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VOL. 4, NO. 17 / NOVEMBER 15, 2012

Also: Frances Collins: International Kidnapper • Holiday Decorating Safety • Details Design


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GENERAL 715 Kirby St., Lake Charles, LA 70601 Phone: 337-436-7800 Fax: 337-990-0262 www.thejambalayanews.com

contents COVER STORY

PUBLISHER Phil de Albuquerque

24 Christmas Under the Oaks 2012

publisher@thejambalayanews.com

REGULARS

NEWS EXECUTIVE EDITOR Lauren de Albuquerque

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lauren@thejambalayanews.com

CONTRIBUTORS Rhonda Babin Leslie Berman George Cline Angie Kay Dilmore Dan Ellender Braylin Jenkins Mike Louviere Mike McHugh Mary Louise Ruehr Brandon Shoumaker Karla Tullos ADVERTISING

The Boiling Pot The Dang Yankee Tips from Tip What’s Cookin’ Sports Report Adoption Corner

5 LA Equine Council 14 Bayou Biz: Details Design 18 Frances Collins: International Kidnapper 21 The Joys of the Gift Closet! 22 Christmas Decoration Safety

ENTERTAINMENT

SALES ASSOCIATES Michele Clack Katy Corbello Faye Drake Allen Garber

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BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER Kay Andrews

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Family Night at the Movies Red Hot Books Lake City Beat Funbolaya Society Spice Jambalaya Jam Local Jam Eclectic Company Killin’ Time Crossword

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Legal Disclaimer The views expressed by The Jambalaya News columnists are their own and do not necessarily reflect the position of The Jambalaya News, its editors or staff. The Jambalaya News is solely owned, published by The Jambalaya News, LLC, 715 Kirby Street, Lake Charles Louisiana 70601. Phone (337) 436-7800. Whilst every effort was made to ensure the information in this magazine was correct at the time of going to press, the publishers cannot accept legal responsibility for any errors or omissions, nor can they accept responsibility of the standing of advertisers nor by the editorial contributions. The Jambalaya News cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or illustrations, even if they are sent to us accompanied by a selfaddressed envelope. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Copyright 2012 The Jambalaya News all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without prior written permission is prohibited.

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GRAPHICS ART/PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Darrell Buck

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A Note From Lauren The Day of Dysfunction

“Thanksgiving is all about getting your entire dysfunctional family under the same roof and hoping the police don’t get called.” Someone posted this on Facebook, and I had to laugh. Because it’s not really a joke. When I think of all the craziness that goes on in families, this quote is not all that far from the truth. And it all comes to a head during the holiday season. The holidays bring people together, but sometimes, that’s not necessarily a good thing. If you have relatives that you only see once a year, there’s probably a good reason for that. Then again, the same relatives you see all the time can also contribute to the seasonal madness. Mine always did. Growing up, I remember my uncle Ricky was in charge of carving the turkey on Thanksgiving. He had this old electric carving knife that was held together with tape. He would spend what seemed like forever slicing up the bird. It took him so long, the turkey would get

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cold and would have to be heated up again. This was before microwaves, and everyone would worry that the meat would dry out. He’d cover the slices with foil to keep the heat in, but that didn’t help. My father, always impatient, would pace around the kitchen, smoking cigarette after cigarette. Richard and I would swipe pieces of meat off the platter and my aunt Gloria would finally yell at him. Then we would eat. I remember another Thanksgiving, years later, when my mother made the turkey and all the trimmings. We’d just sat down to dinner when the phone rang. It was some of our relatives calling to wish us a happy Thanksgiving. My mother told them we were eating, and could she call them later? Well, my aunt Jeannette managed to get hold of the phone and she starting carrying on this marathon conversation with them at the dinner table, letting her food get cold. My mother considered it an insult and basically hit the roof, so Jeannette took the phone into the bathroom and spent the entire dinner talking

to them, while my mother fumed at the table. I was thrilled because it meant there was less time to spend with Jeannette. If she’d been at the table, she’d probably go on and on about something that happened a half century ago and end up fighting with Gloria. Jeannette didn’t like to eat anyway. She claimed to have a hiatal hernia, so for about 70 years, the only liquid she ever drank was hot water because it was supposed to be good for her. And she would just pick at her food, which she made sure was bland and unseasoned because of her “delicate” system. Every time you saw her, she’d regale you with stories about all her aches and pains. But put sweets in front of her, and she’d go to town. Pastries, cakes, pies, you name it— somehow, they were all fine for her oh-so-delicate system. And she did this thing with a box of assorted chocolates that drove my mother crazy. She’d stab at each chocolate with a fork to see if it had a soft filling. If it didn’t, she’d move on. So there were all

these mangled chocolates left in the box as she pursued her quest for a cream-filled chocolate. Sometimes, we’d go out for Thanksgiving dinner. When we did, it was always with a large group of relatives. One year, we all went to a place called the Allenhurst and everyone got food poisoning. I Googled it just now and discovered that it was knocked down and replaced by a Lexus dealership. Good move. Yes, the holidays are supposed to be a whole lot of fun, but very often, they’re a letdown, a disappointment. Maybe we expect too much. But in retrospect, I’d give anything to be sitting at my mother’s dining room table this Thanksgiving, eating one of her fabulous meals served on her Italian wedding china, drinking wine with my father and toasting another holiday with the whole family, my family. We had our problems, but we had love, and for that, I will always be thankful.

– Lauren de Albuquerque TJN

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By Rhonda Babin The Louisiana Equine Council (LEC) was founded in 2005. This non-profit organization was established to create a unified voice for all breeds and disciplines, to address industry issues, and to provide for the growth and development of the entire Louisiana equine industry. And, what an industry it is! Horse lovers, owners, and buyers added $1.21 billion to the Louisiana economy last year. According to figures from the LSU Agricultural Center, that money comes from horse owner expenditures and purchases. These owners, who use their horses for show and/or competition or who enjoy their horses recreationally spend, on average, $4,000 annually. That money purchases feed,

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tack, equipment, and veterinary supplies and medicines. This figure does not include the $2.45 billion that horse racing adds to Louisiana’s bottom line. “The Louisiana Equine Council was started by trainers, amateur riders, business people, and universities across Louisiana,” said Sulphur resident and LEC Council At Large member Terri Martel. “These people had a stake in

giving a voice to the horse industry “We want to encourage horse owners of all breeds to become members and help us inform others of our role in our state.” The LEC is made up of an executive committee that includes the offices of president, vice-president, secretary and treasurer. There is a board of directors and advisors that serve the members as well. Various committee chairs and members educate the membership and public on issues ranging from protecting open lands for trail riding, working with youth organizations to promote scholarships for horse industryrelated careers, planning safe evacuation and transportation of horses in emergency situations, and informing equine owners about health issues that could affect their animals. Meetings are held via teleconference every two months. Recent meetings were filled with plans for the 2013 LEC Expo. The Expo is a yearly event designed to educate, inform, and raise money for scholarships. This year the Expo, which is in its seventh year, promises to be the biggest and best yet! The 2013 LEC Expo will be held Feb. 8 – 10 in Crowley. The kickoff event—a gala at the Crowley Opera House—happens Friday night. That evening, ticket

holders will be treated to an event that includes food, fun, and dancing to the music of Geno Delafosse and the French Rockin’ Boogie Band. Delafosse, a ranch owner who raises horses, understands the importance of this industry for the enjoyment and livelihood of many throughout Louisiana. “Our gala tickets will go on sale in about two weeks,” said organizer and board member Joyce Christian. “Purchase early and help raise scholarship funds to encourage our youth to enter horse-related professions.” The fun continues on Sat. from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. and on Sun. from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the Crowley Rice Arena. This huge arena will be filled with all types of events that feature horses and the people who love them. Events scheduled include demonstrations from horsemen and women who earned top honors at shows across the United States. Western and English riding styles will be demonstrated, along with dressage riding demonstrations as well. Dressage is a discipline that features such moves as the passage, stand square, and pirouette. When a rider competes at a show, movements are scored on a scale of 0 (not executed) to 10 (perfect). Many barrel racers use the discipline of Dressage to work with their horses. Dressage is also an Olympic event that is fascinating to see. If you are a fan of rodeo, there will be “extreme” cowgirl and cowboy events at the Expo. Obstacles, timed events, and riding styles will be

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judged in a high-spirited, just-for-fun competition. There will also be events built around colt starting, driving and carriage horse demonstrations. The Woodland Hills and Sterling Silver stables are bringing their top hunter/jumper students, who will put their steeds through their paces. An invitation has been issued to the New Orleans Polo Club for them to play a “chukka” for the crowds. A chukka is a period of play in polo that lasts about seven minutes. In addition to the riding activities in the arena, there will be booths fea-

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turing Evangeline Downs, The Thoroughbred Rescue Society, and 4 H Clubs. Many farms plan to have booths to show off the breeds they raise, and vendors will be on hand with a variety of merchandise. Booth space is available and now is the time to reserve your space. Breeds that you are sure to see include Hunters, Jumpers, Gypsy Banners, Driving Teams, Quarter Horses, and Paints. Thoroughbreds and Arabians are sure to be on show as well. Any fun event like this features food vendors and activities for the

kids. The Kids Corral will have fastpaced programs involving arts and crafts related to horses. Children will be able to decorate horseshoes and participate in a stick horse race. Serving as gatekeepers and runners throughout the entire expo will be members of the Louisiana Tech Equine Science Equestrian Club. Dr. Laura Gentry, club sponsor, reports that the students are eager to serve and learn throughout the two-day event. “If you’ve never had an opportunity to be around horses or participate in a horse related activity, the LEC Expo is for you!” Christian said. “If

horses are your life or business, the LEC Expo is for you too!” Mark your calendars for Feb. 810, 2013. To purchase Gala Tickets and learn more about the LEC Expo, visit www.laequinecouncil.com or their Facebook page. To reserve booth space or to receive more information about being a part of the LEC Expo, call Christian at (318) 8019554. Membership information may be viewed on the website or by contacting Howard Cormier at (337) 296-6819. TJN

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The

Boiling

P l

Please submit press releases to lauren@thejambalayanews.com

CW, Cumulus Radio), Chelsi Nabours (IBERIABANK), Chuck O’Connor (CHRISTUS St. Patrick Foundation), Joby Richard (Cameron Parish School Board), Cassie Stroud (Calcasieu Parish School Board), Burt Tietje (Zigler Museum Trustee) and Ashli Walrep (Lake Charles Office Supply).

Left to Right: Phil Earhart (IBERIABANK), Kim Lawson (Habitat finance director), Bradi Whittaker (the new homeowner), Jody Barrilleaux (Habitat Service Committee chair) and Lenn Knapp (Habitat executive director).

IBERIABANK DONATES TO HABITAT FOR HUMANITY IBERIABANK, the 125-year-old subsidiary of IBERIABANK Corporation, is pleased to announce a $25,000 donation to the Calcasieu Area Habitat for Humanity. One of Habitat’s requirements for qualifying families to be considered for a home is that they must contribute 300 hours worth of work on the home. The home is not free to qualifying families, and over time, the family pays back to Habitat the cost of the lot and building materials used to complete the home. This process allows for additional homes to be built and Habitat to continue its mission. JASON MARTINEZ INDUCTED AS ARTS COUNCIL PRESIDENT During its annual board meeting recently, the Arts & Humanities Council of SWLA’s board of directors appointed Jason Martinez of IBERIABANK as its 2012-2013 board president. Martinez, who has served on the board since 2007, is VP of business banking for IBERIABANK and lives in Lake Charles. The board of directors also approved a new slate of executive committee members, including Mindy Schwarzauer (The O’Carroll Group) as first VP, Jordan LeLeux (Bolton Ford) as second VP, James Babin (ASI Office Systems) as treasurer, and Laura Moreau (Calcasieu Parish School Board) as secretary. Ten new members representing all five parishes of Southwest Louisiana were also appointed to the board: Billy Edwards (Medtronics), Trevor Cooley (City Savings Bank), Adagria Haddock (Allen Parish Jason Martinez Tourist Commission), Braylin Jenkins (FOX 29/the Volume 4 • Issue 17

Left to Right: Keith W. Henson, L’Auberge Sr. VP and GM with Chance Quirona, Whitney Akers and Adam Manuel with Lake Charles Pride.

L’AUBERGE DONATES TO LAKE CHARLES PRIDE FEST L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles recently hosted the Lake Charles Pride Fest held at Touloulou’s Beach Bar & Grill, donating $4,800 in cash and services. The festival supports Lake Charles Pride in its mission supporting unity and equal rights for all regardless of sexual orientation. This year’s theme was “building bridges.” MCGLATHERY NAMED CHARTER MEMBER OF LA CHAPTER OF NADN Andrew McGlathery III, an attorney with Stockwell Sievert Law Firm, was recently inducted as a charter member of the Louisiana Chapter of the National Academy of Distinguished Neutrals. He was one of only six attorneys/former judges to be selected. Originally from Shreveport, he is a graduate of LSU Law School and has over 28 years of practice experience in personal injury litigation, civil litigation, medical malpractice, hospital law, and insurance litigation. He joined Stockwell Sievert in 1991. McGlathery has received formal mediation training and has been an active mediator since 2003. NADN is a national association whose membership consists of mediators and arbitrators distinguished by their hands-on experience Andrew McGlathery in the field of civil and commercial conflict resolution. NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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JEFF DAVIS BANK BREAKS GROUND FOR TWO LC BRANCHES Groundbreaking ceremonies were held recently for two new branches of Jeff Davis Bank: the new Big Lake branch located at the corner of Big Lake Road and Country Club Road and the new Morganfield branch, 4989 E. McNeese St. in Lake Charles. Both locations are expected to open by fall 2013, giving Jeff Davis Bank a total of 16 branches. The Big Lake location will also serve as headquarters for the bank’s Wealth Management division, while Morganfield will be home to Jeff Davis’ Mortgage Department. Founded in Jennings in 1947, Jeff Davis Bank & Trust Co. offers full-service personal and business banking throughout Southwest Louisiana. For more information, visit www.jdbank.com. CREOLE NATURE TRAIL WINS STOP ON AMERICAN DETOURS The Creole Nature Trail All-American Road (CNT) will be featured on American Detours, a national video series that features classic American collector cars on classic American routes, stopping at local landmarks along the way. The Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana Convention & Visitors Bureau encouraged residents, businesses, visitors, and fans of the Creole Nature Trail to vote continuously recently through social media endeavors. The CNT competed against scenic routes from all over the country. American Detours has not announced when the filming will begin. For more information, contact Anne Klenke, Creole Nature Trail/Adventure Tourism Director for the Lake Charles CVB at 502-4347.

Left to Right: Memorial Senior VP of Philanthropy Leif Pederson, Iowa High School football player D’Juan Rigmaiden, Memorial trainer Chris LaHaye, Iowa head coach Sean Richard and Dr. Brett Cascio, medical director of Memorial Sports Medicine.

FOUNDATION FOR FAIRPLAY DONATES TO IOWA HIGH SCHOOL The Foundation for Fairplay Fund (F3) recently donated $4,500 in athletic equipment to Iowa High School. The money went to the purchase of 10 new Riddell® Revolution® Speed Helmets and 10 Riddell® Power® Extreme SPX™ shoulder pads. The equipment offers the latest technology in football safety. F3 was established by The Foundation at Lake Charles Memorial Hospital in order to provide a more level playing field in the areas of preventable injury needs. The fund will assist schools in acquiring equipment such as quality football helmets, training room equipment needed for the rehabilitation of sports-related injuries and creating safe physical fitness surroundings. To learn more about F3 or to make a donation, call (337) 4943226 or visit www.lcmh.com/f3. IAFRATE NAMED TO MAKE A WISH BOARD Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. is pleased to announce that Geno M. Iafrate, executive VP of Regional Operations, has been named to the board of directors for the Make A Wish Foundation. Iafrate will serve a three-year term in the Texas Gulf Coast & Louisiana Chapter. Make A Wish grants the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions to enrich the human experience with hope, strength and joy. As a volunteer, Iafrate will assist in all phases of the Foundation’s work, from child-focused wish teams to solicitation of goods and services to meet the needs of specific wishes. PAGE 8

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Geno M. Iafrate

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WALNUT GROVE ANNOUNCES FORMATION OF W.G. REALTY COMPANY, LLC Walnut Grove, the new traditional neighborhood development in Lake Charles, has established W.G. Realty Company, LLC. This agency exists strictly to lease and sell property within the development. Matt Redd, owner and operator of Redd Properties and NAI Lake Charles, also serves as the company’s broker. W.G.  Realty will be the main point of contact for those interested in owning a home or opening a business in this development, which is the first of its kind in Southwest Louisiana. Construction of Part One of Walnut Grove, including the Lawton Building and the model home where the future offices of W.G. Realty will be located is well underway. Construction of additional buildings and homes will begin soon. For more information about Walnut Grove property, call (337) 497-0825 or visit www.wgrealtyco.com. ARTS COUNCIL HIRES AMIE HERBERT The Arts & Humanities Council of SWLA is proud to announce the addition of Amie Herbert to its staff as Community Development Coordinator. A native of Lake Charles, Herbert attended McNeese State University and was previously employed by the Imperial Calcasieu Museum. Herbert, who is also a visual artist, has spent the last several years developing and promoting the arts community in the region Amie Herbert through her work with area nonprofits and arts organization. She is a member of Fusion Five, co-creator of the Independent Artist Group, and has served on the Du Lac Merchants Group board of directors. In her new position, Herbert will coordinate community outreach services, manage public relations for the organization, and lead the Arts Council’s administration of its four annual grant programs.

15% Senior Discount All Doctors’ Prescriptions Accepted Experienced Professional Staff • Most Insurance Accepted

Pictured are Doug Gehrig, owner and operator of McDonald’s of Southwest Louisiana and Ryan Navarre of Billy Navarre Chevrolet Cadillac, along with CSC President Charles Stewart and board members Chris Shearman and Curtis Stewart.

MCDONALD’S SWLA AND BILLY NAVARRE DONATE TO CSC McDonald’s of Southwest Louisiana and Billy Navarre Chevrolet Cadillac recently donated $15,000 to the Calcasieu Soccer Club to support its Youth League. SAUCIER NAMED WCCH EMPLOYEE OF THE QUARTER West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital recently named Terry Saucier, RN, surgical services charge nurse, as its fourth quarter Employee of the Quarter. Saucier is responsible for reviewing and monitoring operating room and special procedures schedules and workflow. He is also responsible for assigning/monitoring staffing needs for these areas, in addition to the needs of day surgery, sterile processing and post anesthesia care. Saucier is a resident of Moss Bluff and has worked at WCCH for 27 years.

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Terry Saucier

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Left to Right: Steve Kuypers, Delta Downs Vice President and General Manager; Kristie Remy, Volunteer Event Coordinator Purple Stride Lake Area; Carol Core, Delta Downs Director of Operations; and Nora Popillion, Delta Downs Entertainment and Public Relations Manager.

DELTA DOWNS DONATES $2,500 TO PURPLE STRIDE LAKE AREA 2012 Delta Downs Racetrack Casino & Hotel announced that it has made a contribution of $2,500 to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network in sponsorship of the 2012 Purple Stride walk in Lake Charles. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network is a national non-profit patient-based advocacy organization. Its mission is to advance research, support patients and create hope for those affected by pancreatic cancer. Purple Stride Lake Area 2012 is a two-mile awareness walk with kids’ activities, a silent auction and much more. The event will be held at Prien Lake Park in Lake Charles on Sat., Dec. 8, beginning at 8 a.m. For more information, to make a donation or to register for the event, visit www.purplestride.org/lakearea.

Erin Flavin and Crystal DeBarge, scholarship recipients!

WOMEN’S COMMISSION AWARDS SCHOLARSHIPS The Women’s Commission of Southwest Louisiana, Inc. is pleased to award two $1,000 scholarships for non-traditional students at McNeese State University to nursing major Erin Flavin and criminal justice major Crystal DeBarge. Recipients who maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA are eligible for a $1,000 Women’s Commission Scholarship award for the Spring 2013 semester. This is the eighteenth year of McNeese scholarship donations from the Women’s Commission with scholarship proceeds coming from the commission’s annual Fall Conference for Women. To date, the Women’s Commission has given in excess of $40,000 in scholarship donations to McNeese State University in support of non-traditional students working to complete their degrees.

925 Enterprise Blvd., Lake Charles, LA • (337) 377-6616 PAGE 10

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WCCH OPENS NEW UROLOGY CLINIC IN SULPHUR West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital welcomes the addition of urologist Thomas P. Alderson, MD, FACS, to its medical staff. Dr. Alderson, a graduate of the American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, is now seeing patients Mon. –Fri. from 9 a.m. - noon at the new Urology Clinic of WCCH, located at 914 Cypress Street in Sulphur. Originally from Jackson, Tennessee, Dr. Alderson practiced at the Urology Center of Southwest Louisiana in Lake Charles for over 20 years prior to joining the West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital medical staff. For more information, or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Alderson, call (337) 527-6363. TJN Volume 4 • Issue 17


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Dang Yankee The

By Mike McHugh

Where’s Snoopy? For my wife, watching the Macy’s Parade on television is the absolute highlight of Thanksgiving Day. Nothing else really matters to her. My efforts to deep-fry the turkey could morph into a re-enactment of D-Day, but so long as she gets to see the parade, she’s good. On Thanksgiving morning, she’s like a child at Christmas, leaping out of bed at first light. Wearing wool pajamas and slippers that make her feet look as if they were being consumed by ferrets, she paddles off to the kitchen, puts on some strong French roast, and slides a pan of cin-

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namon buns into the oven. Then, she wraps herself in a blanket and plops onto the sofa, there to await the magic hour. It’s all part of the Yankee ritual, no matter that Thanksgivings here in Louisiana are more apt to involve jet skis than snow skis. It’s not long after that I’m out of bed and joining her on the sofa. She leans her head onto my shoulder and sighs, “I can’t wait to see Snoopy. It’s my favorite balloon of the whole parade.” Personally, I’m indifferent to the Macy’s Parade, but still, I want to be a good husband and share this event

that is so important to her. And besides, who can sleep when the house is brimming with aromas of coffee and cinnamon? If anything can make me a fan of the parade, it’s cinnamon buns. It’s the only time all year that something without the word “lite” makes it onto my wife’s shopping list. I just hope the TV network doesn’t go and screw this up. You see, my wife’s been getting more and more discouraged over the quality of network coverage. These days, they seem to be showing less of the giant balloons, the floats trimmed in holiday style, the celebrities, and the Broadway troupes that she has grown to love. In their place are the talking-head emcees and side-stories. “Why can’t they just stop talking already?” she wonders. “I want to see Snoopy!” I recall one Thanksgiving not long ago, a cold and rainy one where at least the pajamas and blanket didn’t seem so out of place. After about 45 minutes of introductory banter about everything from how much helium it takes to fill the balloons to how much waste is generated by the horses, we finally got a glimpse of an actual float, one that happened to be

carrying Gladys Knight. My wife’s face showed a hint of color, contrasting with the sky outside, as she began to sing “Midnight Train To Georgia.” It didn’t take long for an announcer to cut in over the music. “Gladys Knight, also known as the ‘Empress of Soul’, has sold millions of records during her illustrious career, and at age 65 she’s still going strong. She’s won seven Grammy Awards; she’s well known for her humanitarian efforts, and her son has a chain of chicken and waffles restaurants that bears her name. We recently visited one of the restaurants and talked to some of the patrons.” Cut to a glutinous chap who’s seen shaking a drumstick at the camera while he talks. “I don’t care about chicken and waffles!” my wife cries. “I want to hear the song. And where’s Snoopy?” Eventually, we’re returned to the streets of New York City and a high school marching band. “And here’s the Charles Cotesworth Pinckney High School marching band, doing their rendition of ‘Iron Man.’ Let’s go now to their hometown of Calhoun Falls, South Carolina, where we had a talk with the school’s principal.” My wife kicks her feet, and a ferret slipper goes flying toward the screen. “I don’t want to go to South Carolina! And where’s Snoopy?” I try to console her. “I’m sure it’ll get better as things move along,” I say. “In the meantime, are there any cinnamon buns left?” Her hopes lifted again as coverage turned to the cast of the Broadway musical Elf. “I love Elf!” my wife sighs. Of course, it didn’t take long for the network to break to yet another side story, this time having to do with the costume designer and her selection of buttons or some such thing. “Who gives a flying ferret about buttons,” she cries. “And WHERE’S SNOOPY?” Fortunately, she didn’t have long to wait, as the camera returned to show an unmistakable big, white snout float around the corner onto Herald Square. “Snoopy!” she cheers, hands clapping as she bounces on the edge of the sofa. Then suddenly, the sky outside the windows darkens, the rain picks up, and Herald Square is replaced with a message from the satellite receiver—“Complete Loss Of Signal.” I knew this would not be a good day to screw up the turkey. TJN Volume 4 • Issue 17


By George “Tip” Cline

WISHFUL THINKING Appointment reminders are nothing new. It has become more common now to not only receive a call the day before the appointment, but to also get email, text and even postcard reminders. The cavalier attitude by some uncaring clients and patients has forced the need to use these extra means of insuring that valuable time is not being wasted. Being on time for the appointment—meaning early enough to complete any needed paperwork in advance for their billing and recordkeeping purposes—goes without saying for the responsible person. That being said, the other side of that coin needs to be addressed as well. If an office is sufficiently backed up due to unforeseen delays, it certainly would be nice if there could be some notification. We can hardly complain over a few minutes or so, but when the waiting period gets to be an hour or more, having the option of doing something other than sitting or reading last year’s magazines would be much appreciated. With cell phones on virtually everyone’s hip, a text or notification that your appointment is running X minutes late should be possible. The same personnel calling to remind you of your appointment should also be able to inform you of any delays. MISTLETOE AND MOSS You know the Christmas season is coming soon when The Junior League of Lake Charles, Inc., starts promoting Mistletoe and Moss, their annual Holiday Market at the Lake Charles Civic Center. The event is happening just as this issue of The Volume 4 • Issue 17

survey were: Albertsons, Country Club Road; Market Basket, Lake Street; Kroger, McNeese Street and Walmart, Nelson Road. Prices here were posted on the shelf where the product was placed for sale. The survey was taken on Wed., Nov. 7, 2012. Catfish filets, per pound: Albertsons, $4.99 (only store with catfish filets available unpackaged and unfrozen); Market Basket $4.99 (4-pound package $19.97), Kroger, $5.99 (2.5 pound package $14.99);

Walmart, $5.99 (2-pound pack age $11.98). Russet potatoes, per pound: Albertsons, $.99; Market Basket, $.99; Kroger, $.99; Walmart, $.88. Zatarain’s Seasoned Fish Fri, 12ounce box: Albertsons, $1.69; Market Basket, $1.95; Kroger $1.39; Walmart, $1.50. Kraft Tartar Sauce, 12-ounce bottle: Albertsons, $2.39; Market Basket, $2.19; Kroger, $2.09; Walmart, $1.92. TJN

Jambalaya News is hitting the newsstands. The market has grown over the years, becoming a mainstay of the season in our area. Nearly 100 merchants from all over the country present their gifts, apparel and specialty food items. There are a multitude of activities associated with Mistletoe and Moss, with a Grand Prize Raffle for a five-night Hawaiian Vacation Package, including airfare from Houston, valued at $6,000. All the proceeds from this event benefit the local community projects of The Junior League of Lake Charles. ‘IDA AND EM’ EXHIBIT An exhibit at the 1911 Historic City Hall Arts and Cultural Center will be of particular interest to many longtime Lake Charles residents interested in the performing arts. The “Ida and Em” exhibit is a collection of costumes, set designs, photos and sketches from 1956 to 1986 from Ida Winter Clarke and Emily Coleman, who were the backbone of ballet in our community. These legends of dance were an inspiration with their ability to create so many of the necessary accoutrements before the Internet provided easy design and information. These beloved ladies gave their hearts and souls to their art. The exhibit will run from Nov. 30 through Feb. 2, 2013. Admission is free. Don’t miss it. SUPERMARKET ROUNDUP A recent invitation to a friend’s fish fry became the inspiration for our shopping comparison this issue. We are pricing some of the necessary items used, such as fish fry dredge, catfish filets, russet potatoes for homemade French fries and tartar sauce. The stores used for this NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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Bayou

Biz

By Lauren de Albuquerque

Details Design

Local Decor Consultant Brings Creativity and Passion to her Work Sometimes, following in your mother’s footsteps is the best thing you can do. Just ask Lindsay Dubrock. Dubrock is the proud owner of Details Design, a home decor consulting company in Lake Charles. “This was actually my mother’s dream,” she said. “I remember her coming into my bedroom as a child one evening and telling me all about this dream of hers to have a studio named ‘Details Design.’ I don’t know why that stuck in my head, but to honor her, we created this business together. She still helps me out every once in a while—when I can pin her down!” Born in Lafayette, Dubrock moved to Tucson, Arizona as a toddler—where she remained until she was about 20. “I then made a very strange choice,” she said. “I was in the process of trying to transfer from University of Arizona to UCLA when I traveled to my family’s hometown, Lake Charles, one summer. I suddenly fell in love with this place and couldn’t help but find myself ‘home.’” Although her degree is in public relations, Dubrock got her design training from the PAGE 14

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most authentic and highly acclaimed school of all—her mom, Pam Savoy. She does not claim to be a licensed and trained interior designer. “I’m just a girl who loves it, lives it and breathes it,” she said. “I have been blessed with an extremely talented mother who has been practicing design for over 30 years,” Dubrock said proudly. “I was dragged to every fabric shop, antique bungalow and wholesale warehouse in the great state of Arizona!” Dubrock swore as a child that she would never, ever practice design. “But little did I know that through the dragging and schlepping, I was being subconsciously bombarded with inspiring structures, textures, colors and materials that were combined to create road maps to beauty in my head,” she remembered. “I still use this unique exposure in my designs.” About five years ago, Dubrock had a consulting business here, but the timing wasn’t right. “I loved it, but knew that I wanted babies more at the time,” she said. “Believe it or not, I am a much better design consultant after having children. Children can teach you very Volume 4 • Issue 17


quickly the importance of multitasking, management skills and the everimportant skill of communication.” DETAILS ABOUT DETAILS Details Design’s motto is “Home Decor for us All” since Dubrock feels that it’s important to be available to everyone. “Good design should not be limited to the ultra-wealthy,” she explained. “Yes, this service is a treat and yes, it does come at a cost, but there are a number of ways to get the help you need. Details Design prides itself on tailoring each job to each client and their budget.” This versatile company can handle just about anything. “I have done a number of projects ranging from the Fox studio, a Muller’s building studio, writing Five-O-Five Import’s design handbook to fun residentials,” she said. “I have ‘decorated’ whole houses from top to bottom and I have ‘designed’ whole houses from top to bottom.” What’s the difference? “A house full of accessories, furniture and custom draperies—and a house full of materials, fixtures, redesign and of course—the accessories, furniture and custom draperies,” Dubrock explained.

“There is a big difference in timeline and investment.” Dubrock always works under a licensed contractor when doing any structural changes. “I always tell them, ‘By the end of this job, we’ll be best friends!’ I love that part! I love the collaboration. Most of the time, they just giggle at me because they often find me around a corner jumping up and down with excitement over a tile installation or a new wall!” Details Design can create anything from Sweet Southern Magnolia Charm to Chic Industrial Contemporary and everything in between. “We encourage original art and natural fabrics,” Dubrock said. “Our designs are classic and therefore, it is important to use materials that can stand the test of time. We love stone and classic historical color combinations popped with vibrant youthful hues to add interest.” Dubrock tells her clients to expect the unexpected. “There is often a point in the planning stage where we will hit a wall of client hesitation with one of our designs. Have faith… because that is always the part of the design that takes your breath away!” When Details Design was created, Dubrock said that the company’s

mission was to create an authentic design that was sophisticated and true to the client. “So, when I work with clients, my most used rule of thumb is to educate them. So often, a client has fabulous taste. They know what looks good but don’t have the background to create it from scratch. So, my job is to educate them about my decisions and why and how they pull together,” she explained. Dubrock understands there is a huge level of trust needed for this process that is often hard to give to someone you have never met prior to a first consultation. “It is a big deal, and I truly appreciate that,” she said. “This business was created to operate with integrity and complete transparency. We deal with the creation of a lifestyle. That is a huge responsibility that is met with much respect.” Dubrock works with a number of vendors from all over. “I do try to prioritize local businesses, but I also travel to Houston and Lafayette when I can’t find what I need here. I have a hard time finding exactly what I am looking for around here because I was so spoiled with such sumptuous selections unique to our area.” Her next goal is to attend the Las Vegas market.

THE FUTURE “I would love to be a full-service design studio with everything I need to create an amazing space right at my fingertips!” Dubrock said. “I have been prayerful from the beginning that as God opened a door, I would walk through it—but if a cracked door wasn’t His will, He should slam it shut pretty quickly just to be sure I get the message. My number one priority, no matter my ‘wants,’ is God’s ‘wants’ for my life and my business. It’s already His, so I may as well follow the leader!” Dubrock is grateful for her “incredible” assistant Audrey Schopper. “She is part-time right now, but I am hoping to get so busy that I have no choice but to hire her full-time, along with another one,” she said. “By combining my mother’s talent, my obsession with organization and God’s direction, we made it work and here we are…with a lot more dreams that have yet to unfold.” Details Design, 4711 Common St. Lake Charles LA 70607 PO Box 7856 Lake Charles LA 70606 (337) 4770555 (337) 513-9694 detailsdesign@ymail.com

TJN

2770 Third Avenue, Suite 125, Lake Charles, LA 70601 Located in the Medical Office Building on the Lake Charles Memorial Hospital campus.

Phone (337) 494-AMRI Volume 4 • Issue 17

NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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What’s Cookin’ The Junior League of Lake Charles, Inc.’s Timeless Cookbook Marshes to Mansions is a coffee-table quality cookbook with over 250 recipes and 90 sidebars with helpful cooking tips and interesting information about people, places and events throughout Lake Charles history. It was published in 2007 following the success of the Junior League of Lake Charles’ first cookbook, Pirate’s Pantry. Many assume that the beautiful cover was digitally created, but the magic was actually made in a local marsh with a real chandelier suspended from a crane! The cover is just as unique as Louisiana’s culture. The cookbook provides a range of recipes from cocktails to desserts and everything in between. Plus, it caters to all types of cooks— from novice to expert. Many recipes such as Parmesan Puffs and Celebration Crawfish Casserole are also marked as “Make Ahead.” So, even those of you with the busiest lifestyles can deliciously entertain friends and family with ease! The Junior League of Lake Charles, Inc. collects the proceeds from their fundraisers

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(Marshes to Mansions, Mistletoe & Moss Holiday Market, and Leaguers & Links Golf Tournament) and returns them to the community through their year-round projects and grants. The sale of JUST ONE cookbook helps the JLLC provide dental kits to 50 local pediatric patients. So, know that when you purchase your award-winning copy, you are helping to enrich the lives of families in this community. Marshes to Mansions makes a fabulous housewarming or wedding gift! It is available year-round at www.jllc.net and can be shipped anywhere in the continental U.S. It retails for $28.95 plus tax, but visit their website often for specials, recipes and tips of the month. Plus, their Facebook friends enjoy great recipe demonstrations and updates. Many local retailers also support the JLLC by carrying Marshes to Mansions in their fine stores. During the year, you can find volunteers hosting tastings at various special events. Your taste buds will thank you—so don’t miss it!

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The Junior League of Lake Charles, Inc.’s mission is to promote voluntarism, develop the potential of women, and improve our community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. Its purpose is exclusively educational and charitable. The Junior League of Lake Charles has been “Serving, Strengthening, Sustaining the Community” for nearly 80 years! Learn more about their 80 years of service, current community projects, and upcoming events online at www.jllc.net or call (337) 433-4025. You can also find them on Facebook. The following recipe can be prepared ahead of time, so you can have your cake and eat it too!

Chocolate Kahlua Cake INGREDIENTS • 1 (2-layer) package chocolate fudge cake mix • 2 cups sour cream • 2 eggs • ½ cup vegetable oil • ¼ cup Kahlua • ¼ cup water • 1 (3-ounce) package vanilla instant pudding mix • 1 cup chocolate chips PREPARATION Combine the cake mix, sour cream, eggs, oil, Kahlua, water, and pudding mix in a bowl and mix until smooth. Stir in the chocolate chips. Pour into a greased Bundt pan. Bake in a preheated 350-degree oven for 50 minutes or until the cake tests done. Cool in the pan for 30 minutes. Invert onto a serving plate and serve warm. Serves 12-14. Enjoy!

TJN

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PAGE 17


Top Left: Nocona Burton, Frances Collins and Anna Smith. Top Right: Frances Collins' Wanted Poster.

By Mike Louviere The story of how Frances Collins went from being a successful businesswoman to becoming a fugitive on the run from federal authorities, hiding in a foreign country with her granddaughter and eventually serving a term in federal prison for kidnapping, is as complicated as the plot for a Lifetime TV movie. Collins was a successful businesswoman in Mauriceville, Texas. An attractive divorcee, she kept horses for her three children. Horses need shoes, so she hired a farrier—a young man in his early 30s. He tried to start a relationship with Collins. “I had no interest in him whatsoever. In the first place, he was too young and in the second place, I just did not like him,” Collins said. When she rejected him, he became vindictive. “He began to do mean things, like telling me that mother had sold my horse that I loved dearly. He told me that as he was leaving one day. He drove off laughing about it,” said Collins’ daughter Anna. “Trevor” (not his real name) decided that if he could not have the mother, he would conquer her daughter, Jo Ney. He enticed her into a relationship with him that quickly turned abusive. As abused persons often do, Jo Ney would not listen to her family and friends who begged her to leave him. In 1991, when Trevor was 34 and Jo Ney was just 17, they became the parents of a baby girl, Nocona. Collins saw signs of abuse on both her daughter PAGE 18

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and her granddaughter as time went by. Over a two-year period, Collins took Nocona to the doctor several times. The nightmarish situation continued until Collins decided that it was time to take action. Jo Ney took Trevor to court, sued for parental rights and was awarded custody. But in a later court case, an Orange County judge gave Trevor full custody rights. In that case, the testimony of the CPS worker was discounted. The testimony of the doctor who had seen the bruises on the child’s body was never presented. The child psychiatrist, who had never seen Nocona, did nothing to help with his testimony. Collins later found out that the once-respected psychiatrist had turned into a businessperson more concerned with keeping his position as an expert witness and earning lucrative fees than being the doctor he had sworn to be. Collins’ lawyer had been recommended by an Orange County judge who had been a law partner with Trevor’s lawyer. Trevor’s mother worked in the county clerk’s office. There was an allegation that she had “picked the judge.” Once Collins started legal proceedings against him, it seems that Trevor’s mother used whatever influence she had in the Orange County Courthouse to try to protect her son from Collins’ charges against him.

Nocona and her Mother, River Jo Ney Burton Volume 4 • Issue 17


Collins spent thousands of dollars in legal fees and got nothing in return. Trevor would have as much control as he wanted; Collins had no legal rights after the court ruling. The abuse continued. So in April 1994, Collins took Nocona and disappeared, leaving a letter stating she was fleeing with her granddaughter to protect her from physical abuse. Orange County officials issued an arrest warrant charging Collins with a third-degree felony: interfering with a child custody order. Collins fled the country and lived on the island of Roatan, off the coast of Honduras, for the next eight years. The once-productive citizen of Orange County became a productive citizen of Roatan. She built and operated a small resort and tried to live a quiet life. But the legal system that worked against Collins now went full-steam to prosecute her. Collins became a wanted fugitive. She was listed on “America’s Most Wanted” with posters of her distributed nationwide. Once the legal system in the U.S. knew where she was, they began surveillance. Eventually, there was a “commando raid” at the elementary

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school Nocona attended. The child was taken from the school by persons hired by Trevor and his family— a highly disruptive, emotional experience for Nocona, her schoolmates and the teachers. Fortunately, the group was blocked at the airport by Honduran authorities and Nocona was returned to her grandmother. But after a change in relations between the U.S. and Honduras, Collins was finally extradited back to the states and taken to court. The case was to have been tried in Orange County, but after some legal wrangling, it was passed to a federal court in Beaumont. Over 100 letters of reference were sent to the courts on her behalf from Honduran officials, church pastors, and friends from both Texas and Honduras. The amount of public support was overwhelming. But Collins’ lawyer, a respected criminal attorney from Beaumont, told her to “prepare for the worst.” For some reason, there was high-level (possibly as high as Washington) pressure to convict Collins. Trevor’s sister married a lawyer in Houston that allegedly had influential friends. Is that where the “pressure from

above” came from? Did they use their influence to try to protect Trevor as his mother possibly had? Ultimately, the judge felt as though he had no choice but to rule Collins guilty of the kidnapping charge. She was sentenced to seven months in federal prison and seven months probation. The court stated that she was to be in minimum security in the prison in Fort Worth. But when she arrived, she was treated as an international kidnapper, a dangerous person—and kept in a maximum security prison for several months before finally moving to the minimum security camp she should have been in from the start of her sentence. After she got out of prison, Collins decided to write a book about her ordeal. While Seashell Prisoners is a true story, she states that it is “based” on a true story, preferring to let readers discern the truth on their own. She does not use many actual names, but from the dates, it’s not hard to figure out who the elected officials were. In addition, there are court proceedings that are public records, along with several years of newspaper archives. And, the case was reported on TV and other local

and national media forums. Collins does not have any desire to be vindictive. “One reason I wrote the book is to try to let people know that things can work against them in a very unexpected way. It seemed to me that there was always someone willing to take my money, and give me nothing in return,” she said. “My bottom line is that I want to be able to help people by telling my story.” Her powerful Christian testimony interweaves throughout her narration of her ordeal. She is quick to tell anyone that her strong beliefs helped her survive. Remarkably, Nocona, who was only three when she was taken away by Collins, is very well-adjusted, and is in her third year at Lamar University, majoring in sociology. “I had some problems when I was younger,” she said. “But now, everything is fine.” Collins’ book “Seashell Prisoners” is available in Orange at Asher Luis Boutique; Mack’s Video in Mauriceville; through a link on the Seashell Prisoners Facebook page; or from SeashellPrisoners.com. It is also available from Amazon.com and will soon be on Kindle books.

TJN

NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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Volume 4 • Issue 17


By Lauren de Albuquerque Black Friday is breathing down our necks and most of us are in gift panic mode. But that will never happen if you have a gift closet: a dedicated space somewhere in your home to store gifts, wrap and cards. You probably already have a place for your ribbons, tissue and wrapping paper. Just take it a step further and add any gifts that you’ve been picking up throughout the year to your space. This may require a bigger space, but it will be worth it. It’s all about your time and money. Shopping sales and bargains cuts the cost of Christmas gifts—and holiday shopping is easy when your store is in the attic or a spare room. SELECT YOUR SPACE Your space doesn’t have to be a closet; it can be any storage area, as long as it is secure and accessible: under-bed storage units, sealed plastic storage tubs, a shelf in a high bathroom cupboard, or a large bureau drawer. You will have to use a little ingenuity if you have kids. I remember snooping in my mother’s closet when I was little! In that case, locked suitcases may be the way to go.

Volume 4 • Issue 17

TAKE INVENTORY When you acquire gift items throughout the year, it’s easy to lose track of what you have. The answer? Keep a gift inventory, so you know what you’ve got and where it is. You can write it all down or keep an electronic record on your computer or smart phone. Make it even easier on yourself and include the name of the person who will receive the gift, if you purchased it specifically for someone, or add a few names if it’s a possibility for more than one person. THE FIRST STEP Once you’ve decided where your gift closet will be, the first step is to look around the house for all of the items you’ve purchased throughout the year. They can range from sale items to garage sale and craft fair treasures to gifts that were given to you that you’ll never use. There’s nothing wrong with re-gifting—provided you don’t give it back to the person who gave it you! Of course, there are the items that you see throughout the year that may not be on sale, but are perfect for those on your list. Don’t wait—get them

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now—unless you think they’ll go on sale. At the same time, locate your wrapping paper, gift bags (my favorite—I’m all thumbs when it comes to wrapping anything), ribbons, tissue and cards. Make sure you have enough of everything; if not, make a note of what you need and look for sales so you can stock up. Another great way to give a gift is in a basket. You can buy baskets for next to nothing at a yard sale. They make great containers for your fruit cake or Christmas cookies! Look for discounted raffia shreds and Easter grass in the spring. BE A SMART SHOPPER! Now that you have a dedicated place for your gifts, start shopping for deals! After-holiday sales, craft fairs, seasonal merchandise clearances or inventory reductions are all gift closet candidates. Read the weekly circulars for sales; check out your local merchants’ Facebook pages to see what specials are coming up. Just be sure to update your inventory list each time you add an item. If you see a good deal on a par-

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ticular seasonal house gift, you can certainly purchase more than one. You’ll probably be invited to more than one holiday party, and there’s no law against bringing the same gift to more than one person. STOCKING STUFFERS If you have a lot of stockings to stuff, keep your eyes open for those small items that your family will love. Don’t wait until the last minute to get them. You have enough to think about during the holidays. Shop back-to-school sales for colorful markers, pens and post-its; the clearance aisles in supermarkets and craft shops often have small toys, candles, etc. Look for wine bottle stoppers and unique cocktail napkins that have been marked down. Is your daughter’s favorite hairspray on sale? Buy a few bottles. Once you have gift closet, you’ll wonder how you ever survived without one. And of course, it can hold much more than simply Christmas gifts. Birthdays, baby showers, graduations—the possibilities are as varied as the events that you attend. TJN

Everyone loves to decorate for the holidays—the earlier, the better, it seems. Keep your holidays safe by following these tips from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission. TREES Many artificial trees are fireresistant. If you buy one, look for a statement specifying this protection. A fresh tree will stay green longer and be less of a fire hazard than a dry tree. To check for freshness, remember: • A fresh tree is green.

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• Fresh needles are hard to pull from branches. • When bent between your fingers, fresh needles do not break. • The trunk butt of a fresh tree is sticky with resin. • When the trunk of a tree is bounced on the ground, a shower of falling needles shows that tree is too dry. Place the tree away from fireplaces, radiators and other heat sources. Heated rooms dry trees out rapidly, creating fire hazards. Cut off about two inches of the trunk to expose fresh wood for better water absorption. Trim away branches as necessary to set tree trunk in the base of a sturdy, water-holding stand with wide spread feet. Keep the stand filled with water while the tree is indoors. Place the tree out of the way of traffic and do not block doorways. Use thin guy-wires to secure a large tree to walls or ceiling. These wires are almost invisible. ARTIFICIAL SNOW Artificial snow sprays can irritate lungs if inhaled. To avoid injury, read container labels and follow directions carefully.

LIGHTS Indoors or outside, use only lights that have been tested for safety. Identify these by the label from an independent testing laboratory. Check each set of lights, new or old, for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires, or loose connections. Discard damaged sets or repair them before using. Fasten outdoor lights securely to trees, house, walls or other firm support to protect from wind damage. Use no more than three standardsize sets of lights per single extension cord. Turn off all lights on trees and other decorations when you go to bed or leave the house. Lights could short and start a fire. Never use electric lights on a metallic tree. The tree can become charged with electricity from faulty lights, and someone touching a branch could be electrocuted. To avoid this danger, use colored spotlights above or beside a tree, never fastened onto it. Keep “bubbling” lights away from children. These lights have bright colors and bubbling movement that can tempt curious children to break the candle-shaped glass, which can cut, and attempt to drink the liquid, which contains a hazardous chemical.

CANDLES • Never use lighted candles on a tree or near other evergreens. • Always use non-flammable holders. • Keep candles away from other decorations and wrapping paper. • Place candles where they cannot be knocked down or blown over. TRIMMINGS Be sure to use only non-combustible or flame-resistant materials. Wear gloves while decorating with spun glass “angel hair” to avoid irritation to eyes and skin. Choose tinsel or artificial icicles or plastic or non-leaded metals. Leaded materials are hazardous if ingested by children. If you have small children, take special care to: • Avoid decorations that are sharp or breakable. • Keep trimmings with small removable parts out of the reach of children. Pieces could be swallowed or inhaled.

• Avoid trimmings that resemble candy or food. A child could eat them! FIRES Before lighting any fire, remove all greens, boughs, papers, and other decorations from fireplace area. Check to see that flue is open and keep a screen before the fireplace while the fire is burning. Use care with “fire salts,” which produce colored flames when thrown on wood fires. They contain heavy metals, which can cause intense gastrointestinal irritation or vomiting if eaten. Of course, keep fire salts away from children. TJN

Visit our boutique inside our salon!

LAKE CHARLES 3113 Ryan St, #1 (337) 491-0925

4435 Nelson Rd. (337) 477-5014

SULPHUR 190 N. Cities Service Hwy. (337) 626-0925

www.ASTtanning.com Volume 4 • Issue 17

NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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By Angie Kay Dilmore

Twinkling Christmas lights, holly wreaths, and winding oak branches mingled with a soft glow from falling snowflakes…in Louisiana? That’s right. It snows every year at Sulphur’s Christmas Under the Oaks Festival, located at the Brimstone Museum Complex, 923 Ruth Street, in the heart of Sulphur at Heritage Square where music, carnival rides and holiday shopping are at their height! Festivities begin Thurs. Nov. 29 with a Holiday House Preview Party, 6:30-9:30. The fun continues Friday and Saturday, November 30 through December 1 with food, carnival rides, performances by local dance troupes, musical entertainment, fireworks, the Spectacle of Lights and tree-lighting ceremony, and a highlight of the festival — the popuPAGE 24

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lar Kiwanis Christmas Balloons on Parade. “Christmas Under the Oaks is a festival that grows every year,” said Sulphur Mayor Chris Duncan. “We estimated about 5,0006,000 people a day last year. It’s a magical time for the community to come together and enjoy the holiday atmosphere and historic setting of the grounds at the Henning Cultural Center. We invite everyone to take part in the many activities, music, and events the first weekend in December.” HOLIDAY HOUSE AND MARKET Visiting Sulphur’s Holiday House and Market at the Henning Cultural Center and Brimstone Museum is a great way to kick off your holiday shopping or find that perfect gift Volume 4 • Issue 17


for the hard-to-buy-for person on your list. Over 50 arts, crafts, and specialty food item vendors will be selling their wares and feeding the masses amidst the merriment of the festival. According to Thom Trahan, executive director of the Brimstone Museum, one of the “hottest” selling items at the festival is a popular pepper jelly sold by Bull Dog Farms. You’ll also find Catina Couture’s clothing and accessories, Victoria’s On Oak’s décor and gifts, “Mitsy Morgan” books by Jody Carroll, and Meme’s Sweets selling candy and baked goods, just to name a few. Out of the Oven features food-related gifts and gift baskets. Nancy’s Gifts and Children’s Wear specializes in toys, gifts, and clothing for kids. Studio Creations by local artist Mark John offer artwork and photography. Master’s Three Pens will delight shoppers with their hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind writing implements. These shops are only a sampling of the many wonderful treats, trinkets, and gifts visitors will be able to see! And be sure to come to the festival hungry! Food vendors will offer mouth-watering treats. Try tender pork on a stick or tantalizing beef bowls of thin-sliced beef strips topped with potatoes. Holiday House also sponsors Breakfast with Santa on Saturday morning. Two seatings are available at 8:30 and 9:45 a.m. Tickets for the pancake meal and a photo with Santa are $5 and must be purchased in advance by calling 527-0357. KIWANIS 11TH ANNUAL CHRISTMAS BALLOONS ON PARADE The Kiwanis Club of Sulphur sponsors the annual Balloons on Parade. Approximately 20 colorful inflatables will thrill spectators lined up along the parade route. Several special balloons are

shipped here from a company in California. This year’s Balloon Parade theme is Christmas at the Ballpark, in honor of Sulphur Parks and Recreation (SPAR) and all they do in support of the community. Parade Grand Marshals will be SPAR director Norman Farr and the SPAR Board of Directors. Spectators will also see Sulphur High School’s Marching Band, floats with various dance troupes, local churches, civic organizations and pageant queens. And of course Santa! The parade begins at 3 p.m. at City Savings Bank on Cypress St. and follows Cypress St. to the festival. MISS CHRISTMAS UNDER THE OAKS AND HER COURT The Miss Christmas Under the Oaks Pageant was held Nov. 10 to choose the festival queen and her court. These crowned ladies will be on hand to assist with the tree-lighting and other festivities, mingle with the guests, ride in the parade, and introduce themselves prior to the headlining act on Sat. night. Approximately 60 girls participated in the pageant last year. SPECTACLE OF LIGHTS For the past 11 years, Christmas Under the Oaks has witnessed a phenomenon that continues to occur each year. No matter the weather or temperature, snow always falls on the festival site during the annual Spectacle of Lights ceremony. All ages are invited to attend this special event where the City of Sulphur flips the switch on its Christmas tree and municipal buildings throughout the community.

FESTIVAL SCHEDULE THURS., NOV. 29 Holiday House Preview Party, 6:30-9:30 p.m. FRIDAY, NOV. 30 FESTIVAL HOURS: 4-9 P.M. Carnival rides, 4-9 p.m. Entertainment: 6-7:30 p.m. The Fantastics 8 – 10 p.m. Damon Troy and the Final Five SATURDAY, DEC 1 FESTIVAL HOURS 10 A.M. – 10 P.M. Breakfast with Santa at Holiday House: 8:30 and 9:45 a.m. Carnival Rides: Noon – 10 p.m. Dance Troupe performances: 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Balloons on Parade: 3 p.m. Louisiana Express: 4 – 5:30 p.m. Festival of Lights: 6 p.m. Bag of Donuts 7 – 9 p.m. Volume 4 • Issue 17

Pictured above: Vendors from the Holiday House and Market NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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This year’s Christmas tree will be taller than ever and illuminated top to bottom with LED light technology. Mayor Duncan and his office staff include the younger citizens of Sulphur in this merry event. Each year, an essay contest is sponsored for Sulphur-area fifth graders. This year’s essay theme is “What Christmas Means to Me.” The essay contest winner has the honor of riding up in the bucket truck along with the mayor and placing the star atop the Christmas tree. There is also an ornament decorating contest for kindergarteners. One ornament is chosen from each school and adorns the Festival Christmas tree at City Hall. All winners are acknowledged at the tree-lighting event. Help ring in the holiday season with festive

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cheer and snow at the 11th Annual Spectacle of Lights! Sponsors for Christmas Under the Oaks include Entergy, Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living, and Women and Children’s Hospital. Tickets for the Holiday House Preview Party are available for $35 advance purchase. Admission to the Holiday House on Fri. and Sat. is $5. All proceeds from Holiday House benefit the Brimstone Museum. For more information on Sulphur’s Christmas events, contact the Henning Cultural Center at (337) 5270357. For details on Christmas events in Southwest Louisiana, log onto www.visitlakecharles.org/cajunchristmas or contact the Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana Convention & Visitors Bureau at (800) 456-7952.

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Phone: 337-474-1864

lwv-lc.org; lwvofla.org; lwv.org E-mail: info@lwv-lc.org

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30

The Fantastics! — 6-7:30 p.m. Live music kicks off at Christmas Under the Oaks on the festival stage Friday evening at 6:00 p.m. with Houston’s best party band, The Fantastics. The Fantastics bring together the talent and musicianship of four incredible and energetic performers with a wide span of musical styles from 80’s dance to rock and soul, from K.C. & The Sunshine Band, to Prince, Stevie Wonder, and Lenny Kravitz. These four guys rock and put out as much sound and energy making any venue they play a party experience. Damon Troy and the Final Five (Headliner) — 8-10 p.m. Friday’s headline act at Christmas Under the Oaks promises an unforgettable showcase of “maximum energy” Cajun music by Damon Troy and the Final Five band beginning at 8 p.m. Louisiana sensation Damon Troy began his dream in music at the tender age of 7, and has many success stories under his belt, including hitting the charts with his hit “Rest Your Love” from Volume 4 • Issue 17

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his album What’s Next. Damon’s talent translates into his ability to play seven instruments. His talent and achievements have taken him all over the world. Damon is back with a new band, the Final Five, and is ready to continue his live performances for the communities that have supported him throughout the years. Don’t miss Damon Troy in his Christmas Under the Oaks debut performance on the festival stage.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1

Louisiana Express — 4-5:30 p.m. Festival favorite Louisiana Express returns once again to the Sulphur festival stage as the performing act before the 11th Annual Spectacle of Lights lighting ceremony. Louisiana Express is full of electric energy playing party favorites from all music styles including rock, country, blues and swamp pop. Express is the back up band for the incomparable Percy Sledge, who gave an unforgettable performance last year at Christmas Under the Oaks. Come out for Louisiana Express after the Sulphur Christmas Balloons on Parade and prepare for snow and the annual Spectacle of Lights Ceremony.

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NOVEMBER 15, 2012

Bag of Donuts (Headliner) — 7 – 9 p.m. Christmas Under the Oaks is going back in time with Saturday’s headline act, Bag of Donuts! This popular and unique New Orleans band covers a wide variety of music from the 1960s through today’s top of the pop charts, including TV shows, commercials and movies. Known for their wild stage antics, outlandish costumes and strange renditions of popular songs, you’ll never forget the Bag of Donuts experience. The Donuts must be seen to be appreciated! There is an energy to their shows that is undeniable. They are guaranteed to make audiences of all ages laugh and enjoy themselves. Don’t miss Bag of Donuts. “They bring a big crowd!” Mayor Duncan said. TJN Volume 4 • Issue 17


r m ende's Museu l l E an en By D e Childr of th r o t c Dire

The Artist (DVD, 2011, The Weinstein Co.) If you still haven’t seen The Artist (I hadn’t) then you probably wonder why a silent black and white film would get Academy awards. I certainly did. That is partly what convinced me, finally, to see this film on DVD. The Artist is something very different from today’s films. Why would anyone bother making such a movie, let alone seeing it? Because more than anything, The Artist is an homage to the history of filmmaking. For those that love seeing the old faded three-reelers, this modern movie

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gives us a faithful version of that time, with a few winks to modern audiences added in. George Valentin (Jean Dujardin) is a famous movie star at the height of his career, in the year 1927. After the opening of his latest movie, as he waves at the crowds, he meets an embarrassed fan, Peppy Miller (Berenice Bejo), who finds herself the darling of the photographers on the scene. What follows is a sweet and predictable romance with echoes of Singin’ In the Rain, A Star is Born, Hugo, and every silent film you’ve ever seen. Even a bit of the music is taken from a scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s black and white classic, Vertigo. George looks amazingly like a young Gene Kelly. For that matter, wide-eyed Peppy Miller resembles a young Leslie Caron.

When talkies come to Hollywood, George vows that he will never talk in any film, as he sinks his convictions and fortunes into a final silent movie. His wife, Doris, eventually leaves him to ruin. Meanwhile, Peppy Miller is becoming a star of talking films. (George’s wife is played by Penelope Ann Miller. I believe her nickname happens to be, surprise, Peppy Miller.) Even though the plot is a composite drawn from other movies, it has a certain charm about it that makes it appealing. But why in the world was this film worthy of five Oscars, including Best Picture? I suppose you could make a case that the cinematography is nearly perfect, because it is. Every scene seems authentic, which is pretty impressive considering that shooting the film was done in 35 days Also, there is some light-hearted humor in The Artist, from Keystone Cops action to moments of slapstick worthy of Buster Keaton. George’s scene-stealing pet dog manages to outdo TV’s Lassie in terms of heroics, trying to save its master from a fire. With no talking and not much dialogue in the form of text-boxes (traditionally called inter titling), most of the action has to tell the

story, resulting in heavy drama and physical acting that may seem like something brand-new to a younger generation of film-goers. In fact, I think the film’s awards are a result of its novelty and not-so subtle pandering to Hollywood. But there are some truly beautiful scenes, including one that takes place on a fantastic grid-like stairway that will remind one generation of the setting of Donkey Kong and another of Hogwart’s Castle in Harry Potter. The source of the image is the Bradbury Building in downtown Los Angeles and the movie is full of visuals like this. Although there is some sound and a little bit of talking, they’re used very sparingly and always to make a point. In the end, The Artist is a film made for a generation that has grown up on a diet of mostly modern movies. It’s like a crash course on the history of movie making, but with enough sophistication to make us feel that the lesson is relevant today. The Artist should please most who see it, even if at times it seems a bit long. Children will find it strange and unique, especially if you tell them that all movies used to be made this way. But don’t expect them to believe you. TJN

NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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ker n Shouma o d n a r B y B

Cowgirls Heading for NCAA Tournament? Well, it looks like football season is coming to a close, for the most part. McNeese, despite its recent winning streak, has to win out the rest of the regular season and hope for some serious help nationally to get

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NOVEMBER 15, 2012

into the playoffs with three losses. It’s possible (before, I said it wasn’t, but obviously the script has flipped slightly), but there are some pretty good two-loss teams out there and it doesn’t look very promising for the Cowboys if those teams continue to win. It would be a sad end to the season if they miss out on the playoffs, because it never should have come down to this, with such a talented team. LSU, on the other hand, will reach the postseason easily. However, instead of playing for a

national championship, the Tigers will have to settle for something akin to the Weedwhacker Bowl following their loss to Alabama. Perhaps the best news to come from LSU’s loss to Alabama, though, was the report that WWL “talent” Bobby Hebert was given a police escort from the Tiger Stadium press box for excessive cheerleading. The most surprising aspect of the story wasn’t that Hebert was ejected (there’s ample YouTube evidence of Hebert’s obnoxious press box behavior) but that he would even be at the game

to begin with. I mean, shouldn’t he have been at whatever minorleague Arena Football League game in which his son T-Bob was likely playing? But I digress. All of this means that it’s time to broaden my horizons outside of football and find something new on which to focus. And one thing I’m really looking forward to most in the next few weeks is the start of the McNeese State women’s basketball season. My not-so-bold prediction is that the Cowgirls reach the NCAA Tournament for the third consecu-

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tive year. My bold prediction, however, is that McNeese gets a 14-seed this time around and then upsets a 3-seed in the first round. It almost happened last year, only McNeese was a 15-seed and hung tough against 2-seed Kentucky before falling 68-62. The Cowgirls have posted backto-back 26-win seasons and this year, their schedule, while difficult, is easier in the absence of Texas A&M and Baylor, the past two national champions. The Cowgirls will, however, have to play Vanderbilt, a seven-seed in last year’s tournament, right off the bat on Nov. 10 and will play LSU a couple of weeks later. McNeese also has Houston on the schedule, but this is a winnable game after the Lady Cougars went 3-26 last season. Games against Rice, Louisiana Tech, and Ole Miss should help in preparing the Cowgirls for Southland Conference play. Another reason I think this may be another big year—bigger than last year, for the Cowgirls is the return of much of the starting roster from 2011-12. Guards Ashlyn and Caitlyn Baggett, the Cowgirls’ leading scorers last season, are back to run the show while 6-foot3 senior Adrienne Minor also returns. The Cowgirls also added the Baggett twins’ younger sister, Allison, to the roster, obviously believing that three Baggetts are better than two. That’s not really a wisecrack, either. With the twins in charge, the Cowgirls have consistently shown a team character and chemistry that eludes many teams. They are each comfortable playing on the same court with the other; they seem to know what the other is thinking and that translates into good basketball. Add in a third sister and that chemistry should continue to grow. However, the Cowgirls will miss the graduated Kitty Wells and Martika Hull; rebounding machines that helped complement the Baggetts’ backcourt prowess. Minor and 6-4 junior NeTanya Jones will be expected to step up and contribute right away in order to ensure McNeese’s success this season. McNeese is also fortunate to have such strong leadership on the bench behind head coach Brooks Donald-Williams. Early on in her Volume 4 • Issue 17

McNeese career, things were looking rough for the Cowgirls. However, despite some public outcry, she stuck to her guns knowing that the program was just a step or two away from where it is right now, on the upswing. She seems to relate to the players well and has made the team into a family unit, strong and cohesive in the face of adversity. The Cowgirls could have packed it in after back-to-back losses to Stephen F. Austin and Central Arkansas last year, but they

didn’t. Under Coach Williams they persevered and nearly knocked off a national powerhouse in the NCAA tournament. Can the Cowgirls get over the hump and win an NCAA tournament game? I think they can. They have earned plenty of respect nationally the past two seasons and with much of the core of those teams returning this year, it looks like there’s nothing to hold McNeese back. I’m looking forward to it.

Brandon Shoumaker is a graduate of McNeese State University and has covered sports for more than a decade for various publications. Coaches or par- Brandon Shoumaker ents with story tips or comments may contact Brandon at bshoumaker@yahoo.com or send him a message on Twitter (@bshoumaker).

TJN

NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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By Mary Louise Ruehr

War… What Is It Good For? People don’t seem to want to face the realities of war, but if we’re going to send our fellow citizens into battle, we ought to know something about it. In this regard, What It Is Like to Go to War by Karl Marlantes is one of the most important books I’ve ever read. Marlantes served as a combat Marine in Vietnam, and he returned home unprepared to face civilian life or to deal with what he had seen and done in Asia.

“Warriors suffer from wounds to their bodies, to be sure, but because they are involved in killing people they also suffer from their compromises with, or outright violations of, the moral norms of society and religion. These…are not generally discussed and their impact on a warrior’s mental health and soul is minimized or even ignored entirely, not only by current military training but by society at large,” he writes. The military, he explains, intentionally changes a person. “Boot camp doesn’t turn young men into killers. It removes the societal restraints on the savage part of us.” He goes on, “In Vietnam, I was in situations where any reasonable person would have quit, but I had become a Marine and Marines aren’t reasonable people.” He describes battlefield encounters vividly, letting the reader “see” the action taking place. During a battle, he says, there is no time to think — “to allow the mind to get involved with future, non-present issues like ‘this could kill me’ will only make it more likely that you will be killed” — or even to be afraid. Throughout the book, he shares his problems with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, explaining what causes it and what can help it. “A large part of treating PTSD is simply getting the veteran to remember and talk about what happened to him.” His view is that “We send our youth off to fight our wars ill-prepared for the spiritual and psychological consequences of entering combat.” Years later, “the drugs, alcohol, and suicides are ways of avoiding guilt and fear of grief. Grief itself is a healthy response.” The book is really very spiritual. Marlantes calls upon mythology of

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many cultures, particularly in regard to initiation and ritual. He discusses heroism and transcendence, referring to mythologist Joseph Campbell, the ancient poet Homer, Jungian psychology and more. “War simply isn’t all bad,” he writes. I can almost guarantee you’ve never read a book quite like this before. This is raw, and sometimes painful to read, yet the spiritual moments are almost poetic. The book, now available in paperback, would be especially helpful for veterans dealing with PTSD, their spouses, and those who counsel them. In Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power, author Rachel Maddow looks at the history of America at war and delineates, in a nonpartisan manner, the steps by which the constitutional power assigned to Congress of deciding when to go to war has been given over to the nation’s presidents. Maddow explains how the founding fathers, recognizing that it was the executive branch that was “most interested in war, and most prone to it,” accordingly vested warmaking decisions to the legislative branch. But presidents have, step by step, taken more of that power away from Congress, so that “By 9/11, the Volume 4 • Issue 17


war-making authority in the United States had become, for all intents and purposes, uncontested and unilateral: one man’s decision to make. It wasn’t supposed to be like this.” She explains how military spending has become a bigger and bigger portion of the budget, and military operations and supplies have become more privatized and more secret. The nation has been at war for a long time, she writes, but “Half of

the American public says it has not been even marginally affected by ten years of constant war.” She adds, “We got used to it.” But she also outlines, with a bit of her trademark humor, how we can get back to the way the founding fathers intended it to be. In 500 Days: Secrets and Lies in the Terror Wars, author Kurt Eichenwald also discusses the wresting of war-declaring power from Congress by the president, particularly in the days following 9/11. The narrative is so detailed and immediate that it reads like a thriller — the run-up to 9/11, who was where on the day itself, and decisions made in the first hours and in the 500 days following the attacks. The reader is a fly on the wall in top-secret meetings in the White House as well as conversations in a room with Osama bin Laden and his minions. The author discloses information about White House attorneys manipulating the law, invasive warrantless wiretapping policies, and interrogation and torture of prisoners. One of the most disturbing revelations is how President George W. Bush “bewildered” French President

Jacques Chirac by telling him that a war in Iraq was all about biblical prophesy, that it was “willed by God, who wants to use this conflict to erase His people’s enemies before a new age begins.” This huge page-turner will go down as one of the definitive historical studies of this time period. Another warrior has his say in the controversial No Easy Day: The Autobiography of a Navy SEAL by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer.

Owen (not his real name) discusses his SEAL training and describes actual rescue and assault missions. His detailed description of the raid against Osama bin Laden makes for edge-of-your-seat reading. The SEAL is disgusted by how Bin Laden reacted: “He hadn’t even prepared a defense. He had no intention of fighting. ... There is no honor in sending people to die for something you won’t even fight for yourself.” He has nothing good to say about politicians or the media, complaining that the news media exposed the SEALs to danger, releasing too much information. But wait — isn’t that what he’s doing? Herein lies the controversy. Why would a SEAL, who is sworn to secrecy, put his fellow SEALS in possible harm’s way by revealing so much? He has alienated many veterans, and although he is giving some of the book’s proceeds to charities that support the families of fallen Navy SEALs, many of them have said they don’t want his money. Copyright © 2012 by Mary Louise Ruehr.

TJN

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Volume 4 • Issue 17

NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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Let’s be Great

kins n e J n ayli By Br

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NOVEMBER 15, 2012

What do you like to do in your leisure time? I polled a group of young people, and Cowboys, OB’s, College Station, Cajun Wharf, Petro Bowl, Putt Putt Golf, Luna Live, Luna Bar & Grill, Books-A-Million, The Prien Lake Mall and the local antique malls were mentioned. A big favorite is KD’s Diner. The popular diner sits on the corner of Prien Lake Road and Ernest Street and is probably visited by at least a third of the city each week. The 24/7 dining option alone makes this establishment famous, not to mention the great breakfast items, other food options and the fact that after a long night out on the town, some good grub is exactly what your stomach desires. I just learned that The Porch Coffeehouse and Cafe on Common Street directly across from the McNeese softball fields has closed, with its future uncertain. A lot of young people relied on The Porch as their safe haven to relax, share their music with the world, listen to local musicians and poetry readings, or grab a cup of coffee. Let’s hope it reopens soon. I also found out that the owners of Happy Hippy Pizza located on Broad Street in downtown Lake Charles have

parted ways. Fortunately, it has new owners. It’s now known as The Hippy Pizza and they are keeping many of the same trademarks as the previous owners, such as the Saturday salsa dances and live music on Friday nights. The Prien Lake Mall recently welcomed some new stores. Let’s support them, or they’ll be closing their doors. We’re so quick to travel to Lafayette or Beaumont or Houston, etc., but why can’t we support the stores in our area? This is why we don’t get new stores. So many of us don’t invest in our area, and this looks bad to prospective companies. So make sure that when you find a place you like, patronize it. If you don’t, then who will? We have to make the most of what we have or we will lose it. I have friends who live in Houston and Dallas. Sure, it’s a much bigger scene and the number of shops, restaurants and activities are larger than ours, but at the end of the day, once you have done them, you are probably going to get bored and move on to the next option until eventually you have done all there is to do. And, let’s be honest, don’t we usually stick to the places where we are most comfortable, anyway? We can have a thousand cafes,

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but won’t you choose the same one—the one you find that fits your style best? As you may recall, Lake Charles was destined to surpass Lafayette. That is the truth and is historically evident. But our leaders decided to pass up certain opportunities that in turn were accepted and approved in Lafayette —which were responsible for that area’s rapid growth. While I don’t think we want to be that large, we deserve to be great and are slowly getting closer to attaining what is rightfully ours. I challenge all of our young people to become more involved in our area. Attend city council meetings, suggest a positive campaign for our city, find out what you can do to get a business here. Did you know that you can contact a company and request that they open a business in our community? The more people from one area approach a company, the more likely they are to take notice and do the research to see if our area is a right fit for them. With the holidays quickly approaching, I encourage you to

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pick up The Jambalaya News and also pay attention to other local media sources to be informed of upcoming events and opportunities to enjoy what the Lake Area has to offer. Be a little more openminded and go to an event that you normally wouldn’t attend. You might be surprised. Whether it’s soccer, chess, yoga, partying, dining, indoor skydiving or antique shopping, find your niche in Lake Charles. Remember, get out and take a breather, if only for an hour, because you never know when that chance might just pass you by forever. TJN

Braylin Jenkins

NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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HAPPY THANKSGIVING! - WORD SEARCH L M

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Black Friday Cranberries Massachusetts Plymouth Rock Thanksgiving

Butter Churn Forefathers Mayflower Pumpkin Pie Turkey

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box and take another turn. When all dots are connected, the player with the most boxes wins.

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Volume 4 • Issue 17


HALLOWEEN HARVEST FESTIVAL The ghosts and goblins came out to the Lake Charles Civic Center Coliseum to enjoy the Halloween Harvest Festival! Everyone dressed in their scary best to tour Halloween Hall and show off their costumes. Kids enjoyed a variety of games, jumps, face painting and tasty treats. A frightening time was had by all!

Kyra and Kamryn Burrell with Devyn and Stacy Dellafosse

Brenden Poullard and Tanessa Moore

Gabby Marceaux, Emma Savant and Macie Leger

Ian LeBrun and Miguel Cahilog

Jaylee Gradney and Courtney Jones

Anna Mae, RJ and Ryann Soileau

Sydney and Tammara Olivier

KIWANIS CHRISTMAS ARTS AND CRAFTS FESTIVAL The annual Kiwanis Christmas Arts and Crafts Festival was the place to be to find great holiday gifts! Shoppers loved the “Winter Wonderland” theme and its focus on children, who enjoyed carnival rides and the craft area, where they made ornaments and stockings and visited with Santa. While children were at play, adults shopped the booths for unique arts and crafts gifts! Merry Early Christmas! Miranda Booth, Rhonda LeBlanc and Shonna Anderson Volume 4 • Issue 17

Bethany Vincent, Charlene Hinch and Cami Vincent NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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Rita and Joshua Brassette

Ariel and Angelia Cabrera-Leon

Holly Smeltzer and Lindsey Cotton

LAKE CHARLES COMMUNITY BAND CONCERT We couldn’t have asked for a lovelier fall afternoon to enjoy the free outdoor concert given by the volunteer musicians of the Lake Charles Community Band. The performance was held at Indian Bay Pavilion at Prien Lake Park, with musicians paying tribute to the late Henry C. Alexander, founding band member. Sweet music to our ears! Melinda, John and Jenny Corbin

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Andie Vin, Heng Chi and Yuya Zhang

Grant Fontenot and Savannah Sims

Demyron Haynes, Daniel Chen, Robert Bertrand and Joshua Kimball

Betty Roberts and Jamie Hazi

Benjamin, Amy and Timothy Drymon

Desiree Weidert and Aaron Racca

Charles and Carolyn Rutherford

NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND FESTIVAL The stadium at Sulphur High School was the place to be for the annual High School Marching Band Festival. Local competing bands included Sam Houston High School, DeQuincy High School, Jennings High School and many more, with a special performance by the “Band of Pride.” A panel of music educators judged the bands, with ratings announced in an award ceremony at the conclusion of the event. Host John Bridges of KPLC-TV kept the crowd in high spirits. Congrats to all! TJN Jessicca Zirkle, Morgan Blanchette and Jessica Bellard

Tia Youngblood, Briane Miller, Jazzmyn Feagins, Samantha Maddox

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Lacie Greer, Jashad Feagins and Whitney Waid

Andrew Dilmore, Ethan DeVillier, Chandler Guillory, Tristan Aucoin, Joe Tullos, Caleb Hebert and Gavin Hillard

Chuck and Marie Coleman

NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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MISTLETOE AND MOSS NOVEMBER 14-17 The Mistletoe and Moss Holiday Market showcases merchants from around the country, featuring apparel, gifts, and accessories for women, men, and children; specialty foods; and seasonal, as well as year-round decorative items and home furnishings. Hours are Wed., 7-10 p.m.; Thurs. and Fri., 10 a.m. - 9 p.m.; and Sat., 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. at the Lake Charles Civic Center, 900 Lakeshore Drive. Admission is $8 per person.  Call (337) 436-4025 or visit www.jllc.net for more information. ALICE IN WONDERLAND SCHOOL PERFORMANCE NOV. 15 Westlake High Theatre and Director Kerry A. Onxley present Alice In Wonderland, based on the 1951 Disney film Alice in Wonderland and the novels The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll. The school performance will be at Westlake High School’s state-of-the-art theatre located at 1000 Garden Drive in Westlake on Thurs. Nov. 15 at 10 a.m. Tickets are $7 per person and may be purchased by calling the box office at 217-4950. MOSS BLUFF HARVEST FESTIVAL NOV. 15-17 The Moss Bluff Harvest Festival will be held Nov. 15-17 at the Moss Bluff Recreation Complex. There is something for everyone at this family-friendly festival. Admission is only $2, and the schedule of events is packed full of activities to keep you busy each day! Events include pageants, a gumbo cook-off, crafts, music, carnival rides, a car show, magician and much more! Festival hours are 5-9 p.m. Nov. 15 and 16 and 10 a.m.– 9 p.m. on Sat., Nov. 17. For more information, find them on Facebook or call Michelle McInnis at 540-4626.

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NOVEMBER 15, 2012

L’AUBERGE’S WONDERLAND ON ICE STARTS NOV. 17 Visit L’Auberge Lake Charles’ Wonderland on Ice! The pool area has been transformed into a winter wonderland featuring an ice rink. Cost is $15 per person/per session; tickets are available at Desserts, the Rink Grill, Legends or Ticketmaster. Parents must be present at rink to supervise minors ages 6 to 17 at all times, but do not have to skate with them. Parents must be on the ice rink with any child under the age of 6. Children’s size 11-4 and adult’s sizes 5-15 skates are available, and skates are required at all times to be on the rink. Food and drinks are available for purchase. For more information, go to www.llakecharles.com/entertainment/wonderland-on-ice.

A Chorus Line

A CHORUS LINE NOV. 25-26 A CHORUS LINE, the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning musical for everyone who’s ever had a dream and put it all on the line is back on tour with an all-new production. A “show for all ages,” this all-new production will be directed and restaged by Baayork Lee. A CHORUS LINE will play Sun., Nov. 25 at 3 p.m. and Mon., Nov. 26 at 7:30 p.m. Ticket prices range from $35 to $65 and are on sale now at the Lutcher Theater box office, 707 Main, Orange, TX, online at www.lutcher.org or call 409886-5535.   BALLET LEGENDS EXHIBIT OPENS NOV. 30 The City of Lake Charles will host “Ida and Em Set the Stage,” an exhibition honoring two ballet legends of Lake Charles at the Historic City Hall Arts and Cultural Center. The exhibition will open with a reception

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Ballet Legends Exhibit

on Fri., Nov. 30 from 5:30-8 p.m. and will hang through Feb. 2. In 1950, Ida Winter Clarke and Emily Coleman began a collaboration; Ida as a choreographer and dance teacher, and Emily as a costume and ballet set designer/executor. The dedication and creativity of Clarke and Coleman acted as the catalyst to bring the world of ballet to Lake Charles. Historic City Hall is open Mon.- Fri., 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. and Sat., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Admission is free, but donations are gladly accepted.  For more information, call 4919147 or visit www.cityoflakecharles.com. A CHRISTMAS STORY NOV. 30, DEC. 1-2, 7-9 Artists Civic Theatre and Studio, Lake Charles, announces their upcoming holiday production A Christmas Story on Nov. 30, and Dec. 1, 2 and 7, 8 and 9. The play is based on the 1983 motion picture A Christmas Story. Tickets for the regular performances are $20 for adults and $10 for children and students 18 and over with college ID. Purchase them online at www.actstheatre.com or at Lakeshore Medic Pharmacy, Moss Bluff Florist and Gift, Lake Charles Civic Center, or by calling 337-433-ACTS.

Cinderella’s Holiday Dining CINDERELLA’S HOLIDAY DINING DEC. 1 Children will join their favorite storybook characters for an unforgettable experience. Character meals include pizza, dessert and a drink. The seating incorporates a visit, photos and autographs from each of these famous characters as they make their way around the dinner table. Children are encouraged to wear their favorite costume. Hot cocoa and gingerbread will also be served.  This magical encounter occurs on Sat., Dec. 1,with seating at noon. The cost is $25 per person (everyone must have a ticket including adults and infants).  Seating is limited and reservations must be made by calling the theatre box office at (337) 433-7323 or visiting www.childrenstheatre.cc.

Join the SWLA AIDS Council for our

World AIDS Day Memorial Service Sat., Dec. 1, 2012 at 6:00pm Warren United Methodist Church 1800 Orchid Street Lake Charles, La 70601

For more information contact the Southwest Louisiana AIDS Council – (337) 439-5861 Volume 4 • Issue 17

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(337) 263.4736 Appointment Only NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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LAKE CHARLES SYMPHONY HOLIDAY GALA DEC. 1 The Lake Charles Symphony and the McNeese Art Department will present “A Holiday Gala” on Sat., Dec. 1 in the Shearman Fine Arts Center, McNeese State University. Cocktails and hors d’oeuvres will be served at 6 p.m., followed at 7:30 by a performance of the Lake Charles Symphony with Maestro Bohuslav Rattay conducting. Ft. Worth talent Carla Fay White will be performing “December Songs.” As the songs are performed, slides of original oil paintings by local artist Vickie Singletary will be projected onto a screen behind the orchestra. In addition, artwork by the faculty and students of the McNeese Art Dept. will be exhibited. For tickets, call the Symphony at (337) 433-1611 or go to www.lcsymphony.org. STRIDES FOR ST. NICHOLAS SANTA RUN DEC. 1 The St. Nicholas Center for Children and Project Fit are hosting a 5K Santa run on Sat., Dec. 1 starting at Immaculate Conception Cathedral School Gym, 1536 Ryan St. Registration begins at 6:45 a.m., and the race will follow shortly after at 7:30 a.m. There will also be a one-mile Jolly Jog. The races benefit the St. Nicholas Center for Children, which offers therapies to children with autism and developmental delays. Registration is $25 for the 5K and $20 for the one mile. Participants can register online at www.active.com, or forms can be picked up at Project Fit, 528 7th St. or the St. Nicholas Center for Children, 314 Broad St. Santa costumes and hats are encouraged. For more information, contact Chris Jones at 515-3402 or Dynette Hoffpauir at dynette@stnickcenter.org. HECTOR SAN MIGUEL MEMORIAL LUNCHEON DEC. 6 The Hector San Miguel Memorial Fund will hold its third annual luncheon on Thurs., Dec. 6. in the L’Auberge Casino Resort Ballroom. Nationally known Sports Illustrated author and writer Jeff Pearlman will deliver the keynote address. Hector San Miguel was an awardwinning investigative journalist for the American Press. The Memorial Fund honors someone annually for excellence in journalism and/or relentless pursuit of the truth in Southwest Louisiana. Doors open at 11:30 a.m.; the program begins at noon. Luncheon reservations, available for $20 per person or $160 for a reserved table of eight, must be made in advance and purchased by check or cash. Contact the Community Foundation at (337) 491-6688 or dvaughan@foundationswla.org for further information. DIONNE WARWICK DINNER SHOW DEC. 7 Have dinner with Dionne Warwick! Having been in a partnership with songwriters Burt Bacharach and Hal David, Warwick ranks second only to Aretha Franklin as the mostcharted female vocalist with 56 singles including “That’s What Friends Are For,” “Then Came You,” and “I Say A Little Prayer.” She will be performing on Fri., Dec. 7 at the L’Auberge Event Center. Dinner starts at 7 p.m. Dionne Warwick and entertainment starts at 8 p.m. Ticket prices start at $75 and include a three-course dinner. To purchase tickets, call (800) 7453000, or visit Legends or the L’Auberge Business Center.

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PURPLESTRIDE LAKE AREA DEC. 8 Pancreatic Cancer Action Network’s PurpleStride Lake Area 2012 event takes place on Sat., Dec. 8 at Prien Lake Park at 7 a.m. This year marks the eighth year of the walk and serves as an opportunity to raise awareness and money for pancreatic cancer research. The event also features a raffle, silent auction, children’s activities, a sweets shop and food and refreshments. The fourth most deadly cancer, pancreatic cancer kills more than 35,000 Americans every year. Interested participants may register as a team or individual. Adult pre-registration is $25 with free children registration. Adult registration on the day of the event is $30. For interested parties unable to participate in the event, consider supporting a team or an individual in pancreatic cancer awareness fundraising efforts. For more information or to register for the event, visit the event website at www.purplestride.org/lakearea. PAUL GROVES AND MIRAGE DEC. 8 Enjoy a night of classic rock with Paul Groves and Mirage on Sat., Dec. 8 at McNeese. Concert benefits the MSU and Groves Foundation. For more information, call 475-5588 or go to www.paulgrovesrocks.com. KIDS BLISS JAMBOREE DEC. 8 Louisiana’s inaugural Kids Bliss Jamboree will be held Dec. 8 beginning at 9 a.m. at the Lake Charles Civic Center Coliseum. This is a community event aimed at reinforcing family values within a fun atmosphere while promoting charities. The jamboree will have games, contests, performances and music for children of all ages. There will also be snow cones, snacks and a variety of finger foods available to purchase. Admission is $5 for adults and children ages 4-12 through Nov. 24. Children 3 and under get in free. After Nov. 24, admission is $7 for adults. There is also a family pack of five tickets for $20. For more information, please call Mahoganii Essence of JME Group at (646) 462-0085 or email staff.jmegroup@gmail.com or visit www.kidsblissjamboree.com. TJN

Tickets on Sale Now for LCCB Christmas Performance! Lake Charles Civic Ballet (LCCB) honors Louisiana’s bicentennial year by presenting Christmas in Louisiana, Once Upon a Time, sponsored by L’Auberge Lake Charles. All performances are at the Lake Charles Civic Center’s Rosa Hart Theatre. School Group Performances are Dec. 6 (9 and 10:30 a.m.) and Dec. 7 (9 and 10:30 a.m.). Tickets are $5 Volume 4 • Issue 17

per student. For school group reservations and information, call (337) 802-5779 or (337) 477-1581 or visit www.lakecharlescivicballet.com. Public performances are Sat., Dec. 8, with a matinee at 11 a.m. and the Gala at 6 p.m. Tickets for public performances are $15 for adults and $10 for students. For Saturday tickets call: (337) 474-0311 or visit www.lakecharlescivicballet.com. TJN NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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Sponsored by

To list your event e-mail: lauren@thejambalayanews.com

The

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14 • TBA @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Shelley King/Carter Sampson @ Luna Live, 8 p.m. • Brad Broussard @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Black Tie Affair @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15 • Howard Noel & Cajun Boogie @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Brad Brinkley @ Micci’s Piano Bar, 8 p.m. • Neal Smith @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Stark Experiment @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Damon Troy & Final Five @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9:30 p.m. • DJ Cage @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16 • Briggs Brown & The Bayou Cajuns @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Street Side Jazz Band @ Luna Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Dark Side of the Lake @ Luna Live, 8 p.m. • California Bad Boyz @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Kory Fontenot @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Molly Ringwalds @ Yesterday’s, 9 p.m. • Lee Brice @ Jester’s Jam, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m.

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NOVEMBER 15, 2012

• The (Re) Union @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • BB & Company @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 9 p.m. • No Idea @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9:30 p.m. • John Guidroz @ Micci’s Piano Bar, 10 p.m. • DJ Cage @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17 • Al Roger & Louisiana Pride @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Wynonna & The Big Noise @ Delta Event Center, Delta Downs, Vinton, 7 p.m. • Dierks Bentley @ The Pavilion, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Signals to Vega/Irene & The Sleepers @ Luna Live, 8 p.m. • David Joel @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Junior Lacrosse & Sumtin’ Sneaky @ Yesterday’s, 9 p.m. • City Heat @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • BB & Company @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 9 p.m. • No Idea @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9:30 p.m. • The John Guidroz Band @ Micci’s Piano Bar, 10 p.m. • DJ Cage @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18 • Louisiana Express @ Yesterday’s, 6 p.m. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21 • TBA @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Jason Stutes @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Bag of Donuts @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. • Static @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22 • Asian Concert @ L’Auberge Event Center, L’Auberge Casino, 2 p.m. • Jen Kober @ Luna Live, 8 p.m. • David Joel @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Alex Rosell @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Password @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 9 p.m. • Leroy Thomas & The Zydeco Roadrunners @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9:30 p.m. • DJ San-D @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23 • Megan Brown & T’Monde @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Street Side Jazz Band @ Luna Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Blue Broussard Band @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Mickey Smith @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Leroy Thomas & The Zydeco Roadrunners @ Yesterday’s, 9 p.m. • Mark Reeves Band @ Club Chaotic, Sulphur, 9 p.m.

Volume 4 • Issue 17


• Password @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 9 p.m. • MoJeaux @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9:30 p.m. • DJ San-D @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24 • Scotty Pousson & The Pointe aux Loups Playboys @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Inked Up Eighty-Ones @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Barry Badon & The Bayou Boys @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Geno Delafosse & French Rockin’ Boogie @ Yesterday’s, 9 p.m. • Mark Reeves Band @ Wayne n Layne’s, Sulphur, 9 p.m. • Password @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 9 p.m. • MoJeaux @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9:30 p.m. • DJ San-D @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m. SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25 • Warren Storm/Willie Tee & Cypress @ Yesterday’s, 6 p.m.

Volume 4 • Issue 17

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27 • Homer LeJeune & The Kajun Kings @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Ghostwriter @ My Place Bar, 8 p.m. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28 • TBA @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • TBA @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Cover Stars @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29 • Briggs Brown & The Bayou Cajuns @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Ivy & Timmy Dugas @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Tiffany Renee @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Flashback @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9:30 p.m. • DJ Jose Mata @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m.

TJN

Meet Opal! Opal was rescued from death row in October, so we named her for the month’s birthstone. A wirehaired terrier mix, she weighs 22 pounds and is a gem of a companion! Opal is only about 11 months old and still has some of her puppy spirit.  She is doing well with house and kennel training, and is very submissive if scolded. Opal likes sharing a couch as well as kisses and hugs! She wants to get as close as possible when sitting next to her favorite human.

She would love to have a doggie friend to play with, but has not been tested with cats or small children yet. A fenced yard is preferred to make her life more enjoyable and safe. Opal is truly a wonderful little girl who needs and deserves to be loved forever. Please consider her when you are looking for a great companion to share your heart and home. To arrange a meeting with Opal, call (337) 478-7294 or email lapaw@bellsouth.net and her foster will respond ASAP.  Vet check and home visit required prior to adoption. LAPAW does pet meet and greets most Saturdays at PetSmart, so please let us know if you would like to meet Opal so we can make sure that she is on site. Hurry, Opal is waiting!

TJN

NOVEMBER 15, 2012

PAGE 45


Leslie B e four dec rman’s career in ades, an music folksing er, mus d includes stin spans ic teach ts as a booker, e c tival dir oncert promote r, coffeehouse r e notes w ctor, music jou , publicist, fesr r nalist, a it e r , a organiz ation pr rtist manager lbum , t e attorney s , and p ident, entertain rade r ment e Museum sident o f She pre of Southwest the Music fe L eclectic rs all things ouisiana. , and musicall GRAM y votes M Recordin Ys as a mem on the g Aca ber o reached at leslie@ demy. She c f the an leslieber man.co be m. g “H. n o s r” .. aign camp for Dictato r in 1984 . has t i on o n y w Wood me dictat everybod kitchens ly kno th s u p t t o c u a i (“Ele ke sure th l set up so t disagree d prev ng wi u a l a we ha y I’m deali parental s a I’ll m to eat / I’ / Those th eat / If yo e f da t li nd o a h a m T t e h g f e . t e g w r o u e h n e e r o r i t st e op en fte rev anc sibl orksh major just a arprovid one fo ns of every e / they’ll and led a w er stuff. was g all abrasio worry that or’easter be h . with m te for me”) ries and ot njo styles; e the sm ds, and the back, the N away again o o t n b t y v s i a y t Ann s, ed a will dem r electrici ight take nd mostl poem , showcas Suffet and trigun a e u m e k o l s u spo n Friend iv, Steve rab got nd in wn on re bea nZ Ala own a splayed h o n t o k J ing do r losses we d r r e e n s te di ngwri formed les songs and by and d plan nd after o ut ou l. a s B h h I g r u e e ks ke , nd ro ia rice p dy Guthri f and boo Is Your inanc POSSLQ a ary the wee s at the me th onsidering P f a c s o o r s o nd , The annivers mountain nal folk ande tty well, c we’d ing W hotograph f “This La stic songs ng Isl r l o re a p o t r e n a a o e f m We Lo m Sandy p asking how ell, I mean enjoy ou the Catskil l of traditi in the th n fs so A the au rtet o in azillio e for ely stiva stor tty w about among a g Girls, a qua s and clos ge Sandy fod – a fe artmouth M k Music Super ank you all n I say pre ere relativ e a l d ” w , c e o i n d s Land e Johnso h bold vo ht’s main t Eiste begun in D n by the F we’d met a r and th red it. Wh ily’s losses those of h t g i k i e u u T c e o m r i r t n h r o w o t n and mus and now rk – whe weat mediate fa ompared gues. ingers ed the firs umerous w ghts i nder s i n y o a t c s f e Y n m l 0 s o s i l a ew sh nn clo 197 gu ple s in lly a s and co my d. e ared i a cou onies a iverin ding i ty of N n d specia harm t and appe the weeken ests on th few, e f our frien tment buil at the ocea ge Socie go, so after s house, sh shlight like u r t g r , s o e conc throughou n-Society y Kosek, le year a nd-heat-le ding by fla r campers some mom’s apa York, right ised covera n b e a a v a e m e t r t l g My ch, New h r e m n d t g i o i shops ong the no iddler Ken style possi u n s l re sa ds the com ts r e e a t e w e h f k a v t l y a m B n s u o s r a o , a c A e n w g t o , w ev an ree rdw he nt city you Lon s year just about ist, hands d om nd if ith the boa ft on the st heard t ir of super ks and we vor electri i a h , t t l l n fr bi ic in pa sa le w fro a! ou played r itions e viol ped st rly to rtha ch there, d, if y ast f sand who’s my favorit tless trans Hardange from and tons o ers recede ter, 500 po . we up of days ea r. Ha cha c isteddfod l r h t s e m o y a s e i . l f i , a E t and an and ef wed adwa coup d hot wa bout the with the apart e surge w potable w eeds, a 7 p e s to S a n Bro ryn h o for cle to bluegras k played o ader Jerr y heat a en I wrote llen in love ger and sto after t ey’ve got n the town’s n lives on th e e l e h Wh use I’d fa ional sin ormed swing styles. Kos ful Dead l he musica o, that t es to serve ctricity (sh that she ca dit erf e e t t a s h i p e b e e r a r t l l n . t t w , r e n i o e e d r i , o h h a G d g y m o fi an n ye tim els a-p wa rw for ma ate m d e i r l e d W e d n a p e f n m a o p o o a o h o e, r o t t o c s s c c with , and on B or John G comic, cr musi hristine C while gue f the musi e curfew floor) you home for Rockaway d t a h C t e c i o o d t e r a r h a c g r s n h h d o k ne Gar ver with telle eight e able to erty in Fa ncome (a s) oted t gram, muc embers an fea-man ow with K on n d l I i i i b p , e R i t o e m ’t l r r o i g n p Bi the won as a dio sh lberg e fam SNY m ncert” ireme the pr ental guised ff-hours ra afka” Shu alternaHer r ces her ret low-incom e ceiling of were on ded by FM “camper co an afters i d K no ica en g at rovi o th nar’s rodu arge ated a chie “Citiz BAI Pacif ecade was p ce. Last ye performin s and mai ts that p g for two l water up t ocelyn is a i d p W s c J n – R n o e a a e i and ork City’s r almost audi 5 attende d worksh egrown hous o deluged t my sister ber with a m 1 n Y o s f u l a o m d a b , w h n plu Ne t– ma ture mic was f the ation t Evy ded ot in a semen handy e of noon open mers inclu y Presiden ose harFM st in 1979. members o e v i t t the ba r, and she g er regular In a coupl r r l e c g o the him nin ing Soci perf h i e r. begin ek enlisted nd to join stage s Folksong oro, featur d Hawaiian g wond along with ther Edga d with a fa a s b n o e o n i a B n y i r a h y K such ’s group Tr -picking, reshadow , pump l and his b waders, a e probabl , String how, and t him the n e r s o r ’v s h H i e f a e r s y g t v u May s, hot gui le (nicely Chris Da e). Red e for his r, making Mig f thigh-hi rease, the ater heate e folg l e g . o onsta ed the favo their set th e of monie ies on ukul n music of Jason Poo pairs t of elbow s, two hot w ouse itself f h h d n on n t ia g d e amou wo furnac m, and the e trauma o - melo ar’s Hawai oddard an I were bo ng retur en, durin en is just oldd i t H H e h m G e fifth day. Red of prolific nd saved ctrical syst ally, I had t u all reme or this y ia Kanile’a OSSLQ an and discuss g a s f d P o e d n y l n g e n u e o a n h o a s i w , i t l e r t y e o , lowin ny project Rothfield nd e h r C a a r t pl yo ep yea I kn k evacu f m m o s a i h i e t s r c h r h n i m u g o , e a e T h b F e ee on ng a n am the fiddler J Rita, w he three-w nearly thr ptish si met progr campaign s of campaig pf, and t g e y o n e h c i t v S y u i m b f ti on .T isr rel band, who I r bum ection ings o o well llowed ness d er hus lan Carr, rgh, when ecord ng our coll rs and othe s for amah r ber to rm was fo l and busi s activity tA bu yi a s ke to ing ule bassis go in Edin artment in that s s of person ually aimle n of hurry ly- displa umper stic opyright r ming and a p c b t a r o a h s r i , t r o r g i t s n rf yea ved in an hur’s Seat, ton mon ursts of v e frustra thing, pa ystifyi ssionals pe usic. t i m l y r d h e b t r e m y d A , e h e o h f e v c o sc th km of me tion ting wit bout e er at the in s adow nd pr ditional fol ers on the er own a a a h t s s s n r r u e j a e u h g h t w a te alt or memb ing tr ms, an wait f o sang rmath record er FMSNY Wood wh up to the doldru ch the afte ally accept i d Oth Heather sis an ce with wh led, and fin ere d n e n t ha u le w pe

The s t u O g Riding s With Son Storm

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NOVEMBER 15, 2012

Volume 4 • Issue 17


an amazing giant rock planted in the middle of a park in the middle of the city by some prehistoric giant. Or aliens from outer space. The way I remember it, Jane was always having a musical inspiration, a laugh, or a serious discussion that nevertheless ended in giggles, and so she still goes these days. Jane and her sister, Californian Susie Rothfield, aka Suzy Thompson, well known as a bluegrass and Cajun fiddler, accordionist and guitarist, will be

collaborating on a new album of Jane’s own old-timey songs before the end of the year. I’ll clue you in on Jane’s previous and upcoming albums soon. And for all the great stuff we’ve seen and heard in the last few weeks, there’ll be more commentary and reviews when we’ve recovered from the storms some more. You remember how that goes. Keep us in your good thoughts. TJN

Call For Short Films Submissions On Sat., Feb. 23, 2013, the historic Strand Theater in Jennings, will present a lineup of short films produced by local, regional, national, and international filmmakers. This showcase is a celebration of the art form of short films. This is a call for submissions. If you are in a band and have, or would like to make a music video, this is a great venue to showcase your talent. If you are

a filmmaker and have a short film that you want to see on the big screen, this is your opportunity. If you want to be a filmmaker, here is your motivation to put your ideas in motion. Though they plan on screening national and international shorts, they have reserved slots and will give precedence to local entries. To submit an entry, visit www.grandbayoushortfilmshowcase.com. TJN

Killin’ Time Crossword ACROSS

DOWN

1. 4. 8. 12.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

13. 14. 15. 17. 18. 19. 20. 23. 25. 27. 28. 31. 33. 35. 36. 38. 39. 41. 42. 45. 47. 48. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57.

Court Turkish generals Consequently "Raiders of the Lost ___" Categorize Specific function Sittings Questions Untie Quotes Sheep Winter driving hazard Trails Rented movie Auction offer Pacific weather phenomenon Add fizz Greek letter Gallery display Individual performances Chat-show celebrity Go under Settles Labyrinth Medicinal plant Retail employee Washer cycle "___ fair in love and war" Grow old Pitch Track event Anonymous John

Volume 4 • Issue 17

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 16. 19. 20. 21. 22. 24.

26. 28. 29. 30. 32. 34. 37. 39. 40. 42. 43. 44. 46. 48.

Used to be Source of iron Approves "It's ___ to tell a lie" Merchandise "True Lies" actor Schwarzenegger Holy ones (abbr.) Characteristic Party thrower Sommer in the cinema Capone's nemesis Japanese roll Yields Fencing sword ___ Disney Volcano in Sicily Longoria Parker of "Desperate Housewives" Loses control Indonesian island Kirsten Dunst film, "Bring ___" Study table Bobby of the Bruins Valentine's Day gift Steamed Mexican dish Forebodings Oscar-winning Berry Actors Pet food brand Clark Kent's partner Lemon rind "Casablanca" pianist

49. Wacko 50. A long time ___ 51. Born, in bios

© Lovatts Publications Pty Ltd NOVEMBER 15, 2012

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The Jambalaya News - Vol. 4 No. 17  

November 15, 2012 Christmas Under the Oaks 2012

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