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REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2014 2015

Celebrating 50 years of Excellence in Community Service.


REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY

2014/2015

A WORD FROM OUR CEO As a "change agent", I have pledged to work actively to build a coalition of consciousness. My personal mantra is to be 'deeply rooted, ever-growing and forever serving'. I am a public servant committed to helping our low-income neighbors transition out of poverty, thus becoming sustaining, independent citizens. Success in our brand of community service will occur only when the War on Poverty is won, and only when communities become self-sufficient. Until then, we will actively continue to network, coordinate and collaborate with other key stakeholders in order to provide a seamless network of services to those in greatest need. There is an African proverb that says, "When spiders unite, they can tie up a lion." Gulf Coast Community Services Association, Inc. (GCCSA) is one of those spiders and the lion is the blight of poverty. I often jokingly say that it takes a village to be the CEO of the largest Community Action Agency (CAA) in Texas. But there is a great deal of truth in that statement. As issue-advocates, it is imperative that we educate individuals, organizations and public officials to ensure that the needs of the low-income community are effectively addressed and continue to remain a high priority. In order to combat poverty, it becomes incumbent that the community as a whole works together. CAA's like GCCSA were created to foster this comprehensive approach to the problem, but it will take the entire village to actualize it. Throughout this Report to the Community, it is my hope that you will see how GCCSA has been instrumental in empowering the un-served and under-served members of our community through our diverse programming. I also hope that our partnerships with other community-minded organizations inspire you to become a change-agent in your own right, contributing to the innovative methods CAA's employ to better our community, lifting all those in need out of poverty.

Dr. Jonita "DrJ" Wallace Reynolds Chief Executive Officer


building a coalition of consciousness

CONTENT 04 - Why We Exist 06 - Goals 08 - Services to the Community 10 - Impact on Our Community 14 - Community Partnerships 18 - The GCCSA Food Pantry 20 - Empowering the Whole Child... 22 - Impact on Child & Family Development 24 - Impact on Early Childhood Education COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHTS 13 - A Little Ray of Light One Transformation at a Time 15 - From Generational Poverty to $20/ hour

25 - Head Start/ Early Head Start Center Locations 26 - School Readiness 28 - Healthy Head Starts 34 - GCCSA Financial Position 36 - GCCSA HS/EHS Funding 38 - Board of Directors 42 - Leadership Team 43 - Policy Council 44 - GCCSA Founders 46 - Community Partners

15 - T.O.P. is Just the Beginning 17 - It's Never too Late An Entrepreneur in the Making


assist families in earning a living wage

50 YEARS OF SERVICE Why GCCSA Exists

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OUR PURPOSE

OUR INTENT

Gulf Coast Community Services Association, Inc. exists to strengthen the educational, social and economic well-being of individuals and families as they move toward independence and self-sufficiency.

GCCSA aims to earn the confidence from the citizens of Houston and Harris County so that we become the exemplary model for social services and community leadership.


assist communities in gaining economic security assist individuals in the advancement of their education

During its rich 50-year history, GCCSA has administered diverse services and programs to hundreds of thousands of under-served and un-served individuals and families in Harris County. As a result, GCCSA provides rich benefits and resources designed to eliminate the inhibitive conditions of poverty. GCCSA programs and services: assist families in earning a living wage, individuals in the advancement of their education, and communities in gaining economic security. As a Community Action Agency, our purpose is two-fold: to assist in emergency situations and to empower. We believe that there are times in life where we must "give someone a fish". Thus, we have programs such as the GCCSA Food Pantry, Clothing and Back-to-School Supply Drives, and Utilities and Rental Assistance programs. However, our primary focus is to grow a more self-sustaining community. Therefore, most of our initiatives revolve around "teaching people how to fish, and in some instances, how to buy the pond".

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GOALS

Increase Family Independence and Self-Sufficiency

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Provide Quality Social Services


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Improve Public Support and Confidence in Social Services

Create Opportunities for Partnerships

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SERVICES TO THE

COMMUNITY HEAD START & EARLY HEAD START ADULT EDUCATION & LITERACY EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE FINANCIAL LITERACY VOCATIONAL TRAINING & SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES FOOD PANTRY

7 4 4 8

le p o e of p r e ty s b r d e m r v a u o N fP tow o g t n u i work tioning O si Tran


HEAD START AND EARLY HEAD START The GCCSA Head Start/ Early Head Start Program is a comprehensive, early childhood development program. Early Head Start services eligible pregnant women, infants and toddlers ages 6 weeks to 30 months. Head Start caters to children ages 3 to 5 years from economically-challenged families. GCCSA currently serves over 1,800 children and families in the Southeast Sector of Harris County, including the cities of Houston, Pasadena and South Houston. GCCSA operates 19 Head Start centers functioning as stand-alone centers or within collaborative site, center-based facilities. The Early Head Start center operates a home-based option. Services provided are education, family involvement, health, family literacy, a fatherhood initiative, mental health services, and nutrition to all enrolled children, including those with disabiltiies in the families' homes. The GCCSA Head Start/ Early Head Start Program has been serving eligible children and families in the Houston, Harris County area since 1964.

ADULT EDUCATION & LITERACY

EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE

The GCCSA Educational Scholarships Program offers full scholarships to qualified candidates who are interested in pursuing continuing education or vocational training certifications. Scholarships include: tuition, books, uniforms, and other related fees.

Assistance is meant to offer meaningful support to individuals while they develop practical plans for meeting their own needs. The program requires individuals to complete a service agreement, or “Plan of Action�, that addresses personal and professional development needs.

GCCSA has partnered with the Industrial Welding Academy to provide full scholarships for individuals ready to start a promising career in welding. In partnership with Houston Community College, GCCSA provides a career training program focused on preparing students for General Office Support Specialist positions, qualified to work with just about any employer.

GCCSA provides emergency assistance to individuals and families in the form of: Rental, Transportation, Electricity, and Food Assistance.

GCCSA also provides access to General Equivalency Diploma and Adult Basic Education classes. Students have oneon-one instruction, with staff dedicated to helping students improve their basic skills and obtain high school credentials. The GED and ABE courses allow students to 1) pursue a higher education, 2) get a better job and 3) accomplish personal goals.

1,896

NUMBER OF VETERANS, DISABLED & SENIOR CITIZENS SERVED

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IMPACT ON OUR COMMUNITY

58,000+ individuals and families served in Harris County

243 of the

Volunteer Hours

524 Volunteer Hours

donated by GCCSA clients

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Of the 27 million people living in the State of Texas, 17.6% of them live below the federal poverty level, according to the 2009-2013 U.S. Census Bureau statistics.

$11,880 per year. For a family of four, that is a yearly income of $24,300, at 100% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines. Twenty-Four Thousand Dollars.

How much is that?

Harris County, one of the largest counties in the state, has an even higher percentage of its population living BELOW the

For a single person, that threshold is an income of at least

poverty level - 18.5%. That percentage might not seem so bad until you realize that it means 821,653 of our friends

and neighbors, the very ones GCCSA fights for, live in a constant state of strife and anxiety.


193

Persons

Transitioned Out of Poverty exceeded State-mandated T.O.P. number:

186

84%

120+

of enrolled students obtained Post-Secondary Certificate or Degree The Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP) Family Budget Calculator suggests that a family of four in the Houston/Baytown/ Sugar Land metro area needs an annual income of $60,608 ($5,051 per month) to afford housing, food, healthcare, child care, transportation, and other miscellaneous things.

Community Partners

However, the median income for this foursome in Harris County is a lot less - $53,137, according to the U.S. Census.

minimum requirements to afford The Basics! No wonder so many of us live with the threat of poverty and homelessness.

What does this mean?

Imagine what that is like for someone who makes less than half of that.

That there are a significant number of people in Houston who do not meet the projected

THIS IS WHY WE DO IT.

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IMPACT ON OUR COMMUNITY GULF COAST COMMUNITY SERVICES ASSOCIATION, INC. is made up of employees who live and breathe the ideals that founded this company 50 years ago. GCCSA consists of a family of individuals who are tirelessly working to provide the highest quality of services in the battle to eradicate destitution and the variables that create and prolong the conditions of scarcity. Poverty does not sleep and neither do we.

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

139%

139% of UNEMPLOYED Participants OBTAINED A JOB 129% MAINTAINED A JOB for at least 90 DAYS 113% of Participants Obtained an INCREASE IN INCOME 247 Participants Obtained JOB SKILLS & COMPETENCIES 43 Participants COMPLETED ABE/GED DIPLOMA

ECONOMIC ENHANCEMENT SERVICES

107%

107% of enrolled participants COMPLETED and MAINTAINED A BUDGET for over 90 DAYS 415 EDUCATIONAL and TRAINING PLACEMENT OPPORTUNITIES and Community Resources available to low-income persons in the Community

EMERGENCY SERVICES

7,800+

7,849 individuals received EMERGENCY FOOD 1,525 received fuel or UTILITY payments funded by LIHEAP or other public and private funding sources 2,302 received EMERGENCY RENT/MORTGAGE

FAMILY SUPPORT & DEVELOPMENT

92% 12

92% of families received EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT food assistance 85% of families received FAMILY SUPPORT food assistance 82% of families obtained and/or maintained SAFE and AFFORDABLE HOUSING


A LITTLE RAY OF LIGHT “Abina” has two children under the age of 8 and was in danger of having her elecricity disconnected “any day now.” Shortly after her appointment with her GCCSA Specialist, Charity, Abina’s lights were cut off and her mode of communication was scant. When Charity was able to get in contact with her, Abina stated that her lights had been off for a little over a week. With two small children in her home, everyday tasks were made that much more difficult. On top of that, Abina declined the invitation to a ration of groceries from the GCCSA Food Pantry to hold her over because she did not want any food to spoil and therefore go to waste. What her family was able to eat and its nutritional value during that time is anyone’s guess. Charity got right to work, contacting the energy company to advocate for Abina. After explaining the situation to the customer service agent and asking what she needed to do on behalf of Abina to get the lights turned back on, Charity was treated to a dial tone. Instead of giving up, Charity called back, spoke with a manager and explained that she worked with Gulf Coast Community Services Association, Inc. The manager was very familiar with GCCSA and decided to do something this particular company does once in a super moon lunar eclipse - accept a verbal pledge on good faith. What good news! Charity did not stop there. She continued to forge a professional connection with that customer service manager. Because of this, GCCSA was able to quickly help Abina with her entire electricity bill.

ONE TRANSFORMATION AT A TIME It’s the little things in life that make the most difference some times. Small gestures and big hearts can be the one thing that helps someone have a better day or move one step forward on a path of progress. The road to progress can be a long one, but well worth the journey. One smiling face has the power to bring light where there was only darkness - for GCCSA employees and for our Clients. One of those smiling faces is Victor, a U.S. Army veteran and native Houstonian. Victor initially came to GCCSA seeking assistance with his utilities but has found use for our other services. Through encouragement from GCCSA Gladiators Steve and Lauren, Victor took our Nutrition Class. He went in expecting to hear about the importance of eating more vegetables, and came out with a set of knowledge he didn’t know was out there. He is now on an unexpected, but well needed path to healthier living. Another smiling face is GCCSA Gladiator Steve. A U.S. Air Force veteran, Steve knows what it is to be without a job and food; surviving off of limited resources on a daily basis. From this unique perspective, Steve has joined the GCCSA Family and is able to empathize with our Clients through experience; giving back as much, if not more, than he received himself. These are the smiling faces of light for whom GCCSA pushes the limits. Cheers to Victor. And cheers to the hard-working family of employees striving to effect positive change.

Abina called Charity later that day in tears. Instead of the 24 - 48 hours it normally takes for the electricity to be turned back on, it took a short 4 hours. The only thing Charity could make out clearly was Abina exclaiming, “My lights are on! My lights are on! I can cook my babies dinner now!” It’s the little things we take for granted that can bring the most joy to those without.

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COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

TRANSFORMATIONS OUT OF POVERTY There are many ways to find yourself living and surviving in poverty, whether it is generational or situational. Not just caused by exploitation and systemic failures, the state of living with limited resources can be brought on by individual choices, illness, addiction, job loss, lack of education, criminal convictions, mindsets, mental illness, and disabilities. How do we combat generational and situational poverty? How is an agency like GCCSA making real contributions to Harris County to gradually decrease the 18.5% poverty rate? (2013 U.S. Census Bureau) Partnering with organizations like the Industrial Welding Academy is one way. The CEO and founder of IWA, Andre Horn, and his wife, Miranda Horn, aim to fill the void of unemployment or underemployment for those women and men who live on the margins. By providing students with hands-on training, industry certification and job placement in the lucrative field of welding, IWA is paving the road to the middle class. And since the Houston-area's largest super-sector is Trade, Transportation & Utilities, followed by Construction, IWA graduates have a high chance of securing a career. GCCSA has a strong and on-going relationship with the Industrial Welding Academy through client referrals and scholarship offerings. In 2014, a large majority of our clients who made transformations out of poverty were IWA grads! Research shows that employment and education are key factors in moving from poverty to middle class to wealth. Partnerships and programs such as the one GCCSA has with the Industrial Welding Academy are instrumental in making permanent reductions in the rate of poverty in Harris County.

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FROM GENERATIONAL POVERTY TO $20/HOUR As a student at Barbara Jordan High School for Careers, Javier was already on a path to succeed at a vocation. He knew too well that he could not possibly support his family – consisting of his mother, brother and himself – on the minimum wage he received from his job at a fast food restaurant. He grew up surviving with very little and did not want to continue that cycle into adulthood. So when his metal shop teacher told him about the career training program at the Industrial Welding Academy and took him on a tour, he knew that this might be his chance out of the generational poverty in which he grew up. Luckily, Javier was able to speak to a GCCSA Specialist who happened to be at IWA the day of his tour. That encounter was the boost he needed to solidify the career path in welding that was set out before him.

After graduating from Barbara Jordan in May of 2015, Javier enrolled in the program at IWA and applied for services at GCCSA, including submitting his application for the GCCSA Scholarship for Vocational Training. Not surprisingly, Javier was very gifted at welding and proved sharp enough to be able to immediately start taking the advanced level classes. His instructor recognized his skills, talent and leadership qualities and referred him for an internship at IWA. What did they do that for! Javier was so remarkable an intern, so brilliant a student that after his internship IWA decided to hire him for themselves! Javier is now a shop helper, earning $20 per hour, working to help other students master their welding techniques. He is well on his way to becoming a Master Welder and breaking the cycle of generational poverty for his brother and himself.

T.O.P. IS JUST THE BEGINNING Everything was going well for Donnies. He had a good job, was able to pay his bills and had virtually no complaints out of life. Unfortunately, in the spring of 2015, the economy of downsizing in the once robust world of construction and oil & gas production caught up to him. Donnies found himself with a pink slip reading the dreaded phrase “Reduction in Force.” Normally, finding another welding position for someone with his experience would have been fairly easy. But times have been difficult for the energy and manufacturing industries in Houston; and with all of the mass layoffs, the market is extremely competitive with not enough jobs to go around.

At 38 years old with a high school diploma and several years of experience, Donnies was making a good living as a welder in a small welding shop. But now that he faced unemployment, he realized that somewhere along the way he was missing vital certifications that would help him keep up with the qualifications of the newest generation of welders. So what did Donnies do? He immediately figured out what it was he needed and found himself at the Industrial Welding Academy. Seeing his need for tuition assistance, the instructors at IWA sent him to GCCSA, where Donnies qualified for the GCCSA Scholarship for Vocational Training. Donnies lost his job in March and came to GCCSA for help on the 24th of the same month. After being enrolled in the higher level welding courses at IWA for 13 days, he landed a job at Rilco Manufacturing. At the completion of his program, Donnies was making $38 an hour, had fulfilled his goal to better himself and found renewed confidence in securing a stable job in the profession of his family.

Texas minimum wage is $7.25 per hour. Working a 40-hour work week for all 52 weeks in a year, the minimum wage Texas citizen working 1 job will make roughly $15,080. According to the CPPP Family Budget Calculator, a worker needs to work 2 full-time minimum wage jobs to cover the almost $30,000/ year it takes to cover basic living expenses. - Center for Public Policy Priorities

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COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

ADULT LITERACY EQUIPS & EMPOWERS Along with receiving their certifications for completing the IC3 Internet and Computer Core portion of the inaugural GCCSA/ HCC General Office Support Specialist Career Training Program for Head Start/ Early Head Start Parents, our GOSS students immersed themselves in mastering the labyrinth that is the Excel spreadsheet. They did this by creating a mock business. Our 10 pioneering students decided to open a clothing boutique for their class project. After careful consideration of property and sales tax costs and benefits, they eliminated setting up shop in The Woodlands and Baytown areas in favor of a storefront within the Houston city limits in the Midtown - Montrose area. Unto them Slim Thick Boutique was born. Slim Thick Boutique is a unique clothing store that caters to the modern-sized Houstonian offering jeans, dresses, skirts, tops, and shoes. Using the power of Excel, our small business owners divided up and calculated the costs of wholesale merchandise prices, overhead, employee wages, and business taxes and weighed it against the higher sales tax that the City of Houston allows - 8.25%. After accounting for their expenses, they ended up turning a small profit of $1,488.00 within the first month of opening. After completing their 14-week Houston Community College career training program, that included general education and computer training, at least 4 students already had employment lined up and 2 were in the process of interviewing at graduation. We are GCCSA Proud of our business savvy and brave students!

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IT’S NEVER TOO LATE

AN ENTREPRENEUR IN THE MAKING

At 33 years old with 6 children and what she describes as a sizable “resume in street life”, Ravium is a 9th grade high school drop out with very little to look forward. Every day was virtually the same with nothing much to do but languish about, exist in the moment and get into trouble. It was when she realized that her children were scared to do well in school, showing how smart they really are, that Ravium became truly concerned they would end up in the same place she was at the age of 33 – nowhere. Inspired by her 15 year old son – an aspiring football player determined to succeed – and 10 year old daughter – a genius with an exponential amount of potential – Ravium decided that now was the time to start her life and find a career.

Shamaka is interested in getting her GED so that she can go back to college. That’s right. She has already technically graduated high school and was taking business courses at Houston Community College, but because of new state educational requirements, her home school diploma and credentials are no longer valid.

When Ravium started the GED and City of Houston Community Re-Entry Network Program in November, she saw it as a new start. Walking to the Kashmere Multi-Service Center daily, she views each new day as an opportunity for a fresh learning experience; a way to learn from past and current mistakes. Though she’s having a difficult time in math, she wants to gain more knowledge and excel in it. She discovered that she is a great reader and is getting more and more interested in learning everything there is to know about social studies and history. Ravium discovered a confidence in herself and her abilities that she didn’t have before she enrolled. Prior to registering for the GED and Re-Entry Program, Ravium had given up on life. With no hope for a better life for herself or her children, each day was a struggle to hang on. But now, Ravium has found a purpose and is able to focus on creating a better life for herself and be a better mother to her children. She doesn’t even have a cell phone because she refuses to get distracted from accomplishing her goal and getting her GED. Ravium is on a journey of transformation and selfdiscovery that she would never have guessed a few short months ago.

Shamaka’s goals are simple. She wants to expand her education, get her degree, open a restaurant (Queen Bee Soul Food) and start a clothing line named “R.I.N.G.O.”. Simple, straightforward and attainable. Her simple, straightforward goals are not without obstacles. She is on parole, due to complete it by the end of 2015. Though “caught up in street life”, she always worked, never being without a job in the fast food industry. But she knows that she cannot sustain a meaningful life on that income alone with her criminal background. Obstacle two, Shamaka is homeless. She is able to maintain by staying with friends, sleeping on couches whenever she can. She sees the City of Houston Community Re-Entry Network Program – helping her learn about business, finance and health awareness – as the way to get started. Enrolled during the Fall of 2015, Shamaka has completed a portion of the Program and is looking forward to moving on to the second step computer courses. Shamaka’s nieces and nephews serve as her inspiration. She wants to make them proud and does not want them to struggle in life as she has struggled. To that end, her long-term goals are centered around them. Shamaka plans on not only saving money to buy a house, but start and build a college fund for each of her nieces and nephews. With all of her courage and determination, Shamaka is sure to open up her new restaurant in a neighborhood near you in no time.

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FOOD INSECURITY IN TEXAS

Hunger is an oft-used term to describe the "uneasy or painful sensations caused by a lack of food". For the majority of Texans, those uncomfortable sensations are temporary and easily fixed by a quick trip to a fast food restaurant or a 30-minute meal prep in our kitchens. However, too many Harris County, Texas households (18.7%) struggle to avoid sustained hunger or are at risk of prolonged hunger at any given point during a week, month or year.

The GCCSA Food Pantry is a Houston Food Bank Gold Status Partner. We provide a free supply of groceries for food insecure residents in need. There are two different ways we can help. Our Emergency/Crisis Assistance Pantry is available to those individuals and families experiencing distress or food insecurity. A free, 3-to-5 day supply of emergency groceries is provided to those

Consider these statistics: • The average cost of a meal in Texas is $2.64. • 26.1% of Texas children live in households that struggle with hunger. • The USDA estimates that 96 billion pounds of food are wasted each year in the U.S. • The primary causes of food insecurity are poverty and unemployment.

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# OF PEOPLE WHO RECEIVED EMERGENCY FOOD

7,800+

expressing an immediate need for food.

# OF INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES WHO RECEIVED FOOD ASSISTANCE

600+


COMMUNITY OUTREACH: A THANK YOU Dear Community Leader,

The Client Select Program gives participants an opportunity to acquire food in a meaningful way, utilizing a concept called "client choice." Participants have the ability to "shop" for their food items in an environment that caters to the Client learning nutritional shopping behaviors while they receive food in a dignified manner. Nutrition Education Classes and Oral Health Awareness Workshops are also provided as part of the program.

New Life Church North America has been serving the lower income families of the Spring Branch area for many years. We freely provide them groceries to supplement their home pantry and encourage them in their faith. Last year (2015) alone we fed more than 25,000 people and over 12,000 of them were children, newborn to age 17 years. We would like to extend our gratitude for how you have generously donated food to our Community Outreach Ministry. Sincerely,

Brett Smith

Director of Ministries New Life Church

$96,161 Dollar value of amount of food donated to GCCSA Food Pantry from Whole Foods Market.

# OF FOOD BOXES DISTRIBUTED

3,600+

POUNDS OF FOOD DONATED AND DISTRIBUTED

137,000+

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EMPOWERING THE WHOLE CHILD... We believe that our Head Start/ Early Head Start parents are the first and most important educators of their children. Parent involvement is a core value. We invite our parents to be integrally involved in the education of their children by volunteering in the classroom, attending parent meetings, serving on an advisory committee, and making decisions about the HS/EHS Program in the parent committees. Parents can also be elected to serve on our Policy Council - an opportunity to participate in shared decision-making about the HS/EHS Program. Our Center Administrators have a host of ways our parents can be involved! The GCCSA Head Start & Early Head Start Program is a comprehensive, child development program that serves children from birth to five, pregnant women, and their families. Our child-focused program has the overall goal of increasing the school readiness of young children. We believe in partnering with parents/guardians to ensure that all the needs of our children and families are met.

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...EMPOWERING THE WHOLE FAMILY Parents who are actively involved in their children's education ensures student success in school and in life. GCCSA's Head Start/ Early Head Start Family Empowerment Program provides many experiences at each Center aimed at empowering parents, equipping them with stronger parenting skills, and educating them in becoming full partners in their children's quest for a better education. Parent involvement includes: • Site-Based Parent Committees • Reading a book to the classroom • Fatherhood Program • Family Night, Open House, Family Fun Day, Holiday Celebrations • Policy Council Leadership • Classroom Volunteer • Partnership Activity Conferences

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IMPACT ON CHILD & FAMILY DEVELOPMENT

100%

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100%

100%

IMMUNIZATIONS

NUTRITION

SCHOOL READINESS

There were 1,864 infants and children enrolled in the Early Childhood/ Family Development Program. Of them, 100% obtained age-appropriate immunizations, medical and dental care.

Of the 1,864 infants and children enrolled in the Early Childhood and Family Development Program, 100% saw improved health and physical development as a result of adequate nutrition.

One hundred percent of the 1,864 children participated in pre-school activities that develop school readiness skills.


Nationwide, over 1 million children are served by Head Start programs every year

NATIONAL HEAD START PROGRAM FACTS AND IMPACTS More than 1.1 million adults volunteered in their local Head Start program. Of these, 800,000 were parents of Head Start children.

(Office of the Administration for Children and Families, Early Childhood Learning & Knowledge Center, 2014)

Head Start parents are more likely to increase their educational levels during their children's early years than other at-risk parents. (National

Head Start Association; Sabol & Chase-Lansdale, 2014)

The nationally-representative Head Start Impact Study found Head Start children scored better than a control group of children in all measured domains of cognitive and socialemotional development at the end of their Head Start experience. (U.S. Department of

Health and Human Services, 2010)

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IMPACT ON

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION Funded Enrollment

Head Start 1,624 Full Day, 5 days/week 240 Part Day, 5 days/week

1,864

101

Head Start Classrooms Early Head Start Classrooms

Early Head Start 72 Center-Based, 4 days/week 12 Home-Based, including pregnant women

Average Monthly Enrollment

Head Start Early Head Start

9

84 100% fully enrolled

Total Children Served *program year 2014-2015

Head Start

24

2,141

Early Head Start

113


HEAD START/ EARLY HEAD START CENTER LOCATIONS

GCCSA Head Start/ Early Head Start provides onsite enrichment experiences that give children various avenues to learn. Activities include storytelling, puppet shows, art activities, and community partner visits. We believe that every day is a new day filled with wonderful experiences for our children. GCCSA operates a total of 19 Head Start and 1 Early Head Start center-based facilities, and services two program options— Full Day and Double Sessions, which vary by site. Full Day Services are available for parents who are employed or attending job training or school on a full-time basis and have no caregiver in the home. Double Session Services are available for those parents who are not employed, not attending job training and not attending school and a caregiver is present in the home.

B

B

C

E

E

F

F

G

astian Elementary

5051 Bellfort Houston, TX 77033

arly Head Start

2020 Solo St Houston, TX 77020

ranklin Elementary

7101 Canal St Houston, TX 77011

ellfort Early Childhood Center

7647 Bellfort Houston, TX 77061

ast End

222 South 66th Houston, TX 77011

arden Villa

6724 Telephone Rd Houston, TX 77061

layton Homes

1919 Runnels St, #B1 Houston, TX 77003

oster Elementary

3919 Ward St Houston, TX 77021

G

olfcrest Elementary

7414 Fairway Dr Houston, TX 77033

G

H

K

K

K

P

P

P

R

regg Elementary

6701 Roxbury Houston, TX 77087

IPP Explore

5402 Lawndale Houston, TX 77047

atterson Elementary

5302 Allendale Houston, TX 77017

R

eveille

3716 Reveille Houston, TX 77087

ouston Gateway Academy

3400 Evergreen Houston, TX 77087

IPP Zenith

11000 Scott St Houston, TX 77047

lum Creek

6969 South Loop East Houston, TX 77087

R

elso Elementary

5800 Southmund St Houston, TX 77033

asadena

902 South Wafer Houston, TX 77506

aul Yzaguirre

2950 Broadway Houston, TX 77017

ichey Road

611B South Richey Rd Pasadena, TX 77506

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PREPARING CHILDREN FOR THE FUTURE GCCSA Head Start/ Early Head Start understands that each child comes into our program with his/ her unique personality, various abilities and distinctive cultural background. We believe all children can reach their utmost potential when provided with a stimulating environment fostered by adults who are nurturing and accepting.

The Child Development Department is responsible for ensuring that the Head Start/ Early Head Start Education and Early Childhood Development Services Performance Standards are met in every classroom for every teacher and every child.

Head Start Child Development & Early Learning Framework Outcomes English Language Development Social Studies Knowledge & Skills Creative Arts Expressions Science Knowledge & Skills Mathematics Knowledge & Skills Literacy Knowledge & Skills Language Development Logic & Reasoning Approaches to Learning Social & Emotional Development Physical Health & Development

Physical Social & Health & Emotional Approaches to Development Development Learning 59.73 65.55 51.87 Fall 2014 78.48 81.8 71.77 Winter 2014 88.67 89.77 83.85 Spring 2015

Logic & Reasoning 43.45 66.31 81.1

Literacy Mathematics Science English Language Arts Social Studies & Knowledge & Knowledge & Creative & Language Development Knowledge Expressions Knowledge Skills Skills Skills Skills Development 38.13 36.56 35.16 35.57 45.35 43.32 19.03 58.15 57.84 57.1 58.12 69.07 61.62 23.69 74.12 74.29 74.94 75.96 83.58 75.53 21.07

GCCSA continues to excel at providing high quality academic preparations for our children, ensuring that every child’s head start leads them to success in Kindergarten and beyond.

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With an average progression rate of 32% in 11 key child development and early learning checkpoints, evaluations assessed at the beginning, middle and end of the school year show that our educators provide our children with enriching activities that prepare them for the future.


DEVELOPING

SCHOOL READINESS The School Readiness Goals for Infants and Toddlers in Head Start and Early Head Start is an essential guide in maintaining the high quality of education for our enrolled children. The below information summarizes the progress of children based on Head Start’s Five Essential Domains of Child Development and Early Learning.

School Readiness Goals for Infants & Toddlers Physical Well-Being & Motor Development Cognition & General Knowledge Language & Literacy Approaches Toward Learning Social & Emotional Development

Fall 2014 Winter 2014 Spring 2015

Social & Emotional Development 63.75 79.2 84.34

Approaches Toward Learning 65.78 80.7 85.86

Language & Literacy 46.95 64.31 73.2

Cognition & General Physical Well-Being & Knowledge Motor Development 53.19 65.44 70.81 81.26 78.07 85.47

An average growth rate of 22% in the five key areas assessed at the beginning, mid-point and end of the school year proves that our children are making phenomenal strides and are entering Kindergarten ready to take on the world.

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EQUIPPING & EMPOWERING

HEALTHY "HEAD STARTS" GCCSA Head Start/ Early Head Start is focused on meeting our children’s nutritional needs and establishing good eating habits. The Head Start & Early Head Start Program provides each child with a free nutritional breakfast, lunch and afternoon snack, sponsored by the Texas Department of Agriculture’s Child Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Head Start & Early Head Start emphasizes the role that CACFP plays in promoting lifelong healthy eating and physical habits in children. During the 2014-2015 school year breakfast, lunch and snacks were provided to 2,075 Head Start and Early Head Start girls and boys across the Program.

20

Eligible Sites

2,075

Eligible Children

126,792 Breakfasts

12,029

A.M. Snacks

136,623 Lunches

224,233

P.M. Snacks

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The goals of the CACFP are to improve and maintain the health and nutritional status of children and adults, promote development of good eating habits, and integrate nutritious food service with organized child and adult day care services. Head Start & Early Head Start children are benefited by being fed nutritious USDA regulated meals that ensure their proper development. These children gain from early nutrition education that helps them establish positive eating habits that will enrich the quality of their diet throughout their lives. The program makes healthy eating a fun learning experience as well. Parents are assured that their children receive high quality meals. With proper nutrition, the child is less likely to experience illness and fatigue and will develop at a normal physical and intellectual pace. Good nutrition is the recipe for an all-around happier child!

$840,173.29

Reimbursement to GCCSA

The U.S. Department of Agriculture prohibits discrimination against its customers, employees and applicants for employment on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, sex, gender identity, religion, reprisal, and where applicable, political beliefs, marital status, familial or parental status, sexual orientation, or where all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program, or protected genetic information in employment or in any program or activity conducted or funded by the Department. If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, or at any USDA office, or call (866) 632-9992 to request the form. You may also write a letter containing all of the information requested in the form. Send your completed complaint form or letter to us by mail at U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410, by fax (202) 690-7442, or email at program.intake@usda. gov. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339; of (800) 845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.


GCCSA Head Start 98% of our children have a Medical and Dental Home 98% of our children are up-to-date on their Immunizations 98% of our children have received their Well-Child Exam 90% of our children have received their Dental Exam

GCCSA Early Head Start 99% of our children have a Medical and Dental Home 99% of our children are up-to-date on their Immunizations 98% of our children have received their Well-Child Exam

Children’s overall health and development is needed for a healthy, safe and happy child; one who is ready to experience new things. Every day we strive to meet our children’s needs for healthcare, including dental care, for it is central to learning readiness. We are dedicated to ensuring that all GCCSA Head Start and Early Head Start children are meeting their developmental milestones. We assist families in identifying community resources where they can access health services and learn the importance of setting a strong physical and educational foundation for their children.

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City of Houston Community Re-Entry Network Program Graduation, December 2015

ABC Dental Oral Care visit

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- Community Partnership

Annunciation Orthodox School clothing drive

Kroger food donation to Food Pantry


AARP + LINKS Senior Programming

CPR Certification Course

Industrial Welding Academy hands-on course

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“Welcome to Mr. Rogers Neighborhood Back to School Block Party” Sponsored by the Aldape Legal Firm, PLLC of Pasadena, Texas

- Community Partnership

GOSS computer training

Fatherhood Program Public Forum

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GCCSA Food Pantry Gold Status Pantry


Tavis Smiley Foundation’s “Ending Poverty: America’s Silent Spaces” forum.

(from left to right) Brian Green (President & CEO, Houston Food Bank); Dr. Stephen L. Klineberg (Professor, Rice University); Tavis Smiley (PBS Talk Show Host); Dr. Jonita Reynolds (CEO, Gulf Coast Community Services Association, Inc.); Rick Flanagan (Deputy Director, Emerging Management Coordinator, City of Houston); Tory Gunsolley (President & CEO, Houston Housing Authority)

GOSS Completion Ceremony

Fatherhood Program clothing donation from Alpha Kappa Alpha

Back-to-School Drive

Board of Directors and Leadership Team

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GCCSA FINANCIAL POSITION Revenue for the Period October 1, 2014 - September 30, 2015 FEDERAL & STATE GRANT REVENUE

OTHER REVENUE

IN-KIND REVENUE

TOTAL REVENUE

22,805,349

24,396

5,574,630

28,404,375

2014 - 2015 Audit Results: “In our opinion the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Organization [Gulf Coast Community Services Association, Inc.] as of September 30, 2015 and 2014, and the changes in its net assets and its cash flows for the years then ended in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.

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- McConnell & Jones, LLP Certified Public Accountants


Gulf Coast Community Services Association, Inc. strives every day to fully utilize all of our human and financial capital to educate, equip and empower the Houston Community. When one is lifted up, we all rise. GCCSA's organizational impact on the community is supported via an annual operational budget that exceeds $28 million. The financial position for the October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015 reporting period is reflected below.

Expenditure for the Period October 1, 2014 - September 30, 2015 Program Direct Expenses

Program Indirect Expenses

Total Expenses

SALARIES & WAGES

9,558,461

2,529,706

12,088,167

FRINGE BENEFITS

2,789,998

550,607

3,340,605

TRAVEL

28,447

1,618

30,065

PARENT SERVICES

67,779

-

67,779

FOOD EXPENSES

1,039,967

14,334

1,054,301

CHILDREN’S SERVICES

223,249

-

223,249

SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT

274,071

23,793

297,864

EQUIPMENT LEASES

319,857

77,658

397,515

CONTRACT SERVICES

278,617

9,568

288,185

ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

1,721,804

329,583

2,051,387

UTILITIES

182,016

8,116

190,132

TRAINING & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

195,067

67,088

262,155

DIRECT SERVICES

2,258,074

-

2,258,074

IN-KIND EXPENSES

5,541,730

-

5,541,730

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

24,479,137

3,612,071

28,091,208

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HEAD START/ EARLY HEAD START FUNDING Revenue for the Period June 1, 2014 - May 31, 2015 GRANT REVENUE

17,020,580

IN-KIND REVENUE

5,229,750

TOTAL REVENUE

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22,250,330


Empowering the whole child and the whole family takes a village. We are that Village. Head Start & Early Head Start’s impact on the community is supported via a combination of public and private funds that exceed $22 million. The financial position for the June 1, 2014 to May 31, 2015 reporting period is reflected below.

Expenditure for the Period June 1, 2014 - May 31, 2015 BUDGET

ACTUAL

SALARIES & WAGES

10,897,418

10,455,069

FRINGE BENEFITS

2,829,623

2,974,426

TRAVEL

40,500

25,648

PARENT SERVICES

83,415

79,067

FOOD EXPENSES

98,000

101,010

CHILDREN’S SERVICES

230,352

216,480

SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT

771,274

699,757

EQUIPMENT LEASES

270,964

426,827

CONTRACT SERVICES

137,575

95,458

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

1,294,251

1,557,468

UTILITIES

125,073

148,956

TRAINING & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

242,136

240,415

IN-KIND EXPENSES

4,255,145

5,229,750

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

21,275,725

22,250,330

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2014 GCCSA BOARD OF DIRECTORS Kevin Owens Chair Private Sector Shell Oil Company

Billy Briscoe, J.D. Vice Chair Public Sector Rep. for City of Houston Mayor

Tracy Whitehead Treasurer Under-Served Sector C

Lee Skinner Secretary Under-Served Sector A

Marcos Alvarez

Irma Anderson-Living

Under-Served Sector B

Under-Served Sector D

Jay Griffin

Pam Guthrie

Cedric Johnson

Private Sector H-E-B

Public Sector Rep. for City of Pasadena Mayor

Public Sector Rep. for Harris County Commissioner, Precinct One El Franco Lee

Rudy Reyes

Carolyn Scantlebury

William-Paul Thomas

Public Sector Rep. for State Rep. Carol Alvarado

Private Sector NAACP

Public Sector Rep. for Mayor Pro Tem

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Elected Officials Represented on the Board

Annise Parker Mayor City of Houston

Ed Gonzales Mayor Pro-Tem City of Houston

El Franco Lee Harris County Commissioner, Precinct One

Johnny Isbell Mayor City of Pasadena

Carol Alvarado State Representative

Advisory Members to the Board of Directors

Dr. Vanese Delahoussaye Sivam Mahasivam, CPA Charles Wilson, J.D. Education Consultant Fiscal Expert Legal Counsel to the Board Early Childhood Legal Expert Education Expert

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2015 GCCSA BOARD OF DIRECTORS Billy Briscoe, J.D. Chair Public Sector Rep. for City of Houston Mayor

Pam Guthrie Vice Chair Public Sector Rep. for City of Pasadena Mayor

Tracy Whitehead Treasurer Under-Served Sector C

Lee Skinner Secretary Under-Served Sector A

Marcos Alvarez

Robin Anderson

Under-Served Sector B

Under-Served Sector D

Jay Griffin

Dr. Vanese Delahoussaye

Cedric Johnson

Private Sector H-E-B

Public Sector Private Sector Rep. for Harris County Commissioner Early Childhood/ Higher Education Precinct One El Franco Lee

Rudy Reyes

Carolyn Scantlebury

William-Paul Thomas

Public Sector Rep. for State Rep. Carol Alvarado

Private Sector NAACP

Public Sector Rep. for Mayor Pro Tem

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Elected Officials Represented on the Board

Annise Parker Mayor City of Houston

Ed Gonzales Mayor Pro-Tem City of Houston

El Franco Lee Harris County Commissioner, Precinct One

Johnny Isbell Mayor City of Pasadena

Carol Alvarado State Representative

Advisory Members to the Board of Directors

Sivam Mahasivam, CPA Charles Wilson, J.D. Fiscal Expert Legal Counsel to the Board Legal Expert

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GCCSA LEADERSHIP TEAM Dr. Jonita “DrJ” Wallace Reynolds Chief Executive Officer

Horace Grant, MBA Director of Operations

Debra Fisher, MBA Chief Financial Officer

Sue Kriegel Executive Assistant to the CEO; Board Liaison

Al Maldonado, III, J.D. Compliance & Accountability Director

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Amanda Shelton, MBA Director of Client Services

Tiamoiya Lee, M.ed. Head Start/ Early Head Start Director

Ja’Milla C. K. Lomas, MIB Marketing & Community Relations Specialist


GCCSA POLICY COUNCIL The Policy Council is involved with planning for GCCSA’s Head Start and Early Head Start future. Made up of elected representatives, one from each of our Head Start and Early Head Start Centers, as well as six Community Organizations, the council meets monthly to make decisions for GCCSA’s program and children. The Policy Council is responsible for planning, reviewing and approving all Head Start program areas and assists the Agency in promoting Parental Engagement to Centers and communities, all while volunteering their time.

B

B

C

E

E

F

F

F

astian Elementary

Francelle Leggett ast End

Selina Guerrero

G

arden Villa

Roy Azinge

ellfort Early Childhood Center

amilies Empowered

Olga Meza

Lalla Morris

G

olfcrest Elementary

Irene Dominguez

layton Homes

Ebony FranklinThompson oster Elementary

Laporshae Nelson

arly Head Start

Candice Mendoza ranklin Elementary

Isabel Vasquez

G

H

regg Elementary

Yanci Vazquez

ouston Area Urban League

Gayle Amos

H

H

K

K

K

L

P

P

P

R

ouston Community College

Cyndi Gostenhofer IPP Zenith

Courtney Blake lum Creek

Brittney Wright

ouston Gateway Academy

Shondra Ford

eague of United Latin American Citizens

Herlinda Garcia

aul Yzaguirre

Mayra Gutierrez

elso Elementary

Lucia Revuelta asadena

Ana Escobedo

R

eveille

Karina Hernandez

IPP Explore

Martin Macias atterson Elementary

Katasha Arkadie

R

ichey Road

Susana Delgado

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GCCSA FOUNDERS Mr. Abner Anderson, Jr.

Mr. John H. Crooker, Jr.

Mr. Norman Anderson

Mr. Maurice Dannenbaum

Mr. W.V. Ballow, Jr.

Mrs. Barbara Dillingham

Mr. Claud Barrett

Mr. Chris Dixie

Mr. Spencer Bayles, M.S.

Mr. Robert Dundas

Mr. Hamilton Brown

Mr. Clifford M. Dunn, Jr.

Mr. Harry Burk

Mr. Robert Y. Eckels

Hon. George H. W. Bush

Mr. Aaron Farfel

Mr. Joe Kelly Butler

Mr. Harry W. Ferguson

Rabbi Moshe Cahana

Mr. Felix Fraga

Mr. Pedro C. Caram, M.D.

Mr. Jules R. Frankel

Mr. Julius P. Carter

Mr. T.F. Glass, Jr.

Rt. Rev. Msgr. John J. Cassata

Mr. Marion A. Graham

Mr. Robert A. Childers

Rev. Harstell H. Gray, Jr.

Mr. Manuel Crespo

Mr. Charles W. Hamilton

" Agencies like GCCSA are needed to help

44

families during times of crisis, catastrophes and emergencies. "

- Felix Fraga, Founder


Mr. Sid Hilliard Hon. William P. Hobby, Jr. Mr. Donald A. Horn Mr. Leon Jaworski Mr. Arthur E. Jones Mr. Wendel Ley Mr. Daniel Martin Mr. John McClelland Mr. Pat McDowell, Jr. Rev. A. Aaron McCardell Rev. James V. Navarro Mr. George T. Nelson Mr. Francis N. O’Bryan, Jr. Mrs. Marcella Perry Mrs. W.E. Perry Mr. Truman Reed

Mr. J. Robert Reynaud Mrs. Olon (Verna) Rogers Mr. H.R. Safford, Jr. Mr. Marlin Sandlin Col. Henry A. Sherman Mr. Lonnie E. Smith. D.D.S. Mrs. Robert D. Straus Mr. William Steven Mr. Ed A. Stumpf, III Mr. Howard Tellepsen Mr. Bernard Weingarten Rev. Horace Westwood Ms. Gail Whitcomb Francis Williams Mrs. Queen Ethel Young

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COMMUNITY PARTNERS

46


50

The support of our Community Partners is invaluable. Without you, there would be no GCCSA.

• Houston Food Bank • Community Action Partnership • U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs • U.S. Department of Health & Human Services • Texas Association of Community Action Agencies • Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs • City of Houston Community Re-Entry Network Program • City of Houston Health & Human Services • Tavis Smiley Foundation • Shell Oil Company • SER Jobs for Progress • Career and Recovery Resources • Goodwill Industries of Houston/ Job Connection Centers • H-E-B • Kroger - Houston • Kroger - South Houston • BBVA Compass Bank • Be The Match Marrow Donor Program, Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center • University of Texas Health Sciences Center • Harris Health Systems • Harris County Healthcare Alliance • Harris County Social Services • St. Luke’s Episcopal Health Charities • Prevent Blindness Texas • Sienna Dental • ABC Dental • Hispanic Health Coalition • National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) • League of United Latin American Citizens • National Association of Latino Elected Officials (NALEO) • Lite Up Texas Program - Public Utility Commission • Direct Energy • CenterPoint Energy • Reliant NRG • Worklife Institute for Parenting Programs and Seminars • Professional Career Training Institute

• Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services • Houston-Galveston Area on Aging Agency • Area Planning Advisory Council for Harris County Area Agency on Aging • Collaborative for Children/ College Bound from Birth • Workforce Solutions/ Gulf Coast Workforce Solutions • Houston Police Department’s Youth Policy Advisory Council • Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County

On behalf of the thousands who walk through our doors yearly, we say thank you to our Community Partners.

We, the stakeholders of this GCCSA Village, (children, employees, Board of Directors, Policy Council, funding sources, legislators, clients, parents, and volunteers) are indebted to our Community Partners who have generously contributed their time and resources to our mission of strengthening the educational, social and economic well-being of the Community children, youth, seniors, and adults. Without the support of local businesses, banking partners, individuals, independent school districts, faith communities, community organizations, financiers, legislators, and institutions of higher learning alike, Gulf Coast Community Services Association, Inc. could not make a difference in the lives of so many Harris County area residents. With their aid, GCCSA has been able to make an indelible mark on the lives of millions over the past five decades. Contributions from Community Partners come in many forms - in-kind donations, special pricing, large financial donations, and volunteerism - and are each of extraordinary value to us and the Community. Together, we are building a better Community, and for that, we are eternally grateful.

• United Way of Greater Houston • Texas Workforce Commission • Houston Housing Authority • Harris County RIDES • Commission of Adult Basic Education • Houston Launch Pad • Open Door Mission, Inc.

• Texas Foreclosure Prevention Task Force • Coalition for the Homeless of Houston/ Harris County • Hunger Free Texans Regional Coalition • City Wide Club of America • Houston Money Week

• Harris County Department of Education • Houston Independent School District • AVANCE - Houston, Inc. • Neighborhood Centers, Inc. • Young Learners School • KIPP Houston Public Schools • Houston Gateway Academy • Raul Yzaguirre School for Success • Kashmere MultiService Center • Houston Training and Education Center • Texas Gulf Coast Consortium of Community Colleges • Lone Star Community College • Houston Community College (HCC) • HCC Literacy Consortium • Industrial Welding Academy • Southeast Vocational Alliance • Houston Center for Literacy • Children’s Museum of Houston • Houston Public Library • National Foreclosure Mitigation Counseling • Aldape Legal Firm, PLLC • Legal Aid • Dispute Resolution Center • Missouri City LINKS, Inc. • Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Alpha Kappa Omega Chapter • Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Houston Metropolitan Alumnae Chapter • Mable M. Jones, M.Ed. • Radio One Houston/ KMJQ Majic 102.1 FM • Liberman Broadcasting, Inc./ KTJM La Raza 98.5 FM, 103.3 FM; KQQK El Norte 107.9 FM

• Sheltering Arms • The Fountain of Praise • St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church • Annunciation Orthodox School • New Life Church • Tim & Co. Catering • Sign Shares • Total Call

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GCCSA

EDUCATE. EQUIP. EMPOWER. 9320 KIRBY DRIVE HOUSTON, TX 77054

WWW.GCCSA.ORG

(713) 393 4700

A Community Action Agency.

© 2016 Gulf Coast Community Services Association, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

GCCSA Annual Report 2014 2015  

The 2014-2015 Report to the Community for Gulf Coast Community Services Association, Inc.

GCCSA Annual Report 2014 2015  

The 2014-2015 Report to the Community for Gulf Coast Community Services Association, Inc.

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