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Thank you for your purchase from In the Hands of a Child Your Premiere Lapbook Provider since 2002!!

Celebrating Passover HOCPP 1156 Published: March, 2007 Updated January, 2013

Authors: Katie Kubesh Niki McNeil Kimm Bellotto

For information about other products available from In the Hands of a Child Call 1-866-426-3701 or visit our website at www.handsofachild.com. Entire contents of this Project Pack Š 2013 In the Hands of a Child. 3271 Kerlikowske Road Coloma, MI 49038 Permission is hereby granted to the individual purchaser to reproduce student materials in this project pack for noncommercial individual or classroom use only. In the Hands of a Child gives permission for one copy of all written material to be copied and or printed. Classroom teachers have permission to reproduce one copy for each student in class. Members of co-ops or workshops have permission to reproduce one copy for up to 10 children per unit. Reproducible graphics may be reprinted as many times as needed. Permission is not granted for school wide or system wide reproduction of materials. Printed in the USA. 2|Page


Bringing Laughter and Learning Together In the Hands of a Child From the day we first began using and creating Project Packs we fell in love with them. We knew that this type of hands-on learning experience was just the thing that was needed to make boring unit studies not only educational but fun and exciting too! To help you get started with your Project Pack, we have included some of the most frequently asked questions we receive about our Project Packs. What is a Project Pack? A Project Pack contains both the activities and the lesson plans or research guide needed to complete the activities. Imagine your child not only learning about the life cycle of a butterfly, but also creating a cocoon of his or her own. Students don’t just read the story, Blueberry Sal by Robert McCloskey- they enjoy a “blue day” complete with a recipe for blueberry pancakes, making a “blue” collage, and don’t forget painting a “blue” picture! Why is this a better way to learn? How does this help me? Student learning improves when lessons incorporate hands-on projects or crafts. Children learn by doing. Project Packs put learning into their hands! The possibilities are endless when your student begins a lapbook with a Project Pack from In the Hands of a Child. There are no age or skill limits and any topic or subject can be worked into a Project Pack. When you purchase a Project Pack from In the Hands of a Child, all the work is done for you-the parent/teacher, but not for the student. In addition, Project Packs are easy to store, are an instant review tool, scrapbook, and a ready-made portfolio of all your student’s studies. How do I make a Project Pack? A Project Pack is simply a file folder refolded into a shutter-style book. Open a file folder flat, fold each side into the middle and crease the fold neatly. There you have it! What supplies do I need? You need file folders, paper in different colors and weights*, your student’s favorite coloring tools, tape, glue, scissors, and a stapler. *For a more colorful and appealing Project Pack, it is suggested you print some of the reproducible graphics on colorful, multi-purpose paper. We recommend 24# weight or cardstock.

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Adapting a Project Pack to Fit the Needs of Your Student Adapting a Project or Research Pack is key to ensuring that you provide the best lesson for your student. At first glance, some might just skip over an activity because they feel it is too easy or too difficult for their student. We want you to use all the activities we provide…they are easily adaptable! For example, if you have a PK-3 student the vocabulary activities might be difficult for him or her to complete. Here are some tips to help you adapt the activities that require your student to write: 1. Have your student dictate vocabulary words and their meanings as you write them. 2. Have your child draw a picture instead of writing. 3. You write the word or sentence first so your student can see how it is written (many of our Project Packs also include activities with dotted lines for easy copy work). 4. Practice. Practice. Practice. In the car, on a walk, in the shopping cart! Practice saying the vocabulary words and what they mean. Before you know it your preschooler will be telling others what those words mean! 5. Contact us. We would be happy to give you ideas for adapting specific units to a grade level. On the other hand, some of the activities may seem too easy for your student. Does your 5th grade level student want to learn about butterflies, but the Project Pack seems too easy? Try it anyway; just change things up a bit to suit your student’s grade level and skill. Here are some tips to help you adapt the activities to make them a little more difficult: 1. In addition to writing down vocabulary words and their meanings, ask your student to use the word in a sentence; either verbally or written. 2. Give your student one hour (or reasonable time frame) to research the topic on his or her own either online or at the library. Give your student a set of questions and see what he or she can find without your guidance. 3. Encourage your student to expand on the topic or choose a related subject to learn about. 4. Take a look at some of our preschool units…there is a lot of clipart related to each topic included. Have an older student cut these out and write a story or play about the pictures. 5. Contact us. We would be happy to give you ideas for adapting specific units to a grade level. These are just few ways you can adapt a Project Pack to meet the needs of your student. Let your student be the judge if something is too easy or too difficult…you just might be surprised!

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The Website links we have included in our guides are references we found that contain relevant information. However, the sites are not owned or maintained by In the Hands of a Child. The content may have changed or become a “dead� link. If you find the site contains inappropriate material or is no longer a relevant site, please let us know. Thank you.

Educator Notes:_____________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________

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Table of Contents Planning Guide

Page 7

Related Reading

Page 8

Bibliography

Page 8

Activity Instructions

Page 9

Folder Instructions

Page 11

Sample Picture

Page 12

Research Guide

Page 13

The Passover Story

Page 13

Chamitz

Page 16

The Passover Seder

Page 17

Seder Tradition

Page 18

Passover Rules & Celebration

Page 20

Foods During Passover

Page 21

Vocabulary

Page 26

Reproducibles

Page 28

Answer Key

Page 57

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Vocabulary Words

Day 1

Day 2

Passover Pesach Exodus Torah Pharaoh Plagues Unleavened Seder Chametz Maror Beitzah Karpas Hazaret Haroset Zeroa

Day 3

Matzah Kadesh Kiddush Ma nishtana Ransom Hallel

Day 4

Tzimmes Gefilte fish Kugel Caponata Pastelicos

Day 5

Day 6

Kosher Yarmulke Afikomen Nisan Famine Haggadah Matzah brei Rod Lice Boil Locust

Guide Reading

Complete Activities

Continue Activities

Passover The Passover Story Chametz

2 – The Passover Story 3 – Chametz 4 – Chametz (3 symbols)

1 - Vocabulary

*Why is There a “-“ Between G and D? *The Seder Plate The Passover Seder

5 – The Passover Seder 6 – Seder Plate

1 - Vocabulary

7 – Seder Traditions (Kadesh) 8 – Seder Traditions (4 questions)

1 – Vocabulary 9 – Seder Traditions (Timeline)

Seder Dinner Passover Rules and Celebrations

10 – Seder Dinner 11 - Passover Rules and Celebrations

1 – Vocabulary 9 – Seder Traditions (Timeline)

Foods During Passover *Matzah *Kosher

12 - Foods During Passover (Matzah) 13 - Foods During Passover (Kosher)

1 – Vocabulary 9 – Seder Traditions (Timeline)

*Haggadah

14 - The Haggadah 15 - Recipes

1 – Vocabulary 9 – Seder Traditions (Timeline)

*Kadesh Seder Traditions * Ma Nishtana

Have student complete vocabulary words slotted for each day from activity 1, then read the sections of the guide slotted for the day and any extra books you have on the topic. Finish up each day by having them complete the activities scheduled for that day. NOTE: Items marked with a * are in text-boxed areas in the guide.

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Related Books and Links All-of –a-Kind Family by Sydney Taylor P is for Passover by Tanya Lee Stone Passover by Alice K. Flanagan Penny and the Four Questions by Nancy E. Krulik Sammy Spider’s First Passover by Sylvia A. Rouss The Passover Seder by Emily Sper Uncle Eli’s Passover Haggadah by Eliezer Lorne Segal

Bibliography Cooper, Ilene. Jewish Holidays All Year Round: A Family Treasury. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers, 2002. Hoyt-Goldsmith, Diane. Celebrating Passover. New York: Holiday House, 2000. http://www.chabad.org/holidays/passover/pesach.asp?AID=1981 http://www.kidsdomain.com/holiday/passover/about.html http://www.jewfaq.org/holidaya.htm http://www.holidays.net/passover/index.htm

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Activities and Instructions Vocabulary 1. Vocabulary: As you go through this unit learn a few new vocabulary words each day. Fold Instructions: Vocab Pocket– Fold back tabs on pocket and glue them to folder. Allow glue to dry. Write definitions for words on their corresponding cards. Store cards in pocket. Extra cards are provided to add your own words of so desired. The Passover Story 2. Name each of the ten plagues. Fold Intructions: MiniFan Book– Stack fan blades with cover on top and fasten with a brad where indicated. Chametz 3. Tour your house and make a list of all the chametz you can find and make a list. Fold Instructions: MiniListBook– Stack pages with cover on top and staple at top edge. 4. What three things does a family use to search for and remove any chametz in the house and how or why is each used? Fold Instructions: SideStep Book– Starting at the bottom, fold each section up and behind cover. Close like a book. Use one section per item. The Passover Seder 5. What four elements make up the Seder Table? Fold Instructions: Flip Flap Book– Follow instructions included on Activity #4 to complete this book. Use one flap per element. Seder Plate 6. What are the six items placed on the Seder plate and what does each one symbolize? Fold Instructions: Seder Plate– Cut out all circles and glue each one at the top edge only to the Seder plate to create flaps. On the back side of each flap place one number from 1 – 6. Beneath the flap write the name of the food and give one example. Cut slits above star in center of plate. Cut stars and slide tabs into slits to create flaps. Put the cover star on top. Number each start to coordinate with the circles. On the star tell what the corresponding food symbolizes. See the illustrated example on the Activity # 6 graphic page for a visual explanation. Seder Traditions 7. What is the Kadesh? Write down the Kadesh. Fold Instructions: Shaped Flap Book– Fold back tab on the cover graphic and glue the tab behind the blank graphic to create a flap. Remember that you can write on both the backside of the cover and the blank page. 9|Page


8. What are the four questions asked on Seder? Fold Instructions: Four Flap Book– Cut on dotted lines to create four flaps. Fold flaps upward to close. Number each flap cover. Open flaps and write the Seder questions beneath. 9. Create a timeline for the Seder (what is the order of the traditions usually practiced during the Seder) Fold Instructions: Tim elineBook– Cut all boxes along dotted lines to create flaps. Fold all flaps toward the center so that each pair opposite each other closes like a shutter. Number the left flaps 1 – 6 and the right flaps 7 – 12. Lift the flaps and write one tradition beneath each in the order they occur. Seder Dinner 10. Create a menu for a Seder dinner. Include one main course, 3 side dishes and a dessert. Fold Instructions: Menu – Fill in each oval in your menu with the foods you would serve at your Seder dinner. Close like a book. Glue title label to front or design your own cover. You might also like to make the inside of your menu look fancier too! Passover Rules and Celebrations 11. List the other various traditions and ways that Passover is celebrated during the rest of the week. Fold Instructions: Accordion Book– Keeping cover on top, fold one page back, one page forward, etc. List one rule or tradition per page. Foods During Passover 12. Describe the preparation of matzah. 13. What is kosher food? Fold Instructions: Shaped Card – Close like a book. Inside, describe kosher foods. The Haggadah 14. What is the Haggadah? Fold Instructions: MiniBook– Stack pages with cover on top and staple at the left edge. Recipes 15. Create a recipe card for a traditional food eaten during Passover. Fold Instructions: RecipeCard Book– Fold in half from the top keeping cover on top. Inside, write your ingredients and recipe instructions.

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Creatinga Lapbook Base Basic Lapbook Base § Open a file folder and lay it flat. § Fold both right and left edges toward the center so they meet and close like a pair of shutters. § Crease firmly.

Base withSingle or Double Extensions § Complete the basic lapbook base. § Open base and lay flat. § Cut another folder in half or use a sheet of cardstock for the extension. § Lay the extension in the center of folder at either the top or bottom. (You may add two extensions if need be; one at the top and one at the bottom). § Attach to base with clear packing tape. Single Extension

Double Extension

Double Folder Base § Make two base folders. § Open them and lay them side by side with outer flaps pointing straight up, not flat. § Where the two flaps meet glue them together. § Fold center flap to one side, fold both shutters in and close folders like a book.

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Celebrating Passover Passover, called Pesach (peh-sock) in Hebrew, is a reminder to Jewish people of the Passover story. It is an eight-day holiday celebrated by families recalling the story of the Israelites being led to their freedom. On the fifteenth of Nisan (March-April), Jewish people around the world celebrate the exodus from Egypt. Over three thousand years ago, G-d told Moses to lead the children of Israel out of slavery and take them to freedom in the Promised Land. Passover reminds all Jewish people to honor this history and to praise G-d for giving them freedom. The story of the first passover is found in the Book of Exodus, the second book of the Torah.

The Passover Story

H ebr ew C alendar The H ebr ew C alendar is a lunar calendar . A lunar calendar is based on the phases ofthe m oon. Each tim e ther e is a new m oon,a new m onth on the calendar begins. T he H ebr ew m onths ar e: Tishr i H eshvan K islev Tevet Shevat A dar N isan Iyar Sivan Tam m uz Av Elul

Septem ber -O ctober O ctober -N ovem ber N ovem ber -D ecem ber D ecem ber -Januar y Januar y-Febr uar y Febr uar y-Mar ch Mar ch-A pr il A pr il-May May-June June-July July-A ugust A ugust-Septem ber

Over three thousand years ago the Israelites went to Egypt to escape famine in their own land of Canaan. At first, the Egyptians welcomed them because their ancestor, Joseph, had been an important advisor to the king of Egypt, called the Pharaoh. As hundreds of years passed the population of Israelites grew and the Egyptians began to dislike them.

The Pharaoh of Egypt, Pharaoh Ramses II, became worried that there were too many Israelite people (also called Hebrews) living in Egypt. He feared they would join his enemies so he made all of the Israelites slaves. In addition, he passed a law that ordered all Hebrew boy babies, age two or younger, to be killed. One mother could not bear the thought of her baby son being killed so she hid him. When the little baby became too big for her to hide she placed him in a wicker basket and floated it on the Nile River. The baby’s sister, named Miriam, hid in the reeds along the riverbank so she could watch what happened to her baby brother.

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Miriam looked on as the Pharaoh’s daughter, a princess, walked along the riverbank and found the baby. She immediately fell in love with the baby boy even though she knew that he was a Hebrew child. Miriam heard the princess say that she would need a nursing mother to feed the young baby so Miriam asked the Pharaoh’s daughter if she would like her to find a woman to suckle the infant and the Princess agreed. Of course, Miriam went straight to her own mother and her baby boy was soon back inher arms! She did not have him long, though. When the baby was a little older, his mother had to take him back to the princess. The princess named him Moses and raised him as her own son. When Moses grew up he saw an Egyptian man beating a Hebrew slave. Moses was so upset he killed the Egyptian and saved the Hebrew. Fearing that Pharaoh would have him executed, Moses ran away to the wilderness to hide. He stayed in the wilderness for many years until one day G-d spoke to him from a burning bush. G-d said, “I will send you to Pharaoh so that you may bring my people out of Egypt.” Moses was afraid to leave the wilderness, but G-d gave him the courage to go. Moses went to Pharaoh and told him what G-d said, “Let my people go.” Pharaoh said no and made the Israelite people work even harder. This angered G-d. Moses returned to the Pharaoh again with the same message and again Pharaoh refused.

Iam the L-r d. Iw illfr ee you fr om the bur dens ofthe Egyptians and deliver you fr om bondage. Exodus 6:6

W hy is T her e a “-“ B etw een G and D ? People w ho ar e r esear ching Passover and other Jew ish holidays w illfind thatm any r efer ences leave the “o” outofG -d or L-r d. T his is because people ofthe Jew ish faith do notw r ite the nam e G -d or L-d because ofthe w ay they inter pr etthe 10th C om m andm entabout taking G -d’s nam e in vain. Itis believed thatifthe nam e is w r itten on a piece ofpaper and that paper is dam aged or destr oyed,itw ould be a sin.

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G-d sent the ten plagues to Egypt to show the Pharaoh and the people how angry he was. He sent them one at a time. Each time he sent a plague, Pharaoh promised to set the Israelites free if G-d took the plague away, but each time he went back on his word. Everyone but the Hebrew people suffered from the plagues that G-d put on them. The ten plagues included: 1. Blood: First G-d helped Moses turn the water in the river to blood to show the Egyptians the power of G-d. 2. Frogs: Next G-d sent a plague of frogs. They were leaping everywhere and their croaking was very loud. 3. Lice: G-d turned the desert dust into lice that covered the Egyptians bodies and bit them. 4. Cattle Disease: G-d sent an illness that killed all of the cattle and horses in Egypt. 5. Beasts: G-d sent a wild beast to attack men and animals (some believe it was flies and G-d sent the flies buzzing into all of the homes that belonged to Egyptians). 6. Boils: One morning all of the Egyptians woke to find their bodies covered with boils. 7. Hail: G-d sent a terrible hailstorm that ruined the crops. 8. Locusts: Next, G-d sent clouds of locusts to eat what was left of the crops. 9. Darkness: G-d covered the land in darkness for three days and three nights. 10. Death of firstborn son: G-d promised that an angel of the L-rd would pass over Egypt and kill the firstborn son in every Egyptian home and of every Egyptian animal. G-d told Moses that He wanted every family of Israel to bring a perfect lamb into their home on the tenth day of the month. On the evening of the fourteenth day, the lamb should be killed and its blood smeared on the doorpost of the house. The Israelites followed G-d’s instructions and they roasted the lamb and ate it. G-d told them,” And this day shall be to you for a memorial. You shall keep it as a feast to the L-rd throughout your generations; keep it as an ordinance forever.” Exodus 12:14 (Amplified Bible). The angel of death then swept through Egypt and the firstborn son in every household was killed. Only the Israelites homes, which had lamb’s blood on their doorposts, were spared from having their firstborn sons killed. Pharaoh finally agreed to let the Hebrews go.

W hy is itcalled Passover ? Passover r epr esentsw hen the A ngelof D eath,in the tenth plague, Passed O ver T he hom es ofIsr aelites. 15 | P a g e


The Israelites had to hurry before Pharaoh changed his mind. They gathered as many possessions as they could carry. Some were baking bread, but there was no time to wait for it to rise. They had to mix it, bake it quickly, and leave. This is called unleavened bread. With their belongings packed the Hebrews set out toward the Promised Land. Before they reached their new home, the Pharaoh did change his mind and sent his army after them. When the Israelites reached the Red Sea, Moses stretched out his rod and G-d parted the waters. The children of Israel walked between the walls of water on dry ground! But when Pharaoh’s army tried to do the same G-d closed the sea back up and the army was swallowed up by the crashing waves. The Hebrew people were finally free!

Chametz (pronounced chah-maytz) There are a lot of preparations that must be done before Passover begins. Passover is celebrated in the spring – a time of new beginnings, freedom, and rebirth. One important preparation is spring-cleaning. The most important thing about this step is to make sure that there is no chametzin the house. Chametz is any food that has yeast added to it including bread, cookies, cereal, and crackers. Chametz is from a Hebrew word that means “bread.” Not only must all chametz be removed, but also anything that has touched it because this is considered chametz too. On the night before Passover, the father of the house takes his children on a search of their home to make sure there is no chametz left behind. He uses a feather, a spoon, and a candle during the search. The candle is used to peer into the darkest corners. The feather is used like a tiny broom sweeping up the smallest of crumbs. The spoon is like a miniature dustpan into which the tiniest pieces of chametz are swept. A blessing is said and the kol chamira is recited that declares that any chametz that was missed no longer belongs to the family.

The Seder Plate

The Seder Plate, which is placed in front of the leader at the Passover table, has six symbols of Passover placed on it. The six symbols are: Maror: whole bitter herbs to symbolize the bitterness of slavery (horseradish is often used for this). Beitzah: a roasted egg, which symbolizes life. Karpas: a vegetable such as potato or parsley dipped in salt water. The vegetables are a symbol of rebirth and spring and the salt water represents the tears shed during enslavement. Hazaret: chopped bitter herbs, like horseradish or the bitter roots of Romaine lettuce, are another symbol of the bitterness of slavery. Haroset: chopped apples and nuts mixed with wine are a symbol of the mortar that Israelite slaves used to make bricks for Egypt. Zeroa: a roasted lamb shank bone is a symbol of the Passover sacrifice.

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What is done with the chametz? It is wrapped in a linen cloth and put outside of the house until the next day when it is taken to the synagogue and burned. This is a reminder that when the Hebrews left Egypt they left in such a hurry that all they could take with them was unleavened bread. (**Note to educator: The chametz also represents sin. The feather is used to sweep the sin away. The spoon is used so that the sin is not touched. The sin is then burnt in the fire representing being cleansed of it.)

Passover D ates Passover begins atsundow n on the follow ing dates: A pr il2,2007

A pr il19,2008 A pr il8,2009 Mar ch 29,2010

The Passover Seder Passover begins after sundown with a service called Seder (say-duhr). Seder, which means “order” in Hebrew, is practiced at home and includes dinner with family and friends and a ceremony where everyone talks about the true meaning of Passover. Everyone dresses in their very best clothing including yarmulkes, for the men. Seder Table The table, called the Passover table, is set with the best china, silverware, and napkins. The Passover table is set with many important elements: Ø A pillow rests on the chair of the person who will lead the Seder. The pillow symbolizes relaxation because a free person has the right to rest. Ø A large plate holding six symbols of Passover is placed in front of the leader’s place setting. Ø Another plate on the Passover table holds three pieces of matzah. Two pieces are for the blessing and one is to be broken by the leader for Seder. One of the broken pieces, called the afikomen, is placed in a cloth envelope or napkin and given to an adult who hides it. The children at the Seder look for the afikomen and whoever finds it wins a small gift.

Kadesh You shall observe the Feast of Unleavened Bread, For on this very day I brought your ranks out of the land of Egypt; You shall observe this day throughout the generations as an institution for all time. ~Exodus 12:17 Yizkor Four times a year, Jewish people light a special candle, called the Yahrzeit Candle, in memory of their loved ones who have died. The next day, a memorial service, called Yizkor, is recited. Yizkor is a Hebrew word for “remember.” A Yahrzeit Candle is lit at sundown on: 1. The first night of Yom Kippur 2. The eighth night of Sukkot 3. The second night of Shavout 4. The last night of Passover

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Ø

A small book, called the Haggadah, is placed at every place on the Passover Table. The Haggadah contains prayers, songs, and readings from the Torah. It is read throughout the Seder service.

Seder Traditions

2. 3. 4. 5.

Each family has a different way of celebrating Seder, and it usually takes a few hours to complete. Most Seders follow a tradition similar to this: 1. The meal begins with a blessing called the Kadesh. The first of four glasses of wine, called the Kiddush, is sipped. Each of the glasses of wine represents a promise of liberation that is in the Torah. The leader washes his or her hands using a pitcher of water, a bowl, and a cloth. The greens are dipped in the salt water and passed around the Passover Table for everyone to taste. After the middle piece of matzah is split and put aside as the afikomen, the retelling of the Passover story begins. When the Passover story is retold on Seder, it begins with an introductory question, “Why is this night different from all other nights?” The youngest child at the Passover table asks four questions: Ø “Why on this night do we eat unleavened bread?” Ø “Why do we eat bitter herbs?” Ø “Why do we dip in the salt water?” Ø “Why do we recline?”

Ma N ishtana The Tor ah teaches thatSeder is a tim e for questions and answ er s. T he celebr ation ofPassover is a tim e for each new gener ation to lear n about their histor y,faith,and cultur e. The H aggadah answ er s the question Ma N ishtana,w hich in H ebr ew m eans, “W hy is itdiffer ent?” Ø

Ø

Ø

Ø

O n allother nights w e eatbr ead or m atzah,on this night- only m atzah. O n allother nights,w e eatall kinds ofher bs;on this nightw e especially eatbitter her bs. O n allother nights,w e do not dip her bs atall;on this nightw e dip them tw ice. O n allother nights,w e eatin an or dinar y m anner ;tonightw e dine w ith specialcer em ony.

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The Haggadah answers the four questions by telling the story of the Jewish people and their exodus from Egypt. Each person at the Passover table imagines what it must have been like to be a slave in Egypt three thousand years ago. The Haggadah tells about four different children, the Wise, the Wicked, the Simple, and the One Unable to Ask. Each appears in the Haggadah in a different way to show that there are many different ways to learn about God. When the leader reads about the ten plagues, everyone dips a little finger in a glass of wine before them. A drop of wine is spilled on each person’s plate for each plague. 6. More blessings are given and the afikomen is hidden. 7. The matzah is blessed and eaten. 8. The maror is eaten with the haroset. 9. The maror is eaten with matzah. 10. After the Seder meal ends, the children look for the afikomen. Without it, the Seder cannot proceed so the child who finds it must ransom it back to the leader for a small gift or coin. 11. After the afikomen has been found, the Seder guests open the front door to invite the prophet Elijah to enter. Elijah, who is said to give aid and comfort to the poor, will announce the coming of the Messiah. Elijah brings the promise of a new and better world that will not have poverty, hunger, or war. A goblet of wine is placed in front of the door for Elijah. Some families use a special goblet called an Elijah cup. 12. The Passover meal ends with a reading from the Hallel. The Seder ends with singing and the words, “Next year in Jerusalem.� This has special meaning and represents the hope that soon all people will be free.

Matzah The ingr edients ofm atzah ar e justw ater and flour ,butther e ar e ver y str ictr ules on how m atzah is pr epar ed for P assover . O nly 18 m inutes m ay pass betw een the tim e the w ater and flour ar e m ixed together ,the dough r olled out,and the m atzah is finished baking. W hy 18 m inutes? 18 m inutes is the tim e ittakes for flour and w ater to fer m entand br ead to r ise. People used to m ake m atzah by hand,butm any people today buy itin a stor e thatsells kosher foods. D ur ing the w eek ofPassover , m atzah r eplaces allbr ead pr oducts in a Jew ish hom e. People use m atzah for : Matzah sandw iches Matzah br ei:a dish m ade w ith m atzah and scr am bled eggs and eaten for br eakfast.

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Seder Dinner The Seder dinner is much more special than a dinner served on an average day. Special foods are served and each family has its own traditions and favorite Seder recipes. Some families start the meal with matzah ball soup. The main course of a Seder dinner is usually chicken, fish, or turkey. Side dishes include: Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø

Tzimmes: sweet stew made of fruits and vegetables Gefilte fish: ground fish boiled with onions, carrots, and spices. Kugels: special casseroles made with matzah instead of noodles. Caponata: spicy eggplant stew. Pastelicos: fried mashed potato balls filled with meat.

Passover Rules and Celebrations The Seder plays a major role in the Passover celebration, but there are other traditions and rituals that are practiced throughout the week of Passover including: Ø The Fast of the Firstborn is a practice held the day before Passover begins. All firstborn males fast to remember that all firstborn Hebrew males in Egypt were not killed during the final plague. Ø No work is permitted on the first and last days of Passover. Ø Because of the rule of no chametz, many families have a separate set of dishes they use only during Passover. No leavening has touched these dishes. Ø Many songs are sung during the week to celebrate freedom. Ø The Counting of the Omer is the period of countdown between the days of Passover and Shavu’ot. Beginning on the second night of Passover a blessing is recited counting the days until Shavu’ot. For example, “Today is fourteen days, which is two weeks of the Omer.” The counting is a link between Passover, which celebrates the Exodus, and Shavu’t, which celebrates the giving of the Torah. Ø The days in between the first and the last are called Chol HaMoed and these days are celebrated with family outings, picnics, and eating treats.

Haggadah

The H aggadah is a specialbook that includes the r eadings,blessings,and songs used to celebr ate Passover . H aggadah (hah-gah-dah)com es fr om a H ebr ew w or d thatm eans “to tell.” Today,m ostH aggadotar e w r itten in H ebr ew and include a tr anslation. T his m akes iteasier for ever yone to par ticipate and under stand the Seder . The H aggadah is unique because it contains ar tw or k,like paintings,ofthe Passover stor y in it. O ther sacr ed books ofJudaism ,like the Tor ah,do nothave illustr ations or ar tw or k.

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Ø

The last night of Passover, called Shvi’I shei Pesach, is celebrated with special prayer services and a festive meal. This day commemorates the day that Moses split the Red Sea for the Hebrews to pass to their freedom. Many families place a bowl of water on the table and speak about the splitting of the sea.

Foods During Passover No pizza during Passover? What will we eat for dinner? There are lots of alternative meals that can be eaten during Passover including: Ø Steak and potatoes Ø Roasted chicken or turkey Ø Eggs, omelets, egg salad (without the bread or toast) Ø Tuna salad Ø Cold cuts Ø Many kosher fruits and vegetables

Recipes To celebrate Passover, many special foods are prepared. Some of the foods are symbolic and only used during Seder. Others are traditional foods and eaten during the entire holiday. All of the foods are prepared in a special way just for Passover.

Passover Song H ad H e br oughtus out ofEgyptand notjudged them ,itw ould have been enough for us. Itw ould have been enough for us. H ad H e judged them and notdone so to their idols,itw ould have been enough for us. Itw ould have been enough for us.

Haroset Ingredients: ½ pound chopped walnuts 4 large apples, peeled and chopped (Granny Smiths work well) ½ cup grape juice ¼ pound dried, pitted, chopped prunes (optional) To make: 1. Combine nuts, apples, and prunes 2. Add ½ cup grape juice 3. Blend until sticky 4. Refrigerate until time to serve

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Matzah Balls Ingredients: 8 matzahs 2 T Passover vegetable oil 4 eggs 1 onion, finely chopped 8 T matzah meal 1 t parsley, chopped 1 t salt ½ t pepper Ÿ t nutmeg boiling soup To make: 1. Soak matzahs in water until soft 2. Squeeze matzahs to remove water 3. Combined softened matzahs with onion and parsley 4. Heat oil in large pan and add matzah mixture 5. Heat and stir until dry, add more oil if necessary 6. Let cool 7. Add eggs, salt, pepper, and nutmeg 8. Add matzah meal 9. Roll in balls the size of a walnut (add matzah meal to your hands so the dough does not stick) 10. Add matzah balls to a boiling soup and simmer, covered, for 10 minutes *Makes 12 to 15 matzah balls

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Matzah Brei Ingredients: 2 matzahs, broken into large pieces 1 egg 1/8 t cinnamon 1 t sugar Âź c milk 1 T butter To make: 1. Soak matzahs in warm water until soft 2. Squeeze matzahs to remove water 3. In a medium bowl, whisk egg, cinnamon, and sugar together 4. Add softened matzahs and mix until it is broken up 5. Slowly add milk until the mixture is a batter-like consistency (not soupyyou may not need the full amount) 6. Set aside to thicken, 5-10 minutes 7. Melt butter in skillet 8. Ladle matzah mixture into pan and fry until lightly brown on both sides 9. Serve hot with powdered sugar, sour cream, or berries. *Makes 4 servings

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Gefilte Fish Ingredients: 1 Spanish onion, peeled and cubed ¼ cup Passover vegetable oil 2 carrots, peeled and quartered 2 pounds ground fish (whitefish, pike, pickerel) 3 eggs ¾ c cold water 1 t sugar 2-½ t salt 3 T matzah meal To make: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F 2. Lightly oil 9 x 5-inch metal loaf pan 3. Line bottom of pan with lightly oiled piece of wax paper 4. Using a food processor, chop onion 5. Sautéin hot oil 6. Let cool 7. Add carrots to processor and finely chop 8. Add onion to carrots and mix in remaining ingredients (add in 2 batches using only 2 on/off turns each time 9. Transfer to a large bowl and mix well 10. Pour into a large prepared pan 11. Bake 1 hour, 15 minutes 12. Cool for 10 minutes 13. Invert pan on to a plate, remove pan and wax paper and continue to cool 14. Cover and refrigerate *Makes 10 servings

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Activities for Passover Create a Seder Plate Cut out cardstock symbols that go on the Seder plate: Maror, Beitzah, Karpas, Hazaret, Haroset, and Zeroa. Glue them onto a sturdy paper plate. Decorate the plate. Coat the plate with decoupage and let dry. This can be used as the Seder plate at the Seder. Relaxation Symbol Decorate an old pillowcase to symbolize relaxation and place on the leader’s chair at the Seder dinner Mini Trip Visit a local food store and find the kosher food section. Bring along a camera and have a family member take a picture of you in the kosher food section. Make a mini scrapbook from colored paper, glue your photos in and list the foods you found. Did you buy and try any? If so, tell which ones you liked or didn’t like.

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Vocabulary Afikomen: piece of matzah that is hidden early in the Passover celebration and children must search for it at the end of the celebration. The Seder cannot end until the afikomen has been found and redeemed for a small gift or prize Beitzah: roasted egg, which symbolizes spring and new life; one of the symbols of the Seder plate Boil: swollen, painful sore caused by a bacterial infection Caponata: spicy eggplant stew Chametz: bread or any food made with yeast or allowed to ferment Exodus: mass departure Famine: time when people are hungry or starving because they cannot grow enough food Gefilte fish: traditional fish cakes served for Passover Haggadah: special book used during Passover that contains the religious service, blessings, and songs (plural is Haggadot) Hallel: collection of psalms read at end of the Seder Haroset: special food on the Seder plate; symbolizes mortar for the bricks used by Hebrew slaves in Egypt Hazaret: chopped bitter herbs eaten served on the Seder plate as a symbol of the bitterness of slavery Kadesh: prayer to sanctify the day Karpas: a green like parsley or lettuce that is served on the Seder plate to symbolize spring and rebirth Kiddush: the first cup of wine shared during the Seder Kosher: food that has been prepared according to special laws in the Torah Kugel: dish made by baking noodles made with matzah flour, raisins, and spices Lice: small, flightless parasitic insects that live on bodies of birds and mammals Locust: large swarm of grasshoppers that destroy crops Ma nishtana: Hebrew phrase meaning “why is this night different from all other nights?� Maror: bitter herbs used on the Seder plate to symbolize the bitterness of slavery 26 | P a g e


Matzah: bread made from flour and water and baked quickly before fermentation can occur Matzah brei: dish made with matzah and scrambled eggs Nisan: seventh month of the Hebrew calendar Passover: weeklong celebration of the Jewish faith Pastelicos: fried mashed potato balls filled with meat. Pesach: Hebrew word for Passover Pharaoh: leader of the Egyptians when the Hebrew were slaves Plagues: series of tragic events that Egyptians experienced when the pharaoh refused to free the Hebrew slaves Ransom: payment demanded in return for the release of something Rod: straight thin stick or bar Seder: special meal held on the first and second nights of the Passover celebration Torah: sacred book of the Jewish faith Tzimmes: sweet stew made of fruits and vegetables Unleavened: food that does not contain yeast or is not allowed to ferment and rise Yarmulke: small cap worn to show respect to G-d Zeroa: roasted shank bone from a lamb that represents the Passover sacrifice

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Activity 1: Vocabulary Vocabulary: As you go through this unit learn a few new vocabulary words each day. Answer: Afikomen: piece of matzah that is hidden early in the Passover celebration and children must search for it at the end of the celebration. The Seder cannot end until the afikomen has been found and redeemed for a small gift or prize Beitzah: roasted egg, which symbolizes spring and new life; one of the symbols of the Seder plate Boil: swollen, painful sore caused by a bacterial infection Caponata: spicy eggplant stew Chametz: bread or any food made with yeast or allowed to ferment Exodus: mass departure Famine: time when people are hungry or starving because they cannot grow enough food Gefilte fish: traditional fish cakes served for Passover Haggadah: special book used during Passover that contains the religious service, blessings, and songs (plural is Haggadot) Hallel: collection of psalms read at end of the Seder Haroset: special food on the Seder plate; symbolizes mortar for the bricks used by Hebrew slaves in Egypt Hazaret: chopped bitter herbs eaten served on the Seder plate as a symbol of the bitterness of slavery Kadesh: prayer to sanctify the day Karpas: a green like parsley or lettuce that is served on the Seder plate to symbolize spring and rebirth Kiddush: the first cup of wine shared during the Seder Kosher: food that has been prepared according to special laws in the Torah Kugel: dish made by baking noodles made with matzah flour, raisins, and spices Lice: small, flightless parasitic insects that live on bodies of birds and mammals Locust: large swarm of grasshoppers that destroy crops Ma nishtana: Hebrew phrase meaning “why is this night different from all other nights?� Maror: bitter herbs used on the Seder plate to symbolize the bitterness of slavery Matzah: bread made from flour and water and baked quickly before fermentation can occur Matzah brei: dish made with matzah and scrambled eggs Nisan: seventh month of the Hebrew calendar Passover: weeklong celebration of the Jewish faith Pastelicos: fried mashed potato balls filled with meat. 57 | P a g e


Pesach: Hebrew word for Passover Pharaoh: leader of the Egyptians when the Hebrew were slaves Plagues: series of tragic events that Egyptians experienced when the pharaoh refused to free the Hebrew slaves Ransom: payment demanded in return for the release of something Rod: straight thin stick or bar Seder: special meal held on the first and second nights of the Passover celebration Torah: sacred book of the Jewish faith Tzimmes: sweet stew made of fruits and vegetables Unleavened: food that does not contain yeast or is not allowed to ferment and rise Yarmulke: small cap worn to show respect to G-d Zeroa: roasted shank bone from a lamb that represents the Passover sacrifice Activity 2: The Passover Story Name each of the ten plagues. Answer: 1. Blood 2. Frogs 3. Lice 4. Cattle Disease 5. Beasts 6. Boils 7. Hail 8. Locusts 9. Darkness 10. Death of firstborn son Activity 3: Chametz Tour your house and make a list of all the chametz you can find. Answer: Answer will vary but here are the facts about chametz -- Chametz is any food that has yeast added to it including bread, cookies, cereal, and crackers. Chametz is from a Hebrew word that means “bread�. Not only must all chametz be removed, but also anything that has touched it because this is considered chametz too.

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Activity 4: Chametz What three things does a family use to search for and remove any chametz in the house and how or why is each used? Answer: 1. a feather - used like a tiny broom sweeping up the smallest of crumbs 2. a spoon – used like a miniature dustpan into which the tiniest pieces of chametz are swept 3. a candle - used to peer into the darkest corners Activity 5: The Passover Seder What four elements make up the Seder Table? Answer: 1. A pillow rests on the chair of the person who will lead the Seder. The pillow symbolizes relaxation because a free person has the right to rest. 2. A large plate holding six symbols of Passover is placed in front of the leader’s place setting. 3. Another plate on the Passover table holds three pieces of matzah. Two pieces are for the blessing and one is to be broken by the leader for Seder. One of the broken pieces, called the afikomen, is placed in a cloth envelope or napkin and given to an adult who hides it. The children at the Seder look for the afikomen and whoever finds it wins a small gift. 4. A small book, called the Haggadah, is placed at every place on the Passover Table. The Haggadah contains prayers, songs, and readings from the Torah. It is read throughout the Seder service. Activity 6: Seder Plate What are the six items placed on the Seder plate and what does each one symbolize? Answer: 1. Maror: whole bitter herbs to symbolize the bitterness of slavery (horseradish is often used for this). 2. Beitzah: a roasted egg, which symbolizes life. 3. Karpa: a vegetable such as potato or parsley dipped in salt water. The vegetables are a symbol of rebirth and spring and the salt water represents the tears shed during enslavement. 4. Hazaret: chopped bitter herbs, like horseradish or the bitter roots of Romaine lettuce, are another symbol of the bitterness of slavery. 5. Haroset: chopped apples and nuts mixed with wine are a symbol of the mortar that Israelite slaves used to make bricks for Egypt. 6. Zeroa: a roasted lamb shank bone is a symbol of the Passover sacrifice.

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Activity 7: Seder Traditions What is the Kadesh? Write down the Kadesh. Answer: The Kadesh is the blessing said at the start of the Seder Meal. You shall observe the Feast of Unleavened Bread, For on this very day I brought your ranks out of the land of Egypt; You shall observe this day throughout the generations as an institution for all time. ~Exodus 12:17 Activity 8: Seder Traditions What are the four questions asked on Seder? Answer: 1. “Why on this night do we eat unleavened bread?” 2. “Why do we eat bitter herbs?” 3. “Why do we dip in the salt water?” 4. “Why do we recline?” Activity 9: Seder Traditions Create a timeline for the Seder (what is the order of the traditions usually practiced during the Seder). Answer: Most Seders follow a tradition similar to this: 13. The meal begins with a blessing called the Kadesh. The first of four glasses of wine, called the Kiddush, is sipped. Each of the glasses of wine represents a promise of liberation that is in the Torah. 14. The leader washes his or her hands using a pitcher of water, a bowl, and a cloth. 15. The greens are dipped in the salt water and passed around the Passover Table for everyone to taste. 16. After the middle piece of matzah is split and put aside as the afikomen, the retelling of the Passover story begins. 17. When the Passover story is retold on Seder, it begins with an introductory question, “Why is this night different from all other nights?” The youngest child at the Passover table asks four questions: Ø “Why on this night do we eat unleavened bread?” Ø “Why do we eat bitter herbs?” Ø “Why do we dip in the salt water?” Ø “Why do we recline?” The Haggadah answers the four questions by telling the story of the Jewish people and their exodus from Egypt. Each person at the Passover table 60 | P a g e


imagines what it must have been like to be a slave in Egypt three thousand years ago. The Haggadah tells about four different children, the Wise, the Wicked, the Simple, and the One Unable to Ask. Each appears in the Haggadah in a different way to show that there are many different ways to learn about God. When the leader reads about the ten plagues, everyone dips a little finger in a glass of wine before them. A drop of wine is spilled on each person’s plate for each plague. 18. More blessings are given and the afikomen is hidden. 19. The matzah is blessed and eaten. 20. The maror is eaten with the haroset. 21. The maror is eaten with matzah. 22. After the Seder meal ends, the children look for the afikomen. Without it, the Seder cannot proceed so the child who finds it must ransom it back to the leader for a small gift or coin. 23. After the afikomen has been found, the Seder guests open the front door to invite the prophet Elijah to enter. Elijah, who is said to give aid and comfort to the poor, will announce the coming of the Messiah. Elijah brings the promise of a new and better world that will not have poverty, hunger, or war. A goblet of wine is placed in front of the door for Elijah. Some families use a special goblet called an Elijah cup. 24. The Passover meal ends with a reading from the Hallel. The Seder ends with singing and the words, “Next year in Jerusalem.” This has special meaning and represents the hope that soon all people will be free. Activity 10: Seder Dinner Create a menu for a Seder dinner. Include one main course, 3 side dishes and a dessert. Answer: Answer will vary but will probably include some of the following -- The main course of a Seder dinner is usually chicken, fish, or turkey. Side dishes include: · · · · ·

Tzimmes: sweet stew made of fruits and vegetables Gefilte fish: ground fish boiled with onions, carrots, and spices. Kugels: special casseroles made with matzah instead of noodles. Caponata: spicy eggplant stew. Pastelicos: fried mashed potato balls filled with meat.

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Activity 11: Passover Rules and Celebrations List the other various traditions and ways that Passover is celebrated during the rest of the week. Answer: · The Fast of the Firstborn is a practice held the day before Passover begins. All firstborn males fast to remember that all firstborn Hebrew males in Egypt were not killed during the final plague. · No work is permitted on the first and last days of Passover. · Because of the rule of no chametz, many families have a separate set of dishes they use only during Passover. No leavening has touched these dishes. · Many songs are sung during the week to celebrate freedom. · The Counting of the Omer is the period of countdown between the days of Passover and Shavu’ot. Beginning on the second night of Passover a blessing is recited counting the days until Shavu’ot. For example, “Today is fourteen days, which is two weeks of the Omer.” The counting is a link between Passover, which celebrates the Exodus, and Shavu’t, which celebrates the giving of the Torah. · The days in between the first and the last are called Chol HaMoed and these days are celebrated with family outings, picnics, and eating treats. · The last night of Passover, called Shvi’I shei Pesach, is celebrated with special prayer services and a festive meal. This day commemorates the day that Moses split the Red Sea for the Hebrews to pass to their freedom. Many families place a bowl of water on the table and speak about the splitting of the sea. Activity 12: Foods During Passover Describe the preparation of matzah. Answer: The ingredients of matzah are just water and flour, but there are very strict rules on how matzah is prepared for Passover. Only 18 minutes may pass between the time the water and flour are mixed together, the dough rolled out, and the matzah is finished baking. Why 18 minutes? 18 minutes is the time it takes for flour and water to ferment and bread to rise. People used to make matzah by hand, but many people today buy it in a store that sells kosher foods. Activity 13: Foods During Passover What is kosher food? Answer: Kosher food is food that is prepared according to the laws of the Torah. 62 | P a g e


Activity 14: The Haggadah What is the Haggadah? Answer: The Haggadah is a special book that includes the readings, blessings, and songs used to celebrate Passover. Haggadah (hah-gah-dah) comes from a Hebrew word that means “to tell.” Today, most Haggadot are written in Hebrew and include a translation. This makes it easier for everyone to participate and understand the Seder. The Haggadah is unique because it contains artwork, like paintings, of the Passover story in it. Other sacred books of Judaism, like the Torah, do not have illustrations or artwork. Activity 15: Recipes Create a recipe card for a traditional food eaten during Passover. Answer: Answer will vary but following are some to consider – Haroset Ingredients: ½ pound chopped walnuts 4 large apples, peeled and chopped (Granny Smiths work well) ½ cup grape juice ¼ pound dried, pitted, chopped prunes (optional) To make: 5. Combine nuts, apples, and prunes 6. Add ½ cup grape juice 7. Blend until sticky 8. Refrigerate until time to serve Matzah Balls Ingredients: 8 matzahs 2 T Passover vegetable oil 4 eggs 1 onion, finely chopped 8 T matzah meal 1 t parsley, chopped 1 t salt ½ t pepper ¼ t nutmeg boiling soup

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To make: 11. Soak matzahs in water until soft 12. Squeeze matzahs to remove water 13. Combined softened matzahs with onion and parsley 14. Heat oil in large pan and add matzah mixture 15. Heat and stir until dry, add more oil if necessary 16. Let cool 17. Add eggs, salt, pepper, and nutmeg 18. Add matzah meal 19. Roll in balls the size of a walnut (add matzah meal to your hands so the dough does not stick) 20. Add matzah balls to a boiling soup and simmer, covered, for 10 minutes *Makes 12 to 15 matzah balls Matzah Brei Ingredients: 2 matzahs, broken into large pieces 1 egg 1/8 t cinnamon 1 t sugar ¼ c milk 1 T butter To make: 10. Soak matzahs in warm water until soft 11. Squeeze matzahs to remove water 12. In a medium bowl, whisk egg, cinnamon, and sugar together 13. Add softened matzahs and mix until it is broken up 14. Slowly add milk until the mixture is a batter-like consistency (not soupy- you may not need the full amount) 15. Set aside to thicken, 5-10 minutes 16. Melt butter in skillet 17. Ladle matzah mixture into pan and fry until lightly brown on both sides 18. Serve hot with powdered sugar, sour cream, or berries. *Makes 4 servings Gefilte Fish Ingredients: 1 Spanish onion, peeled and cubed ¼ cup Passover vegetable oil 2 carrots, peeled and quartered 2 pounds ground fish (whitefish, pike, pickerel) 3 eggs ¾ c cold water 1 t sugar 2-½ t salt 3 T matzah meal

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To make: 15. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F 16. Lightly oil 9 x 5-inch metal loaf pan 17. Line bottom of pan with lightly oiled piece of wax paper 18. Using a food processor, chop onion 19. SautĂŠin hot oil 20. Let cool 21. Add carrots to processor and finely chop 22. Add onion to carrots and mix in remaining ingredients (add in 2 batches using only 2 on/off turns each time 23. Transfer to a large bowl and mix well 24. Pour into a large prepared pan 25. Bake 1 hour, 15 minutes 26. Cool for 10 minutes 27. Invert pan on to a plate, remove pan and wax paper and continue to cool 28. Cover and refrigerate *Makes 10 servings

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