Page 1

James Wilson

Riding East for string orchestra


Bigger Tress Near Warter Or/Ou Peinture Sur Le Motif Pour Le Nouvel Age Post-Photographique Bigger Trees Near Warter is David Hockney’s largest work to date. It measures more than four and a half by twelve metres. The painting is made up of fifty panels joined together to form a whole. Its subject returns Hockney to his native Yorkshire with a view of a landscape near Warter, west of Bridlington, just before the arrival of spring when the trees are coming into leaf. In the shallow foreground space a copse of tall trees and some early daffodils stand on slightly raised ground. An imposing sycamore is the composition’s central focus. Another, denser copse, painted in pinkish tones, is visible in the background. A road to the extreme left and two buildings to the right of the composition offer signs of human habitation. The painting’s extensive upper zone is dominated by the intricate but stark pattern created by the trees’ overlapping branches, which are clearly delineated against the winter sky. Due to its massive scale and technical complexity the painting took Hockney six weeks to complete. Following on from preliminary drawings undertaken out of doors, the artist produced a sketched grid of the entire composition to guide the process. Working in stages, Hockney sought directness and spontaneity by painting en plein air (‘in the open air’), a method that evokes the practice of innovative, nineteenth-century French landscape painters such as the artists of the Barbizon School and the Impressionists, but inevitably limited the number of canvases he could work on at any one time. As they were worked on the individual panels were photographed and the photographs made into a computer mosaic, to allow the artist to chart progress on the composition as a whole as he only had space to display six to ten canvases together in his small studio in Bridlington. The canvases were variously reworked, transported back and forth from the studio to the site for subtle modifications that would enhance and strengthen the complete composition. Hockney produced Bigger Trees Near Warter for the Summer Exhibition of the Royal Academy, London, in 2007, where it occupied the end wall of Gallery III. Following the close of the exhibition, once the rest of the works had been removed, this painting remained in place. Two digital photographic renderings of the work on exactly the same scale as the original were then hung on the two walls flanking it. Presented simultaneously on three walls, the vista seemed to engulf the viewer, creating the effect of a cloister. The painting’s alternative title indicates that Hockney saw the conjunction of a method of painting out of doors and in front of the subject (called in French ‘sur le motif’) with the techniques of (digital) photography as central to his project to produce a landscape painting in oils on a very large scale. The experimental combination of traditional and state-of-the-art methods has characterised much of Hockney’s practice over the last twenty-five years. Yet his engagement with the formal and emotive qualities of the landscape itself is also a striking feature of Bigger Trees Near Warter. Having painted in California in the late 1990s landscapes inspired by Yorkshire, in the early years of the twenty-first century Hockney thus came to shift his attention more emphatically to the scenery of his home region through direct engagement with it. He has continued to visit Yorkshire on a regular basis throughout his career, and now lives there part time, drawing inspiration for all his later landscapes on the countryside within a thirty mile radius of Bridlington. These paintings are more naturalistic than those of the 1980s inspired by the panoramas of California, though retain touches of their vivid colouring. In them, Hockney focuses particularly on trees. In the Woldgate Woods series of paintings, produced in 2006, for example, Hockney charted seasonal changes in a specific area of woodland in nine works each made up of six canvases. ‘[Trees are] like faces,’ he has explained, ‘every one is different. Nature doesn’t repeat itself ... You have to observe carefully; there is a randomness.’ (Quoted in Higgins, p.12.) Hockney gifted Bigger Trees Near Warter, and the two digital reproductions of the work, to Tate following his seventieth birthday. Alice Sanger (2009)


String Orchestra Order of performance: A B C D E F G H I J The ensemble consists of 19 parts: 10 violins, 4 violas, 3 ‘celli and 2 double basses. All sections are to be played ad libitum and are not to be conducted. The beginning of each section is marked with an arrow, corresponding to the downbeat of the conductor, indicating the start of a new section and also the end of the previous section. At the end of each section, the performers should immediately move onto the next regardless of where they are in the bar. The double basses are written in octave transposition, with exception to the harmonics, which are written as they sound, marked "suono reali". Accidentals only affect the notes they precede. Notes without accidentals are always to be understood as natural. Accidentals are carried through to tied notes.

Duration: c.15 minutes


Riding East

James Wilson (b. 1991)

Tempo 1 ad libitum (q = c.118)

A

con sord. Violin 4

c.1'30'' p

3

f

p

3

3

ppp

3

f

3

p

con sord. 3

3

Violin 6 3

f

3

3

p

ppp

3

f

p

ppp

f

con sord. Violin 8 3

f

p

3

arco sul pont.

nat. pizz.

arco sul pont.

3

3

ppp nat. pizz.

Violoncello 3 mf cresc.

p morendo

fff cresc.

ppp morendo

suono reale, senza vibr. Contrabass 1 fff

3

3

Long caesura of optional length determined by the performer.

Short caesura of optional length determined by the performer.

ppp

mp

3

3

p

3

3

f

3

p

3

3


2 B Tempo ad libitum (q = c.146)

Vn. 1

c.1'30'' fff

3

3

3

ppp

mp

3

3

3

p

ppp

fff

3

3

3

3

3

ppp

mp

p

3

3

3

3

ppp

3

3

fff

ppp

Vn. 2 3

fff

3

ppp

3

mp

p

3

ppp

fff

ppp

mp

p

ppp

fff

Vn. 3 fff

ppp

mp

p

ppp

fff

Vn. 4 fff sempre con sord. 3

3

Vn. 6 3

p

f

3

ppp

3

f

p

3

ppp

f

3

con sord.

3

Vn. 8 3

p

3

3

ppp

f

p

3

ppp

f

p

pizz. Vn. 10 p sempre pizz. Vc. 3 3

p

fff

ppp p

3

fff

ppp

3

p

Cb. 1 fff

3

Cb. 2 fff sempre

3

ppp

mp

p

3

ppp

fff

ppp

mp

3

p

3

ppp

fff

3

3

ppp

3

3

mp

3

p

3

ppp

3

3

fff


3 C Tempo ad libitum (q = c.176)

Vn. 1 3

3

3

3

ppp

mp

p

3

ppp

3

mp

3

p

3

3

ppp

3

mp

p

3

3

ppp

Vn. 2 ppp

mp

3

3

3

3

p ppp

mp

3

p

3

ppp

3

3

3

3

mp

Vn. 3 ppp

mp

p

ppp

Vn. 4 ppp

mp

p

ppp

3

con sord. 3

mp

3

3

p

3

3

3

3

3

3

Vn. 5

c.1'30'' 3

p

ppp

p 3

3

ppp

3

p

ppp

p

3

ppp

p

con sord. Vn. 6 p sempre

con sord. Vn. 7 p

ppp

p

ppp

p

ppp

con sord. Vn. 8 p

3

3

3

3

ppp

p ppp

3

p

ppp

p

3

3

ppp

p

3

ppp

con sord. Vn. 10 3

f

p

3

ppp

3

3

f

3

p

Cb. 1 ppp

mp

p

ppp

Cb. 2 3

ppp

3

3

mp

p

3

ppp

mp

p

ppp

3

3

3

ppp

p

ppp

3

p

ppp

p

3

3

ppp


4 D Tempo ad libitum q = c.155

Vn. 1 mp

3

3

p

ppp mp

p

3

ppp

mp

3

p

ppp

mp

Vn. 2 mp

3

p

ppp

3

mp

p

3

ppp

con sord. Vn. 3 f sempre

con sord. Vn. 4

c.1'30'' 3

3

f

3

p

ppp

3

3

f

3

3

ppp

p

f

3

3

3

p

ppp

3

3

c.1'30''

Vn. 5 3

p

3

pp

p

3

pp

p

3

pp

3

3

p

pp

p

pp

p

p

3

pp

pp

3

3

p

Vn. 6 p sempre

Vn. 7 p

pp

p

pp

Vn. 8 p

pp

3

p

3

pp

con sord. Vn. 10

c.1'30'' 3

f

3

3

p

ppp

sul G Vl. 2 p

pp

p

pp

pp

p

pp

f

p

ppp

mp

p

sul G Vl. 3 p

con sord.

Vl. 4

Cb. 1 ppp

mp

p

ppp

3

3

f

3

p

ppp

f

3

3

p

3

ppp

3


E

Tempo 4 ad libitum (q = c.155)

Vn. 1 p

ppp

p

ppp

p

Vn. 2 p sempre

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Vn. 3

c.1'30'' 3

3 3

ff

fff

3

mf

3

p

pp

3

ff

fff

mf

3

p

pp

Vn. 4 ff

3

3

3

fff

mf p

3

pp

ff

3

fff

3

mf

p

3

3

pp

Vn. 5 ff

3

3

fff

pp

mf p

ff

3

fff

mf

p

3

pp

3

3

3

3

Vn. 6 3

3

fff

ff

mf

p

pp

ff

fff

Vn. 7 ff sempre

Vn. 8 ff sempre

3

3

Vn. 9 3

3

ff

mf p

pp

ff

fff

Vn. 10 ff

3

3

3

fff

mf p

(sul G) Vl. 1 ff sempre

(sul G) Vl. 2 ff sempre

(sul G) Vl. 3 ff sempre

(sul G) Vl. 4 ff sempre

Cb. 1 p

ppp

p

ppp

3

pp

3

3

3

fff

ff

3

fff

3

mf

p

3

3

pp

mf

3

3

p

3

pp

3

ff

fff

3

mf

ff

3

fff

3

mf

p

3

pp

ff

fff

mf


F

Tempo 4 ad libitum (q = c.155)

Vn. 1 ppp sempre

Vn. 2 ppp sempre

3

3

3

3

3

3

Vn. 3 fff

3

3

3

3

mf

3

3

p pp

fff

mf

3

pp

p

fff

3

mf

3

3

p

pp

3

fff

mf

p

pp

3

Vn. 4 3

fff

mf

p

3

3

pp

fff mf

Vn. 5 fff

mf

p

pp

fff

mf

3

3

3

3

Vn. 6 3

3

fff

3

3

mf

p

pp

fff

3

mf

p

pp

3

3

fff

mf

3

p

3

pp

3

3

3

3

3

3

c.1'30''

Vn. 7 3

3 3

fff

mf

p

3

3

pp

fff

3

mf

p

pp

Vn. 8 fff sempre

con sord.

3

Vn. 9 3

f

3

p

ppp f

3

p

ppp f

p

ppp

f

con sord. Vn. 10 f

3

p

3

ppp

f

p

3

ppp

sul G possibile Vl. 1 fff

mf

p

pp

fff

mf

p pp

fff

mf

p

mf

p

pp

fff

mf

p pp

fff

mf

p

mf

p

pp

fff

mf

p pp

fff

mf

p

sul G possibile Vl. 2 fff

sul G possibile Vl. 3 fff

Cb. 1 ppp sempre

3

3

fff

3

mf

p

3

pp

3

fff

mf

3

p

pp

fff

mf


G

Tempo 4 ad libitum (q = c.155)

Vn. 1 fff sempre

Vn. 2 3

fff

3

ppp

mp

3

p

3

ppp

3

3

fff

ppp

3

3

Vn. 3 3

3

fff

3

3

mf

p pp

fff

mf

3

p

pp

3

3

fff

mf

p

pp

3

fff

Vn. 4 fff sempre

Vn. 5 fff

mf

p

pp

Vn. 6 3

3

fff

3

3

mf

3

p pp

fff

3

3

mf

p

pp

3

fff

mf

3

3

3

3

3

3

c.1'30''

Vn. 7 3

fff

3

mf

p

3

3

pp

3

3

fff

mf

p

3

pp

fff

3

3

3

Vn. 8 3

3

mf

fff

p

pp

fff

con sord. Vn. 9 p

ppp

p

ppp

con sord. Vn. 10 p sempre

sul G possibile Vl. 1 fff

mf

p

pp

mf

p

pp

mf

p

pp

sul G possibile Vl. 2 fff

sul G possibile Vl. 3 fff

Cb. 1 fff

3

3

3

ppp

mp

3

p

p

ppp

mf

p

3

3

3

mf

p

pp

3

3

fff

mf

p

3

pp


H

Tempo 1 ad libitum (q = c.118)

Vn. 2

c.1'30'' 3

fff

3

ppp

3

mp

3

p

ppp

3

fff

3

ppp

mp

p

3

3

ppp

fff

ppp

3

mp

3

con sord. Vn. 4 ppp

3

f

p

3

ppp

3

3

f

3

3

p dim.

con sord.

3

3

3

Vn. 6 f

3

p

pizz.

ppp

3

3

p

f

3

3

3

3

ppp

3

3

f

3

3

3

3

3

Vn. 8

c.1'30'' p

fff

p

ppp

fff

ppp

p

fff

ppp

p

pizz. Vn. 10 p sempre pizz. Vc. 2 p

3

fff

ppp

p

3

fff

ppp

3

p

pizz. Vc. 3 p sempre

Cb. 1 fff 3

ppp

mp 3

p

ppp 3

fff

ppp 3

mp

p

3

ppp

fff

ppp


Tempo 1 ad libitum (q = c.118)

I

Vn. 2 ppp 3

3

mp

p

3

3

ppp

mp 3

p

3

3

ppp

3

mp

con sord. Vn. 4 3

f

p

3

ppp

3

3

f

3

3

p

con sord.

c.1'30''

Vn. 6 p

3

f

pizz.

3

p

3

3

3

ppp

3

3

f

3

p

3

3

3

3

3

Vn. 8 mf

p

fff

ppp

pizz.

mf

3

p

fff

ppp

mf

3

p

3

3

3

Vn. 10 p

mf

fff

mf

ppp

p

pizz. Vc. 2 mf

3

p

fff

3

ppp

pizz. Vc. 3 mf

3

p

fff

ppp

3

Cb. 1 ppp

mp

p

ppp

mp

p

ppp

fff

3

3


Tempo 1 ad libitum (q = c.118)

J

3

con sord.

3

Vn. 4 3

f

3

p

3

ppp

3

f

p

ppp

f

pizz. Vn. 6 p sempre pizz.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

c.1'30''

Vn. 10 p

fff

ppp

p

fff

ppp

pizz. Vc. 1 p

3

fff

nat. pizz.

ppp

p

3

arco sul pont.

fff

ppp

3

p

nat. pizz.

arco sul pont.

nat. pizz.

3

3

Vc. 2 ppp morendo

mf cresc.

p morendo

fff cresc.

ppp morendo

pizz. Vc. 3 p

3

fff

ppp

p

3

fff

ppp

3

p

suono reale, senza vibr. Cb. 1 mp

p

3

ppp

3

fff

3

ppp

3

mp

p

fff

ppp

p

fff

ppp

Riding East  

String orchestra

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