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VOL. 4, NO. 16 / NOVEMBER 1, 2012

ALSO: • Fountain of Youth • Dining in SWLA • It’s Time for Mistletoe and Moss!


There are some wonderful people in Lake Charles who do so much for our community, donating their time and talents to better the lives of others. People who aren’t afraid to take risks and serve as shining examples for the next generation. With the help of the Chamber Southwest and the WestCal Chamber of Commerce, we have selected three people whom we believe exemplify what a “Person of the Year” should be. Now, it’s up to our readers to choose the Person of the Year! Please vote by going to www.thejambalayanews.com and clicking on the banner at the top. That will take you to our voting page. From there, vote for the person of your choice. The contest ends Dec. 1. The chosen individual will be featured in a cover story in our Jan. 12, 2013 issue.

WILLIE KING

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NOVEMBER 1, 2012

SYLVIA CHAVES STELLY

DOUG GEHRIG

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GENERAL 715 Kirby St., Lake Charles, LA 70601 Phone: 337-436-7800 Fax: 337-990-0262 www.thejambalayanews.com PUBLISHER Phil de Albuquerque

contents

On Cover: Katelyn Chargois, LCCB principal, on the fountain at L'Auberge Lake Charles. Photo by Danley Romero of Romero and Romero Photography

November 1, 2012 • Volume 4 • Issue 16

COVER STORY 20

LCCB Presents Christmas in Louisiana: Once Upon a Time

publisher@thejambalayanews.com

NEWS EXECUTIVE EDITOR Lauren de Albuquerque lauren@thejambalayanews.com

CONTRIBUTORS Rhonda Babin Leslie Berman George Cline Angie Kay Dilmore Dan Ellender Monica Hebert Mike Louviere Mike McHugh Mary Louise Ruehr Brandon Shoumaker Karla Tullos ADVERTISING sales@thejambalayanews.com

SALES ASSOCIATES Michele Clack Katy Corbello Faye Drake Allen Garber GRAPHICS ART/PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Darrell Buck BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER Kay Andrews

REGULARS 7 11 12 28 32

The Boiling Pot Tips from Tip The Dang Yankee Sports Report Adoption Corner

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FEATURES 5 10 13 18 25 26 27

Pat Riley, WWII Hero SWLA Heart Walk 2012 Eating Your Way—Around SWLA! Bayou Biz: Mistletoe and Moss Skin Care Tips for Younger Looking Skin Can Varicose and Spider Veins be Prevented? The Detoxifying Body Wrap

ENTERTAINMENT 30 31 32 34 35 38 40 42 43

Red Hot Books Family Night at the Movies HeART of SWLA Funbolaya Society Spice Jambalaya Jam Local Jam Eclectic Company Killin’ Time Crossword

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Legal Disclaimer The views expressed by The Jambalaya News columnists are their own and do not necessarily reflect the position of The Jambalaya News, its editors or staff. The Jambalaya News is solely owned, published by The Jambalaya News, LLC, 715 Kirby Street, Lake Charles Louisiana 70601. Phone (337) 436-7800. Whilst every effort was made to ensure the information in this magazine was correct at the time of going to press, the publishers cannot accept legal responsibility for any errors or omissions, nor can they accept responsibility of the standing of advertisers nor by the editorial contributions. The Jambalaya News cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or illustrations, even if they are sent to us accompanied by a selfaddressed envelope. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Copyright 2012 The Jambalaya News all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without prior written permission is prohibited.

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A Note From Phil Remembering Ghostie It was a typical hot evening on June 30 of last year. I filled a plastic container full of cat food and went about feeding our gang around the house and office. A cat I hadn’t seen in awhile came toward me looking for food. “Well, hello Ghostie!” I said to my little friend. “I haven’t seen you in awhile. Are you staying a little longer this time? Are you going to be friendly?” I never could have known what good friends we would become. When one of our oldest cats, Charles the Boo, sees another cat he doesn’t like (which is most of them) he makes a highpitched sound that we call “ghosties.” So, when a white cat started coming to our house, we gave him the name “Ghostie.” He used to come by every few months or so. He was always slightly dirty and just a feral cat. He wasn’t friendly and we could never pat him. But this time was different. This time, Ghostie came to make friends. After a few days, we noticed that he seemed to have trouble with his mouth. He would suddenly flinch with pain while eating. We brought him to the vet and discovered he had stomatitus, a severe gum infection. Some teeth were pulled and he did okay for a few months. Then it happened again. This time, almost all of his teeth were pulled. “Don’t worry,” the doctor said. “He’ll be a new cat!” And he was. Ghostie ate more with almost no teeth than he had before,

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and even put on weight. Ghostie and I quickly became best friends. He never asked for much. Just a little food and a little brushing now and then. But he gave so much love back. Lauren would be taking a nap and I would be laying on the couch a few feet away. Ghostie would cuddle up to her and rub faces. Then he’d jump over to me and do the same. We would watch him go back and forth and say, “He’s beside himself!” He wanted to love us both equally. At night when it was time for bed, Ghostie was always there. Lauren would be up late working on the paper and he stayed in bed with me, watching a football game, or just curled in my lap while I read. When I would shut the light off, he would nudge up next to me and put his paw on my arm—his way of hugging me. I would put my arm around him, tell him how much we loved him, kiss him on his head, and fall asleep. In the morning, I would usually find Ghostie cuddled up next to Lauren in the same position. As soon as I got up, he would follow me to the cat food. He was my sidekick, running ahead of me and circling me as I put little food piles out as the other cats waited patiently. One of Ghostie’s favorite tricks was to run up our persimmon tree and look down at me as if to say, “C’mon, Dad! You can do it!” I would just laugh and tell him how big he was, and then he would run down and follow me to the back door. He

would then wait for me to make his favorite breakfast—a combination of dry food and water. I would always tell him it was a special breakfast for my Ghostie. A few weeks ago, I noticed my buddy was not as active as he usually was. I brought him to Dr. Matt at Southside Animal Hospital and was told he was dehydrated and worse—his abdominal cavity was filled with fluid—a bad sign. They kept him and did blood work, and I was there at every mealtime, encouraging him to eat. They decided to do exploratory surgery. Afterwards, Dr. Matt called to say it didn’t look good. He had done a biopsy, and we had to wait for the results. Ghostie came home with me the next day and sat outside with all his friends. His favorite pal “Skipperdee” came over and kissed him on the head. We learned he had a rare form of cancer and would not be with us much longer. We kept him comfortable, but our hearts were breaking. One morning as I went off to work, tears filled my eyes at the thought of losing my friend. I turned on the radio to hear “You just call out my name. And you know wherever I am, I’ll come running, to see you again…” I would not let my buddy suffer. We had a long talk that night. I fell asleep on the floor with him after telling him it would be okay for him to move on if he wanted to. I went to work the next morning with a heavy heart. I came home just

before noon and found Ghostie had listened to me and had left us. He was in our bedroom facing our bed where we shared so many fond memories. He seemed to be smiling. It was a rough day for me. As I tried to focus on my work, I asked Ghostie for a message. I turned on the radio to hear ”God bless you. You made me feel brand new…and God blessed me with you.” I had to pull over and take a break before driving again. The next morning, Charles the Boo walked into the house. He looked up at me the way Ghostie used to when he wanted his special breakfast. I made him Ghostie’s breakfast and told him that “this one’s from Ghostie.” I was surprised to see him go straight to the bowl and start eating it just the way Ghostie did. None of the cats liked Ghostie’s food because it was so mushy. I went to the door and looked up in the sky. “Are you up there Ghostie? Are you okay?” I asked. Then I heard it. The “ghostie” sound. I looked in the house to see Boo looking at me. He made the ghostie sound again. I picked Boo up and gave him a big hug. “Thank you for the message, Ghostie” I said to him. “I love you so much. Put a star out for me tonight over the persimmon tree. We’ll play and cuddle again someday—when it’s time.”

TJN

– Phil de Albuquerque

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By Mike Louviere The Chance-Vought F4U Corsair

On the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918, at 11 a.m., a long line of bugles blew, signifying the end of World War I, otherwise known as “The Great War.” On Nov. 11, 1919, President Woodrow Wilson signed a proclamation declaring Nov. 11 as Armistice Day, a national holiday. There were other proclamations over the years declaring how the holiday should be celebrated; so in 1954, Congress declared that the day would therefore be known as Veterans Day. In 2010, Frank Buckles, the last American veteran of World War I, passed away. Buckles had enlisted at the age of 14 and served as an ambulance driver on the Western Front. Some 270,000 World War II veterans died in 2011, an average of 740 a day, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Another 248,000 are projected to die this year. It is unlikely we will ever see a generation of Americans like the men and women who defended America in World War II. They left home as boys and girls and came home as men and women. Tom Brokaw dubbed them “The Greatest Generation.” There is no doubt they were. Paul Riley is one of the surviving veterans of World War II. Raised in Groves, Texas, he graduat-

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ed from Port Neches Groves High School as World War II was beginning. Like so many others of The Greatest Generation, he enlisted in the military to serve his country in wartime. Riley enlisted in the United States Marine Corps and was assigned to the Marines’ air force. Shortly after the battle for Guadalcanal in 1942, Riley’s air wing, VMF 115, landed on the island and took over the operation of Henderson Field. The airfield had been the main objective of the Marines’ invasion and the bloody fighting for control of Guadalcanal. VMF 115 was assigned the duty of doing ground support and escorting bombers as the war progressed. “We didn’t stay on Guadalcanal too long, as we got control of more islands and pushed the Japanese back,” he said. “Our squadron eventually went to Emirau, and we spent most of our time there. I was an armorer. I loaded the machine guns and hooked up bombs. The planes we worked with were the Corsairs.” The F4U Corsair, built by the Chance Vought Aircraft Corporation, had the largest engine of any US fighter plane, a “gull wing” configuration, and a distance of 16 feet from the front of the cockpit to the front of the plane. Since the plane was a “tail dragger,”

pilots sat much lower than the front of the plane and could not see what was straight in front of them when trying to land. As a result, they had to zigzag down the runway after they touched down, looking over the side of the cockpit in order to steer the plane down the runway as they taxied in. The Corsair was powerful and fast, only 13 miles per hour slower that the P-47 Thunderbolt, America’s fastest fighter. Corsairs were used until 1979. Honduras was the last air force to fly them in active duty. “The Corsair only carried one bomb,” Riley explained. “It was a 500-pound bomb, and a lot of the time, they were napalm bombs. We mixed the napalm by hand. It was 100-octane aviation gasoline mixed with a powdered soap, like Oxydol. The soap had some aluminum powder mixed in it. When the soap powder and the gasoline mixed, it turned into a gel. When it exploded, it stuck to whatever it Top picture: Joe Foss, WWII Medal of Honor winner. burned and burned Foss was credited with shooting down 26 Japanese aircraft. Bottom picture:Paul Riley (today)

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a lot slower and hotter than just plain gasoline. One of those bombs would cover about a football field when it exploded. It was nasty stuff, but we were in a war.” In 1944, VMF 115 gained a new commander, Joe Foss, who had been stateside doing War Bond tours. Previously, Foss had been flying for the Marines during the battle for Guadalcanal and was credited with 26 kills. The leading air ace in the Pacific Theater; Foss was awarded the Medal of Honor. His record of 26 kills equaled that of America’s top WWI aviator, Eddie Rickenbacker. Ironically, Rickenbacker had been Foss’ childhood hero. He had met Rickenbacker when he was 12 years old and inspired him to be a flyer from that time. The South Dakota farm boy achieved that goal and more. In his later years he became governor of South Dakota and also the first commissioner of the American Football League. Foss was an aggressive pilot and a great commander of the squadron. “He constantly looked for ways to encourage his men and ways to motivate us,” Riley said. “We all wanted to do our jobs the best we could to repay his efforts for us.”

The squadron became known as “Joe’s Jokers” and designed a distinctive shoulder patch showing a card hand with a Joker. It is one of the most collectable Marine unit patches of WWII. VMF 115 spent days and nights escorting bombers and was instrumental in the effort to cut off Truk Lagoon. Truk was a major anchorage for the Japanese fleet in that area of the Pacific. A large Japanese merchant fleet was attacked by U.S. Navy planes from aircraft carriers and over 100 ships were sunk. “After we left Emirau, we went to the Philippines as part of the Leyte invasion,” Riley said. “Our planes were there to support the ground forces of the invasion.” After the battle was over at Leyte, they went on to Mindanao. “We established a base there, but the runways were the metal mats. It was OK, but not great,” he remembered. One night, one of the big Japanese “Betty” bombers flew in and landed on the runway. “It was shot up and burning, but still managed to land,” Riley said. “There was a suicide squad on board. They got out and started shooting. We had them so outnumbered that they didn’t last too long.” This was a first for Riley. “I had been where there would be a Japanese

plane make a nuisance run on us at night and drop a bomb or two or shoot a little, but this was the only time I got close to that sort of shooting combat,” he said. After Mindanao, Riley started back to the States on a troopship. “I slept on deck most of the time,” he recalled. “Down below it was too hot and there was too much odor.” He returned to the States on June 30, 1945—his birthday. Riley eventually married and now lives in Orange, Texas with his son, Raylin. His wife died several years ago. He also has a daughter Kim, and another son, Konrad. Another daughter, Linda, died two years ago. He retired from DuPont’s Sabine River Works after 38 years of service in the Energy Control Department. Riley was not wounded in combat and does not speak of any delayed stress reactions, but he could be experiencing health problems from his wartime service. The veteran suffers from Meniere’s disease, a disorder that affects the inner ear. There is a possibility that the years of being around the powerful aircraft engines with the loud noise, vibration, and exhaust emissions led to his health

issues. He is currently consulting with Bruce Lockett of the Veterans Advocates of America in filing a claim with the Veteran’s Administration. “Out of 250 in my squadron, I am the only one still alive,” he said. “There are a lot of good men that were my friends in those days that are no longer with us.” November 11 is a day to take a moment to remember veterans like Paul Riley. It is a time to think about the sacrifices that veterans have made for our country. It is a day to think about the young men and women of the current generation of warriors who are serving in the Armed Forces. If you know a veteran or a member of the military and have the opportunity to do so, thank them for their service. They will appreciate it more than you will ever know. TJN

The Fourth Annual Preventing Family Violence Workshop: Blueprint For Change The event will be held Nov. 2, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. in the McNeese State University Para Ballroom. Registration Fee: $50 for CEU/CLE credit, $30 for participants not seeking CEU or CLE credit. Includes breakfast, lunch, snacks, and materials. Registration at the door will include an additional $10 fee. Make check payable to: The People’s Advocate, 607 Ryan Street, Lake Charles, LA 70601. Office: (337) 4363475, Fax: (337) 436-3476. Register at: www.thepeoplesadvocateswla.com (Credit cards also accepted) TJN PAGE 6

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The

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Please submit press releases to lauren@thejambalayanews.com

it in the category of Sustained Superiority Banks. According to BauerFinancial, only three percent of the nation’s banks achieve this distinction. For more information about accounts and locations, visit www.fnbderidder.com.

Presenting the $12,500 donation (L to R): Stephanie Miller, L’Auberge; Julio Galan, Family & Youth president & CEO; and Kerry Andersen, Pinnacle Entertainment. Not pictured: Mike & Martha Holleman, Owners – The Wine Store.

L’AUBERGE DONATES TO TASTING ON THE TERRACE L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles recently hosted “Tasting on the Terrace,” a wine-tasting event in support of the Children’s Advocacy Center at Family & Youth. All proceeds from ticket sales, raffle tickets and a percentage of wine sales from The Wine Store directly benefited CAC. MAPLEWOOD BAPTIST HONORS BROTHER BURKE Maplewood First Baptist Church, located at 4501 Maplewood Drive, is celebrating 10 years of having Brother Ronnie Burke as its senior pastor. The church has been a cornerstone in the Sulphur community for over 50 years, and the congregation is inviting the community to a special commemorative service on Sun., Nov. 11, at 10:15 a.m. with Pastor Robert Carter as the guest preacher. There will be a slide show and a gift presentation, and a reception will follow in the Christian Life Center on the church grounds. For more information, contact the church office at (337) 625-5899 or go to www.maplewoodfbc.com.

Ronnie Burke

FIRST NATIONAL BANK DERIDDER EARNS 5-STAR RATING First National Bank DeRidder was once again named as a5-Star Superior Bank by BauerFinancial, the nation’s leading independent bank rating and research firm. A five star rating indicates a strong capital foundation with active loans and a low delinquency rate. This is the ninety-fifth consecutive quarter for First National Bank DeRidder to earn the five-star rating, putting Volume 4 • Issue 16

2012 Kick Butts Day from l-r: Neonatologist Juan Bossano, M.D., and Sherry Forest, DNP - WCH’s Tobacco-Free Living Program Coordinator. Annette Garber and Nadia Nazeer work a booth at McNeese State University.

WCH RECEIVES TOBACCO-FREE HEALTH CARE GRANT Women & Children’s Hospital is the recipient of the 2012 Tobacco-Free Health Care Project grant, awarded by the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals Tobacco Control Program and its partner, Southwest Louisiana Area Health Education Center. WCH will receive $150,000 over a 30-month period to implement research-based strategies for comprehensive tobacco prevention, control and awareness. The grant is funded through a federal grant from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For information about the Tobacco-Free Health Care grant or educational opportunities, contact Sherry Forest at 475-4102 or sherry.forest@women-childrens.com. GATTE JOINS IMPERIAL HEALTH ENDOCRINOLOGY CENTER The Imperial Health Endocrinology Center of Southwest Louisiana, located at 721 Bayou Pines East in Lake Charles, is pleased to welcome Nurse Practitioner Joan Gatte to the clinical team. Timothy Gilbert, M.D. and the Endocrinology Center of Southwest Louisiana staff are dedicated to providing specialized diagnosis and treatment for an array of endocrine disorders and diseases. Gatte, a Lake Arthur native, earned a bachelor’s degree in nursing from

Joan Gatte

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Loyola University in New Orleans, and a master of science in nursing from McNeese State University. She is a Family Nurse Practitioner certified through the American Nurses Credentialing Certification program. COUSHATTA FARMERS’ MARKET WINS COMPETITIVE GRANT FROM USDA The Coushatta Farmers’ Market program has been selected by the USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service to receive more than $80,000 in funding under the 2012 Farmers Market Promotion Program grant program. The funding is to help promote the Coushatta Farmers’ Market to surrounding communities and expand its offerings of fresh, local produce and food. The funds will support the Coushatta Farmers’ Market Promotion Program; “Increasing Healthy Food Access in a Low-income Community,” which is designed to increase the consumption of fresh, local produce among lowincome households for the benefit of small, local growers. For more information, contact Desiree Duhon of the Imperial Calcasieu Resource Conservation & Development Council at (337) 246-3199.

program. Under the program, the IRS awarded matching grants to organizations that will offer free tax preparation services during the 2013 filing season at locations in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. United Way plans to have a total of nine filing locations available beginning in mid-January. Taxpayers can have their returns e-filed for free across the five-parish area at sites, or during special “Tax Day” events. Filers who choose direct deposit can receive eligible refunds in as little as 7-10 days. The grant funding will enable United Way to expand the program to bring much needed money back into our community. For more information, call Michelle McInnis at (337) 433-1088 or e-mail mmcinnis@unitedwayswla.org.

Dr. Brett Cascio (front left), medical director of sports medicine at Memorial presents a $6,000 check to La Grange Head Coach Jules Sullen. Also pictured (left to right) are La Grange football player Martell Hawthorne, District 7 School Board Member Mack Dellafosse and Memorial Sports Medicine director Jamey Rasberry and trainer Sherie Bates. Chester Daigle, Mayor Randy Roach and Pat Daigle

Mayor Randy Roach and Pam Breaux

MAYOR’S ART AWARD RECIPIENTS HONORED The Arts & Humanities Council of Southwest Louisiana and the City of Lake Charles recently honored area individuals, businesses, and organizations during the annual Mayor’s Arts Awards. Mayor Randy Roach presented awards to seven recipients in recognition of their work to promote, produce, and support the Lake Area’s arts and cultural endeavors and programs. Recipients included Chester Daigle, Artist of the Year; Stellar Beans Coffee House, Citizen of the Arts; Friends of Central School, Citizen of the Humanities; Tracy Beaugh of Sowela, Arts Educator of the Year; L’Auberge Casino Resort/Pinnacle, Patron of the Year; Dancing Classrooms Program, Arts Organization of the Year and Pam Breaux, Keystone Award. Nominations for the Mayor’s Arts Awards are accepted year-round and can be emailed to director@artsandhumanitiesswla.org. SLEDGE NAME CHAIR OF MARCH FOR BABIES Lake Charles business leader, Tom Sledge, assistant CEO of Women & Children’s Hospital has accepted the position of Chair for Lake Charles’ annual March for Babies campaign. March for Babies is the largest annual fundraising event for the Foundation, which will celebrate its 75th anniversary in 2013. As Chair, Sledge will play an integral role in raising awareness and funds to advance the scientific research and eduTom Sledge cational programs at the core of the March of Dimes efforts to prevent preterm birth and birth defects. Lake Charles residents can sign up today at www.marchforbabies.org and start a team with co-workers, family and friends. The fundraiser will be held on April 13, 2013 at the Lake Charles Civic Center. UNITED WAY SWLA RECEIVES GRANT FROM IRS For the fourth year in a row, the United Way of Southwest Louisiana is being awarded a grant from the Internal Revenue Service. The grant, in the amount of $32,000, is awarded through a competitive process. Congress appropriates funds to support the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) PAGE 8

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F3 DONATES TO LAGRANGE HS The Foundation for Fairplay Fund (F3) recently donated $6,000 in athletic equipment to La Grange High School. The money went towards the refurbishment of four training tables and the purchase of 20 new Riddell® Revolution® Speed Helmets. The helmets offer the latest technology in football safety. Helmets are a huge expense for local football programs, as schools are required to replace them after 10 years. F3 was established by The Foundation at Lake Charles Memorial Hospital in order to provide a more level playing field in the areas of preventable injury needs. The fund will assist schools in acquiring equipment such as quality football helmets, training room equipment needed for the rehabilitation of sports-related injuries and creating safe physical fitness surroundings. To learn more about F3 or to make a donation, call 494-3226 or visit www.lcmh.com/f3.

Presenting $2,500 donation check are (L to R): Vivian Reed-Guillory, sexual violence prevention educator & trainer; Tammy Vincent, RN SANE; Keith W. Henson, L’Auberge; and Lucinda Peltier, Floral Retail Shop supervisor.

L’AUBERGE DONATES TO ‘WALK A MILE IN HER SHOES’ L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles recently took part in the “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” event held at the Prien Lake Mall. The L’Auberge floral team created gaming-themed high heels for male team members to strut in for the awareness march. Proceeds from sponsored walkers in the event benefitted Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner Programs in Southwest Louisiana, the Oasis Sexual Violence Program and The Children’s Advocacy Center. Volume 4 • Issue 16


DR. GUPTA JOINS IMPERIAL HEALTH PHYSICIAN TEAM Nishi Gupta, M.D., an internal medicine physician specializing in adult primary care needs, women’s health and preventative care; has joined the Imperial Health physician team in Lake Charles. Dr. Gupta, a Houston native, received a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, and a master’s in health services administration from Saint Joseph’s College of Maine. She earned a medical degree from Saint Matthew’s School of Medicine in Grand Cayman, BWI in 2009. Dr. Gupta recently completed an internal medicine residency at Maine Medical Center in Portland, Maine. Dr. Gupta’s medical practice is located at 501 Dr. Michael DeBakey Drive (2nd Floor) in Lake Charles. For more information, or to schedule Dr. Nishi Gupta an appointment, call (337) 312-8414.   MCNEESE HOMECOMING COURT NAMED Jessica Fry, a nursing senior from Lake Charles, and Austin Bourgeois, an engineering technology senior from Sulphur, have been named as McNeese’s 2012 Homecoming Queen and King. The royal pair and court were presented during the McNeese vs. Stephen F. Austin State University game on Oct. 27 in Cowboy Stadium. Other court members are seniors Megan Anderson, Hessmer; Nicholas Johnson, Welsh; Jade Perry, Iowa and Ryan Rapp, Sulphur; juniors Jessica Fry and Austin Alexandra “Ali” Gallier and Colten Miller, Bourgeois, McNeese’s 2012 Lake Charles; and Leah Moore and Dillon Homecoming Queen and King Richard, Welsh; sophomores Michael Bass, Sulphur; Catherine Delahoussaye, Lake Charles; Kourtney Kennedy, Moss Bluff; and Garrett Soileau, Lake Charles; and freshmen Maddy Dulany, Sulphur; and Grant Dunn, Moss Bluff. TJN

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“Walk this way!” urged Aerosmith in the 1975 song. On Sat., Nov. 10, the American Heart Association and its local Southwest Louisiana sponsors are urging you to “Walk your way!” by participating in the 2012 SWLA Heart Walk. For over 30 years, residents of the Lake Area have supported this event with attendance and funds to help the American Heart Association raise awareness about cardiovascular disease and health. Participating in a healthy activity like walking can lower your risk of developing one of these health issues. The facts cannot be disputed. Heart disease is the number one killer in Southwest Louisiana, with stroke number four. The Heart Walk is designed to help raise awareness of the risks, provide education and fun for the whole family, celebrate the survivors and walk in memory of passed loved ones. The Heart Walk is held in The Quad at McNeese State University. Free food, entertainment, and fun activities will fill the space. Over 2,500 walkers/runners are expected to participate in the non-competitive, three-mile campus trek. Hungry walkers will be able to sample entrees from contestants of The Jambalaya News’ Battle for the Paddle Jambalaya Cook-off challenge. Participants will have been cooking since early that morning, following rules that include a substitution of a traditional ingredient to one that is heart healthy. The contest is designed to show that one of Louisiana’s favorite dishes can be heart healthy. Part of the education that helps cooks prepare meals with heart-healthy ingredients comes from a comprehensive new health, wellness, and fitness platform called “My Heart, My Life,” designed to empower Americans to get healthier. The local 2012 “My Heart, My Life” platform sponsor is Christus St. Patrick Hospital. Events include National Eating Healthy Day on Nov. 7; the Heart Walk; Teaching Gardens, which helps us relearn our eating and thinking habits about food, and National Start Walking Day on April 4. “My Heart, My Life” is helping to improve the health of Americans by focusing on activities that are convenient, free, and easy. You can learn more by calling (800) 257-6941, visiting www.myheartmylife.org, and by attending and/or participating in the 2012 Heart Walk.

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Another great thing you can enjoy after walking Saturday morning is the free performance by the man whom many consider to be the “King of Cajun.” Thanks to Isle of Capri Casino & Hotel, singer and songwriter Jo’El Sonnier will be entertaining the crowd. Young and old alike are bound to get their toes tapping from his energetic mix of Cajun, country, and rock songs. While you have fun and learn at his event, you may hear a story about a baby born with a heart defect. Lifestyle and health choices are not the only reason heart disease is our number one killer. It is a fact that one in 100 babies is born with a heart defect every year. Some are thriving, many are barely surviving, and sadly, some are no longer with us. One of the thriving is Paisley Breaux, 2. A full-term baby weighing in at 7 pounds 3 ounces at birth, she appeared to be the picture of health. At her two-week checkup, a heart murmur was detected. Paisley and her parents were referred to a pediatric cardiologist who diagnosed her with right ventricular hypertrophy. Open heart surgery was performed on Paisley when she was only three months old. She will need another surgery when she gets older, but she is now a walking, talking, very active toddler. The American Heart Association was with her every step of the way. Volunteers who believe in building healthier lives free of cardiovascular disease and stroke made it possible for Paisley to be properly diagnosed and provided medications and treatments for her condition and the technology to make her surgery a success. Volunteers are needed to make the difference. You can help today. Become one of the many of who follow a simple premise: “Walk More, Eat Better, Live Longer.” Register for the American Heart Association SWLA Heart Walk at www.swlaheartwalk.org or call (800) 257-6941, extension 6174 for more information. TJN Volume 4 • Issue 16


By George “Tip” Cline

MUDBUG HEAVEN After speaking with an old friend who is in the business of raising that succulent Southwest Louisiana delicacy known as crawfish, I was elated to find out that this season’s supply should be very plentiful and of excellent quality. He informed me that supplies should be coming in the next week or so. Now, the days of crawfish at $.59 a pound are long over, as the cost of production has greatly increased over the years. I imagine the price on the first batches will be a lot higher than most of us will want to pay. I recall that prices started at around $6 per pound last year. It would not surprise me if the early ones are in that range, but it will come down as the harvest progresses, and we will once again be able to savor those tasty crustaceans. CHECK BIG-BOX PRICES A friend of mine over in Mississippi needed a new refrigerator. She lives between two larger towns and both have branches of the same chain, big box store. She checked prices at each and found that they were significantly different at the two locations. One would tend to think that branches of the same store in the same vicinity would price the same items identically, but that is not always the case. As always, do your homework before you wind up paying more than you should. FEDERAL TAX CHANGE It appears that at least one change in our federal taxes is a sure thing (as if there was ever any stability in our Tax Code). Neither Democrat or Republican congressmen and senators Volume 4 • Issue 16

usual menu is almost always chicken, mashed potatoes, green beans and coleslaw. In the spirit of bipartisanship, we’ll price the items used on those occasions that are also found in many of our homes for dinner. The shopping survey for this issue was taken on Wed., Oct. 24. The stores surveyed were: Albertsons, Country Club Road; Market Basket, Nelson Road; Kroger, McNeese Street and Walmart, Nelson Road. These prices were posted on the shelf where the product was placed for sale.

Cabbage, per head: Albertsons $.69; Market Basket $.59; Kroger $.50; Walmart $.50. Green beans, fresh per pound: Albertsons $1.99; Market Basket $1.79; Kroger $1.89; Walmart $1.48. Red potatoes, per pound: Albertsons $1.59; Market Basket $.99; Kroger $1.29; Walmart $.88. Chicken, whole per pound: Albertsons $.87; Market Basket $1.19; Kroger $.98; Walmart $.98.

TJN

in Washington, D.C. want to continue the reduction in the flow of Social Security dollars paid into the coffers. The employees’ share of the of the 12.4 percent Social Security tax on wages is going back to 6.2 percent from the 4.2 percent rate being paid for the last two years. The tax is going to be on earned income up to $113,700 in 2013. A person earning $50,000 a year will see about a $20 a week deduction in the paycheck starting in January 2013 with the rate returning to its prior rate. The thinking on the lessened rate for 2011 and 2012 was to help stimulate the economy, but it is hard to see much benefit while the Social Security system was being underfunded. The system was still being funded through borrowed money, which just added insult to the injury of our more than bloated national debt. MORE REGULATIONS! We all enjoy a glowing fire in the fireplace, either from burning logs or by simulated log sets that utilize natural gas. The Department of Energy has now extended their reach to include regulation of gas log sets because they classify them as “Heating Equipment,” that falls under their power to improve home heaters that burn natural gas. The 1987 National Appliance Energy Conservation Act allows that department to regulate natural gas-fired equipment, and they now declare faux logs are home heaters. I can’t help but hear “I’m from the gubment and I’m here to help you” running through my head. SUPERMARKET ROUNDUP Being close to the elections, the meetings, rallies and conventions usually have some kind of banquet during the course of the event. The NOVEMBER 1, 2012

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Dang Yankee The

By Mike McHugh

The Merchants of RenFest About three hours from Southwest Louisiana is the hamlet of Plantersville, Texas, home of the Texas Renaissance Festival. The festival attracts thousands of visitors each weekend through the autumn months. They come to experience how life must have been in the simpler times of centuries past, when people didn’t have to call all over town to find someone to repair the washer since, after all, rocks rarely break down.

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NOVEMBER 1, 2012

Many people dismiss these festivalgoers as nut cases, but I know better. I have been going to RenFest for a number of years now, and I can tell you that there are indeed quite a few sensible people who attend. They’re quite easy to make out among the crowd—they are the ones who are not in costume. How do I know this? It’s because I do go in costume, and I know how many hard-earned pounds one must forsake to acquire such adorn-

ments. Even your basic, entry-level sackcloth and ashes will run you about the same cost as a seat on the New York Stock Exchange, although, admittedly, the sackcloth is probably a more fun thing. My preferred dress is that of a pirate. I’ve accumulated several outfits, and I’ve often considered replacing my bedroom closet with a bank vault to protect my investment. I can understand why these swashbucklers had to be plundering galleons day in and day out. Lady Gaga probably doesn’t shell out as much on her wardrobe. I really amaze myself. Here I am, a guy who’s been known to ransack every thrift store in town because I’m not willing to pay more than fifty cents for a baseball cap. Yet, take me to RenFest, and, before you can say “Leonardo,” I’ll drop $14 on one ostrich feather for my cavalier’s hat. And if you think that’s bad, you don’t even want to hear about my boots. But I’ll tell you anyway. I got them at RenFest last year, upon recommendation from another festivalgoer who swore to me that they were so comfortable he could play

basketball in them. It didn’t matter that I hadn’t stepped on a basketball court since I sprained my ankle back when the Shah was still in power. I was sold. So, I hied straightaway to Ye Olde Boot Shoppe, or, as it was otherwise called, “Saks Fisher Row.” The brass buttons alone, of which there are about ten on each boot, go for ten bucks apiece. I know, because I had to replace a few that had become unthreaded and fell off over the past year, undoubtedly by design. And though I doubt you’ll see the Houston Rockets take to the court in these boots anytime soon, I’ll have to admit they do feel good. They’re so comfortable, in fact, that I recommended a pair to a friend after he complained to me how his boots were killing him. So I took him in tow down to Saks Fisher Row, as I just happened to be on my way there to deal with my brass button problem. Upon leaving the store, it occurred to me the risk I’d taken in recommending a pair of boots that requires a similar financial commitment as one would make when purchasing a bass boat. Sure, they felt good on my feet, but what about his? What if they made him feel as if he were walking in leg irons through a briar patch? I would surely be the one to blame for it all. So, for the rest of the day, I walked the grounds in fear that I’d run into him later on at the Sea Witch Tavern, strapped to a gurney and unable to walk. He’d shake a gnarled finger at me, shouting, “There’s the knave who’s crippled me for life!” Then, at his urging, the angry crowd would take up torches and charge after me while other townspeople gathered wood for the stake. But as it turned out, it was just my paranoia, for when I finally got to the Sea Witch, there he was with our other mates, all of them with big smiles, showing off brand new pairs of those very same boots! And so we all made merry and toasted each other’s footwear with large flagons of ale. Who would have thought that I, who am normally on the same scale fashion-wise as Larry the Cable Guy, would end up being the Michael Jordan of Saks Fisher Row? Alas, if only I had the royalties to go along with it. I could buy a few more ostrich feathers. TJN Volume 4 • Issue 16


By Lauren de Albuquerque

Louisiana is a tough state to live in if you want to lose weight. When we moved down here nine years ago, I weighed 100 pounds. I’m not going to tell you what I weigh now, but I’m working on losing it—and I have been! But I’m not here to talk about dieting. I’m here to talk about all the fabulous food we have here in the Lake Area— and to point out that most restaurants do have heart-healthy choices on their menus. Even fast-food restaurants have gotten into the act. So you can still go out and have a good meal and socialize while watching your waistline. But occasionally, you do have to splurge. And this is the place to do it! I am so excited that crawfish season will soon be upon us. That’s one of the perks of the winter season. Phil and I adore them and make sure we have them as often as possible—either in restaurants or at various crawfish boils we get invited to. Everyone has their

favorite place to get crawfish, and everyone swears their place is the best. Guess what? They’re all the best! The only thing I don’t like is the corn. It’s always hard and chewy, and I’m mystified how y’all can eat it like that. Give me fresh corn on the cob or nothing! Of course, we can get crabs and shrimp year round. There are so many different dishes that celebrate them. And then there are oysters—raw, fried, grilled, in a stew—you name it. I am so glad I don’t have a shellfish allergy—because I prefer shellfish to regular fish any day. Now that’s it’s cooler, everyone is saying that it’s finally “gumbo weather.” Hello? I can eat gumbo year round— even on the most humid summer day. Gumbo is the perfect meal. But I eat it like a Yankee—hardly any rice. I don’t want the delicious flavors to be absorbed by the rice. Although I love a little potato salad with it. We are so lucky to have some wonderful restaurants around town and

beyond that serve up all of these delicious Louisiana specialties and more. Unfortunately, most are closed on Sundays, so if you want to eat out on that day, you usually have to settle for a chain. There is one not-so-good thing about dining in Lake Charles: We have a beautiful waterfront that very much needs a restaurant on it. Or maybe two. Phil and I recently visited Regatta LA Seafood and Steakhouse on Lake Arthur. Throughout our very enjoyable evening, sitting out on the deck dining on grilled shrimp and catfish and listening to a great Cajun band, we kept shaking our heads in amazement that we have nothing like this on Lake Charles. Nothing. Hope someone can make it happen. It’s long overdue. TJN

Visit us to stock your freezer for those busy holiday meals with specialty food items prepared and packaged for your convenience. ENTREES Deboned 24 LB Turkey...............$125.00 Half Deboned Turkey .................$62.50 Turkey Gravy PT/QT..................$8.00 Giblet Gravy PT/QT ...................$8.50 Whole Pork Tenderloin ..............$80.00 Half Pork Tenderloin ..................$40.00 Brisket P/LB .................................$16.00 A LA CART Rice Dressing ...............................$3.00 Cornbread Dressing....................$2.00 Asparagus/Spaghetti Casserole..$3.50 Whipped Sweet Potatoes ............$2.25 Candied Sweet Potatoes..............$2.00 (Prices Per Serving 1Serving= 1cup)

VEGETABLES Spinach Madeline ........................$3.50 Corn Maque Choux ....................$2.00 Smothered String Beans .............$2.25 String Beans Casserole................$3.00 Potato Salad..................................$3.00 DESSERTS Pecan Pie.......................................$13.00 Pumpkin Pie.................................$13.00 Strawberry Cream Pie.................$15.00 Chocolate Yummy.......................$25.00 MISCELLANEOUS Bing Cherry Mold .......................$20.00 Cranberry Relish P/Pint .............$7.50

This Thanksgiving, we want to extend heartfelt thanks to all our customers. We look forward to providing you with your Thanksgiving meal. All orders must be placed the Friday prior to Thanksgiving. All Thanksgiving orders should be picked up or delivered after 3pm on Wednesday before Thanksgiving. Prices listed do not include tax or delivery. Local delivery is available for a $20.00 charge. All orders are payable upon delivery or pick up. Please call In or Fax all Orders or Questions. Volume 4 • Issue 16

NOVEMBER 1, 2012

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Cracklins ...............................................................................$4.35 bag or $13.00 lb Pork Skins.............................................................................$2.00 bag Beef Jerky.............................................................................$3.75 bag or $25.00 lb Cajun Slim Jims ..................................................................$4.00 bag or $16.00 lb Boudin ...................................................................................$3.89 lb Fresh $4.15 lb Frozen Chicken Jalapeno Boudin ..............................................$4.15 lb Smoked Boudin .................................................................$4.15 lb Shrimp Boudin ...................................................................$6.25 lb Boudin Balls ........................................................................$1.09 each or 2/ $1.99, $11.59 Dozen Cajun Egg Rolls ..................................................................$1.09 each or 2/ $1.99, $11.59 Dozen Boudin Pistolettes............................................................$1.29 each or 2/ $2.39, $13.59 Dozen Hog Head Cheese.............................................................$4.39 lb Jambalaya .............................................................................$3.59 Pint Dressing Mix........................................................................$3.29 Pint Pork Tasso ............................................................................$5.79 lb Smoked Ox Tail .................................................................$5.19 lb Smoked Ham Hocks ........................................................$3.99 lb Smoked Turkey Necks ....................................................$2.99 lb Smoked Turkey Wings/Legs ........................................$2.37 lb Stuffed Pounce ..................................................................$3.59 lb Small Stuffed Pork Roast ..............................................$3.99 lb Large Stuffed Pork Roast...............................................$4.69 lb Stuffed Pork Chops..........................................................$3.99 lb Stuffed Chicken Breast (jal/cream cheese)...........$6.59 lb Stuffed Pork T-Loin (jal/cream cheese)..................$6.99 lb Stuffed Pork Loin (sausage) ..........................................$4.89 lb Stuffed Brisket ...................................................................$6.19 lb Stuffed Quail......................................................................$10.29 2pk. Marinated Choice Ribeye..............................................$11.00 lb SAUSAGE Pork Mixed Mixed (jap & green onions) Turkey Chicken

$3.99 lb $4.49 lb $4.59 lb $4.49 lb $4.49 lb

BONELESS CHICKENS STUFFED WITH Boudin $13.99 lb Cornbread Dressing $13.99 lb Sausage Stuffing $14.99 lb

Preorder for Thanksgiving! PAGE 14

NOVEMBER 1, 2012

Chicken (pineapple & jal) Fresh Andouille (pork) Deer Gator (green onions & jal)

Broccoli Cheese & Rice Jambalaya Shrimp Boudin

FRIED TURKEYS: Customer Furnished 12-14 lb B&O Furnished 12-14 lb

Whole $28.00 $44.95

$4.69 lb $4.59 lb $4.79 lb $6.89 lb

$14.99 lb $14.99 lb $17.99 lb Carved $37.00 $51.95

BONELESS TURKEYS STUFFED WITH Sausage Stuffing $45.95 Cornbread Dressing $43.95 Boudin $43.95 TURDUCKLINS Sausage Stuffing Cornbread Dressing Boudin

$77.95 $75.95 $75.95

SANDWICHES Ham & Cheese Bologna BLT Ham, Egg, & Cheese Sausage, Egg, & Cheese Bacon, Egg, & Cheese Hog Head Cheese Stuffed Pork Roast

$3.39 $2.95 $4.00 $3.95 $3.95 $3.95 $3.59 $3.95

BURGERS Boudin Cajun Ricky Gaudidaun Tasso Chicken Strip Chicken Fried Steak BBQ Beef

$2.95 $3.95 $4.25 $4.95 $3.95 $4.29 $3.95 $3.59

PO BOYS Brisket Sausage Ham & Cheese Boudin Ball

$5.25 $4.95 $4.95 $4.95

BREAKFAST BURRITO

$3.50

ADD ONS Meat Bacon Cheese Fries

$1.50 .75 .55 $2.09

Deer Processing Available Volume 4 • Issue 16


Everything done the old-fashioned way, from the Malts to the Burgers

ICE CREAM & YOGURT ITEMS

Over 30 flavors of Blue Bell Ice Cream & over 40 flavors of frozen yogurt! Cups • Cones • Waffle Cones/Bowls • Smoothies Smoothie Flavors: Fitness Punch, Jazzberry, Pina Colada, Peach Nectar, Banana Foster, Strawberry Sensation, Bahama Mama, Fruit Blast, Banana Split, Chocolate Dream, Fuzzy Navel, Cappuccino, Mocha Fudge, Peanut Butter or your choice.

2701 S. Ruth St., Sulphur • (337) 527-9189 Exit 20, 1 Blk. South at light on left Drive thru Window ~ Patton St. Entrance

FOOD ITEMS • MUFFALETTAS

Ask about the Burger, Fries and Malt Combo

Sizes: The whole thing or po-boy size

• HOT DOGS

with homemade chili with chili & cheese Plain (on a bun)

• HAM & CHEESE PO-BOYS • FRITO PIE with homemade chili with chili & cheese

Volume 4 • Issue 16

• HOT LINKS

hot link on bun with chili or cheese or both

• BURGERS

Hamburger • Cheeseburger Barbecue • Fries

• SPECIALTY DRINKS Orange Julius, Pink Flamingo Cherry Nectar, Purple Cow

SPECIALTIES (Small, Medium or Large) • • • •

Brownie Bottom Sundaes & Waffle Bowl Sundaes Shakes • Floats • Freezes Malts • Specialty Drinks Banana Splits (Traditional banana split, the Mac-Daddy

of em all, made w/ 3 flavors of ice cream, whole banana, 3 toppings, whip cream, nuts & 3 cherries) TOPPINGS: Reese’s Cups, Reese’s Pieces, Heath, Butterfinger, Nestle’s Crunch, M&Ms, Sprinkles, Gummy Bears, Oreos, Choc. Chip Cookies, Peanuts, Pecans, Almonds, Walnuts, Wet Walnuts, Mixed Nuts, Granola, Strawberries, Cherries, Bananas, Hershey’s Syrup, Hot Fudge, Hot Caramel, Hot Butterscotch, Gold Brick, Sugar & Fat Free Fudge, Whipped Cream

We cater to your diet needs with low carb sugar free/fat free & low lactose products in any flavor! NOVEMBER 1, 2012

PAGE 15


Delectable Cheeses and Crudités Brothers Bennie and Clovis Martin both worked as streetcar conductors for years until they opened Martin Brothers Coffee Stand and Restaurant in the French Market in 1922. In 1929, the streetcar workers went on strike. The transit system remained shut down for weeks. The Martin Brothers provided large sandwiches to the strikers. “We fed those men FREE of charge until the strike ended. Whenever we saw one of the striking men coming, one of us would say, ‘Here comes another Poor Boy.’” You can get a sandwich anywhere, but you can only get a Po-Boy at “Dairy Barn.” 2251 Maplewood Dr., Sulphur

5543 Nelson Rd., Lake Charles

Mon-Fri 10:30am-8pm • Sat 10:30am-3pm

Mon-Sat 10:30am-8pm

(337) 533-1007

(337) 478-5007

Presented in partnership with the culinary team of Delta Downs Racetrack Casino and Hotel, Family & Youth hosted Dinner at Mi CASA at the home of Ted and Trudy Mayeaux recently. Court Appointed Special Advocates are volunteers appointed by Family and Juvenile Court Judges to advocate in the best interests for abused and neglected children. Twice a year, area chefs prepare a wonderful dinner at the home of local philanthropists to benefit the CASA program and the children it serves. The chefs at Delta Downs presented a gastronomical feast. Take a look at the menu: RECEPTION Grilled and chilled fall vegetable crudités; antipasto skewers that included baby mozzarella pearls, artichoke hearts, grape tomatoes and prosciutto; and imported and domestic cheeses served with artisan crackers and cheese straws. PASSED ITEMS Grilled margarita shrimp served with mango key lime chut-

ney and Colorado lamb lollipops with Moroccan tomato jam. DINNER • South Texas venison osso buco finished with a Cabernet demi glaze accented with roasted fall vegetables. • Butter lettuce salad tossed with Asian pears, sundried tomatoes and cranberries and Feta cheese with a champagne poppy seed vinaigrette dressing. • Three petite beef medallions atop a brioche crostini, each finished with wild mushroom ragout, spinach Florentine and a Maine lobster claw. • The Dessert Trio included a warm Granny Smith apple croustade, pumpkin ice cream and a golden cranberry crème brulee. • Mike and Martha Holleman of The Wine Store conducted a wine tasting during the reception and donated the wine served with dinner. For more information about the CASA program, visit www.fyca.org or call (337) 436-9533. TJN

Lauren and Phil with Rebecca and Mark Boniol PAGE 16

NOVEMBER 1, 2012

Volume 4 • Issue 16


Volume 4 • Issue 16

NOVEMBER 1, 2012

PAGE 17


Bayou By Lauren de Albuquerque

The Junior League of Lake Charles, Inc. will hold the 20th annual Mistletoe & Moss Holiday Market beginning Wed., Nov. 14 and running through Sat., Nov. 17 at the Lake Charles Civic Center. The holiday season is fast approaching, and it’s time to think about getting gifts for those special people in your life. With over 75 vendors in one location, you’ll be able to find something for everyone on your list. Not only will this onestop shop provide you with gifts galore, you will also be shopping for worthy causes. The League’s members transform the Civic Center Coliseum and Exhibition Hall into a Christmas shopping wonderland, which offers unique gift items for everyone on your list. For the past 20 years, the Market has been much more than a chance to shop; it’s a chance to give to the community. Proceeds from the event support the Junior League of Lake Charles, Inc.’s mission to promote PAGE 18

NOVEMBER 1, 2012

Biz

The Junior League of Lake Charles, Inc.’s Mistletoe and Moss Holiday Market

A Marketing We Will Go!

voluntarism, develop the potential of women, and improve our community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. Its purpose is exclusively educational and charitable. The shopping is just the beginning of what you’ll experience at Mistletoe and Moss. The Preview Party Gala will be held on Wed. Nov. 14 from 7-10 p.m. and offers a chance for you to be the first to shop at the merchant booths. You’ll enjoy fantastic cuisine and cocktails from Lake Area restaurants and caterers, and live entertainment by Gary Brown. Tickets are $40 per person. On Friday evening, the ladies will enjoy a special Ladies Night event from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. It includes a free glass of champagne and hors d’oeuvres by Luna Bar & Grill. Live entertainment will be provided by Beauregard’s Courtesy. There will also be door prizes, including items from Mimosa Boutique, Navarra’s Jewelry, Accessory Zone, and more. Tickets are $25 per person. Set your alarm clocks and bring the kids for Donuts with Santa on Sat. Nov. 17, with seatings at 8:30

and 10:30 a.m. A Cookies with Santa seating is also available at 2 p.m. Your children will be the first in town to get to tell Santa what’s on their wish list. Kids will not only enjoy meeting Santa, but will also enjoy a performance by Lake Charles Dance Academy. Tickets are $10 per person, with children ages one and under admitted free. There is no stroller fee for this event. Limited tickets are available. Puckett’s Photography will be there to offer photos of children with Santa in his sleigh. To commemorate the 20th anniversary of the market, a special raffle will be held for a trip for two to the Ritz-Carlton Kapalua in Maui, Hawaii. Trip includes airfare from Houston Intercontinental Airport, a luxurious spa gift certificate and a Visa travel expense card. The trip is valued at $6,000. The drawing will be held Nov. 17 at 3 p.m. You need not be present to win. Raffle tickets are $10 and can be purchased from any Junior League member or at the market. General admission for the market is $8. Children eight and under are admitted free, with a stroller fee of $8 on Friday and Saturday. A complimentary bag hold will be available, thanks to IberiaBank and Martin GMC.

Holiday shopping for unique gifts, glam catered parties, and the opportunity to help make a difference in kid’s lives – all in one place, all in one fun-filled weekend. Join the fun, help make a difference, and give back to your community, at this year’s special 20th Anniversary Mistletoe and Moss Holiday Market— another Christmas tradition that we look forward to each year. The Good Works of the Junior League of Lake Charles The Junior League of Lake Charles has been “Serving, Strengthening, Sustaining the Community” for nearly 80 years, establishing and supporting local programs such as Family &

Volume 4 • Issue 16


Youth Counseling Agency, Harbor House, The Children’s Museum, Imperial Calcasieu Museum, and the Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) program, just to name a few. Proceeds support many current programs such as the Kids in the Kitchen program, which helps address the urgent issues surrounding childhood obesity and nutrition. In addition, a dedicated group of Junior League volunteers work on a number of unrelated, short-term community projects when non-profit agencies are limited in achieving their goals because of a lack of man (or woman!) power through its Done in a Day Committee. The That’s My Bag Committee designs, creates, and distributes personal care packages for children recently removed from their homes or newly placed in foster care. The League provides approximately 200 bags each year that are distributed through local and regional offices of the Office of Children’s Services and to the local Women’s Shelter. Each duffel bag, which has a detachable backpack and overnight case, is stuffed with much needed toiletries and items (games, footballs, stuffed animals, etc.) that will bring some comfort and joy to children during tough times of transition. These are just a few examples of what the Junior League of Lake Charles is currently doing the within our community. All of these programs are made possible through the League’s volunteers and fund raising events, with the Mistletoe and Moss Holiday Market making up the majority of the Junior League’s annual funding.

To put it all into perspective, a general admission ticket will provide a tiger toy for a pediatric patient at Moss Regional Hospital. Two general admission tickets will help an autistic child practice social skills through Lego play. One ladies night ticket will allow one student to participate in the The Leader in Me school project or allow the Done in a Day program to purchase paint and supplies to paint the front porch of the Imperial Calcasieu Museum. Just two raffle tickets will provide six pediatric patients at Moss Regional Hospital with dental kits. Your purchase of four tickets to Breakfast with Santa will provide six children with Christmas gifts from the Joy Drive. For more information about the Junior League of Lake Charles, Inc., to purchase tickets for this year’s market, or to see a complimentary list of this year’s merchants and donors, visit www.jllc.net or contact the Junior League of Lake Charles office at 436-4025. You can also donate directly to the Community Project Fund or the Gift and Memorial Fund online as well. Tickets are also available at the Civic Center Box Office. If you are interested in becoming a merchant for next year’s market, please contact the Junior League of Lake Charles office at 436-4025 for information. The Junior League of Lake Charles would like to extend a special thank you to the volunteers, merchants, attendees, and donors for coming together to make this unforgettable and muchanticipated event possible. Together, we are making a difference in our community. TJN

15% Senior Discount All Doctors’ Prescriptions Accepted Experienced Professional Staff • Most Insurance Accepted

Volume 4 • Issue 16

NOVEMBER 1, 2012

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Graceanne LaCombe, Andrew Anderson, Katelyn Chargois, Jordan Lee, Grace Helms and Adrian Durham on location at the home of Laura and Buddy Leach.

Story by Angie Kay Dilmore Photos by Danley Romero of Romero and Romero Photography

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NOVEMBER 1, 2012

Want to take a special trip back in time while enjoying the holiday season? The Lake Charles Civic Ballet (LCCB) has a treat for all of us—young and old. LCCB presents their annual holiday production Dec. 6-8 at the Rosa Hart Theater. This year, the ballet company will perform Christmas in Louisiana: Once Upon a Time. This production, co-written and choreographed by LCCB Artistic Director Lady Holly Hathaway Kaough and her mother Lady Leah LaFargue, artistic director emeritus of LCCB, was first performed by LCCB in 2004. They chose to bring it

back to the stage this year to commemorate Louisiana’s bicentennial. “It is time to bring this historical ballet back to our community,” Lady Holly said. “The original inspiration was a desire to pay tribute to our city and its founding. We want to keep the story of Lake Charles alive in a fun and entertaining performance.” According to Kelley Saucier, immediate past president of LCCB, the Christmas performance is a great way to get into the holiday spirit, celebrate the season, and have some fun with kids. Through talented dancers, breathtaking stage sets, and colorful creative costumes, LCCB tells the Volume 4 • Issue 16


Aidan O'Neal, Cagle Kaough, Ashley Eaves and Leo Huber.

story of Santa arriving in Southwest Louisiana on Christmas Eve. He reminisces about all the times in the past he has come to the town of Lake Charles. As Santa takes his trip down memory lane, the history of our city unfolds on stage before the audience. They see Charles Sallier in the late 1700s at his log cabin on the south shore of “Charlie’s Lake,” the area now known as Shell Beach Drive. Sallier, performed by Adrian Durham, soon meets his future wife, Catherine LeBleu. Durham is currently working on the choreography and plans to do some research to help him prepare for the role of Sallier. “The history behind the character of Charles Sallier is very interesting,” said Durham, a homeschooler who has been dancing with LCCB for seven years. Legendary privateer Jean Lafitte and his tap-dancing pirates bury treasure along the mysterious hidden bayous of the Calcasieu. Ashley Eaves, a senior accounting major at McNeese University and four-year LCCB dancer, performs the role of Lafitte in this production. Putting on her swashbuckling costume – the high black boots, plumed hat, royal purple jacket, and heavy dark beard – helps her get into this “manly” character. “It is a challenge, but I enjoy being animated and bringing a character to life,” she said. She has also been watching a lot of pirate movies to help her prepare. In addition to dancing, Eaves is responsible for teaching the choreography to the young “pirates.” “The choreography is beautiful and I feel it is well-suited for the piece,” she Volume 4 • Issue 16

said. “I want all the kids to really get into the choreography of this legendary piece because the audience needs to feel the roughness of these pirates and our history. The kids have huge personalities, which they will bring to the stage.” In the mid-1800s, Jacob Ryan establishes the lumber industry in the area, depicted by LCCB’s dancing lumberjacks. A trolley transports dancers up and down Ryan Street. Santa also remembers a festive ball at the Majestic Hotel and the audience sees elegant couples waltzing across the dance floor. Who, besides Santa, remembers the year a hard freeze hit our hometown and Lake Charles froze over? Well, maybe the lake didn’t freeze over, but we can pretend! To creatively illustrate this event, Lady Holly adapted and incorporated elements from the famous ballet Les Patineurs (“The Skaters”) into the story. Against a backdrop illustrating the deep blue of winter, dazzling white snow, and twinkling Christmas lights, dancers appear to ice skate across a frozen lake. In honor of Louisiana’s bicentennial, Lady Holly added some new features to her original 2004 show. The Lake Charles High School Kilties, an all-girl drum corps, performed from 1939-1983. As Santa looks back on his many visits to Lake Charles, he sees the Kilties in 1948, practicing through the Christmas season to prepare for their performance in the January 1, 1949 Sugar Bowl game.

Representing the Ave Maria piece, Annabelle Bang (kneeling) Gabrielle Saucier, Ashley Eaves and Julia Basone

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Local artist Fred Stark has been helping the LCCB with art direction and set construction since 1986. He designed and created the sets for the original 2004 production of Christmas in Louisiana: Once Upon a Time. He painted the backdrops and built elaborate props, such as a pirate ship and a moving trolley. Now, he is refurbishing, altering, and adding to the set designs. This year, Stark is adding a gazebo to facilitate some of the storylines. Katelyn Chargois, a home-educated senior and principal dancer with LCCB, believes these sets are what make this show especially memorable. “The backdrops used in this performance are some of my favorites created for a LCCB production,” she said. Katelyn performed the role of one of the trolley children in the 2004 production. Much research went into creating Christmas in Louisiana: Once Upon a Time. Lady Holly and Lady Leah

Andrew Anderson and Caroline Kaough, as Charles Sallier and one of his children under the Sallier Oak on the grounds of the Imperial Calcasieu Museum. pored through archives, studied history books, and interviewed longtime Lake Charles residents in order to write an accurate narrative. And, Starks used vintage photographs to create believable sets. “There are a few scenes that are very historically correct; others use a lot of artistic license,” said Stark. “We depict houses on Broad Street that are representative of houses in that era, but not exact replicas. The trolley is probably the most historically accurate scene in the show. I based it on a postcard photo of a trolley on Ryan Street.” In addition to entertainment, LCCB also places a high priority on education. “The core of what we do as a non-profit ballet company ties in with our mission to bring the total theater concept, the visual of performing, to the community and to educate children,” Saucier explained. “Our goal for the school group performances is to make the production something that is both fun and

Katelyn Chargois, LCCB principal, on a balcony at L'Auberge Lake Charles

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Lumberjacks Ann-Margaret Rosteet, Marin O'Neal, Avery Wubben

informative, not only from an artistic standpoint, but to bring in the history also. These performances are so important. For some children, this is the only opportunity they have to see a full length live performance that brings music, dance, narrative, sets, and costumes all together.” Saucier said the student performances were a primary reason Lady Holly came up with the concept of Christmas in Louisiana: Once Upon a Time — to reach children in a different way. “The educational aspect is so great, and really very affordable. Our tickets have been $5 per student since 1968,” she said. “Teachers who book reservations for their classes are admitted for free. The performances make a great field trip and several arts education requirements can be met by attending the show.” LCCB’s new website, designed by local artist, musician, and web designer Kirby Doss contains educational resources for children of all ages, which can be used by teachers and parents. Go to www.lakecharlescivicballet.com and click on the “Education” tab to find lesson plans, accelerated reading book lists, writing and vocabulary exercises and fun activities such as word searches, crossword puzzles, and coloring pages. Several local educators contributed to these resources, including Duane Clemmons, Episcopal Day School; Marlana Collins, Education in the Arts Co-Chair of the LCCB

Board, and administrative intern, Calcasieu Parish School Board, J. D. Clifton Elementary; and Melanie LeJeune, a teacher at St. Louis High, and her husband Dr. Keagan LeJeune, a professor at McNeese. Kayla Little from Barbe High School put together the reading lists. Also on their website is a “Plan Your Visit” page, under the “Performance” tab. Here, ballet patrons will find links to many area museums and other visitor websites. “This year’s production is a celebration for Christmas, but also a story about our local Lake Charles history,” Chargois said. “These are not the stories you read in your history books. They are the stories that would have been told to you by your grandmother — stories every Lake Charles native should know — brought to life by Lake Charles Civic Ballet on the stage of Rosa Hart Theatre.” Get in the holiday spirit and order tickets now! School performances of Christmas in Louisiana: Once Upon a Time will be held Dec. 6-7. Tickets are $5 per student. Two performances are offered on Sat., Dec. 8: a matinee at 11 a.m. and a gala performance at 6 p.m. Tickets for Saturday’s performances are $10 for students, $15 for adults and can be ordered on their website, www.lakecharlescivicballet.com. Consider becoming a sponsor of the LCCB. For sponsorship informa-

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tion, go to the website or contact Kelley Saucier at (337) 513-5808. The ballet company will thank their sponsors with a special “Season Sneak Preview and Behind the Scenes” event on Sun., Nov. 11, 5 p.m. at the Benjamin W. Mount Auditorium at Central School in downtown Lake Charles. The preview event gives sponsors an opportunity to see snippets of the upcoming show and interact with the principal dancers and choreographers.

The Lake Charles Civic Ballet is supported by grants from the Louisiana State Arts Council through the Louisiana Division of the Arts, City of Lake Charles, Calcasieu Parish Police Jury, and Southwest Louisiana Convention and Visitors Bureau as administered by the Arts and Humanities Council of Southwest Louisiana. LCCB would like to thank sponsors PPG; Stockwell, Sievert, Vicellio, Clements & Shaddock LLP and Merchant and Farmers Bank & Trust Company and presenting sponsor, L’Auberge Casino Lake Charles. TJN

Katelyn Chargois, LCCB principal

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women whose skin looks like leather. It’s too late for them—but hopefully, not for you. If you plan on being out in the sun, make sure you use a good sunscreen! GET ENOUGH SLEEP Going to bed by 11 p.m. each night allows your body to be asleep during the peak output of your natural human growth hormone. Human growth hormone promotes cell turnover and collagen production, both of which are essential for healthy, youthful skin. DON’T SLEEP ON YOUR BACK This is another tough one, but try to avoid sleeping on your side. If you sleep on your side, it can cause wrinkles since a pillow is pushed up against your face all night.

A big part of aging is watching our once dewy complexions start to dry out and wrinkle. If you follow these tips, you’ll be able to get a head start on the aging process: NEVER USE SOAP Soap dries out your skin and makes aging skin worse. Instead, use a mild cleanser that won’t dry your skin. It will cleanse your skin thoroughly while retaining the essential moisture that you require. FIND A GOOD ANTI-AGING CREAM You should know how to choose the right anti-aging cream. Your skin needs it. Your skin loses moisture constantly and you need to keep it hydrated properly. Dry skin is the starting point of most aging problems like wrinkles and lines. Some of the best ingredients you should look for include Cynergy TK, phytessence wakame, coenzyme Q10, active manuka honey, natural vitamin E, vitamin B5, allantoin, babassu, jojoba oil, olive oil, grapeseed oil, macadamia oil, avocado oil, rigin, and nutgrass root extract. All of these substances have great anti-aging properties

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EXFOLIATE YOUR SKIN ONCE A WEEK If you exfoliate your skin once a week, you’ll get rid of the dead skin cells that make your skin look dry and dull. You will be left with skin that looks smooth and radiant. Apply an exfoliating product to your skin in gentle circular motions for about two minutes and rinse.

STOP SMOKING You already know that smoking is bad for you. It causes various health problems such as cancer, emphysema and heart disease. But did you know that it’s also bad for your skin? Smoking cigarettes impedes blood flow to the skin’s

surface and can also cause wrinkles around your mouth. EXERCISE In addition to keeping your body fit, exercise will also keep your skin looking young, since it promotes blood flow and nutrients to the skin’s surface. Because your blood is pumping, skin cells are pushed up higher to the surface of your skin. TAKE A MULTIVITAMIN AND SUPPLEMENTS Not only can vitamin E help reduce damage from the sun, there is also evidence that it can actually help reverse some skin damage. Research has shown that fish oil prevents wrinkles. EPA, an omega3 found in fish oil, can suppress the type of aging damage in your skin that causes sagging and wrinkles. Both fish oil and flax seed oil can help keep your skin moist and supple and your hair shiny and healthy. Make sure your multivitamin contains biotin. This B vitamin is essential for healthy nails and hair. TJN

EAT THE RIGHT FOODS Your diet can affect the way your skin looks. Make sure you eat plenty of fish, strawberries, oranges, and whole grains to keep your skin looking young. Winter squash, carrots, sweet potatoes, even corn and tomatoes have compounds such as betacarotene, lutein, zeaxanthin and lycopene that protect your skin and your eyes. Eat fatty, salty and sugary foods in moderation. Sugar and salt attach to collagen in your body and make it break down at an increased rate. STAY OUT OF THE SUN It’s difficult to avoid the sun. We all love lying on the beach and soaking up those rays. But doing this not only puts you at risk of developing skin cancer, it can also make your skin dry and discolored. We’ve all seen those

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For some people, having to expose unsightly varicose and spider veins while wearing a pair of shorts, a skirt or a swimsuit tends to be a little comfortable. In some cases, physical pain is even associated. Varicose veins are enlarged veins that can be flesh-colored, dark purple or blue. They often look like cords and appear twisted and bulging. They are swollen and raised above the surface of the skin. Varicose veins are commonly found on the backs of the calves or on the inside of the leg. Symptoms can include mild swelling in the ankle area, as well as fullness, heaviness, aching and sometimes pain in the legs. Spider veins are similar to varicose veins, but they are smaller and are usually not painful. They are often red or blue and are closer to the surface of the skin than varicose veins. They can look like tree branches or spider webs with their short jagged lines. Spider veins can be found on the legs and face. They can cover a very small or very large area of skin.

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The heart pumps blood filled with oxygen and nutrients to the whole body. Arteries carry blood from the heart towards the body parts. Veins carry oxygen-poor blood from the body back to the heart. According to local cardiologist and Vein Center of Southwest Louisiana specialist Carl Fastabend, M.D., the squeezing of leg muscles pumps blood back to the heart from the lower body. Veins have valves that act as one-way flaps. These valves prevent the blood from flowing backwards as it moves up the legs. “If the one-way valves become weak, blood can leak back into the vein and collect there. This problem is called venous insufficiency,” Dr. Fastabend said. “Pooled blood enlarges the vein and it becomes varicose. Spider veins can also be caused by the backup of blood. Hormone changes, inherited factors and exposure to the sun can also cause spider veins.” Unfortunately, not all varicose and spider veins can be prevented. But some things can reduce your chances of getting new varicose and spider veins. Dr. Fastabend suggests the following

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tips to help ease discomfort from the ones you already have: • Wear sunscreen to protect your skin from the sun and to limit spider veins on the face. • Exercise regularly to improve your leg strength, circulation and vein strength. Focus on exercises that work your legs, such as walking or running. • Control your weight to avoid placing too much pressure on your legs. • Do not cross your legs when sitting. • Elevate your legs when resting as much as possible. • Do not stand or sit for long periods of time. If you must stand for a long time, shift your weight from one leg to the other every few minutes. If you must sit for long periods of time, stand up and move around or take a short walk every 30 minutes.

• Wear elastic support stockings and avoid tight clothing that constricts your waist, groin or legs. • Eat a low-salt diet rich in high-fiber foods. Eating fiber reduces the chances of constipation, which can contribute to varicose veins. High-fiber foods include fresh fruits and vegetables and whole grains, like bran. Eating too much salt can cause you to retain water or swell. The Vein Center of Southwest Louisiana, located at 501 Dr. Michael DeBakey Drive in Lake Charles, offers state-of-the-art nonsurgical outpatient treatment options for varicose and spider vein patients. Log on to www.veincenter-swla.com for more information or call (337) 312-VEIN to schedule a free consultation with Dr. Carl Fastabend and The Vein Center of Southwest Louisiana staff. TJN

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A detox body wrap works by drawing toxins out of your body. These toxins are often stored in and around your fat cells. Because of the way the wrap fits on your body, fat cells will be repositioned. The wrap itself acts like a warm towel hugging your body and removing toxins through the pores of your skin. Additional toxins continue to be flushed away even after the treatment is complete. And the best part is, the toxins you remove are gone for good. You will, of course, build up new ones over time—the amount of which will depend on your lifestyle. For more information on detoxifying body wraps, call Slender Solutions’ results hotline at (337) 562-9400 or visit slendersolutionsoflakecharles.com. Slender Solutions is located at 1602 West McNeese Street Lake Charles. TJN

NOVEMBER 1, 2012

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ker n Shouma o d n a r B y B

Playing for Fourth Prize I’m just going to come right out and say it. Something must be done at McNeese State to return the Cowboys football team to its glorious past as a football powerhouse because, at this point in time, “powerhouse” is one of the last words that come to mind when referring to McNeese football.

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It is obvious that the program is going in the wrong direction. Just look at the facts. Fact: The last time McNeese made the playoffs was 2009, a 49-13 loss to New Hampshire. Fact: It has been 10 years since the Cowboys actually won a playoff game. Fact: McNeese has not gone three consecutive seasons without a playoff appearance in more than 20 years. With three losses already this season, playoff hopes look bleak. Fact: Since the playoff loss to UNH, McNeese has posted back-to-

back 6-5 seasons while failing to score more than 300 points in either to 2010 or 2011 seasons. Fact: The team that looked so fearsome in whipping FBS opponent Middle Tennessee State in the season opener, blowing out inferior McMurry the next week, and beating Weber State on the road in Week 3 has completely fallen apart in just four weeks. It’s the disaster against New Hampshire in the 2009 playoffs that marks the beginning of McNeese’s unfortunate slide into national irrelevance. Actually, one could argue that it was the Cowboys’ 35-3 playoff loss

to Northern Arizona in 2003 that marked the turning point, but I disagree as McNeese had just been to the national championship game the year before and won 10 games in 2003. But this slide is neither because McNeese does not have a talented football team nor because McNeese doesn’t field talented football teams yearly. Over the past six seasons, the Cowboys have put guys like Bryan Smith, Quinten Lawrence, Stephen Whitehead, Derrick Fourroux, Todd Pendland, Javaris Murray, Champlain Babin, and Malcolm Bronson on the field. Clearly, McNeese isn’t losing on a lack of talent.

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So, what is it that is costing the Cowboys this season? Injuries? Yes, injuries matter. McNeese has been decimated by injuries in the past. But injuries do not call prevent defenses late in games, allowing opponents to drive the ball downfield at will and score touchdowns. Injuries do not cause missed extra points. Injuries do not blow kick coverage assignments. You can only use the injury excuse for so long before it starts to sound like an excuse. What else can you point to? Number one is lack of execution on special teams. This one almost got the Cowboys in the MTSU game, when terrible kick coverage gave the Blue Raiders a chance to win the game late in the fourth quarter after McNeese spent much of the previous three and a half quarters running the ball down their throats. But the special teams failures finally caught up with the Cowboys in the fourth quarter of the Southeastern Louisiana game when McNeese missed a 36-yard field goal, not a chip shot but a fairly routine kick just the same, which could have given the Cowboys a 27-17 lead. Instead, the Lions went on a 17-play, 80-yard drive for the eventual winning touchdown and McNeese loses by a point. Two games later against Central Arkansas, McNeese misses an extra point and touches an onside kick headed for the UCA trainer’s table allowing the Bears to recover and kick a game-winning 47-yard field goal. McNeese again loses a game it should have won by a single point. Number two is defensive playcalling. McNeese isn’t even in a position to screw up an onside kick if the Cowboys don’t bring out the prevent defense on the Bears’ previous possession, allowing UCA to pick up five first downs, one a 12-yard run

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on fourth down-and-10, before throwing a touchdown to cut McNeese’s lead to 26-24 and set up the winning field goal. Let’s not forget the 27-yard pass Southeastern completed on fourthand-11 on the Lions’ game-winning drive in Hammond. And the less said about the 348 rushing yards McNeese gave up to Sam Houston State the better. If I’m in charge of McNeese’s football program, and thankfully for everyone involved I am not, I think you’ve got to make some tough choices. McNeese State’s coaching staff is filled with some very personable guys who love the school and the football team almost as much as life itself, I’m sure. But, as Alec Baldwin’s character from Glengarry Glen Ross spells out, “A-Always, B-Be, C-Closing. Always be closing!” And the McNeese State Cowboys have stopped closing. If it’s up to me, and again it’s not, I’m instituting a new twist to the race for the Southland Conference trophy. To quote Mr. Baldwin again, “First prize is a new Cadillac. Second prize…a set of steak knives. Third prize is you’re fired.” At this juncture of the season, three days before the McNeese State’s homecoming game against Stephen F. Austin, the Cowboys look like they’re playing for fourth prize. Again. This is, in a word, unacceptable. Brandon Shoumaker is a graduate of McNeese State University and has covered sports for more than a decade for various publications. Coaches or parents with story tips or comments may contact Brandon at bshoumaker@yahoo.com or send him a message on Twitter (@bshoumaker). TJN

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By Mary Louise Ruehr

Good Books in Praise of Reading Good Book Devout book lovers are always seeking recommendations for a good read. And I may have found the mother lode. These marvelous books contain recommendations throughout, as well as lists at the back. For the reading addict, it’s like candy. And they’re all now available in paperback. Alice Ozma’s The Reading Promise: My Father and the Books We Shared documents the nine-year, 3,218-night reading marathon she calls “The Streak,” during which her father read aloud to her every night, from the time she was nine years old until she went away to college at 18. Her father was an elementary school librarian, and “Reading to children was what he liked to do best.” Because he usually read to her at night anyway, she and her father tried to see how many days in a row he could read to her. They set up ground rules: “We had to read for at least ten minutes (but almost always much more) per night, every night, before midnight, with no exceptions. … The reading should be done in person, but if the opportunity wasn’t there, over the phone would suffice.” They started with a goal of 100 days, and then decided to go for 1,000. She doesn’t discuss the books themselves much, though she does share important references to plots and characters. This is really a memoir of her growing up, her life with her father, traumatic moments such as her mother moving out and her grandfather dying, and what books they read to help them cheer up or figure out life. She talks about how they chose books and how it was sometimes a challenge to find the few minutes to get the reading in before midnight, what with school activities, illness, or the time she was so angry at her dad she wouldn’t talk to him. PAGE 30

NOVEMBER 1, 2012

This is comfort food for the book lover and is a wonderful idea for parents and children; nine years may be excessive, but a reading commitment couldn’t hurt. As she writes, “A reading family never stops reading.” In Tolstoy and the Purple Chair: My Year of Magical Reading, author Nina Sankovitch talks much more about the books themselves. She describes growing up with immigrant parents: “Our family was different from other families. Our house had more books, more art, and more dust than anyone else’s. … Books were a part of my family’s life, present in every room and read every night by both parents, to themselves and to us.” My favorite line: “From the time we could toddle, we toddled toward books.” After her sister died (her recounting of this is extremely sad), she went into a depression. “I needed comfort now. I needed hope.” So she turned to books and decided to read a book a day for a year. Think about that — a whole book every day for 365 days, working around the needs of four kids and a husband. “The rules for my year were simple: no author could be read more than once; I couldn’t reread any books I’d already read; and I had to write about every book I read” on her blog. Her motto was “Great Good Comes from Reading Great Books.” She chose books at the library with a good title and “with a width of one inch. A one-inch thickness in a hardcover book of average height (nine to ten inches) generally translates to a total page count of about 250 to 300 pages. Because I read about 70 pages an hour, I can read a 300-page book in just over four

hours.” That seems pretty fast to me. For some of the books, she describes her reactions to them, what else she did during the day, and what she learned from them that she could apply to life. She also shares anecdotes about sick kids, Christmas, falling in love, and her parents’ struggles during World War II in Europe. Sankovitch read “more sobering works balanced with lighter-hearted volumes, mysteries tempered by coming-of-age novels, reflections on middle age or end-of-life harmonizing with literature for younger readers, gothic and noir countering memoir and exposition. I read short stories and longer novels, personal narratives and science fiction. I found pleasure in all of it,” she confesses. In books, she writes, she began to understand life through the experiences of others. She traveled the world and met characters completely unlike herself. As she approached the end of her year, she experienced “Book bliss, brought on by good writing.” Howards End is on the Landing by Susan Hill is sort of a British version of the Sankovitch book. One day Hill, an author and publisher, discovered there were dozens of books in her home that she had never read. (The title refers to one of the places in her house where she found books stashed.)

“I wanted to repossess my books, to explore what I had accumulated over a lifetime of reading, and to map this house of many volumes,” she writes. “I decided to spend a year reading only books already on my own shelves.” She has chapters on just about every genre and also discusses such topics as the physical presence of books, design and type font, titles, speed-reading, the value of reading aloud to children, and whether a man could have written the books by women (and vice versa). The author of 37 books herself, she shares interesting anecdotes of several famous writers she has known. She compares authors — such as Dickens and Trollope — and discusses a few at length. For example, in reference to author Elizabeth Bowen, she describes “the prickly thicket of her prose” and says about Bowen’s novel The Last September: “It has an atmosphere about it which wraps the reader round.” She decided to make a list of the 40 books she “could manage with alone, for the rest of my life” re-reading and enjoying. She tried to discern which books will “stand the test of time” to become classics. I wonder if you will agree with her choices. Copyright © 2012 by Mary Louise Ruehr. TJN Volume 4 • Issue 16


r m ende's Museu l l E an en By D e Childr of th r o t c Dire

Alex Cross (QED International) Tyler Perry has made a film empire playing an outrageously funny black woman named Madea. I mention this because many will rush out to see Alex Cross and be shocked. This movie, about an incredibly smart detective, is extremely violent. I would call it grisly, definitely beyond its PG-13 rating. Dr. Alex Cross lives in Detroit and is a detective for the Detroit Police Department. He has a wife, home, two beautiful kids, and is thinking about joining the FBI in Washington, D.C. He’s very good at his job, with a lightning-quick memory and powers

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very good dramatic actor. He is larger than life, likeable, and believable as a devoted family man. Likewise the rest of the cast, including Matthew Fox as the horrible villain Picasso, play their parts to perfection. The problem with this film is partly the script these actors are given to recite. Sometimes the lines are so canned that they smell like old tuna. (Picasso: “Good afternoon, detective. Am I calling at a bad time?” Alex Cross: “That depends. Are you calling to tell me where you are so I can hunt you down like a rabid dog?”) The plot is fairly complex, although at times it seems to move in steps and fits. But the real problem is the relentless lack of humor combined with a downward spiral of violence. Perry plays an Alex Cross who threatens to become an executioner, making us wonder if he is capable of as much hatred as the man he hunts. This is

brilliant, but I think Perry is capable of much more than this. It’s as if he is just trying too hard to lose his Madea character. He definitely succeeds, but it seems the price is too great. Getting past the unpleasantness of the movie, there’s very little background about Picasso. What makes him so evil? We never find out, even though Alex tries to goad him to reveal something about his motivation. I left the movie impressed but drained, just wanting to forget about it. Even the shots of old Detroit, with blocks of abandoned buildings, was depressing. Alex Cross, I repeat, is definitely not for kids or even young teens. Tyler Perry fans in particular should know what they are going in to see. If you like Tyler Perry, you’ll certainly be pulling for Dr. Cross, but I think he has a better movie out there waiting for him. Good luck next time, Mr. Perry. TJN

of deduction that rival Sherlock Holmes. His current case involves a killer who can best be described as inhuman. This person enjoys pain, especially torturing women by cutting off their fingers while they are conscious. To this artist of depravity, nicknamed Picasso, trading blows in the ring with murderous professional kickboxers is a relaxing evening. The more he gets hurt, the more he likes it. The movie follows Picasso as he threatens to kill a billionaire who has a plan to rebuild Detroit to its 20th Century glory. Alex and his partner, Tommy, track Picasso and frustrate his plans. Then things get really ugly as he turns around to harm Dr. Cross. Alex Cross the movie seems to cross a line way beyond drama into the distasteful. At the same time, Tyler Perry shows himself to be a

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Meet Diva! WHAT A GIRL! This beauty flourished in a dog-free, child-free home for five years. One fateful day, a baby appeared. Try as she might, her person could not get her to adjust to the baby. In addition, a household crisis arose. Talk about having it all! Darling Diva came to us with collars, jewelry, mountains of toys, an Eddie Bauer rolling pet taxi, and a pink pet stroller. And— all of her previous photos were done by a professional photographer! Needless to say, going from being the Queen to a mere foster cat was traumatic! So, she spent the first four weeks of her fosterhood in hiding. At last, she has come out of the closet and emerged as a loving, exceptionally friendly girl. All she needed was time to grieve her loss and then, a little TLC. Her new person needs to be devoted to her—no distractions like children, dogs, or other cats. This girl is a Diva’s Diva! She would make an excellent BFF for a single person but she MUST be an INSIDE ONLY cat as she has been declawed. (All accoutrements will move with her.) If you are ready for this beauty to enter your life and be your daily ray of sunshine, email us at lapaw@bellsouth.net or leave a message on our answering machine 337-478-7294. Meeting potential new person(s) will be done privately instead of the usual PetsMart adoption. (Editor’s Note: Diva is a “tortie” [tortoiseshell] and this breed makes phenomenal pets. We have several!) TJN PAGE 32

NOVEMBER 1, 2012

“Back away from the canvas!” I repeat. “Back away from the canvas—now.” Often, artists say this to themselves in the course of completing an artistic endeavor. It’s sometimes difficult to come to the end, to just let the work be. Most artists have a yearning to do just one more little tweak to the painting, the sculpture, or the piece of pottery that is being molded. But not Vicky Singletary. It’s the complete opposite for her. From the time she picked up her brush to paint over 11 years ago, she simply finishes one, puts it aside and declares, “Next!”

What a Feeling Walking through her beautiful home/studio in Lake Charles and seeing the wide variety of her paintings, I experienced the vibrant energy that stems deep from within this tiny lady. Like other artists, she has lived through some “tough stuff ” which, through a gift from God, she has deftly turned into works of beauty. Her joy of living is fully presented in each of her works. In particular, her signature “Red Cardinal” series pres-

By Monica Hebert

What’s Next?

ents her commitment to what’s next, yet strikes a delicate balance between the past and the future of her painting career. Singletary started her “Red Cardinal” series many years ago. During a desperate time in her life, a cardinal appeared to her in an unlikely place and seemed to have pierced directly into her soul, providing her with a long-awaited answer for which she had been ceaselessly praying. Convinced that the little red bird was a symbol of God’s presence in her life, she frequently honors this experience in her paintings. Through her art and her travels, she shares her cardinal story with everyone. Singletary’s work is primarily abstract, with a garden setting or the side of a fence becoming the sacred space to allow the beauty of the cardinal to shine. Some of these works are luminescent, allowing us to feel the simple truth of the bird’s message that we are not alone. I mentioned that she is a small woman, and as one myself, I wondered why she seems to favor large canvases. The physicality, the movement it takes to create such a body of work on such large surfaces factors into Singletary’s immense exhilaration since she is offered the opportunity to let everything she feels in her gut come forth and stream onto the canvas. I imagine there is a little dance of not only her feet, but of her hands as she deftly moves the tools of her craft over the surface. As an abstract colorist (an artist who uses color to define her work, instead of form), she never does a sketch. Instead, she Volume 4 • Issue 16


allows the emotions she wants to express take the lead for color choice and statement. It always works out very well. She has collectors all over the country and a steady request for commissions. She is especially noted for her unique ability to capture the essence of who someone really is. This is the “next” in her journey as an abstract painter. She calls this “ The Music of Your Soul” project, where she paints a personal expression of an individual’s life story or memorable event. It’s a departure from the “Red Cardinal,” yet she works with the same intuitive color choices that communicate the substance of her subject. Not limited to brushes or paint, Singletary will utilize whatever she feels necessary to convey the complete message. While not true collage, it does have that feel to it. Most collages are busy with details. Not so with Singletary’s abstracts. She allows the color to tell the whole story, with freedom of space. Next, Singletary will be gracing the audience of the Lake Charles Symphony. To kick off the holiday season, several pieces of her work will be presented at a holiday performance of the Lake Charles Symphony and the McNeese Art Department. Together, they will present “A Holiday Gala” on Sat., Dec. 1, in the Shearman Fine Arts Center at McNeese State University. The Lake Charles Symphony, with Maestro Bohuslav Rattay conducting, will perform “ December Songs,” an original song cycle by Broadway composer Maury Yeston. As the songs are performed, slides of Singletary’s original oil paintings

A Wonderful Dream

inspired by the lilting music will be projected onto a screen behind the orchestra. In addition, there will be an exhibit of the artwork by the faculty and students of the McNeese Art Department. This gala event kicks off the holiday season and offers a memorable evening for art and music lovers alike. Tickets may be purchased by calling the Symphony office at (337) 433-1611 or by going to www.Lcsymphony.org. In the meantime, we wait, and hope it won’t be too long, to see what comes “next” from this talented Lake Charles painter. TJN

According to a 2001 study of intentional animal abuse published by the Humane Society of the United States, 13 percent of these cases involved incidents of domestic violence, 7 percent coincided with child abuse and 1 percent with elder abuse.

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Air Force One Barack Obama Debates Democrat Election

Electoral College First Lady Incumbent Mitt Romney November Six

President Republican Running Mate Vote White House

The Dot Game Players take turns connecting two dots. When you make a square, put your initials in the

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box and take another turn. When all dots are connected, the player with the most boxes wins.

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NOVEMBER 1, 2012

Volume 4 • Issue 16


ETHEL PRECHT BREAST CANCER WALK October was National Breast Health Awareness month. The ninth annual Ethel Precht 3K Breast Cancer Walk was held recently at the Lake Charles Civic Center. Over 2,000 survivors and supporters “Got Their Pink On” as they came out to celebrate HOPE! Participants signed balloons that were released in memory of those who were lost to this disease. It was a memorable day…and a fabulous turnout to fight this terrible disease.

Aleisha’s Angels

Sonia Sumpter and Tarah Dorman

Wanita Cox, Tony Guillory and Darin Owens

Janey Reeves and Shayna Miller

Kenisha Lewis, Val Alexander and Jameca Jones

Christy Guillory and Kandi Jolivette

Emmalee Shaheen, Aleshia Adams and Alli Aguillard

WOOFSTOCK All the dogs came out to strut their stuff at Woofstock 2012 at the Lake Charles Civic Center. Man’s best friend’s rally to rescue event was a fun family day, bringing local pet shelters and advocacy groups together. There were fabulous doggies up for adoption, costume contests, photo ops and so much more. Thanks to Claire Whitlock Skinner and her group for putting on a wonderful event. Dogs Rule! Susan Stanford with Cody and Jean Duelm Volume 4 • Issue 16

Dana Frye, Monique Travis and Heather Boudreaux NOVEMBER 1, 2012

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Grace Huval and Sam Trahan

Makenzie Chambers, Kamri Lewis and Destinee Livingston

Malissa Jones, Jessica Hoots and Lindsey Sanders

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS FASHION SHOW Quad Clothing Company and the American Cancer Society teamed up to host the second annual “Fight Like A Girl” Breast Cancer Awareness Fashion Show and Ball at McNeese’s Parra Ballroom. Breast cancer survivors and caregivers modeled the latest fabulous styles and shared inspiring testimonies before a crowd of supporters. Lets hear it for the girls! Erica, Leslie and Aubrey Swiney

Jean East, Donna Whitlow and Erin Davison

Kristin Fenetz, Tina Babineaux, Angie Meche and Cynthia Victory

Nancy Rougeau, Raeana Tracy, Linda Graham, Alexis Lee and Shari LaCombe

Pamela Thomas and Verna Gordon

Shawntaye Thomas and Chuck Slugg

Daniel Goodly, Mahogani Essence and Ariel Caraway

Katie McCarty, Karon Derrick and Hali Smith

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NOVEMBER 1, 2012

Volume 4 • Issue 16


MSU JAZZ CONCERT Jazz lovers were in for a treat as they came out to enjoy a free concert at the Shearman Center for the Arts at McNeese. Guest artist Jeff Gardner presented Brazilian rhythms under the direction of Patrick Sheng, director of jazz studies at McNeese. The concert, featuring both the MSU Big Band and Little Big Band, well deserved a standing O! Bravo! TJN Patrick Sheng, Jonathan Hewsley and Joey Guiddry

Haley Gill and Hayden Doucet

Brenda Young and Teresa Jones

Jeremi Edwards, Austin Vallet, Irrik Godsey and Alicia Adams

Trabais and Antoinette Montgomery

GREAT RATES!

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(337) 263.4736 Appointment Only Volume 4 • Issue 16

NOVEMBER 1, 2012

PAGE 37


KIWANIS CHRISTMAS ARTS & CRAFTS SHOW, NOV. 2-4 Check out the sneak preview, gumbo and silent auction Fri. from 6 - 9 p.m. Weekend hours are Sat. from 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. and Sun. from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. The event takes place at the Lake Charles Civic Center, 900 Lakeshore Drive. Admission is $10 on Fri. and $5 on Sat. and Sun. For more information, call (337) 532-3839. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM EVENTS FOR NOVEMBER The Children’s Museum is happy to announce the following activities scheduled for the month of November! • Fri., Nov. 2: Pasta Necklaces — Join us anytime between 3:30 - 4:30 p.m. in the ArtSpace! • Tues., Nov. 6: Election Day Workshop — Celebrate Election Day by making a patriotic visor at 11 a.m. Class is limited to 20 children. • Fri., Nov. 9: Finger Painting — Join us anytime between 3:30 - 4:30 p.m. in the ArtSpace! • Sat., Nov. 10: Sasol’s Second Saturday Science Show — At 11 a.m., Sasol employees will explore the human senses: taste, touch, hearing, sight and smell with hands-on demonstrations. • Mon., Nov. 12: Veteran’s Day Workshop — Make a patriotic lantern to celebrate Veteran’s Day at 11 a.m. Class is limited to 20 children. The Children’s Museum is located at 327 Broad Street downtown Lake Charles. Museum hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. Admission is $7.50 for children and adults. Call (337) 433-9420 or visit www.swlakids.org for a complete list of admission fees, memberships and birthday party information. PORCH READING SERIES NOV. 2 On Fri., Nov. 2 at 7 p.m., the First Friday Reading Series returns with a free reading by Clare L. Martin held at the Porch Coffee House & Café in Lake Charles. Martin is a graduate of University of Louisiana at Lafayette, and her poems have been nominated for numerous awards. She will be reading from in t r a M . Clare L her debut poetry collection, Eating the Heart First, with an open mic reading session immediately following her reading. The First Friday Reading Series occurs on the first Friday of each month and presents a wide range of published poets from across Louisiana. The Porch is located at 4710 Common Street in Lake Charles. For details, contact the Arts Council office at 439-ARTS.

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NOVEMBER 1, 2012

BAYOU WRITERS GROUP MEETING NOV. 3 Carol V. Weishampel of Beaumont will be the guest speaker for the monthly meeting of the Bayou Writers Group Sat., Nov. 3 at Carnegie Memorial Library at 411 Pujo St. Dr. Weishampel is a retired public school teacher and Christian school administrator. Each summer, she drives her motor home to Alaska to volunteer at Christian youth camps and schools. While on the road, she writes and has published her nonfiction travel journal, Grandmas’ Ultimate Road Trip; a novel, Venture in Faith; and an illustrated children’s book, Loon’s Necklace. Open to the public. For more information, call 433-4107. BAYOU PLAYERS PRESENT THE WOMEN OF LOCKERBIE NOV. 7-10 The McNeese State University Theatre Bayou Players will present The Women of Lockerbie at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 7-10, with a 2 p.m. matinee Nov. 11 in the Shearman Fine Arts Theatre. The play gives a powerful voice to a disturbingly contemporary anguish – how to respond to suffering caused by a terrorist attack. Ticket prices are $15 for adults, $10 for McNeese faculty/staff, senior citizens and youth, and free for McNeese students with a current ID. For tickets or more information, call 475-5040. ITINERANT THEATRE’S THE WRITERS NOV 9-10 Itinerant Theatre announces its third bicentennial year production The Writers ~ Maggie, Kate and Rosa. The monologues, written by Lake Charles native Carolyn Woosley, are part of her 13-play cycle, Louisiana Women. It will be held at the Gibson Barham Gallery, Imperial Calcasieu Museum at 204 W. Sallier St., Lake Charles at 7 p.m., Fri. and Sat., Nov. 910. To purchase $10 tickets, visit www.itineranttheatre.com, or purchase at the door.

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HARVEST MOON HORSE SHOW NOV. 10 The third annual Harvest Moon Horse show will be held at The Stables at Le Bocage located at 4550 South Park Road in Lake Charles, just east of Burton Coliseum. The show is open to all competitors and will feature top English Hunter/Jumper riders on all breeds and classes. The deadline for advanced registration is Wed. Nov. 7. Show brochures and entry forms can be picked up at the facility or found online at www.lebocagestables.com. CRUISING FOR A CAUSE NOV. 10 November is National Adoption Awareness Month. To bring attention to this important issue, Volunteers of America is hosting the “Cruising for a Cause” motorcycle ride on Sat., Nov. 10. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. with the ride starting at 9 a.m. from Lake Villa Apartments at 645 15th Street in Lake Charles. All motorcycles and vehicles are welcome. There are prizes for favorite bike and most patriotic vehicle. The cost is $25/bike, $15/extra rider, and $30/car. The ride ends with lunch and prizes at the Volunteers of America office at 2121 Oak Park Boulevard. This is an alcohol-free event, and everyone rides rain or shine. All proceeds support the adoption program of Volunteers of America in Southwest Louisiana. For more information, call Kay at (337) 497-0034. SCARECROW FESTIVAL THROUGH NOV. 10 Shangri La Botanical Garden and Nature Center’s Scarecrow Festival is in full swing, featuring creations designed by local businesses, schools, families and groups. This annual festival features unique scarecrow designs, fall flowers and autumn decorations throughout Shangri La. During Scarecrow Festival, visitors are asked to vote for their favorite scarecrow, with prizes being awarded at Autumn Fair on Nov. 10. Autumn Fair is familyfriendly event with a variety of crafts, fun and games for children of all ages. Located at 2111 West Park Avenue in Orange, Texas, Shangri La is open to the public Tues.-Sat., 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. and noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday (after Nov. 11, Shangri La will no longer be open on Sunday). For more information, visit www.shangrilagardens.org. BOOK AND ART SALE NOV. 10 St. Andrew Presbyterian Church, 4020 Hodges Street, will host a Book and Art Sale 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sat., Nov. 10 in the fellowship hall. The church is located near the corner of Hodges and Sale Streets, across from the McNeese State University campus. Hundreds of books and several works of art donated by students of local artist/teacher Nancy Melton will be available. Also on sale will be beautiful handmade art including quilted and crocheted work from the St. Andrew Sewing Circle. Proceeds benefit the Papua New Guinea Medical Mission that St. Andrew supports. For more information, call 477-6166 between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Mon. – Fri. RONNIE DUNN AT L’AUBERGE NOV. 10 American country music singer-song writer Ronnie Dunn, formerly of country super-duo Brooks & Dunn, will perform at the L’Auberge Lake Charles Event Center. Floor seating is priced at $70; stadium seating is $55. Discounts apply for mychoice® members. The performance begins at 8:30 p.m. on Sat. Nov. 10; doors open one hour before the show. Tickets can be purchased in person at the L’Auberge Business Center, Legends or by visiting www.ticketmaster.com, or calling Ticketmaster at (800) 488-5252. Guests must be 21 years of age and present a valid photo ID. For more information, visit www.mylauberge.com.

Volume 4 • Issue 16

ALICE IN WONDERLAND SCHOOL PERFORMANCE NOV. 15 Westlake High Theatre and Director Kerry A. Onxley present Alice In Wonderland, based on the 1951 Disney film Alice in Wonderland and the novels The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll. The school performance will be at Westlake High School’s state-of-the-art theatre located at 1000 Garden Drive in Westlake on Thurs. Nov. 15 at 10 a.m. Tickets are $7 per person and may be purchased by calling the box office at 217-4950. MOSS BLUFF HARVEST FESTIVAL NOV. 15-17 The Moss Bluff Harvest Festival will be held Nov. 15-17 at the Moss Bluff Recreation Complex. There is something for everyone at this familyfriendly festival. Admission is only $2, and the schedule of events is packed full of activities to keep you busy each day! Events include pageants, a gumbo cookoff, crafts, music, carnival rides, a car show, magician and much more! Festival hours are 5-9 p.m. Nov. 15 and 16 and 10 a.m.– 9 p.m. on Sat., Nov. 17. For more information, find them on Facebook or call Michelle McInnis at 540-4626. LAKE CHARLES SYMPHONY HOLIDAY GALA DEC. 1 The Lake Charles Symphony and the McNeese Art Department will present “A Holiday Gala” on Sat., Dec. 1 in the Shearman Fine Arts Center, McNeese State University. Cocktails and hors d’oeuvres will be served at 6 p.m., followed at 7:30 by a performance of the Lake Charles Symphony with Maestro Bohuslav Rattay conducting. Ft. Worth talent Carla Fay White will be performing “December Songs.” As the songs are performed, slides of original oil paintings by local artist Vickie Singletary will be projected onto a screen behind the orchestra. In addition, artwork by the faculty and students of the McNeese Art Dept. will be exhibited. For tickets, call the Symphony at (337) 433-1611 or go to www.Lcsymphony.org. STRIDES FOR ST. NICHOLAS SANTA RUN DEC. 1 The St. Nicholas Center for Children and Project Fit are hosting a 5K Santa run on Sat., Dec. 1 starting at Immaculate Conception Cathedral School Gym, 1536 Ryan St. Registration begins at 6:45 a.m., and the race will follow shortly after at 7:30 a.m. There will also be a one-mile Jolly Jog. The races benefit the St. Nicholas Center for Children, which offers therapies to children with autism and developmental delays. Registration is $25 for the 5K and $20 for the one mile. Participants can register online at www.active.com, or forms can be picked up at Project Fit, 528 7th St. or the St. Nicholas Center for Children, 314 Broad St. Santa costumes and hats are encouraged. For more information, contact Chris Jones at 5153402 or Dynette Hoffpauir at dynette@stnickcenter.org. HECTOR SAN MIGUEL MEMORIAL LUNCHEON DEC. 6 The Hector San Miguel Memorial Fund will hold its third annual luncheon on Thurs., Dec. 6. in the L’Auberge Casino Resort Ballroom. Nationally known Sports Illustrated author and writer Jeff Pearlman will deliver the keynote address. Hector San Miguel was an award-winning investigative journalist for the American Press. The Memorial Fund honors someone annually for excellence in journalism and/or relentless pursuit of the truth in Southwest Louisiana. Doors open at 11:30 a.m.; the program begins at noon. Luncheon reservations, available for $20 per person or $160 for a reserved table of eight, must be made in advance and purchased by check or cash. Contact the Community Foundation at (337) 491-6688 or dvaughan@foundationswla.org for further information.

TJN

NOVEMBER 1, 2012

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Sponsored by

To list your event e-mail: lauren@thejambalayanews.com

The

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31 • Jerry Dee & Rocking Randy @ VFW Post 2130, 7 p.m. • TBA @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • The Kid Carsons/Sons of Bill @ Luna Live, 8 p.m. • Foxy & The High-Hats @ Cigar Club, 8 p.m. • Jason Stutes @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Static @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1 • TBA @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Old Man Markley @ Luna Live, 8 p.m. • Ganey Arsement & Lakeside Gamblers @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Brian Moore @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Richard LeBoeuf @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • DJ Jose Mata @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2 • TBA @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Street Side Jazz Band @ Luna Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Brian Racca @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Behelit Official/Burial Shroud @ Nate’s Place, 8 p.m.

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NOVEMBER 1, 2012

• Wayne Dylan Duo @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Ryan Bourque/Kevin Johnson/Wes Spears @ Cigar Club, 9 p.m. • James Dupre @ Yesterday’s, 9 p.m. • John Guidroz @ Micci’s Piano Bar, 9 p.m. • Karma @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • Chubby Carrier & Bayou Swamp Band @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • Southern Soul All-Stars @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 9 p.m. • Triggerproof @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m. • Twangsters Union @ Longhorns & Legends, Vinton, 11 p.m. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3 • TBA @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Signals to Vega @ My Place Bar, 8 p.m. • Ink’D Up @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Signals to Vega @ My Place Bar, 8 p.m. • Second Nature @ Cigar Club, 9 p.m. • Joel Martin Project @ Yesterday’s, 9 p.m. • Derryl Perry @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • Karma @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • Southern Soul All-Stars @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 9 p.m. • Triggerproof @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4 • Ken Marvel Band/Jivin’ Gene @ Yesterday’s, 6 p.m. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 • TBA @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Kris Harper @ Cigar Club, 8 p.m. • Cold Sweat @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8 • TBA @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • The Posse @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Alistair White/Blake Sticker @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Bernie Alan @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9:30 p.m. • DJ Jose Mata @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9 • TBA @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Street Side Jazz Band @ Luna Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • When the Word was Sound/imagineIAM @ The Porch, 8 p.m. • Frayed Knot @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Chasing Daylight @ Micci’s Piano Bar, 8 p.m. • Paul Tassin/Nico Guiang @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Wayne Toups @ Yesterday’s, 9 p.m. • Kory Fontenot @ Cigar Club, 9 p.m. • Blackbird @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m.

Volume 4 • Issue 16


• Primetime Band @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 9 p.m. • ISIS @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9:30 p.m. • Mojeaux @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10 • TBA @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Brian Racca @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Ronnie Dunn @ L’Auberge Event Center, L’Auberge Casino, 8:30 p.m. • Brian Moore @ Cigar Club, 9 p.m. • Kevin Naquin & Ossun Playboys @ Yesterday’s, 9 p.m. • Bernie Alan Band @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • Primetime Band @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 9 p.m. • ISIS @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9:30 p.m. • Mojeaux @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m.

Volume 4 • Issue 16

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14 • TBA @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Shelley King/Carter Sampson @ Luna Live, 8 p.m. • Brad Broussard @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Black Tie Affair @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15 • TBA @ DI’s Cajun Restaurant, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Neal Smith @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Stark Experiment @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Damon Troy & Final Five @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9:30 p.m. • DJ Cage @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m. TJN

‘Love Makes a Family’ Adoption Seminar Nov. 10 Whether you are just beginning to consider adoption or have decided to adopt, the purpose of this seminar is to give you a glimpse of the adoption process. Professionals in the fields of international, domestic and foster-to-adopt will explain the paperwork and procedures. You will hear adoptive families share their personal and profound experiences, and have an opportunity to ask specific questions of the speakers

in the breakout sessions. The seminar will be held on Sat., Nov. 10 on the campus of Trinity Baptist Church at 1800 County Club Rd. in Lake Charles and will run from 9 a.m. -1 p.m. Registration begins at 8 a.m. Refreshments will be served. For more information, email Kelly at family@tbclc.org. You can register online at http://tbclc.org/pages/family/re gister/registration. TJN

NOVEMBER 1, 2012

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Leslie B e four dec rman’s career in ades, an music folksing er, mus d includes stin spans ic teach ts as a booker, e c tival dir oncert promote r, coffeehouse r e notes w ctor, music jou , publicist, fesr r nalist, a it e r , a organiz ation pr rtist manager lbum , t e attorney s , and p ident, entertain rade r ment e Museum sident o f She pre of Southwest the Music fe L eclectic rs all things ouisiana. , and musicall GRAM y votes M Recordin Ys as a mem on the g Aca ber o reached at leslie@ demy. She c f the an leslieber man.co be m. t a h t t lug men ess) equip ucky (hapl uld get to festival or l o l c e some sidekick w this musi s pan s Joel striou ality d/ nd wa her and at u e n l i e l r m i i i f r f h t n n a n tha d for ograp perso hs which aroun ncert. Ofte arist, phot et, at er-than-life photograp e e r t dt o S i e c that c a blues gu attorney. night’s stan Princ ed his larg y of iconi d behind th ’s , w t l e s d a s t e s Sieg ahr’s esta gether la hich we s es, discu pressive bo ere projecte d at the ler x p n w e a m led to us fac ow G , l at w h d a ) c s n i a him which a wh s n Siegel pul memoria ome famo amentt f d n o e i r d e p u s y l yl ed of (som s they la allery, in om on ahr d tr u l tures a n fram ing-ro amous pic our late an e David G ropanel on Hotel G ere hung i ase. v f t a , s e w g u h i d ew p som sced abo Morr r’s photos le for purc res of Joan y, or, an ed” (Hebr he so t i n n e i r i u h l b r t a a a m e c l n rem nd and of G “kovo onor) nny T his pi e avai perso frie e bit of the meaning h n to b ou’ve seen s Joplin, So nie Raitt, in the sic you d o e t o s s e l r i y n litt sh, y inte hs m mu Once Dylan, Jan Dowell, Bo Smith, just a ed in Yiddi all of ave an ho perfor photograp eri b c t h t a o c a ether era of a u B n M . g P o , u , w o d o z p d t d o e t n e s e r If y v e t n n a g o r a i r s v B ti li n se hem llin ich enn pi F the ar evitably ru cting their e that hly de rchivist pu and the ep y for retrosissip sh, John L es Davis, R ou’ll f c s i o i r s M e l i i n t p The a es, prints, ing the wa elieve will ny Ca like, y es dep s, Mil ers hr ou’ll i d p eo like, y oving imag events an hotograph ou John ylou Harri er and the David Ga e, slid pav at I b e p y Gahr’s ar career is d books th tfully along Emm , Pete Seeg ecognize a trospectiv iand m ces and th me of the jects, and e h n y s r g n a a i i u o n b s o r 50+ Farin be able t captured ing m shows forma nd them. S as their su nd gallery a tists a work a ys , show e seen, but spective ace Gahr’s of such ar ams and he d u n a s n o s t w i m w r a c l o r u L e , a j e u , n h s z pl Ad phs to b grap nts is sub nn d mus well-k bowit finally e photogra bus, Ansel photo l sides of h hey wanted ded mome are as d books an Annie Lie t Landy, Ly jn r h t t A r u t i y n ert on side e, Diane soulf ot only as , in ungua can fi of works b ruen, Ellio nton Corb ist exp some l e e g e n n r e a s A G e e s ith ep cian ly w ge. r dis ing W r greats. show tney, Bob hy White, . ut aid, w ial, on y real a , Gah ed r t e othe the memor lar music s biquitous b as the n and offst and funny them, spew McCa ith, Timo ers to nam cities teem u u t p e t o A m le ic both o l-mouthed as he shot g salacious s of p he bes that th Golds o many oth other mus er the ferti u n ts image his voice, d Gahr is t ver y i o l c f l v l e o l F d e o t o j o e h n t t s b s d a D r t u e i an alis ork s yea his s lly) es and ish rise in about d has n Dav New Y photojourn ublication eek some armed of expletiv e favorite ed beautifu sts surp st unknow her the fiel o, and cher p k w i n s h t y oc sic almo photograp thought s usical string including o photograp . As the ar with r d pop mu when ever print an or s r h , e e g , n d s l s k h a u e d u a 0 a k l k music . I’ve alway ry shared mentry notes er e o o 9 m o r j 19 roc ho rw r go ie-b expected king e – w c o ( p i e f n s a v 0 e n w d e p r 6 dia o o e i s , s ref n ic kn Part as a suref the 19 ine or new that defin e photo ed t eeting rief Wikipe edia’s page ve heir u ssential, cl s of m t y d r w n e h p h z e b a t n a o t v p h T e t a e is cl ’t a or tha mag photogra sonality. or gro something ands of sho after ent. H of the ency o you won images, s imp nd a d m r e e o c r e r i a p e m n s t d us ro n’s ico ls w he tone a mous ozens aphs, caugh n tho ore an usicia odica t that d r’s photogr e of his fa f. It’s a little ter, he ds and eve s, both bef ill a m those peri editors to ave special , n m l h e e t f to Ga finding so man himse tter late tha agazin s hundr f his subjec m tors o writers and es, and I h longtime ad e e e l e m , m of th d. troub sician , but b t at Ti each o ital era. as the of those ti McDarrah oice, who h , s craf s of the mu up and or a picture ying it now y dear frien i g i h e d r o d V d u e p e e e t r y th lag pic wa tem ries of F hon trait be sa ios, m rhe Vil elling Gahr ed on por m on their rmth and late to vaya con d memo editor of T or a storyt lishing a pe s e a u h w c t : l ld o f o never then f d, catching with equa Amram to ce in photo edible eye me by pub re Roche t ia e n d n v i r OMEN laboration r h w e d o c v e i l o p e W a l n T d r d e e f u D o A h d y a o n l a a N n an i l o o o i n a c IA ound rw yt ici take e Ph nce h LOUIS ce our first ducing so during n thei ity, as mus ts gave wa it of the ph o and o ce shot I’d lumn on th o y r lis ra os Sin n g photo to pla een p gener n the pane ting a port icler and a forma pany my co I’ve b usic cues l as selectin 5mm ly , 3 e n n 1 i e h o 0 a t i r m w 0 p l h h 2 n m , s e c o w n u d w e o acco estival. g d i n v as sa nd siti ipat ge ck an t usin t effect formances y before a sley’s partic her as a sen Folk F ok that bla age at nigh r the tutela e ligh g l b a r l a e l p i p o p . a t e a to W o d I to che ons vid the togr thetic fan ster of av developin music of Carolyn If you sh) un rapher, Da o a d l , a f a R y o . p g m h o o s i b m sym hr was a of M le light (n ic photog g a five- of plays. tograp n ac ts f in a n b s Ga etwee na Women t Theatre’s ’s te pho ges himsel lope neigh i b h w availa master mu 2008 leavi uded some um ia ran rand ma rk S l Louis o see Itine asieu Muse black inting his i oklyn’s Pa them in pe o of the ho died in rk that inc f American t c l n e o r a g r , w e o p m n e o C f co and stone in B deliveri er servic Gahr, body of w epictions icians of th perial tion o f n g e d s and Im-10 produc iters ~ brown d, and the no messen r decades o decad st famous d rock mu r oo d te . o e n Nov. 9 ey’s The W osa, you’ll the m lues, jazz a 0th century ng-overdu in borh as he truste y. In the la witched to f l R s o o s n s o l Wo e, Kate & son, ompa folk, b alf of the 2 eceived a l ir of event tantly rsena i a r n h ping c Gahr reluc be to his a p o p e r i e a Magg h e h t r , t s n t o a i l tro igh rk er, e St s e n l o r a p t w a s p c d s a i e A s L hi dd of h – at the and a ation y color celebr w York Cit Ne

s, e g a Im c i s u ic s M u M re t a e h T

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NOVEMBER 1, 2012

Volume 4 • Issue 16


get a chance to hear what I’ve unearthed this time. Woosley’s one-actor plays set in many different decades are especially fun to work on, because my task is to find music appropriate to a character’s cultural background, the context of her times and her personal tastes. That means some happy hours spent on research, during which I discover or re-discover songs and tunes from different genres that were known in the variety of eras in

which the plays are set, and a final selection that I program as if I were a DJ building a set list for a party. The play scripts give some hints as to appropriate sounds, but Woosley herself is a multi-instrument musician and music fan; all her writing reflects an inner rhythm that lends itself well to lyrics and music, and she’s articulate on the subject of appropriate sounds to accompany yet not overwhelm her writing. For a music fan like me, this work is all play. TJN

Phone: 337-474-1864 Email: info@lwv-lc.org

Website: www.lwv-lc.org

Killin’ Time Crossword ACROSS

DOWN

1. 8. 12. 13. 14. 15. 17. 18. 19. 21. 22. 23. 27. 30. 31.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 16. 20. 23.

33. 34. 37. 39. 40. 41. 44. 45. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52.

Military dining room On ___ with (equal to) Up for it George, for short "Othello" villain Screenwriter's creation Nabisco cookie Wiesbaden's state "___ Marner" Suffix with lactChildren's author Blyton Now CRA data Alloy Neil Diamond song, "Cracklin' ___" Lady's man Witch Big name in faucets German grandpa Coke competitor Actress Gaynor Detective's assignment Willing to follow orders "Growing Pains" and "RoboDoc" actor Thicke Affirmative action "The Simpsons" bus driver Parker and Waterman Goodbye in Tokyo

Volume 4 • Issue 16

24. 25. 26. 28. 29. 32. 35. 36. 38. 40. 42. 43. 44. 46. 47.

Classic sports cars Apiece "Peter Pan" pirate Detection devices Assents Luau souvenir Relax Garlic mayonnaise Seventh heaven Long time Friend of Tigger Judges Fearless Stomach muscles, for short Prefix with angle Italian cheese Musical aptitude Frank McCourt memoir Nintendo's Super ___ Formal speech Eye-watering vegetables Funny film Unseals Wan Actress Catherine ___Jones Foreword (abbr.) Protective lid Constrictor "Ode ___ Nightingale"

© Lovatts Publications Pty Ltd NOVEMBER 1, 2012

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The Jambalaya News - Vol. 4 No. 16  

November 1, 2012 LCCB Presents Christmas in Louisiana: Once Upon a Time