATEST   DESTINATIONS   SPECIALS   iREPORT   CONTESTS   MOBILE   TV

Like

276k

What to tip, how much and where ­­ Tipping guide for travelers Skip the awkward exit, follow our comprehensive gratuity guide for big cities like Rio, Cape Town, Hong Kong and more By Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung) 

Like

Send

1 March, 2012

54 people like this. Be the first of your friends.

2

Tweet

43

Tip too little and you’re blacklisted, tip too much and you’re a chump. Different cultures call for different gratuity customs, so here's a comprehensive guide to the etiquette in seven different big cities. But when in doubt, remember the golden rule ­­ always leave 10 percent and you won't get chased down the street. Probably. Got your tipping tips for lesser known destinations? Let us hear them in the comments Also on CNNGo: Best places to travel to in 2012 (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/escape/best­ places­visit­2012­776891%20) (mailto:?subject=What to tip, how much and where --

ng guide for

lers&body=http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/how-

Toronto, Canada

p-like-local-569155)

Canada is known as a friendly place, but skip the tip and you may set off a riot. Giving gratuities is heavily emphasized in the service culture and servers rely on their tips as a big part of their income. Restaurants: The bill will come with a 13 percent government Harmonized Sales Tax, but a 10­15 percent tip is still expected for standard service. If the service was above average, 20 percent is expected. If the meal was not satisfactory, alert a manager instead of foregoing the tip. He or she may be able to offer a complimentary dish or discount. A CA$1­2 (US$1­2) tip is expected at the bar, and 10­20 percent is still expected for table service.

"That smile isn't free, is it?"

Taxi: Cabbing is not common outside downtown Toronto. A small tip of C$1­2 is expected. Hotel: Tipping is at the discretion of the guest but a CA$5 tip is sufficient for porters who carry your bags.

Other: Tipping in cafés is not expected, but give your pizza delivery guy a CA$2­5 tip.

London, England  Brits are not as keen on tipping as their transatlantic cousins, but in certain situations it is expected, especially for good service. Restaurants: Diners are not expected to add an additional tip if there is already a 10­12 percent service charge in the bill. If the bill says “service charge not included!!!” leave a 10 percent tip. Taxi: If a cab is any kind other than a black cab, passengers usually round to the nearest pound or just tell the driver to “keep the change.” Black cabs are more worthy of tips because they have better knowledge

Expect to get more and pay more on these

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/how-to-tip-like-local-569155

1/4


8/29/12

What to tip: How to tip like a local | CNNGo.com

iconic rides. (http://www.tfl.gov.uk/businessandpartners/taxisandprivatehire/1412.aspx) of London's maze­like roads. Tip

at least 10 percent.  Hotel: Tipping is at the discretion of the guest, but we suggest £2­5 (US$3­8) for the porter if he helps with bags. Also on CNNGo: 10 best taxis of the world  (http://www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/worlds­best­taxis­ 013358%20) 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Brazilians have a friendly reputation, but tipping is not a part of the culture. Brazilians are often direct and clear on money they want or do not expect.

Restaurants: A 10 percent “servico” charge is often added to the bill. While there is no legal obligation to pay it, it is customary to do so. Taxi: Tipping is not expected, but cabbies will often round to the nearest real. No one likes to deal with change in Brazil, even in supermarkets cashiers will round to the nearest five cents. Hotel: Tip at least R$5 (US$3) per person in hotels for the room service, maids and bellboys.

The "servico" charge, kind of like a voluntary obligation.

Other: In nightclubs, people are given a paper ticket that tracks each individual’s drinks, and it is paid at the end of the night so bartenders never deal with cash. Most of the time, a 10 percent service charge will be added, so you do not have to tip.

Food delivery does not require a tip because there is often already a delivery fee. Tipping for beauty and hair is not standard.

Hong Kong Tipping is not a Chinese custom. Most low to mid­end restaurants prioritize speed and efficiency over friendliness and customer service. Restaurants: A 10 percent charge is added to most restaurant bills. But a Hong Kong restaurant insider tells us that less than one percent of places which charge service tax will give it to their staff. It is just a means of making prices appear lower. So, if there is a service charge, leave anything from a HK$5­10 (US$0.65­1.3) dollars on top, just in case. Hotels: Locals don’t often tip in hotels, but if the porter carries your bag in a high end hotel, HK$10 is sufficient.

At Hong Kong stalls, service consists of giving you food. That's it.

Taxi: Tipping is not expected in taxis, but don’t be surprised if the driver doesn’t return small change like HK$1 or HK$2 coins.  Note: Hong Kong coins are thick and heavy, so people often leave small tips ­­ not for the service ­­ but to relieve

their bursting pocket seams. Also on CNNGo: Capsule hotels coming to Hong Kong  (http://www.cnngo.com/hong­ kong/visit/capsule­hotels­coming­hong­kong­746122) 

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/how-to-tip-like-local-569155

2/4


8/29/12

What to tip: How to tip like a local | CNNGo.com

  Singapore According to the Singapore government website (http://www.singaporeedu.gov.sg/htm/liv/liv09.htm) , tipping is “not a way of life” in Singapore and the government does not encourage a tip beyond the service charge and tax. Restaurants: Despite the no­tipping rule, locals tell us that a small tip is greatly appreciated when someone has gone out of their way to help you, even if it's just the change. Taxi: Tipping in cabs is not expected, but it is a nice courtesy to round up or tell the driver to keep the change. Hotel: An exception to the rule is hotel staff. Tip porters around SG$2­5 (US$1.6­4)  if they help you with your bags or flag you a cab. Other: Do not tip at Changi Airport. Hotel staff ­­ among the few who rely on your tips.

Changi Airport corporate communications representative, Kwan Shu Qin tells us, “Service staff are not allowed to accept tips from passengers and customers they serve.

"This is to ensure that all airport visitors enjoy a consistent high standard of service, regardless of whether they tip.”

Sydney, Australia Some tourists believe laid­back Aussie culture doesn’t practice tipping, but just like the Brits, local Aussies tip for table service ­­ unless the service is bad. Restaurants: Starting wage for wait staff is around AU$15 (US$16) per hour and can go up to AU$25, so waiters do not rely on tips for their wages. Most diners do tip about 10 percent for good table service, but on the flip side, cheapskates don’t have to feel particularly bad for giving exactly AU$150.50 if that was the billed amount. Hotels: Tip the porter AU$1­2 per piece of luggage. Taxi: Tipping isn’t common but taxi drivers will usually round to the next AU$2­5. Unlike Canadians, Australians don't reward mediocre service.

Other: Tipping at pubs is not expected either unless your bartender makes you a special fancy drink ­­ then, give him a dollar or two.

Also on CNNGo: Qantas offers in­flight movies on iPads (http://www.cnngo.com/sydney/visit/qantas­ passengers­first­get­flight­movies­ipads­736391) 

Cape Town, South Africa Tipping is common practice in South Africa for a range of services, such as given by taxi drivers, tour guides and gas station attendants. Restaurants: It is expected for diners to tip a standard 10­15 percent of the bill in both bars and restaurants. Similar to Canada, low­paid wait staff rely on gratuities as part of their income. Taxi: Taxi drivers expect to be tipped around 10 percent. Hotel: Hotel porters who carry bags should be tipped R5­ 10 (US$0.65­1.3).

A mini vuvuzela tune? Worth 20 percent surely.

Other: You’re likely to run into “car guards” when traveling, these orange­vested, often self­employed helpers direct you to a parking spot and stand around to protect your car. If you use their services, they expect to be tipped R1­5.

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/how-to-tip-like-local-569155

3/4


8/29/12

What to tip: How to tip like a local | CNNGo.com If you do not want to use a car guard, wave them away

and ignore them. Got your tipping tips for lesser known destinations? Let us hear them in the comments

 (/author/jane­leung)

Jane Leung is a Hong Kong­born Canadian who has dabbled in the mixed media bag of film and television production, the professional sports industry and magazine publishing. 

Read more about Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung)

Tags: 

You might like:

Paid Distribution

(http://www.cnngo.com

(javascript:void(0)) (http://www.frommers.c

World's 10 most /explorations/life/10­ loved cities

om/slideshow/? America's 10 Best Ice Cream Factory group=586&p=1) Tours

most­loved­cities­ (http://www.cnngo.com 068149) /explorations/life/10­

(http://www.frommers.

most­loved­cities­

com/slideshow/?

068149)

group=586&p=1)

(CNNGo)

(Frommer's)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

(http://www.frommers.c

explorations/life/10­

om/slideshow/?

most­loved­cities­

group=586&p=1)

068149)

(http://www.cnngo.com

World's most /explorations/escape/ beautiful towns

worlds­most­beautiful­ (http://www.cnngo.com towns­580013) /explorations/escape/w

(http://www.cnngo.com

(http://www.cnngo.com

12 overlooked /explorations/escape/1 islands worth 2­overlooked­islands­ visiting

World's most /explorations/escape/c expensive cities for ostliest­hotels­list­ a hotel room

worth­visiting­454538) (http://www.cnngo.com

637685) (http://www.cnngo.com

orlds­most­beautiful­

/explorations/escape/12

/explorations/escape/co

towns­580013)

­overlooked­islands­

stliest­hotels­list­

(CNNGo)

worth­visiting­454538)

637685)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

(CNNGo)

(CNNGo)

explorations/escape/wo

(http://www.cnngo.com/

(http://www.cnngo.com/

rlds­most­beautiful­

explorations/escape/12

explorations/escape/co

towns­580013)

­overlooked­islands­

stliest­hotels­list­

worth­visiting­454538)

637685)

[?] (javascript:void(0))

1 comment

0 Stars

Leave a message...

Discussion

Community

Siddharth Singh

6 months ago

Nice article! Here are the tipping tips for India Restaurants: Some restaurants add 10% service charge to the bill. If not, leaving behind a 5% tip is appreciated. Taxi: We don't tip taxi drivers and if they don't have the change we make sure they understand our displeasure. Hotel: No compulsion to pay hotel porters who carry bags. But a Rs.20-50 tip is appreciated, depending on the type of hotel. Do tip the valet anywhere between Rs. 2050, depending on your car. 4

1

Reply

Share ›

www.cnngo.com/explorations/life/how-to-tip-like-local-569155

4/4


8/30/12

Jane Leung: Tired of not being 'Chinese enough' | CNNGo.com Register  Sign In

CNN International

Follow

LATEST   GUIDES   HONG KONG ESSENTIALS   iREPORT   CONTESTS   MOBILE   TV

Like

276k

切換到繁體中文

Jane Leung: Tired of not being 'Chinese enough' A Canadian­Chinese stakes her claim on the native land By Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung) 

Like

Send

12 April, 2011

Charlene Fang, Paul Leung and 407 others like this.

0

Tweet

31

“Banana’s here! Poor thing. Illiterate and can’t speak properly.” This was not the welcome I expected from family friends when I arrived in Hong Kong from Canada. I had grown up as the token Asian, but now I had become the token white girl, a.k.a. the “gwai mui.” I am Chinese. I look Chinese. I was born in Hong Kong. I have had Confucian principles bred into me from birth. I put career and good grades above life itself and believe that whatever I can’t achieve through talent I can make happen through hard work and self­discipline. Yet, if I listen to friends and family here in Hong Kong, I am no more Chinese than lemon chicken. I was raised in a Western community in Canada and speak basic Cantonese, but can’t read or write it, which apparently means I am a sell­out, a banana (yellow on the outside, white on the inside) with no right to associate with locals or their higher Chinese values. It is apparent to me that some Chinese feel “more Chinese,” thus superior to those who aren’t fluent in the language. But from Liverpool to Melbourne, Paris to San Francisco, don’t you ever wonder why there are so many Chinatowns all over the world? It’s because more than 18 million Chinese have left China since the 1970s. That number represents just half of the approximately 35 million Chinese who live outside of China, making the Chinese the most visible diaspora on Earth, according to professor Peter Kwong in Yale Magazine (http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/chinese­migration­goes­global) . Global Chinese migrations have created hyphenated nationalities such as Chinese­Canadian or Chinese­Indonesian. In order to socially and economically survive in new societies, first generation immigrants often adapt to their new countries' languages, at the expense of mastering the character strokes or the native tongue of Chinese.

Embarassing hyphens So why are they put to shame for not being fluent in the language of a country where they didn’t grow up? I wasn’t raised in a Chinese community such as Richmond or Burnaby, British Columbia. I grew up in a “white community” next to a pig farm in the small town of Port Coquitlam, B.C. My single working mother didn’t have time to teach me or my brother how to read or write Chinese, and by necessity I was more concerned with excelling in school and dealing with regular teen problems such as fitting in with the cool white kids. This is not unusual. Everyone has issues growing up that prevent them from being the best they can be.

What makes me Chinese? Never doubting that I am one.

Despite my illiteracy in Cantonese, I made the move to Hong Kong equipped with hardcore “Chinese” values that I believed everyone would appreciate. I would no longer be the “token Asian.” For the first time, I would finally be one of "them."

www.cnngo.com/hong-kong/life/jane-leung-banana-speaks-out-382737

1/10


8/30/12

Jane Leung: Tired of not being 'Chinese enough' | CNNGo.com

When I arrived, it was the complete opposite. During my first internship in Hong Kong, a Chinese guy passed me a note written in Chinese characters. I said to him, “I can’t read this.” He cackled, “That’s the point! You’re illiterate!” A few weeks later, my father introduced me to one of his co­workers, who ended the conversation with, “You know, it embarrasses your father that little children can speak better Cantonese than you. You’re not really Chinese.” These are just two of many Hong Kong incidents that irked me. Nonetheless, I am not ashamed. The reason other “bananas” shouldn’t feel ashamed is because the charge doesn’t fit the crime.

Ching­chong is Chinese Being raised in Chinese­speaking places such as Hong Kong (or Richmond) doesn’t make you Chinese. If you’re proud to call yourself Chinese and were brought up with Chinese values, then you’re Chinese. As for the older Chinese generation who pick on us, their superiority complex is actually a cover­up for their own insecurity in their ability to remain competitive members of a rapidly changing workforce. Back when the British ruled Hong Kong, there was more segregation between whites and Chinese. Now, the economic boom in China is attracting expats who need to work alongside locals, often speaking fluent Chinese, resulting in more of a melting pot. Not everyone is ready to adapt. On the other hand, I stepped out of my comfort zone to relocate my entire life to better understand where my family came from and practice my Canto. I made my first monoglot Cantonese friends here, I watch Chinese movies, I chill with grandma to force myself to practice and I’m not ashamed to say I bought a children’s Chinese textbook. For locals who can’t adapt to multiculturalism accepted in other countries, the only way they think they can tangibly confront this issue is by picking on what they believe is the living embodiment of something they fear: Westernized Chinese kids. Being a hyphenated Chinese is often hard because traditionalists have so much pride in what they are that they will bluntly remind others to be more Chinese. Oddly enough, that’s one of the things I’ve come to unconditionally love about my culture. So what makes me Chinese? Never doubting that I am one.

The opinions of this commentary are solely those of Jane Leung and do not reflect the views of CNNGo.

 

 (/author/jane­leung)

Jane Leung is a Hong Kong­born Canadian who has dabbled in the mixed media bag of film and television production, the professional sports industry and magazine publishing. 

Read more about Jane Leung (/author/jane­leung)

Tags: 

You might like:

Paid Distribution

(http://www.cnngo.com

(http://www.cnngo.com

Half­naked, all /hong­ smiles: kong/shop/abercrombi Abercrombie & e­340592) Fitch opens in Hong Kong

88 things to do /hong­kong/play/88­ this summer in things­do­summer­ Hong Kong

(http://www.cnngo.com

things­do­summer­

/hong­

654587)

kong/shop/abercrombie

(CNNGo Hong Kong)

­340592)

654587) (http://www.cnngo.com /hong­kong/play/88­

(CNNGo Hong Kong)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

(http://www.cnngo.com/

things­do­summer­

hong­

654587)

hong­kong/play/88­

(javascript:void(0)) (http://www.redbull.co

m/cs/Satellite/en_INT/ Disney Pixar’s Eight Greatest Article/Eight­great­ Moments | Movie moments­from­Brave­ Feature

creators­Disney­ (http://www.redbull.co 021243242545573? m/cs/Satellite/en_INT/ p=1242745950170) Article/Eight­great­ moments­from­Brave­ creators­Disney­ 021243242545573? p=1242745950170)

(Red Bull)

kong/shop/abercrombie

(http://www.redbull.com

­340592)

/cs/Satellite/en_INT/Arti

(http://www.cnngo.com

Hong Kong's best /hong­kong/eat/best­ rice

(http://www.cnngo.com

rice­257998) (http://www.cnngo.com

How to be a Hong /hong­kong/life/how­ Kong local: 10 tips be­local­10­tips­faking­ on faking it

/hong­kong/eat/best­

it­316802) (http://www.cnngo.com

rice­257998)

/hong­kong/life/how­

(CNNGo Hong Kong)

be­local­10­tips­faking­

(http://www.cnngo.com/ hong­kong/eat/best­

(CNNGo Hong Kong)

rice­257998)

(http://www.cnngo.com/

it­316802)

hong­kong/life/how­be­ local­10­tips­faking­it­ 316802)

cle/Eight­great­

www.cnngo.com/hong-kong/life/jane-leung-banana-speaks-out-382737

2/10


Jane Writing CNNGo Portfolio Part 1