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453* Royal Flying Corps. Pair to Sergeant T.W. Haines, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (87596. Sgt. T.W. Haines. R.A.F.), minor edge bruises, good very fine 87596 Sergeant Thomas William Haines, was born in Sittingbourne, Kent in 1895, prior to WWI he worked as a seaman and then on the outbreak of the war enlisted as a Gunner in the Royal Artillery (88433), he served on the Western Front from November 1915, he later transferred to the Royal Flying Corps in June 1917 and served as an Air Mechanic, 2nd Class (87596). Haines then trained as Pilot remaining at home until 1918. He returned to the Western Front in September 1918 and joined 103 Squadron and flew as a pilot in Airco D.H.9. bomber aircraft. On 2 October 1918 he flew in a bombing mission to Fives with 2nd Lieutenant D.C. McDonald as his observer, dropping one bomb from 15000 feet, his aircraft was damaged in anti-aircraft fire. On 23 October he flew with McDonald on a reconnaissance mission, but observations were impossible owing to bad visibility. The following day Haines flew with McDonald on another reconnaissance sortie, during which he and his observer shot down an enemy aircraft which was observed to have crashed out of control, and sent down another out of control. Haines and McDonald who were on a dusk reconnaissance, encountered six Fokker Biplanes over Leuze at a height of 12000 feet. McDonald fired 10 rounds at one enemy aircraft which burst into flames and fell like a stone. McDonald fired the remainder of the same drum at a second enemy aircraft which went down out of control rolling and spinning, but he was not observed to crash owing to the clouds. Haines and McDonald were confirmed with two kills for this incident. Another incident on 28 October saw Haines and McDonald claim one Fokker Biplane over Chapelle-A-Wattines. At the close of the war Haines and McDonald were recorded to have three kills between them and Haines’ individual report from the period recorded ‘is a good pilot and keeps formation comparatively well. He is, I think, intelligent, trustworthy and keen, but has hithero been somewhat handicapped by having indifferent and stupid observers behind him. He is above the average and should do well. 33 hours war flying as a Pilot, 12 Bomb Raids, 3 Enemy Aircraft shot down (by Observer).’ Haines continued his RAF service after the war and discharged from service on 8 November 1926, however, he re-enlisted as an Aircraftsman on 9 January 1939 and was promoted to Sergeant the following day. (2) £400 - £500

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Profile for Jamm Design Ltd

Dominic Winter  

Military, Aviation & Transport History | 16 May 2019 | High Res

Dominic Winter  

Military, Aviation & Transport History | 16 May 2019 | High Res