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YCP’s first management Janez Majnik, chairman Marino Antolovič Enes Lojo Marjan Jakič Marčelo Kovšca Nino Spinelli Lucijan Stadina Nikolaj Strah Boris Šnuderl Milenko Šober

Executive committee: Peter Vidmar, chairman Ivo Štravs, vice-chairman Aldo Krejačič, secretary Ernest Dobravec Gianni Gomezel Andrej Macuh Evgen Cerkvenik Ivan Štravs

Supervisory committee: Anton Kariž, chairman Tomi Semelbauer Zvone Petek

In the organisation of regattas have been particularly active: the long-standing club secretary Andrej Macuh, secretary Suzana Jukič, treasurer Jelka Lojo, owners Mario Klun and Vasja Cerar, on the “Maman” race committee boat Jože Krapež and on the “Jolanta” boat Jure Honigsman, recently also Enes Lojo on the “Azur” boat. The current club secretary is Monika Romanello. Excellent work has also been done by international regatta secretaries Jana Tolja, Branka Klemenc and Zora Flajsinger, and the international judges Ivan Štravs, Janko Kosmina, Bojan Gale, Stane Černe and Miha Vohinc.


The three chairmen During its 35 years, Yachting Club Portorož has been run by three chairmen: Janez Majnik, Zvonimir Birsa and Marjan Bauer.

Most presences at regattas One of the main activities of Yachting Club Portorož was participation at regattas, mostly for cruising yachts. Some club members and friends have been especially active at this, among which (in alphabetical order) Aljoša Lipovšek, Branko Parunov, Darja Mihelič, Demeter Prislan, France Mihelič, Franci Stres, Gianni Gomezel, Herman Antonič, Igor Mali, Igor Švarc, Ivan Štravs, Janez Valant, Jurij Huebscher, Katarina Kerševan, Klara Maučec, Mario Gašpič, Marjan Bauer, Matjaž Prijatelj, Matjaž Ribnikar, Mitja Margon, Peter Podunavac, Rafael Draksler, Rudi Frantar, Stanislav Černe, Tomaž Čopi, Vesna Dekleva Paoli.


Zvonimir Birsa and Ladi Cociani

Janez Majnik, first chairman

World Championship Star Class 1998

Mitja Kosmina and DuĹĄan Puh

Riccardo Simoneschi


Opening ceremony - World Championship Star Class

Antique Boats- regatta

World Championship Star Class 1998

Opening ceremony - World Championship Star Class

Miran Trontelj, Zvonimir Birsa and Peter Vidmar


Antique Boats - regatta

Miran Trontelj, Mario Fafangel and Lojo Enes

Russell Cutts, Lojo Enes and Marjan Bauer

Peter Bossman mayor of Piran and Marjan Bauer chairman of the YCP


Regatta committee – Portorož Cup RC 44

Marjan Bauer and Russell Coutts

Marjan Bauer and Rafaele Ceolin

Tomaž Čopi and Mitja Margon


Divine wind machines Yachting Club Portorož was the first to consolidate the tradition contained in the very often, wrongly understood and negatively misused English word yachting. What can one write when something that has connected people and ideas, materials and souls celebrates 35 years? Especially when it involves a sports association or club that brings together three generations at one time and quite extends those three decades. Memories of victories and defeats, everything that has happened or didn’t suddenly piles up like it’s been a hundred years and not just thirty-five that have passed, squeezed into some kind of mould formally known as measured time. When we talk about the sea, seafaring and sailing the common denominators are watercraft and boats. In the case of Yachting Club Portorož, they were mainly cruising boats that marked it off, something not everyone liked, but politics nodded in affirmation, aware of the fact that a maritime country has to achieve more also in offshore sports and leisure and reach further than a mere stone’s throw from the

coast. Today we can say that the yachts of YCP members have left a wake in all the oceans of the world with all the consequences this implies. From triumph to death. Because that’s how a sailor’s, yachtsman’s life is. I don’t know how many nautical miles YCP members have sailed. If we presume each member has sailed or travelled using a motor approximately 1000 miles per year and on average there were just a hundred yachtsmen and yachtswomen in the club, in 35 years time, we’ve accumulated 3 million miles. In particular with yachts which have always worked according to the same physical principle. A yacht is an object that at the interface between two intertwined yet very different elements, water and air, takes advantage of wind power, the third, even more moody element. Have you ever thought that wind near running water, rivers, was the first real propellant of a man-made machine? Exploitation of human or animal power is indeed something else. You prob-

ably haven’t. And wind is undoubtedly a much more sophisticated propellant than a watercourse. So sailing boats, a yacht. Its thousand year old principle, solutions and enhancements brought by knowledge and experience. I’m always amused by the thought that today’s boats and those from centuries ago are sisters. What is different are only the materials (not all of them), the line details and the amount of equipment. Above all electronics and the immense amount of circuits, processors and gigabytes turning to terabytes. Who is still able to determine their position with the use of a sextant and chronometer? Don’t worry. Sailing is still a matter of human thought and creativity. The helm, impossible to give up, still knows who the helmsman and master are. The helm; made for a human, made for the hand of a sailor. The first image of a sailing boat is 6000 years old, even the pyramids are younger. Marjan Bauer


In the beginning and in the end there is always just the sea and man - 35 years of YCP An interview with Peter Vidmar, one of the founders of Yachting Club Portorož, a club that’s featured on the most prominent pages of Slovenian sailing chronicles for many reasons. In the beginning there were the sea, the coast, boats and enthusiasm. And thus begot Yachting Club Portorož, which now is celebrating its 35th anniversary. Back in those quite difficult times, that were already beginning to loosen up, it was set up by a group of sailing and motonautics enthusiasts, among which were Janez Majnik, Peter Vidmar, Gianni Gomezel, Enes Lojo, Ivan Štravs, Stane Černe, Aldo Krejačič, Andrej Macuh, Zvonimir Birsa and others. The founding took place on 6 January 1982 in the premises of Splošna plovba Piran in Portorož. Janez Majnik became the first chairman of the yachting club and Peter Vidmar, the man who from the very beginning had been the strongest link, motivator and soul of Yachting Club Portorož and a competent spokesperson for everything that has happened or is about to happen, was named chairman of the executive committee. At that time you gentlemen, or should I say comrades, left the section of cruising boats of the Pirat Yachting Club. Why? It was not a kind of club coup that frequently occurs today. The decision was unanimous. At that time, there were several tens of cruising and other boat owners and sailing and motonautics lovers who wanted to join their interests and ambitions into an independent association. The programmes of other clubs were roughly the same with training of juniors for yacht racing in an Olympic triangle at the fore-

front. But the horizons of sailing are much broader and developed maritime nations also use other approaches to sea. Which ones were mentioned at the founding? Several were included in the programme of the new club. Familiarisation with navigation, maritime regulations and laws, safety, construction and maintenance of watercraft, organisation of competitions in the broader area and events that link together sea lovers. We emphasised the importance of connections and linking with foreign yachtsmen and sailors, and did not forget about the importance of sailing and yachting for the sphere of tourism. Our approach to the sea was broader than that of other clubs of the time. The main activity of the club was organisation, co-organisation and cooperation at cruising boat regattas. What kind of and how much interest was there in the YCP membership? A lot, really. The club was and still is operating under the then newly constructed Marina Portorož, and here the club members, who soon reached a total of 170, had and still have moorings. Already in the first year of operations the YCP organised the May, September and closing regatta, and we are proud of our longstanding friendship and cooperation with yachting clubs from Muggia, Monfalcone and Lignano, we also cooperate with other sailors, but the friendship between Regatta Muggia - Portorož and Portorož - Muggia really is special. Tradition – it just so happens that present, on the same boat, are grandfather, father and grandson. When everything started, the now grandfather, who had already been sailing at that time, was not yet a grandfather. Yachting Club Portorož has organised a number of important competitions during its long and rich history. Can you list some of the most important ones?


There are really a lot of them. I would like to mention the Tempest Class World Championship which we organised twice, the first time in 1984, soon after the founding of the club. Closely tied to Portorož and our club is Star Class. Star Class competed in the Gulf of Piran not only in two District, but also in European and World Championships. We have also organised Solig Class Open European Championships, 18 Foot Skiff European Grand Prix, Extreme 40 Word Championships, Musto Skiff Class European Championships, to mention just the main events. Connected with Yachting Club Portorož and Marina Portorož is also the RC 44 Class. That’s how everything began. That’s right. The constructors of this extremely fast and demanding Formula One sailing equivalent are New Zealander Russell Coutts, the four-time winner of the America’s Cup, and Slovenian nautical architect Andrej Justin. Russel liked it here in Portorož and so the first RC 44 Class Portorož Cup took place here in 2006 and then two more times. Our team was directed in the racing area by a man who also does this in the America’s Cup regattas and he said that you seldom see or experience such a flawless organisation. Sailing star Russell Coutts is also a member of Yachting Club Portorož. He usually doesn’t do this since there are so many requests and offers of this kind. I don’t know how it works elsewhere but when we invited him to join us he felt honoured. Speaking of stars, I would like to mention that the RC 44 Class regattas in the Gulf of Piran were attended by more than ten of the then top fifteen drivers in the world. The club organised also the 12’ Dinghy World Cup. Marina Portorož and the yachting club once again proved to be an excellent organiser assuming from what the Italian media had written, as most competitors were from there. Yes, we drew a lot of praise from all sides, not just from the Italians, but we also got lucky with the weather and the

Gulf of Piran is a wonderful racing area. The 12’ Dinghy Cup proved to be a success in both an organisational and sporting aspect, since our member Peter Podunavac, an excellent sailor, beat all the competition and became the world champion in this amazing class that had been rescued from oblivion. But it almost went unnoticed since Slovenia sailing, as a rule, doesn’t get a lot of attention from the public, not even as a favourite at the Olympics in Athens. I don’t know why it’s like that, maybe this sport is just too smart for those who would like to touch the jersey of some football player from second division or who have no clue what Vesna Dekleva and Klara Mavčec or Tomaž Čopi and Mitja Margon have achieved through knowledge and dedication. You mentioned two globally successful crews in the 470 Class who were shaped by your club. Well, they were shaped elsewhere as well, the credit should never go to just one person, for sure our yachting club offered Vesna, Klara, Tomaž and Mitja first-rate training conditions and a pleasant environment in the marina and club. It all began in the nineties when the club expanded its activities to cover Olympic classes. Tomaž Čopi and Mitja Margon became club members in 1993 when they were at the very top of the 470 Class. Among their most prominent success are the victory at the Mediterranean games in Bari (Italy), 2nd place at the European Championship in Cesme (Turkey) and Zadar (Croatia), while in 1998 they reached even higher and came in second at the World Championship in El Arenal (Spain). At the Olympics in Atlanta they finished in 14th place while in Sydney they were 9th. What about the girls, Vesna and Klara? This was also a brilliant crew that formed in 2002. In season 2003 Vesna Dekleva and Klara Maučec came in second at the European Championship, the next year they won silver at the World Championship in Zadar, at the Olympics in Athens they narrowly missed bronze and finished fourth, they also classified for the Olympics in Beijing where they ended in 13th

place. Quite a lot for a yachting club in a country with a mere 42 kilometres of seacoast. Sailing needs supporters, sponsors. Who’s helped you during these past three decades? This is a very thankless question. I could answer it diplomatically by not mentioning anyone and thus not forgetting anyone. Nevertheless, I will try. Particularly in the past there have been a lot of people and companies, institutions on which the YCP was able to rely. Today there are just a few, almost none left anywhere is this current crisis. From the very beginnings support has come from Splošna plovba, Casino Portorož, Luka Koper and the different mayors of Piran. And, of course, Marina Portorož with whom we mutually collaborate. I must also mention Mobitel, and Pivovarna Laško who mostly, at our international regattas, each year there are up to ten of them, quenches thirsts. In the last few years there have been no more offers for help. Will you persevere? Of course, as long as there is a sea, there will be boats and people who love them both. And as the Romans used to say: Navigare necesse est, vivere non est necesse (To sail is necessary, to live is not necessary). How has sailing changed in the last 35 years? A lot and at the same time almost nothing. In the end, you still have to take the helm, brave the elements and beat the competition, who, like you, are just people. There is certainly much more technology involved than there used to be. It seems that the Yachting Club has turned over a new page after its 30th anniversary five years ago by taking a new generation of young, talented sailors under its wing. It’s true. After expressing their desire to become members of YCP, Kim, Lin and Nik Pletikos joined our ranks in the Laser Class, and Rok Verderber and Klemen Semelbauer in the 29er Class. The club is thus continuing its tradition by providing support to young sailors who already proved themselves and show great promise.


Century-old wooden boat delights with its character In 1913 the English amateur boat designer George Cockshott designed the 12 foot sailing Dinghy and the class is still sailed today, well over a hundred years later. Its widespread popularity led to it being chosen as a class for the 1920 and 1928 Olympic Games. The first 12’ Dinghys were made entirely from wood, and some still are today, but in 1977 the first fibreglass Dinghys appeared. The latter are much more popular and widespread today. Although it cannot be compared with modern yachts, Dinghy’s character undoubtedly delights many sailing enthusiast around the globe. In 2014 some 171 helmsmen from all parts of the world gathered in the Netherlands to celebrate the centenary of this class. The International 12’ Dinghy Class is present in Australia, Argentina, Canada, Croatia, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Switzerland, the UK and the USA. In Italy it is even the second most popular class of centreboard boats. In 2008 Slovenia joined this global fleet. In May 2010 at the initiative of YCP the first international regatta took place. In 2011 Slovenia took part at the World Cup in Venice, and on that occasion YCP was invited by the AICD (Italian Dinghy Class Association) to hold the next world cup. The 12’ Dinghy World Cup took place in Portorož from 4 to 8 July 2012. YCP with the help of Marina Portorož made sure that everything ran smoothly, on sea and on land. Slovenia was represented by three athletes from our club: Gianni Gomezel (1937) started sailing in 1950 on a 12’ dinghy. He then moved to the larger Finn class, and later to the Flying Dutchman Class together with Stane Černe. After

1977 he sailed and competed on cruisers and scored some excellent results. Under the aegis of Pirat Sailing Club he participated in the organisation of some high-profile Olympic Class regattas. He has been a member of the YCP executive committee since 1982, a club for which he has also competed. In 2009 he bought a wooden 12’ dinghy and devoted himself to the organisation of regattas. He wishes to revive interest in the International 12’ Dinghy Class in Slovenia, too. Igor Švarc (1961) was born in Maribor. He studied music in Ljubljana and Graz, Austria. He works as a cello teacher at Koper Music School. He started sailing in 1989 on a Fireball as a member of the Fireball Sailing Club. He successfully competed on Elan Express racers/cruisers. In 2011 he joined the Slovenian 12’ Dinghy section, operating under the aegis of YCP. Peter Podunovac (1974) started sailing in the Koper based Jadro Sailing Club and quickly proved himself to be a talented sailor. At the age of 15 he moved from the Optimist Class to the 420 and together with Mitja Petrič won the national championship. The two then successfully raced in the

470 Olympic Class. After 1999 he took part as a professional sailor in maxi yacht races in Italy and Spain and further improved his sailing skills. For 3 years he was skipper and helmsman on Esimit Europa maxi yacht with a 17-member crew. Other than working in his sail loft, he also participates at regattas at home and abroad. In 2012 he won the 12’ Dinghy World Cup in Portorož. The section was joined also by Lara Poljšak (1998). Before moving to the 12’ Dinghy Class, she raced 5 years in the Optimist Class and one year in the 29er Class. Now she races in 12’ Dinghy and ORC Classes. In 2016 she represented the YCP at the Italian 12’ Dinghy Championship where among 85 participants she was 5th overall and 1st place female. The section counts 9 helmsmen, all members of Yachting Club Portorož. They take part in regattas in Chioggia, Venice, Mestre, Bibione, Monfalcone, Trieste, Sistiana and elsewhere. They regularly participate in vintage yacht regattas in Piran and Izola. Last year YCP’s 12’ Dinghy regatta saw the participation of 24 helmsmen, of which 4 from Slovenia. It seems that Gianni Gomezel’s wishes are coming true - interest in the International 12’ Dinghy Class is growing in Slovenia, too.


If you can dream it, you can make it Rok Verderber and Klemen Semelbauer The boys wrote in their presentation about how they learnt to swim before even learning to walk, and how unforgettable their first time on a small sailboat was. At the beginning the Optimist was just a pastime but soon became their passion. They grew up together, inseparable friends on land and major competitors on sea. This raised them above the others. Klemen was 8th at the European Championship (2013), national champion in 2013 and 2nd at one of the most important international Optimist Class regattas in the Netherlands. Young Rok was 2nd at the European Championship in Hungary (2013) and world champion in 2015. The two were always neck to neck, but there can only be one winner. Their paths joined in September 2015 when they started to sail together in the Youth 29er Class which is often seen as the trainer for the Olympic 49er. Rok and Klemen are secondary school students and attend a sports/classic programme. Their sailing successes are being replicated at school and they are among the best students in their school. As top-notch athletes they have been granted a sports scholarship by the Slovenian Olympic Committee. Skiffs like the 29er and 49er are the future of sailing. Their common characteristics are speed and adrenalin, and only the very best can prove themselves capable of handling them.

Rok Verderber and Klemen Semelbauer are members of the Yachting Club PortoroĹž and as such have at their disposal all the infrastructure of Marina PortoroĹž. Already in their very first season the two collected a number of achievements. Their major achievements: 16th place at the World Championship from among 230 of the best sailors in the world, Netherlands 2016 3rd place at the European Championship U-18, Austria 2016 7th place at the European Championship, France 2017

Next season they aim for the podium at the 2017 Youth Sailing World Championship in Sanya, China and the 2018 World Championship in Hong Kong. And their goals are set even higher - the Olympics. The road may be a long and hard one, but sailing is their life.


Vesna, Klara, Tomaž and Mitja have “sailed” down in history. Even today the results of YCP 470 Class crews still represent a milestone that will be difficult to repeat, let alone exceed.. In 1993, a new era began at the Yachting Club Portorož. On the initiative of Ivan Štravs, the club invited sailors competing with smaller sailing boats to join their ranks. Among the first were Tomaž Čopi and Igor Jakomin who joined the club with 470 Class ambitions. Tomaž Čopi, a sailor who by that time had been scoring top results for nearly 15 years in classes Optimist, 420 and 470, wanted to turn the page in his career with his then schoolmate Igor. With the help of sponsors, they bought a new yacht and from the Koper based yachting club Jadro moved to YCP. They achieved some good results and in 1994 won the title of 470 Class National Champions. Something similar was happening to Mitja Margon who at that time was sailing with helmsman Aleš Smerdu for the Izola based club Olimpic. Mitja had also been racing for over 10 years and Tomaž’s invitation to join forces was a perfect opportunity for a new beginning. In the 1994 season, Tomaž and Igor won the right to compete at the World Championship in France but, due to academic obligations, Igor was not able to join the championship. In July 1994, the then 24-year-old Tomaž and 23-year-old Mitja started to write a new success story. At their first regatta at the aforementioned World Championship in France, they placed themselves in the final, gold group, and in 26th place, set a new milestone –the best Slovenian result at an Olympic Class World Championship up until then. The Čopi - Margon crew set a goal for themselves – to achieve the Olympic standard at the World Championship in Brazil (1996).Their new workout regiment, which included even more daily on-water training, regular physical exercise

(even twice a day, six days a week), improving theoretical knowledge and equipment, brought results. The new yacht they bought was also bound to achieve results that would allow them to join the Olympics. The 1995 season created an opportunity to familiarise themselves with the world competition, with some good results - a strong victory at national selection regattas, and also some disappointment - a bad result at the European Championship and failure to participate at the Pre-Olympic regatta because the Slovenian Sailing Federation decided not to co-finance their participation. Their journey to the World Championship in Brazil was a big deal also from a logistics point of view and as an important experience. Everyone was therefore all the more delighted by their final 16th place which brought them the Olympic standard and soon the undisputed confirmation and nomination as Olympic candidates and later participants in the Olympic Games in Atlanta, or more precisely, Savannah. This is how Yachting Club Portorož got its first Olympic athletes and became the best Slovenian club in terms of results. After participating in the Olympic Games where they achieved a very good 14th place and gained a lot of experience, Čopi and Margon decided to continue sailing and even more seriously undertake the project of the 2000 Sydney Olympics. Employment at the Ministry of Finance at the beginning of 1997, which is provided to top athletes, contributed to an improved quality of work and the club’s more active engagement. Carefully planned work in conjunction with the work of specialists in the field of physical fitness, psychology, equipment, and accompanying activities (marketing, PR), brought even better results in racing and elsewhere in the next four years. Some of the results: 1st place (gold medal) at the Mediterranean Games, 1997 2nd place (silver medal) at the European Championship, 1998 2nd place (silver medal) at the World Championship, 1998 2nd place (silver medal) at the European Championship, 1999

Victory and 3rd place at the World Cup regatta, five more classifications among the top 10 at the World and European Championships, several National Champions titles are sports results that no sailor would dare refuse. The medals won at championships were the first medals in Olympic classes for Slovenian sailing. Their 9th place in the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games left a somehow bitter aftertaste, but it was nevertheless a very good achievement that inspired the future generations of Slovenian sailors. The aforementioned results and activities brought more visibility to the sailors, the club, sailing as a sport, and they became an example, a source of inspiration to young sailors and brought a number of awards: In 1998, Tomaž and Mitja were the first sailors to receive the Bloudek Award, the most prestigious award for achievements in Slovenian sports, and likewise the title of “Best Slovenian Athlete” and several times “Best Athlete of Primorska” and the Municipality of Piran. After 2001, when Mitja withdrew from racing and Tomaž continued the story with other sailors, achieving results that weren’t really top world ranking but nevertheless solid, and at home, retaining the primacy of an “unconquered fortress”. With Davor Glavina they even managed to achieve the Olympic standard in 2003 and classify for Athens 2004 Olympics where they reached 14th place, this being the third time at the Olympics for Tomaž. This period saw the beginning of another success story, this time in women’s sailing. On Čopi’s initiative, a women crew formed in the 470 Class. Vesna Dekleva and Klara Maučec sailed for the first time together in 2001, and at their first important competition – the World Championship in Koper, they drew everyone’s attention by ending in 11th place. By 2004, with the help of Čopi and Margon (and their equipment and experience), and with Margon as coach, the crew achieved results that no Slovenian yachtswoman or female crew had ever achieved. At the national selection regattas they were defeating the competition and regularly reaching world top results.


Vesna and Klara won their first medal (silver) in Olympic Classes at the European Championship in France in 2003. Later they also won silver at the World Championship in Zadar, just a few months before the Olympic Games in Athens. In great shape and regarded favourites for the medal, Vesna Dekleva and Klara Maučec performed confidently. Due to a mistake in the first and a misfortunate slip that caused overturning in the second regatta, they missed the podium by 1 point. They left Athens, 4th place, a slightly bitter aftertaste, but by far the best Slovenian classification in female racing. In the period leading up to 2008, Vesna (married name Paoli) and Klara continued to sail. Vesna, in the meantime, became a mother which made it slightly more difficult for them to keep in excellent shape, but they nevertheless, persevered. They won another medal, this time bronze at the European Championship in 2008, gained the right to perform at the Olympics, but in 2008 in Beijing (Qingdau) they did not repeat their performances and results from Athens. At their second Olympics (having attended the Olympics once before with other crews) they reached 13th place and ended their common path which brought them the titles of Best Slovenian Female Athletes, Female Athletes of Primorska and the Municipality of Piran. The results of YCP crews in 470 Class still represent a milestone that will be difficult to repeat, let alone exceed. The 15-year-old period that saw Vesna and Klara, Tomaž and Mitja among the best in the world, proved that only hard work, long hours of training and a comprehensive approach together with a supportive environment (club) bring top results. A total of 7 medals from the largest competitions, the podium at World Cup races, several classifications among the best ten at the largest competitions, a number of national champion titles and, last but not least, 4th and 9th place at the Olympic Games and five performances at the Olympics are facts that confirm Yaching Club Portorož’s contribution to Slovenian sailing history.


Kim Pletikos

Lin Pletikos

National championships national champion (2005-2016) – in classes Optimist, Laser 4.7, Laser Radial

National championships national champion in classes Laser 4.7 and Laser Radial (2013-2016)

European and world championships, important international regattas

European and world championships, important international regattas

youngest participant, European Championship, Optimist, Stari Grad (Croatia), 2003

9th place, European Championship U16, Laser 4.7, Balaton (Hungary), 2013

9th place, World Championship, Optimist, St. Moritz (Switzerland), 2005

10th place, World Championship U16, Laser 4.7, Balaton (Hungary), 2013

8th place, World Championship, Optimist, Montevideo (Uruguay), 2006

8th place, European Championship, Laser 4.7, Moss (Norway), 2014

16th place, World Championship, Optimist, Cagliari (Italy), 2007

2nd place, European Championship U16, Laser 4.7, Moss (Norway), 2014

15th place, European Championship, Optimist, Lake Garda (Italy), 2008

14th place, World Championship, Laser 4.7, Karatsu (Japan), 2014

4th place, World Championship, Laser 4.7 U18, Buzios (Brazil), 2009

7th place, World Championship U16, Laser 4.7, Karatsu (Japan), 2014

2nd place, World Championship, Laser 4.7 U16, Buzios (Brazil), 2009

2nd place, Izola Spring Cup, Laser 4.7, Izola (Slovenia), 2014

3rd place, European Championship, Laser 4.7 U18, Helsinki (Finland), 2009

1st place, Izola Spring Cup, Laser 4.7, Izola (Slovenia), 2015

1st place, European Championship, Laser 4.7 U16, Helsinki (Finland), 2009

1st place, Europa Cup Italy, Laser 4.7, Malcesine (Italy), 2015

6th place, World Championship, Laser 4.7, Pattaya (Thailand), 2010

1st place, Europa Cup Slovenia, Laser 4.7, Koper (Slovenia), 2015

9th place, European Championship, Laser 4.7, Hourtin (France), 2010

2nd place, Croatian Open Championship, Laser 4.7, Zadar (Croatia), 2015

2nd place, World Championship, Laser 4.7, San Francisco (USA), 2011

11th place, European Championship, Laser 4.7, Gdynia (Poland), 2015

4th place, European Championship, Laser 4.7, Workum (Netherlands), 2011

4th place, World Championship, Laser 4.7, Medemblik (Netherlands), 2015

34th place, European Championship, Laser Radial, Hourtin (France), 2012

10th place, European Championship, Laser 4.7, Crozon (France), 2016

4th place, European Championship, Laser Radial, Balaton (Hungary), 2013

4th place, International Regatta, Laser 4.7, Pula (Croatia), 2016

5th place, World Championship, Laser Radial, Balaton (Hungary), 2013

12th place, World Championship, Laser Radial U19, Medemblik (Netherlands), 2017

9th place, Mediterranean Games, Laser Radial, Mersin (Turkey), 2013

4th place, European Championship, Laser Radial U19, Gdynia (Poland), 2017Nik Pletikos

17th place, World Championship, Laser Radial, Douarnenez (France), 2014 2nd place, Izola Spring Cup, Laser Radial, Izola (Slovenia), 2015 1st place, Europa Cup Slovenia, Laser Radial, Koper (Slovenia), 2015 2nd place, Croatia Open Championship, Laser Radial, Zadar (Croatia), 2015 3rd place, Split Olympic sailing week, Laser Radial, Split (Croatia), 2016 4th place, Europa Cup Slovenia, Laser Radial, Koper (Slovenia), 2016 2nd place, Split Olympic sailing week, Laser Radial, Split (Croatia), 2017 28th place, World Championship, Laser Radial, Palma de Mallorca (Spain), 2017 22nd place, World Championship, Laser Radial, Medemblik (Netherlands), 2017


Nik Pletikos National championships 3rd place, National Championship, Optimist, 2001 1st place, National Championship, Optimist, 2002 3rd place, National Championship, Optimist, 2003 1st place, National Championship, Optimist, 2004 1st place, National Championship, Laser 4.7, 2005 2nd place, National Youth Championship, Laser Radial, 2005 2nd place, National Championship, Laser Radial, 2006 2nd place, National Youth Championship, Laser Radial, 2006 1st place, National Youth Championship, Laser Radial, 2007 1st place, National Championship, Laser Radial, 2007 3rd place, National Championship, Olympic class - Laser Standard, 2008 2nd place, National Championship, Olympic class - Laser Standard, 2008 2nd place, National Championship, Olympic class - Laser Standard, 2010 1st place, National Youth Championship, Olympic class - Laser Standard, 2010 1st place, National Championship, Olympic class - Laser Standard, 2013 European and world championships, important international regattas 14th place, World Championship, Optimist, Corpus Christi (USA), 2002 2nd place, World Championship U12, Optimist, Corpus Christi (USA), 2002 13th place, World Championship, Optimist, Las Palmas (Spain), 2003 10th place, European Championship, Laser 4.7, Izola (Slovenia), 2005 9th place, World Championship, Laser 4.7, Boston (USA), 2005 2nd place, European Youth Championship U17, Laser Radial, Riccione (Italy), 2006 9th place, European Youth Championship, Laser Radial, Riccione (Italy), 2006 11th place, World Championship, Laser 4.7, Hourtin (France), 2006 10th place, European Championship, Laser 4.7, Hourtin (France), 2006 9th place, World Youth Championship, Laser Radial, Auckland (New Zealand), 2008 5th place, European Championship, Laser Radial, Copenhagen (Denmark), 2009 13th place, European Youth Championship, Laser Standard, Landskrona (Sweden), 2009 10th place, Mediterranean Games, Laser Standard, Pescara (Italy), 2009 3rd place, European Youth Championship, Laser Standard, Gdynia (Poland), 2010 15th place, Mediterranean Games, Laser Standard, Mersin (Turkey), 2013 1st place, Izola Spring Cup, Laser Standard, Izola (Slovenia), 2014

1st place, Europa Cup Italy, Laser Standard, Malcesine (Italy), 2014 4th place, Europa Cup Slovenia, Laser Standard, Koper (Slovenia), 2014 5th place, Italian Open Championship, Laser Standard, Riva del Garda (Italy), 2015 4th place, Croatian Open Championship, Laser Standard, Zadar (Croatia), 2015 1st place, Izola Spring Cup, Laser Standard, Izola (Slovenia), 2015 1st place, Europa Cup Slovenia, Laser Standard, Ankaran (Slovenia), 2015 2nd place, World Championship, Laser Radial, Dun Laoghaire (Ireland), 2016 3rd place, Europa Cup Slovenia, Laser Standard, Koper (Slovenia), 2017 8th place, World Championship, Laser Radial, Medemblik (Netherlands), 2017


Giro Vela 2010

Gino Rizzi – Giro Vela 2010


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MARINE HARDWARE

Yachting club Portorož - the first 35 years  

Yachting club Portorož and its people are sources of boundless stories of inspiration and triumph. This proud history – and the vision for f...

Yachting club Portorož - the first 35 years  

Yachting club Portorož and its people are sources of boundless stories of inspiration and triumph. This proud history – and the vision for f...

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