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Justin Cho Architectural research & design


Justin Cho / Work Samples 1. Urban Planning: Territorial Estates 2. Design Studio: Diamond Express 3. Site Analysis: Memory Garden 4. Fabrication: Serpenti(form)

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples


Territorial Estates Mapping Community Empowerment

Pratt Institute / Fall 2012 / Critic: Vito Acconci

What began as a study of vacant lots in historic parts of Brooklyn became an analysis of how local communities identify with the built environment. Proceeding from the belief that a generalized designation by neighborhood does not serve as a proxy for the needs and desires of a population, several other boundaries were identified and mapped to reflect the agency individuals have to affect and define their communities. ArcGIS; NYC’s zoning, land usage and property databases; and fieldwork were used to compile and visualize the data.

Reassembly Vacant lots (light blue) were re-imagined as connective nodes. This allowed for segments of neighborhoods to be rearranged into a disjointed urban fabric. Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Urban Planning


Functioning local communities This research focused on self-organized territories in the historic, densely-populated areas of Fort Greene, BedfordStuyvesant and Clinton Hill. Clockwise from top left: map of neighborhoods; block associations; “campuses,” including public housing and school properties; and historic districts.

Defining “territories” The three types of territories were identified by focusing on small organizational bodies instead of larger political or service boundaries. In general, community members identify with the entire geographical area represented by their territory. Each type of territory informs the physical environment in its own way.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Urban Planning


Different speeds Combining the three types of territories illustrates how they relate to each other temporally and physically. Small block associations (hatched) depend on social agreements and are the least permanent type, but they are the seats of grass roots movements and niche experiments. They provide the seeds

for larger plans, such as the historic districts. These districts (light grey) have the most permanent boundaries, but rely on local activism to become a reality. They contrast strongly with “campuses� (dark grey), which in many cases involved the clearance of homes and spurred campaigns for preservation.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Urban Planning


Behavioral patterns Territories do not encompass all parts of the study area. Most vacant lots (orange) are concentrated outside of the organized areas. Those that are located within territories are interpreted here as connective nodes (light blue) instead of being cast as breaks in the fabric.

While historic districts (pink) are highly populated by block associations (yellow), the “campuses� (blue) tend to push other organizations away and have the fewest vacant lots. Buildings are color coded in shades of red to depict age, with the most recent appearing brightest.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Urban Planning


Diamond Express

Comprehensive Architectural Project (CAP) Studio

Pratt Institute / Spring 2012 / Critic: James Garrison

CAP Studio requires a team of graduate students to realize a design in great detail with the aid of technical consultants. Our project, a modular air rail system on the Las Vegas Strip, used energy efficient climate control systems and on-site energy production to achieve net-zero operating emissions. A unique cable-stayed system with ocular pylons was designed to minimize obstruction of the site’s famous tourist attractions. Team: Justin Cho ’13, Andrew Harris ‘13, John Redington ’13 Consultants: Cristobal Correa, Matthew Flannery, Sameer Kumar, Elliot Maltby

Environmentally responsive Photovoltaic cells on the roof and aluminum panels on the facade are positioned throughout the day by heat-actuated pneumatic devices. Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Design Studio


150’

260’

260’

300’

350’

350’

350’

Progression of track and pylon design The track, pylon and station designs co-evolved through a stage of intensive studies. The final system has a span 2.3 times as long as the original column and beam approach and the track is 32% thinner. Fewer pylons and a thinner profile meant less visual obstruction of the Vegas Strip.

Process models Different strategies for integrating structural systems, canopy structures, and the cable-stayed track were tested through physical models.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Design Studio


1

FACADE SYSTEM AND PLATFORM FLOOR SECTION

PLATFORM EDGE DETAIL

2 PLATFORM COLUMN PIN CONNECTION 6’-7”

DRIP EDGE FACADE CONNECTION

SKYLIGHT NEOPRENE GASKET

ALUMINUM PANEL LOUVRE SYSTEM 0”

2’-

VERTICAL MULLION

VERTICAL MULLION-FLANGE CONNECTION

0’-6”

BAFFLE CEILING SYSTEM GLASS FLANGE FACADE SUPPORT STRUCTURE

3

TICKETING LEVEL FLOOR AND WALL SECTION

SHADOW BOX RAISED FLOOR SYSTEM PEDESTAL

2 1

COMPRESSION STRUT AND TENSION CABLE DROP CEILING EXTERIOR ALUMINUM CLADDING

Facade A facade system of heat-actuated louvres covers the station’s platform level and extends down to cover part of the ticketing level, giving the station a unified appearance. Glass panels extend the full height of the bottom level and into the floor system.

3

Track and station The station rises from beneath the cable-stayed system to wrap around the track on both sides. The bottom of the track is visible from within the station, with a special skylight and flexible gasket allowing for vibration.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Design Studio


4

LONGITUDINAL SECTION OF TRACK AND PYLON

5

7

6 ANCHORAGE BOX

8

9 FIXED ANCHORAGE 1’-0”

6” REINFORCED CONCRETE DECK CONSTRUCTION JOINT BETWEEN 25’ LONG POST-TENSIONED DECK SEGMENTS HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE (HDPE) PIPE CONTAINING STEEL CABLES AND CORROSION PROTECTION COMPOUND STRESSING ANCHORAGE 2’ x 1’ CHANNEL FOR PASSAGE OF WIRING

Expressive forms The pylon’s ocular form and angled cables emphasize the track’s thinness and long spans. The structure is composed of modular reinforced concrete segments that are repeated along Las Vegas Boulevard. Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

REINFORCED CONCRETE PILE CAP, REBAR NOT SHOWN FOR CLARITY CAST-IN-DRILLED-HOLE CAISSONS WITH 35’ DEPTH

Work Samples | Design Studio


5

SECTION AT TYPICAL TRACK CONDITION

6

SECTION AT END OF DECK SEGMENT

7

SECTION AT PYLON-DECK CONNECTION

4 7’-6”

5’-0”

7’-6”

32’-0”

POST-TENSIONING HOLES SEGMENT-TO-SEGMENT INTERLOCKING NOTCH SYSTEM 4’-0”

REINFORCED CONCRETE REBAR NOT SHOWN FOR CLARITY

6”

1’ x 2’ CHANNEL FOR WIRING

32’-0”

Track and pylon cross sections To preserve pedestrian space along the edge of the road, the pylon structure sits within the existing median of Las Vegas Boulevard. While passengers see a single fin rising from the track, legs spread out beneath it to provide lateral bracing.

16’-0”

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Design Studio


8

SECTION AT END OF PYLON

9

SECTION AT MID-POINT OF PYLON

10

PYLON FOOTING DETAIL

11 4’-1”

12 REBAR REBAR TOP OF INITIAL PILE POUR

13

SKIN FRICTION PILE

14

15

10 16

Pylon footing Researching the geology of the site led us to determine that skin friction piles with a depth of 35’ would be sufficient to provide a stable footing and lateral support for the pylons.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Design Studio


HOLLOW SPACE TO ACOMMODATE FIXED ANCHORS

7’-8”

3’-6” 6”

11

SECTION THROUGH ANCHORAGE BOX EL. 56’-8”

14

SECTION THROUGH LOWER LEGS EL. 22’-8”

CENTER LINE OF TRAIN

12’-0”

4’-5”

12

SECTION THROUGH PYLON ABOVE TRACK EL. 45’-4”

15

SECTION THROUGH LOWER LEGS EL. 11’-4”

12’-0”

12’-0”

12’-0”

4’-0”

16’-0”

5’-0”

4’-0”

13

SECTION THROUGH PYLON IMMEDIATELY BELOW TRACK EL. 32’-0”

16

SECTION THROUGH PYLON BASE EL. 0’-0”

4’-6” DISTANCE O.C. BETWEEN 1’-0” DIA PILES

Pylon plan sections The ocular structure is met by the track halfway down its diamond shape, at its widest point. This allows the pylon to support a long span of track despite a relatively small base.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Design Studio


17

STATION LEVEL COLUMN-BEAM CONNECTION

18

AXONOMETRIC VIEW OF STATION LEVEL COLUMN-BEAM CONNECTION

COLUMN REACHES A TOTAL DEPTH OF 3’-0”

STEEL BOXES WELDED ONTO FLANGE SURFACES OF COLUMN TO PROVIDE A CONNECTION PLATE

C-CHANNELS 2’-0” IN DEPTH ARE BOLTED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE COLUMN THROUGH CONNECTION PLATES

COLUMN REMAINS AT DEPTH OF 3’-0”

19

STRESSING ANCHORAGE

20

FIXED ANCHORAGE

CABLES IN CORROSION PROTECTION COMPOUND NEOPRENE RING HDPE PIPE DEVIATOR

BEARING PLATE LOCK NUT

Structural details To use the existing median as a public transit lane, the station was designed to bear on a narrow footprint. The column-beam connection became a vital detail in how the wide upper levels transition to the small column base.

Cable-stayed track details Researching the structure of the track and pylon system presented its own set of challenges. Case studies included the Millau Viaduct, Christian Menn’s Sunniberg Bridge, and several other modern bridges.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Design Studio


PYLON SKETCHES

FOOTBRIDGE SKETCHES

STATION COLUMN SKETCHES

Pen and paper Prior to 3D modeling key structural elements, sketches were used to explore different designs and give the project an overall coherence.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Design Studio


Open-air, perforated aluminum wrapping While the track and pylons were the expressive forms of our system, the station presented a chance to explore other Las Vegas themes, such as collage and signage. A facade of perforated alumiunum panels created a semi-transparent enclosure that provided ventilation and a visual lightness.

Clockwise from top left: view of the facade from the footbridge, the cable-suspended track running between boarding platforms, and a view of the station from the median.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Design Studio


Memory Garden

Participatory Design and Historical Context Meta Brunzema Architects P.C. / Summer 2012

Hell’s Kitchen Neighborhood Association approached Meta Brunzema Architects P.C. to guide a public design charrette for a new park to be located at the southern end of Dyer Ave, between 34th and 35th St. Following initial feedback, we prepared several layout options and presented them, along with a sun study and historical research, at a second public forum. We then developed a conceptual design with which HKNA could move forward in its plans. The goals of the new garden were to increase pedestrian safety, provide varied recreational spaces, and reinforce ties to the neighborhood’s past. Lack of greens Two tall trees stand guard at the northern end of the site, providing a rare glimpse of green and shading during the summer. Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Site Analysis


BRICKWORK DETAIL

Yellow brick road Several sections of Dyer Ave feature yellow brick walls which the Port Authority of NY and NJ built during construction of the Lincoln Tunnel. The brickwork, now obscured, contains subtle Art Deco detailing in the pilasters and a distinct pattern that is repeated along the spans.

In plain sight Many buildings in Hell’s Kitchen were demolished in the 1930s to make way for the 75-foot-wide avenue. An eastern elevation of the site shows the silhouette of a vanished home’s partition wall, still visible on a surviving structure.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Site Analysis


DECEMBER 22, 2011 (WINTER SOLSTICE)

1867 8AM

1PM

6PM

MARCH 20, 202 (SPRING EQUINOX)

OLD FARM-LINE

1891

1879

8AM

1PM

6PM

JUNE 20, 2012 (SUMMER SOLSTICE)

1920

8AM

1PM

6PM

1934

Before Dyer Historical maps tell the story of how the surrounding area was built up into tenement housing, including some dumbell designs. Several nearby lots were eventually merged to make way for larger buildings. The highlighted portion indicates the section converted into Dyer Ave.

Sun study Because Dyer Ave ends in the middle of 34th St, tall buildings block off direct sunlight for most of the day during winter and spring months. A large tree shades the northern end of the site in the summer. These studies helped determine how ambitious our proposal could be for intensive planting.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Site Analysis


CURRENT CONDITION

OPTION 3

OPTION 1

OPTION 4

PROPOSED LAYOUT

OPTION 2

What kind of park? The Port Authority is allowing HKNA to convert two lanes of traffic along Dyer Ave into green space. MBAPC met with community members and subsequently prepared four options for how the land could be distributed. After a second meeting, local stakeholders chose to blend options 1 and 2.

Utilizing the past Old building footprints, farm-lines and lot borders were incorporated into the programmatic layout and gave rise to the concept of a “memory garden.� The dark grey catch basins demark the current width of the road. The sidewalk on the west side will be expanded to incorporate them into a traffic buffer.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Site Analysis


Serpenti(form)

Computer-Aided Construction

Pratt Institute / Spring 2013 / Critic: Christopher Whitelaw

Serpenti(form) is an indoor canopy that draws attention to its surroundings and provides a small enclosure at a busy intersection within Pratt Institute’s Higgins Hall. Placed near a cafe, a large studio space, and a main stairway, the structure has to allow for heavy foot traffic to flow around it and be durable and safe. By reaching up to hook onto two columns, the fanning shape mimics the vaulted architecture of the site while creating a stable three-legged base. Team:

Justin Cho ‘13 Erin Kelly ’13 Adam New ‘13

Parametric design, fabrication Grasshopper was used to create an adjustable model of the canopy in Rhinoceros. The individual pieces were then cut out with a CNC router. Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Fabrication


1

2

5

Unit assembly Steps 1-4 show how connectors are inserted into each board and rotated into place to form a unit. When units are wedged together, they exert pressure on each other, which helps the canopy hold its form.

4

3

6

7

Prototyping The connectors and boards were designed through a series of scale and life-sized prototypes. Materials were tested for strength and lightness.The final canopy was built out of 0.5� Baltic birch so that the structure could bear its own weight.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Fabrication


Development of a parametric design We wanted to create a unitized system that could adjust to fit any type of column condition. After designing how the units would connect, we translated this into a parametric system in Grasshopper. At the end, we added an attractor-based pattern to the boards to allow light through the structure.

Kit-of-parts The final assembly consisted of 28 boards matched with 28 pairs of connectors. Each piece is uniquely shaped due to incremental changes that created the branching of the canopy.

Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Fabrication


Canopy details The assembly system allows for the canopy to have a very slim profile, which emphasizes its presence as a semi-protective envelope. The overlapping panels and cutouts also give the structure a slight visual depth through layering. Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Fabrication


Final installation The canopy marks a communal space that was easily overlooked by students rushing to classes or the cafe. It envelops one column to create a calm space and acts as a visual landmark. Justin Cho | 212 W 79th St, Apt 3C, New York, NY 10024 | e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com | cell: 614.403.1449

Work Samples | Fabrication


Justin Cho M. Arch ‘13, Pratt Institute cell: 614.403.1449 e-mail: justinwcho@gmail.com


Justin Cho: Architectural Work Samples