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01 The College of Environmental Design

College of Environmental Design 3801 West Temple Avenue Pomona, CA 91768 csupomona.edu/~env


01 WINTER 2013 10

DEAN’s Note

3

The Grid

4

Highlights of ENV projects on and off campus.

LETTERS OF REC

8

First Person

10

A Design Tradition

JULIANA TERIAN

14

Opportunity Knocking

China SUMMER Program 14

20

Passage to the East

Healthcare Architecture Initiative

26

Taking the Initiative

26 All photos on the inside cover from #CPPENV


“the College of Environmental Design has plenty of good stories to tell.”

Managing Editor James Brasuell ENV Outreach and Data Coordinator Art Direction Studio Fuse, Inc. Photographer Tom Zasadzinski Cal Poly Pomona University Photographer ENV Advisors Dean Michael Woo Director of Development Carrie Geurts ENV Department Chairs Architecture Department Chair Judith Sheine Art Department Chair Sarah Meyer Landscape Architecture Chair Lee-Anne Milburn Urban and Regional Planning Chair Richard Willson John T. Lyle Center for Regenerative Studies Director Kyle Brown   Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalPolyPomona. CollegeofEnvironmentalDesign Twitter: @PolyPomona_ENV Instagram: #CPPENV

When I first met our alumna Juliana Terian, one of the main points she impressed upon me was her enduring frustration, harking back to her student days, about the lack of public awareness of Cal Poly Pomona. When Ms. Terian would mention the name of her alma mater, some confused us with another school whose name includes “Poly,” or with another school whose name includes “Tech,” or with yet another school named “Pomona.” Those other schools all have fine attributes. But as Ms. Terian reminded me when she returned to the campus for the first time in 30 years, the College of Environmental Design has plenty of good stories to tell. We just need to start telling them. If we did a better job of conveying the astonishing feats of ENV faculty and students, then state legislators, opinion makers, leaders of the environmental design professions, and the general public would have a better understanding of the connection between an ENV education, the future of the environmental design professions, and the health of California’s economy. Ms. Terian’s generosity in supporting this new magazine and the overhaul of the ENV website is an unprecedented vote of confidence in the future of the college and a clear directional arrow showing us how to elevate the college to a higher level. There are two things you need to know about the name of this magazine. First of all, the name “Link” in either its noun or verb form honors one of the themes that unifies the disparate disciplines within the College of Environmental Design. The

graphic designers, architects, landscape architects, and urban planners in the ENV departments sometimes appear to inhabit separate worlds, and bridging the disciplines in the college may appear to require surmounting tall walls and leaping over wide moats. A characteristic shared by many of the best in the environmental design disciplines, however, is the ability to recognize a degree of order or logic where others see only chaos—a talent for “connecting the dots” (or making creative linkages). Hence the name “Link.” Second, “Link” refers to the connections that we hope to initiate and reinforce among current students and faculty, alumni, and practitioners in the real world. Cal Poly Pomona is sometimes stereotyped as a commuter school without a sense of community or a sense of identity. On the contrary, this university and especially this college have generated uniquely devoted alumni who demonstrate their loyalty in many tangible and intangible ways. We need to do even more to find the alumni who have used their education to achieve professional success (but have lost their connection to their alma mater). And we should heed the lesson understood well by many private universities about the importance of starting early, with the most recent graduates and the youngest alumni, who need to know that their connection to the university and ENV community does not end at graduation. Let us know your ideas about what we can do to make the next issue of this magazine your “Link” to the College of Environmental Design.

Michael Woo Dean, College of Environmental Design

xx

LINK MAGAZINE

WINTER 2013

3


DANA POINT

31

50

15

LA PUENTE HILLS REGION SPREADING GROUNDS

125

WHITTIER NARROWS - 7.6M Gal./Day Water Capacity - 15M Gal./Day Project Cost - $4,653/AF

60

75 50

15

5280 55

OLDHYP ER ES IO T N AN TR D EA LA TM RG EN ES T T W PL AST AN EW T TH AT E ER

LO VA S LL AN EY GEL LA ES ND CI AN TY D BU W YS AT O ER W RI EN GH S RU TS NN IN G AN D

UP W AS UED UCT AQ LA

RS HE D

AN SEVE D

AT E

D AN D

Montebello Forebay

75

05

75

2002

80

2000

65

25

85

1950 125

55 60

100

S.G. RIVER (MONTEBELLO FOREBAY) SPREADING GROUNDS

75 50

15

65

125

95

60

75 50

65

25 10

65

25 10

95

LONG BEACH - 18.5M Gal./Day Water Capacity - 25M Gal./Day Project Cost- $262

LOS COYOTES - 32.9M Gal./Day Water Capacity - 37M Gal./Day Project Cost - $307

DOMINGUEZ GAP BARRIER PROJECT INJECTION WELLS

90

N

2025

85

WELL ID: 1035C RP ELEV: 36.90 HIGH MEASURE: 75.10 ON 10/08/59 LOW MEASUREL 9.50 ON 4/25/95

2030

2040

ALAMITOS BARRIER PROJECT INJECTION WELLS LONG BEACH

STATE WATER PROJECT

LOS ANGELES AQUEDUCT

LOCAL GROUNDWATER COLORADO RIVER AQUEDUCT

DESALINATION

RECYCLED WATER

70,000 (TONS CO2)2

196 kWh/AF

4,000 (TONS CO2)2

$600 to $1,500 per AF

1,139 kWh/AF

2,200 kWh/AF

$1,300 to $2,000 per AF

2052

2,000 kWh/AF

$216 per AF

280,000 (TONS CO2)2

$527 to $869 per AF

25M. Gal./day, 136,363. kwh./day

2,580 kWh/AF

Los Angeles Aqueduct Colorado Aqueduct State Water Project Desalination Local Water Sources Reclaimed/Recycled Water Water Supply (How fast water moves) Embodied Energy Embodied Carbon Energy Required to Operate Energy Produced Water Capacity Watershed outlines Facility Groundwater Flow Injection Well Line Main Groundwater Flow

80

2000

DISTRIBUTION

2072

5 MIL

ar H/ye

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2020

70

75

05

ar

DU DRO E TO IN TH TO LO UG TO S CA E POPU HT PU SW 20 CA AN LI CO LA M P PI CO % FO LO PT GEL PI RE NTI URE ES NG PE RN RA TIO DU NU IA D N PL BU TH MA CT ARE O RI GRO ES AN ILT E FI KE IO IN T CO N SI VER WTH RS S M AN N TH GN RE IN T AN D NEC SI E CO 3/ IF G AN ER TH TI IC IO D 4” DAT RA AN N D LO E FE N OF O G RA SN TL , SU RO ST RY AT BA Y DO OW ORM PO HER N LO PP UG KS LI RI PA W LIES HT VE RI W CY ER CK VE AT R ED RE R ER

50

15

ar

0 AF

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5,000 (TONS CO2)2

1600 0CFS 12000C FS

MJ

/kg

MJ

B.

CO2

1.25

kg M.

1 Billion

CO2/kg

27.5

ar

kg

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ar

MW

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22M.

00

MW

60

MW

Aqueduct Diagram Key KEY

55

75

4,000 kWh/AF

900000 AF

year

WH/year

00

8000

AF

ORANGE COUNTY COASTAL PLAIN BASIN

1950 125 100

0 AF

MWH/

600000M

4.7M. ar

85

ar

00

60000

300000 MWH/year

200000

400000

1.5B. MWH/year

90

WELL ID: 877H RP ELEV: 25.50 HIGH MEASURE: 111.5 ON 2/22/91 LOW MEASURE: 8.3 ON 4/11/05

3B. MWH/ye

H/ye

/year

5000

4.4M. AF

MWH/ye

0MW

1000 0MWH

MWH/y ear

95 MWH/

kg CO2/kg

/kg

20000

750M. MJ 16.5M. kg CO2/kg

1.2M.

160M.

illion

5.5M MJ . kg CO2

CENTRAL BASIN

80

2000

year

1.4M.

3.2M.

4B. MJ

FS 250M

CO2/kg MJ kg 500M. 11M. 400000MWH/year

FS

4000C

1.5M

250000C

0CFS 8000CFS

. AF

2012

. AF

1.1M. MWH/year

FS

MJ

kg CO2/kg1.5B.

ear MWH/y

3.6M.

AF

MJ

FS

36000C

AF

. MW

2M. MWH/year MJ

/kg B. CO2 2.25

1M.

1.8M.

POMONA - 10.5M Gal./Day Water Capacity - 13M Gal./Day Project Cost - $339/AF

70

AF

MWH/

MJ kg CO2/kg 77M. 2.8M. MWH/year

3.75B. MJ 82.5M. kg CO2/kg 58000CFS

$589 per AF

kg

33M.

ear MWH/y

600000

2010

75

05 4.1M.

year

2.6M.

3.5B.

CFS

52000

38.5M. kg CO2/kg 24000CFS 1.75B. MJ S 20000CF

1.2M. MWH/year

2.1M. AF

0CFS

1.3M

3.3M. AF

M.

3200

28000C

AF

. AF

49.5

2B. MJ

2.75B. MJ 60.5M. kg CO2/kg

ar

2.7M

r

kg CO2/kg

MWH/ye

ar

700000 MWH/year

kg CO2/kg2.5B.

H/ye

ear MWH/y

MW /yea 44M.

55M.

00

1.8M.

9000 1.4M.

40000CFS

AF

ear MWH/y

3M. . MWH

MWH/y ear

AF

44000CF 3B. MJ 2.2M. MWH/yea S 4800 r 66M. 0CFS kg CO2/kg 3.25 B. MJ 1.2M. 2.4M 71.5 MWH/ye . MW M. ar kgCO H/ye 2/kg ar 3.9M

1M.

1.6M

800000

2.4M.

90

85

WELL ID: 881F RP ELEV: 63.60 HIGH MEASURE: 179 ON 4/14/10 LOW MEASURE 65 ON 6/4/49

55

100

15

SAN JOSE CREEK - 81.2M Gal./Day Water Capacity - 100M Gal./Day Project Cost - $455

80

2000

1950

Desalination/Recycled Water Key

70

75

05

30,000 (TONS CO2)2

00 KWH 17.5 /day M. Gal. 14M. /day KWH/d Gal./da ay y

10

WEST COAST BASIN

ay

KWH/d

100000

50000 y

1250

Gal./da75000 KWH/day 7M. 10.5M. Gal./day

/day

$527 to $869 per AF

ay

WEST COAST BARRIER PROJECT INJECTION WELLS

0 KWH

day

20,000 (TONS CO2)2

Gal./D 35M. ay

KWH/d

ay KWH/d 350000 y Gal./da 375000 KWH/day 49M. 52.5M. Gal./day 400000 56M. 3.5M Gal./Day KWH/da y . Gal./ 2500

00 KWH 31.5 /day M. Gal./ day 28M. KWH/da Gal./day y 24.5M Gal./day y Gal./da 21M. ay KWH/d

150000

530 kWh/AF

250000

275000 KWH/day 38.5M. Gal./day 42M. 300000 45.5 Gal/day KWH/da M. 3250 y Gal/ 00 day MW H/d ay

25

2250

200000

175000 KWH/day

2008

75 CFS, 913 AF

R

90

WELL ID:2626P RP ELEV: 88.50 HIGH MEASURE: 416.5 ON 4/10/53 LOW MEASURE: 68 ON 4/25/06

85

FO

95

70

75

80

2000

Well Elevation Key

CA SIER USI RA NG SN A OW LO PA W SU CK M IS RE M ER D SU UCE PP D LY BY OF 40 W % AT 6 MIL. ER

50

05

90

1985

WELL ID 8786B RP ELEV: 2793 HIGH MEASURE: 187 ON 8/15/89 LOW MEASURE: 110 ON 7/1/93

RIO HONDO COASTAL SPREADING GROUNDS

70

60

100

10

95

LO EP O RE DW S ART BR WEN WAT AFT WIL DLI P ES HO FO AN M IN G S VA ER FE TA OVE R GEL EN ER LIAM W SH CO ES T AT LL O AN BL R TR M LO A OF ER EY RT AG U D ISH DAM RA PP WAT FR . lO AG ED LH VE ED DO RO ER OM S ES GEE M CO Y OLL A AT A RI VED A CO NG IN TA AN MPL VE 2 N ST ND D TI AG ET LO EL LOS R . FR LE ON EM ED AQ MIL PO RA ES A AN FT PR EN UED LIO WER DO DEC NG CI DW ES T SD P RI ID ELES UCT N D ER FO VE ES OLL AM VA R R TO TI AR ON IL

EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMPING PLANT 438FT. LIFT

5,400 CFS, 164,800 MWH/YEAR

65

10

1950 125

5,445 CFS, 184,810 MWH/YEAR

85

90

25

Spreading Ground Key 15

1980

HA LO DW RV S A ES NG CO FO P A TI EL LO NG ES R NN RA LO LO O RE CO DO SE W UN CY N ST ER CE RI IN CL TIN BA S VE FL ED U SI GU R NS ID W ES TO IN OW AT OF EL TH FO ER EX E PA M CO INES FR PA LO RE OM N ST THE D RA G 10 SA TE DO ULA 0 YE NIT CH RI TIO AT NIQ ARS VE N IO U R S N ES DIS TR IC TS

CFS

200

AF

AF

960 AF

AF

55

100 7200

0 AF

480

1920

AF

160

120 CFS

1440

SAN GABRIEL COASTAL SPREADING GROUNDS 1950

AF

6720 AF

CFS

CFS

7 IRON MTS PUMPING PLANTS 144 FT. LIFT

15,450 CFS , 567,000 Mhw/year

9

JULIAN HINDS PUMPING PLANT 441FT. LIFT

75

80 95

AF 6240

CFS

600 CFS 640

40

CFS CFS

240

8

70

05

5760 CFS

CFS

440 CFS

560

CFS

280 CFS

EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMPING PLANT 438FT. LIFT

5,400 CFS, 184,000 MWH/YEAR

25 10

15M. Gal./day, 113,636. kwh./day

AF

4800 AF

CFS

480

360 320

520

AF

1,800 CFS , 471 MHW/YEAR

10,688 CFS, 191 MWH/YEAR

CARLSBAD

50M. Gal./day, 378,786. kwh./day

65

2000

AF

PALO VERDE DIVERSION DAM

WHITSETT INTAKE PUMPING PLANT 291FT. LIFT

AN

WELL ID: 3784 RP ELEV: 632 HIGH MEASURE: 23.2 ON 10/17/96 LOW MEASURE: 1.10 ON 4/17/99

6

5

CAMP PENDLETON

60

75

85

21,620 CFS, 460,000 MWh/year, 35,000 AF

520 M/Kg, 440,000 MWh/year, 170,000 AF

4

PARKER DAM, LAKE HAVASU RESERVOIR

50M. Gal./day, 378,786. kwh./day

WALNUT SPREADING BASIN

55

43,400 CFS, 36 M.KgCO2/Kg, 180,000 AF

DES

1950 125 100

655 CFS, 4244 AF

AF

1970

3

DAVIS DAM, LAKE MOHAVE RESERVOIR

BR

90

HOOVER DAM, LAKE MOHAVE RESERVOIR

HUNTINGTON BEACH

IRWINDALE / MANNING PIT SPREADING BASINS

70

75

80

EL SEGUNDO

3840

4

2

1

50M. Gal./day, 378,786. kwh./day

SAN GABRIEL VALLEY BASIN

65

S.G. RIVER (SAN GABRIEL VALLEY)

2400

5

THE COLORADO RIVER AQUEDUCT

T

60

25

260 AF

30

28 HUNTINGTON BEACH

1968

ES

55

75 50

2000

3360

1964

3

9 7 8 6

W

125 100

05

2880 AF

1953

DRY CANYON

BEN LOMOND SPREADING GROUNDS

10

390 AF

29

50M. Gal./day, 378,786. kwh./day

EATON WASH SPREADING GROUNDS

PALMDALE - 15M Gal/Day Water Capacity - 15M Gal./Day Project Cost - $389/AF

130 AF

26

PECK ROAD SPREADING BASIN

1950

1 MIL.

SAN FRANCISQUITO

CITRUS SPREADING GROUNDS SANTA FE SPREADING GROUNDS EATON SPREADING BASIN BUENA VISTA SPREADING BASIN

1960

6000 CFS,1.7 MWH/YEAR,150 AF 4000 CFS,4.4 MWH/YEAR, 1325 AF

25

SAN GABRIEL CANYON SPREADING GROUNDS

SANTA MONICA BASIN

1957

1

NORTH HAWIEE RESERVOIR, DAM

9000 CFS, 3.9 MWH/YEAR, 11, 533AF

2

20 21 10 11 23 24

654 CFS, 7235 AF

95

60,000 CFS , 67,748 AF

11

10 17 18 19 22

2 MIL.

16

27

15

300CFS,4.3 MWH/YEAR, 215,120 AF

1959

COTTONWOOD RESERVOIR, DAM

85

VALENICA - 15.55M Gal./Day Water Capacity - 21.6M Gal./Day Project Cost - $642/AF

TIMEMAHA RESERVOIR, DAM

9

8

200 CFS, 766061 MWH/YEAR, 2000 AF

OCEANSIDE

HOLLYWOOD BASIN

O RIVER

CA LIF OR NI

11%

WATER 1% YCLED REC

CAMBRIA

12

3 MIL.

7000 CFS, 3.4 MWH/YEAR

BISHOP LAKE

ALI N EN ATIO CH TE N RP BE (W RI CA IL SE M LI AM W E IT A W H FU ARN TE LL CH Y E PO NO CO W LO MM ER GY ER PL CI AN AL T) CO M PL ET ED

14

SANTA ANITA SPREADING GROUNDS

SAN GABRIEL VALLEY SPREADING GROUNDS

750 CFS 3.2 M. MWH/YEAR

7

1935

OR

1951

PLEASANT VALLEY POWER PLANT

11

13 15

70

90

500 CFS,183,465AF

6

L CO

UPPER GORGE POWER PLANT

CROWLEY LAKE

34 CFS, 47,500 AF

5

650 AF

780 AF

370 CFS, 4.1 M AF

520 AF

MONO LAKE RESERVOIR GRANT LAKE RESERVOIR

7

4

3

1925

1928

AD

2

1

D HE RS

OCEANO

WELL ID: 5912A RP ELEV: 1447.20 HIGH MEASURE: 45.10 ON 12/11/61 LOW MEASURE: 3.50 ON 4/27/67

SAUGUS - 4.76 M Gal./ Day Water capacity -7M Gal./Day Cost - $ 526/AF

THE LOS ANGELES AQUEDUCT

1923

W

9

65

80

MOJAVE SIPHON POWER PLANT

2,880CFS, 1,000 to 77,000 MWh/year

8

60

2000

2,575CFS, 240,000 to 700,000 MWh/year

32CFS, 237MWh/year

1.5B. MJ/kg, 86M. kgCO2/kg, 131,000AF

OCEAN VIEW PLAZA

LANCASTER - 12.3M Gal./Day Water Capacity - 16M Gal./Day Project Cost - $320/AF

PEARBLOSSOM PUMPING PLANT

21,620CFS, 3.3B. MJ/kg, 19M. kgCO2/kg 350,000AF

29GREENSPOT PUMP STATION 2,000 to 3,000 MWH/year 30 CRAFTON200CFS, HILLS RESERVOIR, PUMP STATION 120CFS, 1,500 to 2,000MWh/year, 85AF 31 CHERRY VALLEY PUMP STATION

LAKE PERRIS, DAM

10

25

75

OSO PUMPING PLANT

3,252CFS, 58,420 to 237,296 MWh/year

26

W

28

4 5 6

3

26,180 to 114,340 MWh/year

DIV ORO ER VI SI LL USE EL CO PE CO ON E LA M AU D ECTG M RI AST PO KE LL EX RO ER TH BU TH AM AS AL OL, AN CI TE PR ORI RN LO OSM E O ERIC NSI D AL AN BR TH D D OPO ST .7 THE SA NG S-PO IA M TH CA AT 5 D AN ERM AM OSI FFIC AN NG SC VEL, LYSI EM M SA SE E EN CO RT BA CH A , BO E D LIFO PA GD U S PL E O GO D EL ALE H S BR NST ER DG AQ LIIT TH ND W LO VE TH GIN O & A RN ES TH GUS AN F SA RN ER U O ERM S TO R CA IA RU ACT VE FR BE D U WER REVE NE AN W TH EFEA EE TS LIN M HIL ED FO ALI RD OM G P FO VE RS PR CT PA EX RP E SA TH R A FI N SE SUPR IN W E EN IO SS ED L PUUCT REBA TO NA LL .D PE IS EX SA S TO R R, TH E O OCE ER W TS N ES TE ER . ED IV LA CT NCE A EM NIT E BU AT CR OF TH M PHA Y, CAAFT SM SS ER W RIVE M D E ED PAN ER PI SE AT RECI RG E PR O ES ER A E AT SI SW DIT CO ILT . TH EATE ON ST LE IO EV E PR O SIS INCL NG 1 LIFO BA FR DED ER R PR ON CE P IO URT AT G IN E D N PL ( IN RN , TH OM PR O STO DAM CO NA DIS E RE OJE SS WER UD E W ISLA TH FIRS & FU AN CL FR RU OJE JE N ER .7 N L IA EU T N TR CY CT WA E IN TS U CT AT TU 5 TO OM ST RE LE CO CT (L PRO IC CL S. S BE G ) CO DED AQ MA ER RE S & RE DED RU VE S .2 NST T. ED NO ING U LI ) AT PO 1. 5 TO PR , CT NU M LA ED TO EU VERS 5 ER SE T YE RU W OJE IO E PL S U M RO E AT CT BE D N G ET CT T CT PE D ER , CO ED ED . M ES

WATER ED SH

CO LO RA DO

34%

CT DU UE AQ A

B

8

ALAMO POWER PLANT

1907

62,720CFS, 1.5 Million to 4.6 Million MWh/year

CASTAIC LAKE, DAM

515 M. MJ/kg, 29M. kgCO2/kg, 171,200AF

1 2

75 50

POLONIO PASS

21

20

25

55

100

134CFS, 16,500 to 24,000 MWh/year 134CFS, 16,000 to 23,000 MWh/year

24

OWE 7

1950 125

05

1905

450CFS, 7,000 to 10,000 MWh/year

460CFS, 18,360 to 26,660 MWh/year

BADGER HILL PUMPING PLANT BLUESTONE PUMPING PLANT

EDMONSTON PUMPING PLANT 1,926FT. LIFT

4995CFS, 403,720 to 1,256,414 MWh/year

PYRAMID LAKE, DAM

QUAIL LAKE RESERVOIR WARNE POWER PLANT

1,564CFS, 6,890 to 498,305 MWh/year, 40,325AF

SAND CITY MARINA

10

13 14 15

LAS PERILLAS PUMPING PLANT DEVILS DEN PUMPING PLANT

19

CHRISMAN PUMPING PLANT

TEERINK PUMPING PLANT 205FT. LIFT

3,000CFS, 15,000 to 1.2M. MWh/year

BRANFORD SPREADING BASIN

95

18

23

5

9

1894

CORDELIA PUMPING PLANT

140CFS, 7,080 to 10,575 MWh/year

11 12

DOS AMIGOS PUMPING PLANT 118FT. LIFT

DEL VALLE RESERVOIR, PUMPING PLANT

5,445 CFS, 184,810 to 567,100 MWh/year

DEVIL CANYON POWER PLANT

6

230CFS, 5,920 to 10,900 MWh/year

900M. MJ/kg, 17M. kgCO2/kg, 71,000AF

120CFS, 3.1B. MJ/kg, 182 M. kgCO2/kg 15,450 CFS, 201,010 and 454,992 MWh/year 1,348 MWh/year, 77,000AF

17

27

SF BAY REGIONAL PLANT

BARKER SLOUGH PUMPING PLANT

THERMALITO DAM, RESERVOIR CANAL, FOREBAY, AFTERBAY

9

134CFS, 16,700 to 24,000 MWh/year

16

3

MOSS LANDING

15

OROVILLE DAM, RESERVOIR EDWARD HYATT POWER PLANT

150,000CFS, 380M. MJ/kg, 23M. kgCO2/kg 2.8B. MWh/year, 3.5M. AF

6

10

BETHANY RESERVOIR SOUTH BAY PUMPING PLANT

330CFS, 58,000 to 116,000 MWh/year, 5,100AF

AT E IVER W NS R

S ED SH ER AT EW TH

4

MONTARA

231 CFS, 980 AF

80 CFS

LINK MAGAZINE

Designed by Richard Neutra and currently owned by the College of Environmental Design, the VDL House is one of ENV’s most treasured resources. Since 2008, ENV has undertaken a number of restoration and preservation projects at the VDL, most recently restoring the house’s roof and penthouse, which overlooks the Silver Lake Reservoir in Los Angeles. The current

CROCKETT

SAN RAFAEL

SAN FERNANDO VALLEY SPREADING GROUNDS

CFS

4

Roof and Penthouse Restoration Nearly Complete at the VDL House; Architectones Exhibit Draws Crowds

10.5CFS, 727,000MWh/year

BUENA VISTA PUMPING PLANT 205FT. LIFT

SAN FERNANDO VALLEY BASIN

400

Use the QR code for PolyKroma to tap into updates and news about the upcoming event. ACROSS: The celebrated Pop-A-Waffle design. ABOVE: The winning submission for the Carfree Day in L.A. contest by GOOD Magazine and LA/2B, URP student Elizabeth Gallardo’s map communicates playful exploration.

Top:

Assistant Professor of Art Ray Kampf got a taste of stardom recently for his design of the graphics for the Pop-AWaffle food truck—a contestant on Season 3 of the Food Network’s Great Food Truck Race. (For the uninitiated, the Great Food Truck Race plays on the popular mobile food vending culture in a reality show competition pitting food truck operators against each other to determine which makes the best meal on wheels.) The Pop-A-Waffle truck ended up taking third place on the show, and the vehicle’s graphics got served a heaping helping of acclaim along the way: Complex, an online style and lifestyle magazine, ranked the truck as the “Coolest Looking Food Truck” on the show.

4

8

7 BANKS PUMPING PLANT 244FT LIFT

LTA DE

SANTA CRUZ

AF

The Pop-A-Waffle Truck, Designed by Art Department Faculty Member, Shines on the Food Network

KESWICK RESERVOIR, DAM POWER PLANT

250,000CFS, 321M. MJ/kg, 46M. kgCO2/kg 441,312 MWh/year, 23,800AF

22

HANSEN SPREADING GROUNDS

PACOIMA SPREADING GROUNDS

3

5,400 CFS, 191,610 to 524,347 MWh/year

LOPEZ SPREADING GROUNDS

4320

During the summer of 2012, URP student Elizabeth Gallardo won a design competition held by GOOD Magazine and LA/2B that asked participants to plot a path for a carfree day in Los Angeles. Gallardo’s submission invited adventurous Angelenos to explore the urban wilderness around Elysian Park— particularly along the path of the original Spanish settlement in Los Angeles near where the Los Angeles River, the Arroyo Seco, the 110 Freeway, and the 5 Freeway intersect. Gallardo, an avid walker who grew up nearby in Eagle Rock, was first introduced to some of the locations featured in her plan during a performance

by the bodycity dance troupe. “This is a magical place, where all these weird confluences happen,” says Gallardo, who wanted her submission to inspire locals to explore the natural beauty available in Elysian Park. Since winning the contest, Gallardo has continued her mission to make it easier for Angelenos to walk around their city as an intern with the L.A. Department of Transportation’s new pedestrian planning program. According to Gallardo, the city should reconfigure streets to make them safer and more welcoming to pedestrians: “People don’t think walking is safe. Making streets smaller and more intimate is the first step to getting more people to walk in L.A.”

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SHASTA RESERVOIR, DAM POWER PLANT

186,000CFS, 943M. MJ/kg, 135M. kgCO2/kg 4,552,000 AF

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A Carfree Day in L.A.

This spring, the Art Department will take its annual end-of-year show on the road to the Millard Sheets Gallery at the Fairplex in Pomona for Poly-Kroma from June 5 through June 15. Poly-Kroma marks the first time that the Art Department will leave campus to showcase the year’s best student work. A concurrent exhibit featuring work by faculty and alumni is one of many celebrations made possible by the special arrangement. Art Department students will spend the year preparing for the event by creating marketing and branding designs for the event. The QR code pictured here is the first such marketing effort. Use the QR reader app on your smart phone to get connected with news about the event and stay in the loop for details about the opening reception, alumni networking events, and future student recruitment activities planned for the show.

California’s water delivery systems remain the lifeblood of Southern California’s residential metropolis and the Central Valley’s agriculture industry— not to mention an unparalleled accomplishment in the history of engineering and infrastructure. With the centennial anniversary of one of the system’s biggest components—the Los Angeles Aqueduct— approaching in November 2013, Metabolic Studios recently awarded a $100,000 grant to Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture Barry Lehrman to fund the Aqueduct Futures Project. Aqueduct Futures launched this fall quarter with the first of a series of interdisciplinary courses and studios that respond to this historic moment by exploring the future of water infrastructure. Students in these courses will organize and create events, exhibitions, and media directed at the public and K-12 students with the goal of improving the adaptation and resiliency of Southern California. Given the holistic set of considerations that define the importance of the Aqueduct, Prof. Lehrman has teamed up with Associate Professor of Art Crystal Lee and Adjunct Assistant Professor Meredith McKenzie in leading the courses.

THE CYBORG WATERSHED

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A powerful framework essential to each environmental design discipline, The Grid applies in the studio and in the real world—every place ENV is at work.

Poly-Kroma Is Coming to the Millard Sheets Gallery

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Aqueduct Studios Celebrate the Past by Looking to the Future

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Top: An infographic produced for Landscape Architecture 301L/401L (The Aqueduct Futures Project) by the student team of Lonnie Roy, Mersedeh Hatami, Luis Esparza Jr., Antonio Fernandez, Arturo Contreras, and Juan Alvarez.

restoration (made possible by a $50,000 grant from the Friends of Heritage Restoration, along with donations from Marmol Radziner, Friends of VDL, and artist Xavier Veilhan) will restore the home’s famous rooftop reflection pools when the project is complete in January 2013. The restoration is in conformance with the Secretary of the Interior Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties and holds permits from all applicable historic and building departments, including the department of Cultural Affairs. Prior to the roof restoration, the VDL House hosted Architectones, an

installation by artist Xavier Veilhan that drew throngs of art and architecture fans as well as media attention from all over Southern California. The installation featured numerous monochrome sculptures created by Veilhan specifically for the VDL’s famous indoor and outdoor spaces—focusing especially on the house’s history as a family residence and creative office. Says Veilhan of his work at the VDL: “it is the perfect equation between people, function and environment. I want to celebrate and expand the concept of modernity that this represents.”

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First Year Architecture Students Finds Creative Ways to Store Bikes

Designs produced for earlier NASA/CPP studios. Luis Gil, Space Hotel, 2010-11. LEFT: Matthew Trujillo and Albert Escobar, Space-Based Solar Power, 2011-12. BELOW LEFT: David Phan and Sho Ikuta, Space-Based Solar Power, 2011-12. Top:

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Architecture Department Studio Funded by NASA’s National Space Grant Foundation’s X-Hab Academic Innovation Challenge

URP Student Represents Well at California Transportation Foundation

Urban and Regional Planning faculty selected students Tom Vo and Arriana Working with NASA and Allahyar to represent Cal Poly Pomona at Gehry Technologies, the 18th annual California Transportation the Architecture Foundation Education Symposium in Department will conduct November. The symposium gathers 36 consecutive studios of the state’s best planning and civil over the course of the engineering students to learn from 2012-13 academic year private and public sector professionals to develop a habitation module for space in transportation-related fields. During travel as part of the National Space Grant the symposium, participants split into Foundation’s X-Hab Academic Innovation teams to produce a Project Study Report Challenge. X-Hab will challenge Cal Poly that they then presented to a mock Pomona architecture students to design a “Consultant Selection Committee.” The vertically oriented module (approximately charrette-style exercise acts as a proxy 20’x34’) to sustain a crew of four on an version for the traditional RFP process, outer-space journey of 60 days. According allowing students to work alongside to Professor Michael Fox, the habitation professionals to learn best practices. module must meet two critical requirements: Vo’s team produced the winning report, “to sustain life and to be mission directed.” proposing a transportation corridor Building on the work of each preceding studio, enhancement project that included students will build a full- or half-scale model increased vehicle lanes, the removal of of the module by the end of the year. The an existing highway, transit-oriented current X-Hab studios are not the first foray development, and a designated route for into space for the Architecture Department— freight trucks. student work from last year’s Space Architecture studio was on display at this fall’s Venice Biennale. 6

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For the last two academic years, the Architecture 103 studio course has challenged first year architecture students to design and build bicycle storage units entirely from recycled material. According to Architecture faculty member Robert Alexander, who leads the studio, the requirement to build from recycled material provided more lessons than just those of sustainability: “The better projects saw artistic potential in already existing material. They had to confront that history and incorporate it.” The course starts with case studies of famous examples of residential architecture, which students then applied to their site, i.e., a single parking space. “On paper it looks like a jump from rich people’s houses to bike facilities, but architecture is about strategies to accommodate very basic needs,” says Alexander. After completing the studio, student Benjamin Tunigold took additional steps to make sure that the project had a lasting physical benefit. Tunigold, who now works as a resident advisor at the University Village (i.e., off-campus student housing) worked with the Village’s director of housing, Ken Fisher, to install the rack at the bus stop for the Village, along with a small garden. In its current location, “the bike rack is an ideal spot for students to stop, store their bike, and rest before they hop on the bus,” says Tunigold, who also reports that students are using the bike rack every day. Tunigold and Fisher plan to make the installation of the best bike rack produced from each year’s 103 studio a yearly tradition.

Raphael Soriano, architect, David and Riva Schrage House, Los Angeles, 1952. Facade studies, Raphael Soriano Collection, ENV Archives-Special Collection.

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URP Partners with the University of California Transportation Center

Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A. Coming to Cal Poly Pomona Cal Poly Pomona will host an exhibition titled “Technology and Environment: The Post War House in Southern California” as part of Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A. coming in spring 2013. Professors Judith Sheine and Lauren Bricker of the Architecture Department, along with Professor Philip Pregill of the Landscape Architecture Department, received grant funding from the Getty Foundation for the research and planning of the exhibition, which will open on April 11, 2013, and run through June 12, 2013, at the Cal Poly Pomona Kellogg University Art Gallery. In addition to examining some of the most famous examples of post-war modern residential architecture in Southern California—examples that grew from the flat-roofed, steel boxes of the Case Study House program made famous by the likes of Neutra, Soriano, Ellwood, and Koenig, the exhibit will also look at

another tradition of modern architecture starting with Schindler, including Lautner and Kappe, and continuing into early post-modern architecture by Moore and Gehry. “We’re looking at how this other tradition used a variety of construction materials and methods and an interest in new technology and the environment to develop a huge variety in approaches to site,” says Prof. Sheine. Prof. Bricker adds that historic context will also be considered: “We’re interested in how these ideas were promoted to the public and how homeowners have adapted the houses to changing standards of comfort.” Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A. will celebrate Southern California’s lasting impact on modern architecture through exhibitions and programs organized by several arts institutions in and around Los Angeles. Designed to continue the momentum and collaborative spirit of Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945–1980, Modern Architecture in L.A. is the first of the smaller-scale Pacific Standard Time Presents offerings.

Cal Poly Pomona is one of four Cal State University campuses to partner with the University of California Transportation Center (UCTC) on transportation research projects by faculty and students. The partnership, brokered thanks to a proposal by Urban and Regional Planning Department Chair Rick Willson, along with Professor Xudong Jia from the Department of Civil Engineering, will allow Cal Poly Pomona to compete for research funds from the federal government. In a release announcing the partnership, UCTC cited CPP’s status as a “Hispanic Serving Institution” as particularly pursuant to its diversity objectives and Prof. Willson and Prof. Jia have written an additional proposal for $75,000 to fund opportunities for underrepresented students to conduct research and attend events in transportation planning and engineering. Professor Willson reports that the program will build on URP’s existing participation in the Transportation Research Board’s Minority Student Fellow program. Last year’s Minority Student Fellow, Edna Cruz, presented her paper, “Evaluating Demand for Bicycle Facilities in Community-based Bicycle Planning,” at the annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board.

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Letters of Recommendation

ENV faculty share the books, movies, exhibits, and ideas that are inspiring them to higher levels of thinking in environmental design

Assistant Professor Rennie TAng, Landscape Architecture Department I recommend two books that concern the human body, on the one hand as vulnerable to forces beyond its control, and on the other hand as resilient and completely controllable. Petrochemical America tells the haunting tale of how a 150-mile stretch of the Mississippi River came to be known as “Cancer Alley.” The deterioration of human life is revealed through a striking visual narrative about the American landscape. Photographs by Richard Misrach and drawings by landscape architect Kate Orff illuminate discomforting scalar juxtapositions such as a tiny body standing in front of a massive infrastructural landscape. Yvonne Rainer: Mind is a Muscle is a book authored by performing arts scholar Catherine Wood recalling the groundbreaking work

of American post-modern choreographer Yvonne Rainer. Wood constructs a scene that rescales dance performance as another live entity within the city, amongst a myriad of other bodies, gestures, positions, and actions. This image reinforces the nature of Rainer’s work, which casts the human body as a relentless moving machine of strength, resilience and, in the words of Rainer, “the only enduring reality” within a surreal 1960s political landscape. Orff’s diagrams and Rainer’s dance have evoked critical conversation within their respective disciplines on the too often unspoken relationships between urban landscapes, human bodies, and everyday life.

More: aperture.org/shop/books/petrochemical-americarichard-misrach-kate-orff-book#.UJqqD47vNhN

Associate Professor Sarah Lorenzen, Architecture Department In his seminal book America, Jean Baudrillard suggested that to understand the American city, “you should begin with the screen and move outwards towards the city.” Nowhere is this truer than in Los Angeles, where the hundreds of films set in L.A. have significantly affected how we view this city. It may be that Hollywood has had a greater impact on the built environment in Los Angeles than have the city’s planning instruments. Here is my top ten list of films set in Los Angeles: 1. Sunset Boulevard (Billy Wilder, 1950) 2. The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967) 3. Chinatown (Roman Polanski, 1974) 4. Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982) 5. Colors (Dennis Hopper, 1988) 6. Boyz n the Hood (John Singleton, 1991) 7. Falling Down (Joel Schumacher, 1993) 8. Pulp Fiction (Quentin Tarantino, 1994) 9. The Big Lebowski (Joel Coen, 1998) 10. Magnolia (Paul Thomas Anderson, 1999)

mitpress.mit.edu/books/yvonne-rainer/?

Assistant Professor Juintow Lin, Architecture Department I received a galley of Dreaming Up by Christy Hale, a kids book about architecture that showcases a number of great buildings and relates them to objects and activities children understand. For example, Hale illustrates Moshe Safdie’s Habitat with kids playing Legos, and expresses Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic dome as kids joining toothpicks with candy. At the end, the book summarizes the buildings and the architects, and includes an anecdote from their youth. Even an architecture professor can learn a thing or two. I was both delighted and a bit frightened at my four-year-old son’s love of the book and the buildings. A scene from Yvonne Rainer’s performance of ‘The Mind is a Muscle’ at the Anderson Theatre, New York, in April 1968, which is the focus of Wood’s book.

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More: leeandlow.com/books/487/hc/dreaming_up_a_ celebration_of_building

Professor Babette Mayor, Art Department Three things inspire me: traveling, reading, and, most importantly, art making. I have found great comfort through my most difficult and trying times relying on these three things. Last year, my husband had a lung transplant and was in the hospital for over 85 days. I don’t think I would have survived this ordeal as well as I did if it hadn’t been for my family and my three muses. Each of these activities has a Zenlike quality that allowed me to focus on the positive of my situation and produce a lot of artwork. Because I am not able to travel great distances, I have rediscovered Southern California, with all its beauty and cultural diversity. I also reread some of my favorite texts, which include Naomi Klein’s Shock Doctrine and No Logo. I believe these two books should be required reading for all university students. Thomas Hine’s Total Package is up there as well. My all-time favorite photographer is Peter Menzel. His book Material World: A Global Family Portrait should be required of all ENV students.

Assistant Professor Melissa Flicker, Art Department Ed Ruscha’s work bridges the gap between fine art and graphic design. Although his work is created with traditional fine art media, he continually references typography. As a graphic designer, I find particular resonance in Ruscha’s word paintings. His inventiveness both semantically, in expressing the meaning of the rendered word, and syntactically, in his choice

More: lacma.org/art/exhibition/ed-ruscha-standard Installation view, Ed Ruscha: Standard, September 22, 2012–January 21, 2013 Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Artworks © Edward J. Ruscha IV. All rights reserved. Photo © 2012 Museum Associates /LACMA

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Professor Richard Willson, Urban and Regional Planning Chair Visit Mor York, a magical art studio and gallery full of sculptures made from recycled materials by Clare Graham. This grocery store then roller rink then art studio is a treasure of Highland Park and an anchor of the York Boulevard revitalization. Mor York is rarely open to the public, but you can visit during the NELA Art Walk, held on the second Saturday of every month. The Art Walk event shows the vitality of Highland Park/ Eagle Rock, including the explosion of bicycle culture. Then you can have a coffee at Café de Leche or a drink at Johnny’s or the York.

More: naomiklein.org/main hachettebookgroup.com/titles/thomas-hine/totalpackage-the/9780316365468/ amazon.com/Material-World-Global-Family-Portrait/ dp/0871564300

of material to create the letterforms, is inspiring to me. I recommend Ed Ruscha’s show “Standard” at LACMA for both artists and designers alike.

Some of the sculptural curiosities on display at Mor York.

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More: claregraham.com/MorYork.html nelaart.org WINTER 2013

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first Person

A Design Tradition Frank Villalobos (’70) describes how Barrio Planners Incorporated, a firm committed to designing for the local vernacular of East L.A.’s neighborhoods, got its start on campus at Cal Poly Pomona. left:

Ramona Gardens Park Sharkey Park

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Frank Villalobos graduated from Cal Poly Pomona in 1970.

You came into Cal Poly Pomona in a period of transition, when many of the programs were just being accredited. What was it that enticed you to attend Cal Poly Pomona? Ray Kappe was recruiting extensively from East L.A. at the time because East L.A. College and Cal Poly Pomona were competitors. I chose to enroll at Cal Poly Pomona because the Vietnam War was in the middle of the fight, and we didn’t have much time to think about whether or not to continue school. This was survival. Going into a transfer student course was a way to stay out of the conflict. At the same time, we had the prejudice that existed nationally against Latinos, especially in the Southwest, like Texas and Arizona. I suppose it is still here. I come from an intergenerational design family. We date back

to the churches of Mexico in the 1700s and 1800s— including the Cathedral of Zacatecas and other religious structures. Coming to Cal Poly Pomona gave me an opportunity. Architecture was not available as a degree at Cal Poly Pomona at the time, so a lot of people would transfer from landscape to architecture. That was the way in. Many of the students that transferred out of East L.A. College to Cal Poly Pomona—such as Raul Escobedo, David Angelo, and Manuel Arrosco—came in to Ray Kappe’s first class in the fall of 1968 and went on to found Barrio Planners. He took on 30 students. East L.A. was such a good training ground that we came in really blazing—we had good hands to draw. I ended up in Ray Kappe’s class in the School of Landscape Architecture. So your degree was in landscape architecture? I have a degree in environmental design. Neither landscape architecture nor architecture offered degrees at the time. Some of your business partners were also from Cal Poly Pomona. Is there a Cal Poly Pomona tradition at Barrio Planners? We try to open our doors to everyone, but we continue to recruit Cal Poly Pomona alumni. Raul Escobedo (’68) was my partner—he was one of the founding members when we started Barrio Planners back in 1969-1970.

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Many of us got drafted, but he spent two years in Vietnam. We waited for him, and when he got back, we started the company. Luzmaria Chavez (’86) is also a Cal Poly Pomona grad; she just recently left Barrio Planners last year.

been to understand the origin of the problem and then synthesize a solution through design. I am happy with where Barrio Planners has come; we host and encourage new ideas and technology and maintain the quality and character of traditional methods.

Marlene Lechuga Ramirez is also a Cal Poly Pomona grad and a relatively new member of the BPI team. She has taken Luz’s place as our new Project Coordinator. Marlene is a new breed of architectural designer. Designers today don’t think too much about pencils; they’re all into computers. Students back then were ‘Pentel kids’—they had a lot of flair with traditional drawings. Today, it’s all electronics. It lacks the charisma of the Prisma.

You have an environmental design degree, a landscape architecture license, an architectural license, and the word “planners” is in the name of your firm. How has your interdisciplinary range of skills benefitted your practice? If you’re a student that comes out of East L.A. like I did, you have to drive back and forth. We’d stay on campus. We lived off the cafeteria. At night, we had interdisciplinary exchange. I’d help friends with architectural assignments; they’d suggest something in landscape. That’s how the landscape designs of Barrio Planners became so modernistic and architectonic—the influence of that exchange gave it that distinct look. Otherwise

The product coming out today is much better. I don’t criticize it—coming out of East L.A. College, our skills were for graphics, not process and thinking. But Cal Poly Pomona is a think tank. The thought process has always

it would have just been plant material. I trained as an architect at East L.A. College before transferring. I would have become an architect at Cal Poly Pomona, I suppose, except that I wanted to get an accredited degree. As it turned out, Cal Poly Pomona became accredited the year after I left. You’ve spent your entire career at Barrio Planners. What motivated you and your colleagues to start the company, and how has your practice changed over the years? It was an era when Latinos were breaking through mainstream culture. In the ’60s, the entire nation woke up to the challenge of America being a world leader. The Vietnam War ended people’s naiveté. In this period, unprecedented numbers of Latinos—disproportionate to the population—were being sent to Vietnam and coming back in boxes. In our community, there were at least one

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or two burials per month—just in my little neighborhood in East L.A. We had to challenge ourselves to go to school. As we acquired Americanism and a sense of patriotism, there was always this reaction to “the man.” But we never knew who “the man” was. “The man is gonna put you down,” they said. That was the black community with its struggle in the South, rioting in Watts, and the Latino community rioting in East L.A. in 1969. When we came to Cal Poly Pomona, we said, “We can’t let that happen to others. We need to create a think tank.” We were influenced by Bauhaus and other such design influences. We opened the same books that everyone else did. But we would have to travel all the way to La Brea if we wanted to see things. The opportunity for employment in our field was at Brandow & Johnson; AC Martin; and Kissner, Wright, and Wright. There were no Latino firms at the time. We didn’t have anyone to look up to. If we looked up to somebody, it was always somebody that worked for the government. Whenever we went to look something up, we found that there wasn’t any corresponding literature about our past or our Latino culture in East Los Angeles. We would sit around here at Cal Poly Pomona and talk about our opportunities. We were the Barrio Boys because our state of mind was always in East Los Angeles. Our group met to discuss opportunities in design, and we focused our efforts in East Los Angeles. We named our company Barrio Planners because most of our student projects were in East L.A., such as Ramona Gardens Park. When we got out, we tried to get jobs. The big landscape firm to come out of Cal Poly Pomona at the time was POD (Process-Oriented Design). POD was the Cal Poly Pomona motto at the time. So they named their firm POD; ours was Barrio Planners. Our first project was a pocket park in Wilmington, the one in Ramona Gardens, and then a third one here in Pomona, Sharkey Park. Above:

Metro Gold Line, Civic Center Station. BELOW: Metro Gold Line, Mariachi Plaza Station.

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“Our non-traditional ideas are behavioral— you expect that in other communities. If you go to East Los Angeles today there is a lot of color—that’s borrowed from our own heritage” –Frank Villalobos In 1972, we were hired to design Ramona Gardens Park with Ray Kappe. Kappe was our mentor, and a principal with the firm Kappe, Kahn, and Lotery. Our team was talking to the community at a hearing regarding the plans for the design of Ramona Gardens. Outside the room where the meeting was held, the freeway was so loud that we could not hear one another in the meeting room. This experience prompted us to begin a challenge: we sued the State of California Department of Highways—CalTrans didn’t exist yet. We sued them because they were trying to expand the freeway for the El Monte Busway without doing an environmental impact report. Barrio Planners invented the sound barriers on the freeway in an effort to reduce sound decibels. We proved that we could cut back sound to 17 decibels. As a result of sound reduction,

people inside classrooms could hear better and teaching performance improved. With that victory, we thought we were big guys. We thought that Raul Escobedo should stay with the Planning Department, and he’d be president because he was the only one with a full time job. I went to work for Barry Berkus, who at the time was principal of Environmental Systems Inc. (ESI) and Keith French and Associates. They designed housing in California and the Southwest: Irvine, San Diego, Newport Beach, and Huntington Beach are all Barry Berkus. It didn’t matter what developer it was; ESI was always the architect. When I joined him he had 60 people, but in four years his company had grown to 2,000

or more employees internationally. The 1974 recession stopped their boom, and they were forced to close. When the business shut down, Barrio Planners inherited the job of completing the unfinished landscape architecture plans. Thanks to that opportunity, we quickly became a large landscape architecture firm; that was the birth of our company. We were quite successful in completing the work, and I became licensed in landscape architecture in 1973. What is so unique about the story of Barrio Planners? You need to know that we met our vision. We thought that we would change Boyle Heights. As a result of our involvement in the community over 40 years, we designed Metro’s Eastside Gold Line Extension. We also did the master plan for LAC+USC Medical with HOK/ LBL and the master plan for White Memorial Medical Center; we designed several buildings at White Memorial. We also designed the East Los Angeles Clinic for Kaiser Permanente. Our most recent work was the design of Mendez High School with Nadel Architects. Our non-traditional ideas are behavioral—you expect that in other communities. If you go to East Los Angeles today, there is a lot of color—that’s borrowed from our own heritage. When you travel through the community, it is very easy to recognize our stuff. It’s given us a recognizable signature brand. Others have been influenced by our efforts. We encourage that. We need more kids of our heritage to try it—to go to the bank, borrow money to get into the game, and bring that success home.

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Mendez Learning Center

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Opportunity Knocking Juliana Terian (Arc ‘80) returned to ENV after 30 years away to make a recordbreaking, game-changing donation.

Right: Juliana Terian with ENV Dean Michael Woo in studio at the IDC. Below: A conceptual rendering of the new IDC.

Juliana Terian recognizes an opportunity when she sees one. While the Cal Poly Pomona alumna was studying for her Bachelor of Science in Architecture, she received a $400 scholarship from the Pasadena chapter of the Women’s Architecture League after a helpful graduate student instructor nominated her for the award. Terian, who was working to support herself through school, was extremely grateful for the financial assistance: “It might as well have been $4,000—that’s how big an impression it made on me.” That scholarship helped her join her sisters as the first generation in her family to attend and graduate from college, and she never forgot that generosity helped her achieve her academic goals. “I wanted to do that for others,” says Terian.

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Juliana Terian with members of the Cal Poly Pomona chapter of the AIAS.

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this page (left): Juliana Terian talks with President, J. Michael Ortiz.

Juliana Terian critiques work on display for Interim (the Architecture Department’s quarterly showcase of best student work).

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worked for Giorgio Cavaglieri, FAIA, on restoration projects at the Public Theater and the Eldridge Street Synagogue. Terian eventually launched her own practice, Curran Architects and Planners, which specialized in restoration and medical interiors. The passing of her husband from cancer, however, forced Terian to put her architecture practice on hold and take over the family business, Rallye Auto Group in New York. Though a novice in the car business, Terian’s education and experience proved instrumental in helping her adapt and thrive: “Architects have to have this great eye,” she explains. “Architects aren’t afraid of hard work, and they persevere.”

“Cal Poly Pomona is just as good as, if not better than, other nationally recognized universities.” - Juliana Terian

Today, Terian is paying that early favor forward in a major way. With her recent gift of $2.5 million to the College of Environmental Design as part of the Cal Poly Pomona Comprehensive Campaign, Terian made the sixth largest cash donation in the history of Cal Poly Pomona and the largest ever for ENV. And since early 2012, Terian has been funding ENV outreach efforts with a monthly donation of $10,000 to raise the visibility level of the college (benefits of the latter donation include the magazine you now read). According to ENV Dean Michael Woo, Terian’s success story is a Cal Poly Pomona standard: “She epitomizes the archetypal Cal Poly Pomona student, especially in this college—many students here are the first in their family to attend a university.” After graduating from Cal Poly Pomona, Terian attended Pratt Institute in New York and

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Terian’s return to Cal Poly Pomona and her generous donations involved a bit of serendipity. About five years ago, a staff member in the university’s Advancement Division encountered a reference to Terian in the New York Times. University president J. Michael Ortiz reached out to Terian, inviting her to revisit her alma mater for the first time in 30 years. When Terian agreed to visit the campus, Dean Woo asked her to a home-cooked dinner at his home in Los Angeles, also attended by Architecture Department Chair Judith Sheine and Prof. Emeritus Spyros Amourgis, who happened to be visiting Los Angeles at the time (Prof. Amourgis now makes his home in Greece). The dinner party brought about a happy reunion between the former student and a treasured professor. Prof. Amourgis taught Terian as her advisor during her third year of architecture study, and although they hadn’t spoken in many years, Terian hadn’t forgotten his importance to her studies: “I always loved listening to him speak. He’s such a great communicator of design. Design is his whole being. His essence is design and clarity.” Now Terian has returned on a mission to help Cal Poly Pomona share its design excellence—so eloquently represented by Prof. Amourgis—with a broader audience.

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“No matter what you do with it, studying design is so profitable as a life choice.” - Juliana Terian

Given the environment, Terian wants students to recognize and take advantage of the insights emanating from the regional design community, conversations Terian describes as “priceless interactions.” “My undergraduate years at Cal Poly Pomona opened my eyes to the creative possibilities of architecture, art, and design in ways that changed my life. No matter what you do with it, studying design is so profitable as a life choice.”

this page (left): One of three women studying architecture at Cal Poly Pomona while earning her degree, Terian says, “Women have to fight for their position; they have to be strong.”

Terian inspecting a model with Professor Kip Dixon, AIA, and members of the AIAS leadership.

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Now it’s the ENV community’s chance to take advantage of the opportunities created by Terian’s donations. ENV is launching several initiatives that will boost the stature of the college among environmental design practitioners. Her $10,000 per month outreach donation has funded the launch of Link Magazine, which will celebrate ENV’s design excellence while raising the level of discussion in ENV fields (with twice yearly distribution to students, alumni, and design professionals around the country). The outreach fund is also funding the development of a new state of the art website for ENV—one that embodies the college’s design ethos and provides a gathering place to share news of the ENV community’s accomplishments. That project is well underway, with launch of the new website scheduled for early 2013.

As a proud Cal Poly Pomona graduate living on the East Coast, Terian is no stranger to the frustration generated when Cal Poly Pomona’s reputation gets confused with Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, our neighbors in Claremont (i.e., the not-so-aptly named Pomona College), or the other prominent schools located in Southern California—not to mention the not insignificant bias East Coast natives feel toward their own educational institutions. Terian hopes that her donations will “let the public know that the quality of the programs at Cal Poly Pomona is just as good as, if not better than, other nationally recognized universities.”

The story of the $2.5 million, however, has yet to conclude. ENV’s strategic plan identifies a new facility to replace the Interim Design Center as the college’s greatest need. An expanded IDC would allow more students to study architecture because the department’s highly selective admissions standards prohibit many aspiring architects from getting a chance to study the practice (usually the department receives 1,500 applications for 100 undergrad positions and over 100 applications for 20 graduate positions)—students who want the same opportunity Terian had when she attended Cal Poly Pomona. However, even a sum as large as the $2.5 million donated by Terian leaves work to be done before the goal of a state of the art studio facility can be fully realized.

In addition to the advantages gained from Cal Poly Pomona’s interdisciplinary study, Terian also cites the university’s location as one of its best assets, especially its “proximity to the best and brightest of the Southern California design industry.” Terian identifies a long tradition of integrating design innovation into all sectors of business (think of the revolutionary contributions made by Charles and Ray Eames to modern culture) as one of the defining characteristics of the Southern California design community.

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Photo by Tom Zasadinksi

Dean Woo identifies the interdisciplinary environmental design approach as the key attribute of the quality Terian hopes to showcase: “We are the only college of environmental design in Southern California and one of the few academic institutions in California that unifies disciplines focusing on buildings, the natural environment, cities, and sustainability. You can study these subjects at UCLA or USC, but there are more opportunities at ENV to pursue an interdisciplinary approach to environmental design.”

The opportunity to make a tremendous difference in the future of ENV is also yours, says Dean Woo: “Juliana Terian’s astonishing generosity is more than a down payment on a building to serve the growing demand for environmental design education—it’s a challenge to other alumni who have benefited from their Cal Poly Pomona education to help us achieve our dreams and raise ENV to the next level of excellence.”

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Photo by Mason McCarthy

In 2012, the program worked for the first time in a neighborhood surrounding the Fragrant Hills Park, a botanical garden nestled next to the mountains at the northwest end of Beijing with ties to China’s imperial history and the life of Mao Zedong. The neighborhood also marks the periphery of the city’s urban settlements, situated 20 kilometers away from the city’s core. As it exists now, the neighborhood surrounding Fragrant Hills is primarily a retirement community, where locals enjoy better air than can be found in the interior of Beijing. The local population also includes commuters who take advantage of the area’s less expensive housing and farmers who harvest the land nearby. There are few historic structures outside of the park; the neighborhood instead rises as a result of a scattered development history, undefined by a specific era of construction or architecture. Much of the housing in the neighborhood is sub-standard by American standards, lacking interior plumbing, and the neighborhood’s most prominent infrastructure features are two large streets, designed with the primary function of providing ingress and egress to the park. Unlike the rest of the city, the neighborhood is not yet fully developed, providing a unique setting that Architecture graduate student Leina Naversen describes as “an important antidote to the rest of the city”—one of a vibrant and diverse local culture.

Passage to the east The ENV China Summer Program provides students unique access to neighborhoods in Beijing, with award-winning results. This summer, while many of their College of Environmental Design colleagues were spending the season next to swimming pools or behind desks at internships, a group of intrepid students representing four departments of ENV embarked to China for a design studio in Beijing. Since 2005, the ENV China Summer Program has partnered with North China University of Technology (NCUT) to send ENV students to study life in Beijing. In that short period of time, students have collected an impressive amount of honors while producing urban design solutions for some of China’s richest urban case studies.

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Opposite:

Life in the Bejing suburb of

Fragrant Hills. this page: Student Ou Yang Li Qiong interviews local man.

Along with its partners from NCUT, the ENV China Summer Program studied the potential of the neighborhood to provide novel approaches to the development of thriving, livable urban environments—especially in the face of rapid urbanization, which could soon change the neighborhood’s quiet situation at the edge of the city. “We chose this area because it addresses the challenges of a new Beijing—an expanding Beijing,” says Associate Professor of Architecture Irma Ramirez, one of two ENV faculty members who lead the program’s design studio along with faculty members from NCUT. In the case of Fragrant Hills, the Chinese government would like to transform the park into a major tourist attraction as part of its goal to make Beijing a world-class center of urbanity, like Shanghai or Hong Kong. Already, a festival celebrating the changing seasons brings over seven million visitors to the park, and the Chinese government is planning to build a subway line with a terminus in the neighborhood. As explained by the trip’s other ENV faculty member, Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture Andrew Wilcox, “Someone is going to develop it at some point, so how might we approach it to create a neighborhood for the farmers and the aging population that already lives there?” Over the course of five weeks, ten ENV students worked in two teams alongside ten NCUT students to develop a suite of urban design recommendations for the neighborhood. The hope is to begin a conversation that inspires the Chinese government and the design firms urbanizing China to find creative solutions that improve the neighborhood as it changes, rather than producing cookie-cutter urban environments.

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Student Sun Xiao Bo interviews This page (above):

local man. this page (below): ENV and NCUT students work together in the classroom.

A day in the life of an ENV student in China The China Summer Program is first and foremost an intense and immersive exploration of neighborhoods. The program spends a total of five weeks in China, with half of the trip devoted to explorations off the beaten path around Shanghai and the Shanxi Province. Professor Ramirez describes the time spent traveling as intended to give students “a very real idea of China,” including some of the country’s less familiar aspects: “We hope to break the stereotypes that people get when traveling to China.” While most tourism by westerners in China focuses on urban settings, much of the country’s population of ethnic minorities, “live very much outside of the comforts of city life,” says Professor Ramirez, “When we travel outside the cities, we are made aware of the isolated nature that a vast majority of the population experiences.”

this page (Left): Sketch of terracing design concept for Fragrant Hill community, sketch by Gregory Dalton

Pagoda at Summer Palace by student Greg Dalton (L.Arc)

After receiving a nuanced exposure to the lives of the Chinese population, the program participants return to the city, where lessons in urban design abound: “In the United States, we have grown through centuries, but much of China’s urban transformation has happened within the last 35 years,” says Professor Ramirez, rendering the repercussions of contemporary approaches to urbanization much more immediate and visible. The challenge for the students is not to get distracted by the flashy, well-documented development currently underway with such fervor in China. “We’re not there a long time, but the students have to find opportunities that are totally local, totally endemic, so they don’t end up with the cut-and-paste urbanism that has happened everywhere else in China,” says Professor Wilcox. Like all ENV studios, the China Program requires a rigorous and accelerated studio schedule, given the group’s short amount of time on site and the rich variety of challenges to be addressed. Architecture graduate student Leina Naversen went to China to explore the country’s role at the center of processes of climate change and globalization. She found Beijing and the Fragrant Hills neighborhood to be an ideal and challenging test bed to explore urban design solutions for those powerful forces. Naversen pointed out the neighborhood’s already present ethos of do-it-yourself sustainable practices, such as recycling and

Mutianyu Great Wall Isolate Ruin, by student Mason McCarthy (Arc)

composting, but focused on the need to develop solutions in housing, water, and quality of life for the neighborhood to become truly sustainable. To address those issues, Naversen’s group proposed a topographical housing intervention. The most ambitious of the team’s proposals included mounded landforms where homes would cluster based on principles of feng shui. The clustered landforms would allow winds and diurnal processes to provide passive cooling (processes already largely mastered by the feng shui principles practiced by many of the neighborhood’s residents). The landforms would offer the additional benefit of masking the local community from soon-to-come tourist facilities while not detracting from the natural beauty of the nearby mountains. The new local community would also be flexible, with modular housing allowing for additional growth. Naversen’s group also addressed the neighborhood’s dry, warm climate and lack of fresh water supply to much of the existing housing stock by proposing a sheltered canal system that would be built between the landforms, providing an intermittent supply of fresh water, sheltered beneath energy-producing solar panels that would create shaded escapes from the sun. In another example of the program’s focus on what Professor Ramirez describes as “getting to know the people and identifying opportunities,” the other of the program’s two design teams proposed a market to support local farmers, leveraging the popularity of the seasonal festivals and the expanding role of the park as a tourist destination to grow the local economy.

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Hongcun Village, Anhui Province, by student Mason McCarthy (Arc) WINTER 2013

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Design project from Team 1: Greg Dalton, Rose Le, Louise Le, Mason McCarthy, Leina Naversen, Ou Yang, Bai Xue Feng, Jin Zhen, Li Xin Yu. Exploring This page (Left):

Transitional Terain. this page (bottom): Leina Naversen sketches while children watch.

Past accolades In the past, the hard work of the ENV China Summer program students has paid off in some of ENV’s most prestigious recognitions by professional organizations. In 2011, the ENV China Summer Program culminated three years of research at the Fayuan Temple Hutong site in Beijing by earning the Environmental Design Research Association’s Great Places Award—an international award presented annually to honor the human experience of welldesigned places. According to the EDRA, its mission is to honor environmental design processes that create “humane environments achieved by an interdisciplinary approach and concern for human factors in the design of the built environment,” a description that fits the interdisciplinary China program perfectly. The EDRA award joined the AICP Student Project Award for Applied Research from the American Institute of Certified Planners/American Planning Association; the Planning Achievement Academic Award of Merit from the American Planning Association, state chapter; and the Academic Award of Merit from the American Planning Association, Los Angeles chapter. That Fayuan Temple Hutong project provided abatement strategies for thousands of years of history imprinted in the city fabric of Beijing. Since the initial stages of this project in 2008, demolition for the area of the Fayuan Temple has been put on hold pending further evaluation of issues and possibilities raised by the project. New heights of collaboration The awards and the political successes speak well of the ENV China Summer Program’s unique ability to identify and participate in some of the world’s most instructive urban case studies—subject matter that proves rich soil for all the disciplines of the College of Environmental Design. This year, the program welcomed its first Art Department student to the fold—fourth-year graphic design student Louise Le—to a team of students including representatives from the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Landscape Architecture, and Architecture. Le returned from China eager to share the appeal of exploring China to graphic design students. “The challenge is really rewarding if students jump into it,” Le reports, “Urban design uses everybody’s skills.”

Professor Wilcox credits the interdisciplinary studio format of the China Program as the source of some of the most valuable professional training available to ENV students. But the collaborative, interdisciplinary process employed by the program also pulls off a more difficult trick: straddling the seemingly opposing goals of producing local solutions to global problems. According to Professor Wilcox, “It’s not Americans coming in and just doing their thing, which seems to happen everywhere else.” Instead, the locally focused, interdisciplinary processes applied by the ENV China program produces results with a much broader impact than the immediate neighborhood of the study. “The partnership between ENV and NCUT should produce results that are appropriate,” explains Wilcox, “but that also project out a significant distance to leverage the unique qualities of places, so that it’s uniquely Chinese.”

ENV International The China summer program, available to students of every ENV major, is one of several “CPP Faculty-Led Programs” available for ENV students. The Greece summer program is available for fourth and fifth-year Bachelors of Architecture students and third-year Masters of Architecture students. While oversees, Greece summer program students also visit Italy, France, and Germany. The Italy fall program allows Landscape Architecture students to study at the Santa Chiara Study Center in Castiglion Fiorentino, about 50 miles southeast of Florence in the Tuscany region.   ENV students also have many options for international study through the Cal Poly Pomona Exchange Program and the California State University International Program. The CPP Exchange Program gives ENV students an opportunity to study at partner universities in Germany and Taiwan.

Students studying in Taiwan, for instance, can choose to study at the National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, the Chaoyang University of Technology, or Tamkang University. Another enriching benefit of the exchange programs is that international students come every year to study at Pomona—the Taiwan exchange program brings an average of eight to ten Taiwanese students during spring quarter. The Taiwan exchange program has been recognized with scholarship awards (and financial support) from AAa/e (Asian American Architects and Engineers) five out of the last six years.   Programs in Italy, Denmark and Mexico are also available through the CSU International Programs. ENV students from each department have options to study abroad for a quarter or a year, all while earning units toward graduation.

THE TEAM CAL POLY POMONA FACULTY

Irma Ramirez

Andy Wilcox

associate professor, architecture

associate professor, landscape architecture

CAL POLY POMONA students

Gregory Dalton (L.ARC) Nikki Diaz (URP) Leina Naversen (ARC) Louise Le (ART) Ken Lee (ARC) Gloria Mah (ARC)

Mason McCarthy (ARC) Kuniko Nickel (ARC) Rose Le (L.ARC) Josh Do (L.ARC)

NCUT PROFESSORS

Zhang Bo

associate dean, architecture

Xiong Jiaquan

Fu Fan professor

Ying Juan professor

associate dean international programs

An Ping

Jia Dong professor, associate dean,

Qin Ku

architecture

Li Zhengxi vice president

professor professor

Chen Sui professor

“The challenge is really rewarding if students jump into it.” - Luise Le, 4th-Year Graphic design

NCUT Students

Ou Yang Li Qiong Bai Xue Feng Sun Xiao Bo Zhang Shou Peng 24

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Jin Zhen Zhang Xiao Dong Li Xin Yu

To learn more about summer programs visit: csupomona.edu

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Seemingly the only field inoculated from the effects of the recent recession, the healthcare industry has provided a steady, welcome source of revenue for architects throughout the downturn. The industry’s demand for design work, however, is more than just a response to the needs of population growth. The healthcare industry is in the midst of a massive therapeutic overhaul—the sterile, uninviting hospital facilities of yesteryear are being replaced with holistic approaches to green building, renewable energy, and public spaces that double as healing environments. With the help of a dedicated group of alumni, the College of Environmental Design’s Architecture Department recently launched a new Healthcare Architecture Initiative with the industry’s changing business paradigms in mind. The initiative has already commenced with healthcare-specific studios created to train students in the complex skill sets required by the industry. The first healthcare design curriculum on the West Coast, it’s already a model for success, with strong industry support and plans for rapid expansion. The Changing Needs of the Healthcare Industry Despite the healthcare industry’s enormous size and power (it generates $2 trillion a year in the country’s economy), healthcare providers are working hard to keep pace with recent innovations in the industry. Technological advancements such as electronic medical records, wireless communication, and home care offer agility and flexibility, driving a shift toward more operationally efficient healthcare environments. Meanwhile, policy developments such as the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and demographic changes like the aging of the Baby Boomers have mandated a comprehensive adjustment of priorities on the part of healthcare providers.

taking the initiative Spearheaded by alumni Bob Kain (’73) and Sanford Smith (’79), the Architecture Department’s new Healthcare Architecture Initiative is the first of its kind on the West Coast

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Sanford Smith; Bob Kain; Dennis Mc Fadden, FAIA; Jessica Scott; Demetria Nelson, and Alex Phung participate in a desk crit for the Healthcare Architecture topic studio.

left to right:

Sanford Smith (‘79), senior vice president of real estate at Hoag Hospital in Irvine, says the primary concern of the healthcare industry has become “patient value,” which he defines as “outcomes over cost.” The increased focus on patient outcomes is a relatively new development in the field. Bob Kain (‘73), senior vice president of healthcare for HMC Architects in Ontario, points out that the concern for patients is something that his generation has learned on the job: “‘Patient-friendly’ was not part of the lexicon of healthcare design when I was in school.” Now, Kain claims, the healthcare industry “views a medical facility as a vehicle of healing.” More specifically, “It’s the use of natural light. It’s something that will calm people. It’s a warmer environment, softer colors, less noise.” As Smith points out, patient outcomes are also inextricably linked to the environment in a more universal sense through green building practices: “Buildings designed more efficiently produce positive impacts on patient value—you can impact both the cost side and the outcome side of the equation through good designs.”

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As an example of an industry leader adopting the new healthcare architecture paradigms, Kaiser Permanente recently hosted the “Small Hospital, Big Idea” competition, which asked competitors to design hospitals that fit the needs of smaller Southern California communities, like Lancaster and Victorville. The joint winners of the competition—San Bruno-based Aditazz and Portland-based Mazzetti Nash Lipsey Burch (the latter teamed with the New York office of Perkins+Will)—produced netzero designs featuring outdoor plazas, new circulation systems, and direct connections between the hospital and the surrounding community. According to the new model of healthcare design, hospitals become the health component of the community civic center, standing alongside the library and city hall in civic life. The process of implementing a comprehensive overhaul of facilities operations for the entire industry is especially complex given the industry’s regulatory environment. The healthcare industry requires strict oversight by the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD). OSHPD handles plan checks and construction approvals, with more attention given to fire and life, seismic, and other code requirements than would be

The advisory board for the Healthcare Architecture Initiative (shown at its fall 2012 gathering), has grown in numbers given the success of the program’s initial efforts.

above:

expected from local oversight. Once the industry’s strange exemption from Title XXIV requirements are added to the mix, what’s left is a complex business and regulatory environment, requiring best practices and high-level design understanding by all parties.

few architecture schools have healthcare-specific curricula— Texas A&M does, as does Clemson. “There is a huge need for people trained in healthcare, both from architecture practices and from hospitals,” says Kain. Drawing upon his own professional contacts and his connection to the faculty and students of Cal Poly Pomona, Kain took the first step in filling that need. On his recommendation, the HMC Designing Futures Foundation donated $10,000 to ENV, which, along with another $10,000 personal donation from Smith, launched the Healthcare Architecture Initiative. “It’s totally selfish on my part,” says Kain of his firm’s support of the program. “We hire interns every year. Sixty-five licensed architects in our firm are from Cal Poly Pomona.” HMC and Hoag are not the only businesses that stand to benefit from the program. Cal Poly Pomona has the geographic benefit of being located at the nexus between L.A. County and the Inland Empire—in the middle of one of the healthcare industry’s most valued markets. Kaiser operates 13 medical centers in the region, and Dignity Health and Catholic Healthcare West also represent some of the region’s largest businesses. Then there are the countless community hospitals, such as San Antonio in Upland. “There are a lot of hospitals around and therefore a lot of hospital design firms around,” Kain notes—all perfect employment opportunities for Cal Poly Pomona’s graduating cohorts of highly skilled healthcare architects. The Cal Poly Pomona Healthcare Architecture Initiative Version 1.0 With the initial donation from the HMC Designing Futures Foundation, the Architecture Department faculty has worked alongside Kain and Smith to establish the program’s legitimacy. During the 2011-12 academic year, the healthcare architecture curriculum included a fall elective course and winter studios led by Professor Hofu Wu and Professor Pablo LaRoche of the Architecture Department.

Perkins + Will, NTD Architects, and LA Design attended project reviews and desk crits to give students feedback and instruction on their designs. Continuing on lessons from the elective course earlier in the year, the winter studio completed a master planning process and designed a facility that complemented current hospital facilities, integrated amenities like a natural trail, healing gardens, and a river walk, and made improvements to site navigability. The proposal by architecture students Ron Kwok and Chris Young, for instance, combined streamlined outdoor balconies, roof top gardens, and soothing colors and palettes throughout the facility. “We challenged the typologies of healthcare architecture as we know it—which includes very few buildings—and how we can relate to it and transform it with a new typology,” reports recent grad Jessica Scott. After completing the elective course and the winter design studio, Scott created a master plan and design for Kaiser Permanente’s Market of Wellness site in Irvine for her senior project. Her interest and practice in healthcare design is helping Scott flourish in a design position at Ware Malcomb in Irvine, where, she says, “I have a lot of opportunities to reach out to the network of professionals and I have a strong grounding in the expanding practice of my firm.”

A model depicting the master plan for the Hoag Irvine Ambulatory Care Center.

ABOVE:

A conceptual rendering for the Hoag site produced by the student team of Alex Phung and Jessica Scott.

BELOW:

The elective seminar led by Professor LaRoche focused on LEED standards as a framework for sustainability in healthcare.

The Winter Integrated Healthcare Design Studio, led by Professor Wu, gave students ten weeks to produce designs for the Hoag Irvine Ambulatory Care Center, a proposed addition to current Hoag Hospital facilities. Adding a layer of professionalization to the studio process, representatives from

Given that complexity, immense potential exists for mutually beneficial exchanges between university design schools and the healthcare industry—the industry would benefit from the creative work of design studios and the rigorous study of those new ideas by academic researchers; universities would benefit by graduating well-trained, highly employable students. It’s a classic win-win. Yet for the most part, architecture schools around the country have neglected to develop healthcare-focused curricula that could benefit both the industry and architecture school. Only a

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The class also worked with Hoag in Newport Beach—this time to remodel patient rooms with new systems for shading, illumination, and energy. According to LaRoche, the case study provided a lot of opportunities to ask “what if?” of mechanical systems and the building envelope. LaRoche reports that the studio produced high performance patient rooms by asking the right questions—“looking at the holistic response rather than looking at one thing at a time.”

Interior rendering of the Kaiser Permanente Market of Wellness designed by Jessica Scott.

ABOVE:

BELOW:

Exterior of the same site.

Ron Kwok and Chris Young participate in a desk crit with Bob Kain.

Across:

Kain, who also joined Smith in lecturing students about sustainability and healthcare design throughout the academic year, hopes that the healthcare courses will inspire students to the potential of a career in healthcare design: “We are giving them an orientation to how exciting healthcare design can be. It’s to heighten their curiosity—a sensibility of the sophistication of healthcare and the opportunities for design in healthcare than in traditional commercial architecture.” So far the students have been receptive, and participation has not proved a tough sell. Says Jessica Scott, “Professor Wu laid the foundation for how important these ideas are. It’s something that should be taken seriously, and it helps specialize students in a field.” The Cal Poly Pomona Healthcare Architecture Initiative Version 2.0 Looking to expand on the initial efforts of the Healthcare Architecture Initiative, ENV Dean Michael Woo, Architecture Department Chair Judith Sheine, professors Wu and LaRoche, and alumni Kain and Smith, gathered early in the Fall 2012 quarter with a group of 18 industry professionals to discuss the initiative’s next steps. The assemblage, cultivated from Kain and Smith’s network of professional contacts, included representatives from some of the largest healthcare-related businesses in Southern California: CBRE, DPR, Jones Lang LaSalle, Snyder Langston, Ware Malcomb, HCP, HOK, Health Care REIT, PMB, McCarthy, and Nelson-Okerlund. The advisory board responded to the design studio work with overwhelmingly positive feedback and suggestions for new projects to be tackled by upcoming studios. Following the recommendations of the advisory board, the Winter 2013 healthcare studios will explore five projects with special needs for adaptive reuse. Prominent among these projects is one involving the Los Angeles County Medical Center—the County Department of Public Works has requested that the Architecture Department study the facility as an example of adaptive reuse for aging or obsolete medical facilities. According to Professor

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“the long-term goal of thE Healthcare Architecture Initiative is to create a graduate-level concentration in healthcare architecture” Sheine, much of the work to make a more sustainable healthcare industry will be in retrofitting: “There are a whole bunch of facilities that are either obsolete or need to be rethought.” Massive portfolios of commercial real estate that didn’t survive the recession are also attractive possibilities as outpatient facilities. Looking even further into the future, the long-term goal of the Healthcare Architecture Initiative is to create a graduate-level concentration in healthcare architecture. That lofty goal, however, would require an endowed chair and an expanded masters program (see article on Juliana Terian, page 14, to learn how her $2.5 million donation has enabled the first major steps toward building a new IDC, which is crucial for expansion of the program). Of course, the program’s primary goal is to produce a cadre of employed, successful graduates—a practical concern that has already produced positive results. According to Professor Sheine, “A huge number of students got jobs out of the studio— with Hoag Hospital, Jacobs Engineering, and with architecture firms in the area.” Hoag Hospital even wants to go so far as to set up a regular internship program with the initiative. Given the success and excitement it’s generated at this early stage, the initiative’s outlook is very healthy indeed. “People from construction industries, real estate industries, architects, engineers—they are all wildly enthusiastic about this program because there is so much need. They really see a need for innovative work,” says Professor Sheine. As demonstrated by the results of the Healthcare Architecture Initiative, Cal Poly Pomona will continue to provide for those needs.

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events calendar EXHIBITION SCHEDULE FOR THE W. KEITH & JANET KELLOGG UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY MID-VALLEY ARTS LEAGUE 60th ANNIVERSARY MEMBERS’ EXHIBITION

Exhibition dates: Opening Reception:

Sun, Jan 6 – Sat, Jan 26, 2013 Sun, Jan 6, 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

CARTE DE CALIFORNIA: CONTESTED TERRAIN Artists: Jeff Cain, Julie Shafer, and Dee Williams

Exhibition dates: Opening Reception:

Sat, Feb 9 – Sat, Mar 23, 2013 Sat, Feb 9, 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm

TECHNOLOGY & ENVIRONMENT: THE POSTWAR HOUSE IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Exhibition dates: Opening Reception:

Fri, Apr 12 – Fri, Jul 12, 2013 TBA

event date: Location:

Wed, Jan 9, 2013, 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm The IDC at Cal Poly Pomona

event date:

A Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A. event Curators: Profs. Lauren Bricker and Judith Sheine

ENV/CPP EVENTS WINTER QUARTER INTERIM An exhibition of the best work from the Architecture Department

2013 WILLIAM R. AND JUNE DALE PRIZE FOR EXCELLENCE IN URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING Restoring Main Street: Historic Preservation as an Economic Development Strategy

Dale Prize Banquet: Locations:

Wed, Feb 6, 2013, 6:00 – 8:00 pm (reception from 5:00 – 6:00 pm) Thur, Feb 7, 7pm – 9pm TBA

CAL POLY POMONA DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARDS

event date: Location:

Fri, Apr 26, 2013, 6:00 pm The Restaurant at Kellogg Ranch

CAL POLY POMONA TASTING & AUCTION

event date: Location: More info:

Sun, May 5, 2013, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm Cal Poly Pomona Rose Garden polytaste.com

poly-kroma 

event dates: Opening Reception: Future Student Night: Industry Night: Graduation Reception: Location: More info:

Mon, Jun 3 – Sat, Jun 15, 2013 Thu, Jun 6, 5pm – 9pm Tue, Jun 11, 5pm – 9pm Wed, Jun 12, 7pm – 10pm Sat, Jun 15, 7pm – 10pm Millard Sheets Gallery, Pomona Fairplex poly-kroma.com

Featuring art work from students, graduating seniors, and alumni of the Art Department

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Nonprofit Organization U.S. POSTAGE PAID Cal Poly Pomona

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