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ARCI 212 ARCHITECTUAL DESIGN INTERGRATION

Project 1 - Bach Design “Recreating the Architect’s Bach”

“Recreating the Architects Bach” is a movement away from the generic multi-storied holiday houses of the rich that are so often seen on the beachfront in recent times. It is an attempt to reclaim the freedom we once had with our beachfront dwellings by moving away from the strict rules that dictate how we live our lives at our ‘Home away from home’.

James Willis (300223808)


Project 1 – ‘Recreating the Architects Bach’ Freedom constrained by strict parameters

Scale 1:150

The aim of the project is to recreate the architect’s Bach of old. The kind of Bach where every weakened or holiday you went there you had the freedom to be able to change what you liked. You could repaint the fence, fix the roof, build a shed etc. It is a movement away from the New Zealand ‘Holiday Homes’ of the 21st century, which have become monster multi story houses dominating the beachfront. The typical kiwi holidaymaker is almost to scared of damaging something to truly relax and be free of the working week. The typical Bach has many different uses and functions as family and friends come and go throughout weekend holiday seasons. The design aims to allow and adapt for all these different uses by having an adaptable architecture that can change for many different situations.

A small series of photographs that portrays my initial reaction to the site and the environment of Pukerua Bay. From Harsh and windy, to dangerous, to beautiful sunsets but most importantly the sense of freedom that the area depicts with the raw beach and the old shack.

Scale 1:150

The Bach is centered around a solid core which is completely fixed into the ground and includes fixed plumbing functions such as Kitchen, Bathroom and laundry that are always going to be constant no matter how many people are staying and what there individual preferences for a space are. The Core is a structure within a structure, where the Kitchen and bathroom are surrounded by a hallway with glass walls and sliding glass doors that open out onto any one of the Modules that can connect to the core area. The rest of the Bach is made up of small individual modules (2m wide by 3.2m long, excluding deck) hanging from large steel tracks around the site. These modules can be moved both in both orthogonal directions to be set back from the core or moved forward on either side. Multiple of these small modules can be moved together, and there center/side walls opened up, to create one larger space. These modules can be adapted to the position that the user requires such as all the modules together or all separate units. Having these small movable individual modules solves the problem one of the most frustrating problems with going on holiday to a small Bach, not having a big enough living space for when family and friends come over (especially in wellington weather). Having these moveable modules means the space can be adapted to how the user sees fit, it can be one large space (living area), many small spaces (Bedrooms) or anywhere in between (Living area + Bedrooms). The space is adaptable for any situation and even though the movement is limlim ited to a degree by the tracks on which it hangs from there is a feeling of freedom in the design. This comes both from the fact that the modules can be moved however the user wants and also that they are hanging off the ground which along with not destroying the native environment gives an even grater sense of freedom. “Freedom constrained by strict parameters”

James Willis (300223808)


Project 1 – ‘Recreating the Architects Bach’

Freedom constrained by strict parameters

Scale 1:100

Scale 1:100

Scale 1:50

Perspective View

James Willis (300223808)


Plan view showing the way the Bach can move back and forward, bending at will to the users requirements and desires.


Sectional cut, looking out to sea, showing both inhabitation and various uses of different spaces for different people.


3D Perspective view capturing the essence of the Bach life style in Pukarua Bay.


Final Bach Design