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VOL. 4, NO. 4 / MAY 17, 2012

ALSO: Cooking Offshore SWLA Summer Activities Guide Teach Your Infant to Swim!


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GENERAL 715 Kirby St., Lake Charles, LA 70601 Phone: 337-436-7800 Fax: 337-990-0262 www.thejambalayanews.com PUBLISHER Phil de Albuquerque publisher@thejambalayanews.com

NEWS EXECUTIVE EDITOR Lauren de Albuquerque lauren@thejambalayanews.com

CONTRIBUTORS Rhonda Babin Leslie Berman George Cline Angie Kay Dilmore Dan Ellender Mike McHugh Mary Louise Ruehr Brandon Shoumaker Karla Tullos ADVERTISING sales@thejambalayanews.com

SALES ASSOCIATES Michele Clack Katy Corbello Faye Drake Karla Tullos GRAPHICS ART/PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Darrell Buck BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER Kay Andrews

contents

May 17, 2012 • Volume 4 • Issue 4

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COVER STORY 18 L’Auberge Casino Resort Presents Party By the Pool

REGULARS 7 10 10 11 22

The Boiling Pot Adoption Corner Tips from Tip The Dang Yankee Sports Report

FEATURES 5 Cooking Offshore 13 Summer Activities Guide 17 Teach Your Infant to Swim!

ENTERTAINMENT 24 26 27 29 32 36 38 39

Red Hot Books Funbolaya Family Night at the Movies Society Spice Jambalaya Jam Local Jam Eclectic Company Killin’ Time Crossword

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Legal Disclaimer The views expressed by The Jambalaya News columnists are their own and do not necessarily reflect the position of The Jambalaya News, its editors or staff. The Jambalaya News is solely owned, published by The Jambalaya News, LLC, 715 Kirby Street, Lake Charles Louisiana 70601. Phone (337) 436-7800. Whilst every effort was made to ensure the information in this magazine was correct at the time of going to press, the publishers cannot accept legal responsibility for any errors or omissions, nor can they accept responsibility of the standing of advertisers nor by the editorial contributions. The Jambalaya News cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or illustrations, even if they are sent to us accompanied by a selfaddressed envelope. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Copyright 2012 The Jambalaya News all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without prior written permission is prohibited.

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A Note From Lauren Thanks for the Memories

The other night, Phil and I had the pleasure of attending “A Black Tie Affair,” the annual fundraiser for the Calcasieu Medical Society Foundation held at L’Auberge. As part of the entertainment, we were treated to a performance by The Victory Belles. And what a treat it was. The Victory Belles are three young women who regularly perform at the World War II Museum in New Orleans, singing songs from that era in three-part harmony. Decked out in glamorized WAC uniforms and 1940s’ bobs and red lipstick, the Belles personify a time that is long gone but very much alive in the hearts of many. And even though I was not born in that decade, it is so very dear to me. My mother came of age in the 40’s, and I grew up hearing all of her stories and listening to her sing the very songs the Belles sang that night. Since it was Mother’s Day Eve, I feel as if the performance was a special gift from her to me. I knew the words to most of the songs, some of which I hadn’t heard in years, and most reflected the state of war that the country was in.

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“Don’t Sit Under the Apple Tree” recorded by Glenn Miller and his orchestra two months after Pearl Harbor, is a plea from a soldier to his sweetie to be faithful to him while he’s away. The “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy,” originally sung by the Andrews Sisters, is “a famous trumpet man from out Chicago way” who got drafted into the Army and now “the Company jumps when he plays reveille. “I’ll be Seeing You,” is probably the most poignant of wartime songs, as the lyrics can be sung by either a woman waiting for her soldier’s return or a soldier in some faraway land, hanging on to his memories as he fights for his country—and to stay alive. In a world war, everyone’s lives are affected. No one is spared. Our country mobilized and all the citizens did their part. Women took over the factory jobs left vacant by the men who went overseas. Commodities were rationed and people stoically went without, all for the war effort. My mother took a job at the Army Base in Boston. My Uncle Frank, as did many of my male relatives, went overseas. And many did not come back. My cousin

Junior was one of them. His sister, Gilda, who had been saying rosaries daily for his safe return, was so devastated that she lost her faith and never set foot in a church again. War is hell. But, “The country really came together back then,” my mother would say sadly during the Vietnam Era, with all of its protests and violence. “I don’t understand what’s going on now.” Well, the Vietnam War was a completely different kind of war, and I won’t get into that here. But that was the era I grew up in. The idealism and sacrifice of the 40’s were only something I heard about from those who lived through it. So it was bittersweet to listen to the Victory Belles sing their brave songs, including musical tributes to every branch of the Armed Forces — “Anchors Away,” “The Army Goes Rolling Along,” etc., ending with “God Bless America.” Many in the audience were moved to tears. But some of the younger people I spoke to later in the evening had never heard of most of the songs and couldn’t relate to them. Sadly enough, generations pass, and so do their music, dancing,

and traditions. Whether we can relate to these “days-gone-by” or not, on Memorial Day, we must remember and honor those past generations who “jumped when he played reveille.” They gave their hearts, souls and lives so that we can enjoy our freedom today and create our own fond memories. Thank you Mom, Uncle Frankie, and cousins Junior and Gilda. Happy Memorial Day. I’ll be seeing you.

– Lauren de Albuquerque TJN

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By Rhonda Babin

Working as an offshore chef is quite an experience, requiring special training and talents. Randy Israel, 59, a steward for an offshore catering company, was trained to feed employees on an offshore production platform, but his love of cooking started at a very young age. Born in Port Arthur, Texas, he moved to Lake Charles at the age of ten. He remembers attending Kaufman Elementary and Central School, where the cafeteria became a favorite place because of the good food and delicious homemade rolls. He received his calling early. He knew he wanted to be a chef and learned to cook from his mother, Joyce Devall and his grandmother, Maw Maw Ardoin. His aunt Gloria Gossett and sister Shelva Reed also had a hand in teaching him how to prepare Cajun and country-style dishes. “You learn authentic Cajun cooking when all of your family is from Mamou,” Israel laughed. When he was 16, he lucked into a job that started the ball rolling. Israel was a LaGrange Senior High student looking for work who made a telephone call. J.B. Glenn was a business owner whose staff had all walked out the previous night. “I guess it was just meant to be,” Israel said. Within a few days, he had started his professional cooking career at the Prien Lake Road Kentucky Fried Chicken. After high school graduation in the early 70s, Israel began to learn about offshore food preparation by working as a kitchen/galley hand. This position helped him learn the ropes of working in a kitchen or “galley,” as the area is known on a platform.

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He studied in New Orleans at the Royal Sonesta School under Chef Willy Cone. But Cone wasn’t the only chef responsible for his formal education. “There were several chefs who would teach you the different aspects of running a galley on a platform,” Israel said. “I learned every aspect of food and beverage work.” This included food preparation and display, food and labor costs and sanitation and safety. Israel moved through the ranks quickly and found his choice of career offered good pay, lots of time off, and a chance to practice the culinary arts in a satisfying way that is also filling a need. Twenty-two years ago, Israel signed on with an offshore catering company, and has been with them ever since. All its employees are required to be “floaters,” which means they are not permanently assigned to just one location and move from rig to rig. Presently, he attends to the daily living and dining needs of up to 20 people on a production platform. (A production platform has been drilled and is producing oil and gas.) Israel cooks three meals a day. In addition, he takes care of laundry, sanitizes the living

Randy Is rael

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Electrical Engineer (Multiple Openings): Provide technical assistance, coordinate internal & external resources for project management, incl. project planning, execution, startup & closeouts. Bachelor's, Electrical Engineering; 2 yrs exp. as Electrical Engineer incl. some exp. in each of the following: instrumentation & controls; project scheduling & coordination. Must be able to maintain open, timely, & positive communication w/ customers; able to work under adverse conditions; able to analyze problems, develop solutions, & communicate recommendations; strong leadership & work process skills. Excellent interpersonal & communication skills. Excellent PC skills. May be transferred to undetermined locations w/in US. Employer: Entergy Gulf States Louisiana, LLC. Job location: Westlake, LA. Mail resume to Lori Hendler, Entergy Services Inc., 639 Loyola Avenue 22nd Floor, New Orleans, LA 70113. Must apply w/in 30 days and refer to job #11521 to be considered.

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quarters, and cleans up office areas. He attempts to do his job in the background and is considerate of the workers’ time and situation. “I try to get in the offices while personnel are away so as not to bother their routines,” he said. He is always mindful of what is happening to someone emotionally when they are away from land and living out on the water. “Being on a platform for 14 days at a time can feel like incarceration for some of my co-workers,” he explained. “People have to deal with some deprivation, not being able to do their normal everyday things, and to be without friends and loved ones for a couple of weeks at a time. That can be really hard, so I try to remind them of home by cooking country-style with things that smell wonderful.” He bakes a lot because “everybody loves sweets!” he exclaimed. “I try to serve a variety of things and include many salads. I plan the daily menus with input from personnel.” Coming up with new salads is something Israel enjoys and he gets lots of request for seafood dishes from the platform employees.

“I would say my job is 90 percent communication,” he explained. “You have to listen and adapt to the needs of the staff. My philosophy is listen and learn.” His galley consists of all stainless steel surfaces and appliances. There are triple compartment sinks, reachin and walk-in refrigerators and freezers, dual ovens, commercial-size electric stoves, and deep-fat fryers. The galley has several overhead hoods to vent the heat away from the cooking area. Steam tables hold the cooked food and keep it hot. Storage space is at a minimum and that can make for some challenges when the supply boat arrives. “It would be nice to have a clone on supply days and new construction days,” Israel laughed. “Our regular scheduled work has to proceed and the off-loaded supplies have to be placed carefully to best use the space that is in short supply.” In addition to expected challenges, Israel has faced the unexpected problem situations as well. “I’ve had a few catastrophes, like flooded kitchens, loss of power from the generators, and stopped-up sinks

when large air hoses have to be brought in.” he recalled “Ever had to cook while stepping over moving hoses and having items flying around your head?” he asked. “I have!” He dealt with the power outage by cooking on a grill outdoors. “It’s great to work with personnel that understand offshore living quarter problems,” Israel said. “We are our own community and work through problems together.” In his off time on the rig, Israel catches up on his sleep, spends time on the Internet, and reads news articles and autobiographies. During his seven days off, the cooking continues on land. He enjoys grilling and sitting outside, enjoying a nice day with his friends and family. Israel loves what he’s doing and can’t imagine a different life. “Good nourishment and good rest are vital to a person’s ability to perform well,” he said. “I have a great position where I get to do my best and truly enjoy cooking for people who enjoy my food.” TJN

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The

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Please submit press releases to lauren@thejambalayanews.com

LCMH WOUND CARE CENTER RECEIVES NATIONAL AWARD The Lake Charles Memorial Hospital Wound Care Center was recently awarded the Diversified Clinical Service Center of Distinction Award for 2011. The Wound Care Center has provided healing for people in Southwest Louisiana since 1991. Specializing in treatment of chronic wounds, the team is made up of local physicians and nurses who are specifically trained in wound care healing. The center also received the award in 2009. For more information about the center, call (337) 494-6700.

DA DISTRIBUTES BOOKLETS TO LOCAL HS SENIORS District Attorney John DeRosier recently distributed Welcome to the Real World—Now that You’re Eighteen booklets to local high school seniors. It is designed to help the students gain an understanding of the new rights and responsibilities that accompany their transition into adulthood. The booklet addresses some very important topics, ranging from criminal procedure to registering to vote. It also contains helpful phone numbers and websites. Additional copies of the booklet can be obtained from Beth McGee at the Calcasieu Parish District Attorney’s Office.

Left to right: Sumer McFarlain, tournament co-chair, Debby Nabours, WCCH Foundation director and tournament co-chair, Bill Hankins, CEO of WCCH, Dana Keel, CITGO Lake Charles, and Karen Lambert, tournament co-chair.

WCCH FOUNDATION RECEIVES $7,500 FROM CITGO CITGO Lake Charles recently presented the West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital Foundation with a check in the amount of $7,500 in support of the annual Mac Burns/WCCH Foundation Golf Tournament, which was held on May 12. CITGO was this year’s title tournament sponsor. For more information on the activities funded by the grant or to donate to the WCCH Foundation, call (337) 527-4144.

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BALLARD RECEIVES WCCH SAFETY AWARD West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital recently named Bill Ballard, biomedical technician, as the recent recipient of its Safety Award. The award, which honors employees for their promotion of safety and safety awareness in and around the hospital, is distributed to those employees that demonstrate extraordinary awareness and action in minimizing potential safety risks. Bill Ballard NEW LOCATION FOR FIRST NATIONAL BANK DERIDDER’S MORTGAGE LOAN OFFICE First National Bank DeRidder’s Mortgage Loan Office has moved to a new location in Lake Charles at 4031 Nelson Road, Unit 200. Manette Pecorino is mortgage loan officer. She has worked in the mortgage industry for over 11 years with a focus on refinancing, conventional and construction-to-permanent loans. Lara James, mortgage loan originator/processor, recently Manette Pecorino joined the staff. James has four years of experience in the financial industry. For more Lara James information, call (337) 477-6693.

BROUSSARD JOINS JEFF DAVIS BANK Keith Broussard has joined Jeff Davis Bank & Trust Co. as a financial advisor, bringing 17 years of investment experience. Broussard has expertise with a broad range of consumer financial services such as fixed and variable annuities, mutual funds, life insurance, retirement plans, investment trusts, among others. He earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from McNeese State University and he is a fully licensed Louisiana general securities representative. A lifelong resident of Lake Arthur, Broussard previously worked for A.G. Edwards & Sons, Inc. and Wells Fargo Advisors. For more information on Jeff Davis Bank, visit www.jdbank.com or call (800) 789-5159.

Keith Broussard

FIRST FEDERAL INVESTMENTS’ PROFESSIONAL RECEIVES AWARDS First Federal Investments financial professional Janet LeLeux, located at First Federal Bank of Louisiana in Sulphur, recently received customer servMAY 17, 2012

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ice awards for her 2011 achievements. Allianz Life Insurance Company awarded LeLeux with the 2011 President’s Club and Outstanding Customer Service Award in recognition for delivering superior customer support that helps clients reach their financial goals. Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company awarded LeLeux with The Circle of Excellence, for excelling at helping her clients prepare for and live in retirement. Her accomplishments have earned her a spot among the very best for differentiating her performance and commitment in 2011.

tiative, professionalism and uniqueness of contribution. Basone was one of three finalists for this award. Other finalists included Keith Broussard, a Hathaway senior majoring in radiologic sciences who works in the Recreational Complex, and Jeremiah Johnson, a DeRidder junior majoring in mathematical sciences, who works in the Services for Students with Disabilities office.

Janet LeLeux

Left to right: Mayor Randy Roach, co-chair, Mayor’s Committee for the Fournet Memorial; Mary Leach Werner, The Sweet Lake Land and Oil Company, LLC; Lisa Verrette, president and CEO, Community Foundation of Southwest Louisiana; Laura A. Leach, The Sweet Lake Land and Oil Company, LLC; and Calcasieu Parish District Attorney John DeRosier, chair. Pictured are Kayla Rigney, executive director of Calcasieu Community Clinic; Dr. Yoko Broussard, Foundation VP; Keith W. Henson, L’Auberge senior VP and GM; and Dorothy McDaniel and Cyrena Hight, Foundation board members.

L’AUBERGE DONATES TO ‘A BLACK TIE AFFAIR’ L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles donated $20,000+ as the Diamond Sponsor of the Calcasieu Medical Society Foundation’s “A Black Tie Affair.” The event took place in the L’Auberge Ballroom on May 12. Proceeds benefitted the Calcasieu Community Clinic and their efforts to better serve the working uninsured citizens of Imperial Calcasieu.

Pictured from left: Janice Ackley, regional director; Keith W. Henson, senior VP and GM for L’Auberge Lake Charles; and Dana Keel, 2012 Chairperson.

L’AUBERGE HOSTS ‘GO RED’ LUNCHEON L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles recently hosted the American Heart Association’s “Go Red for Women” luncheon and presented a donation of $20,000+. With this donation, the American Heart Association can continue their mission helping individuals build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. For more information, visit www.heart.org. MCNEESE STUDENT EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR NAMED Gabrielle Basone, a Lake Charles chemistry senior at McNeese State University, has been named as McNeese’s 2012 Student Employee of the Year. Basone works in the Admissions and Recruiting office. The Student Employee of the Year Program recognizes students who demonstrate reliability, quality of work, iniGabrielle Basone PAGE 8

MAY 17, 2012

SWEET LAKE LAND AND OIL DONATES TO FOURNET MEMORIAL The Sweet Lake Land and Oil Company, LLC presented a check for $5,000 to the Mayor’s Committee for the First Lieutenant Douglas B. Fournet Memorial and the Community Foundation of Southwest Louisiana. The funds will be used in support of a project to erect a statue of First Lieutenant Douglas B. Fournet for Veterans Memorial Park. Fournet, a native of Lake Charles, was awarded the Medal of Honor, posthumously in April of 1970 for his selfless act of sacrifice in May of 1968 during the Vietnam War. The Medal of Honor is presented by the President of the United States in the name of Congress and is the highest honor that can be bestowed upon any American of the U. S. Armed Forces. MCNEESE 2012 SPRING COURT McNeese State University students Austin Bourgeois, an engineering technology senior from Sulphur, and Miranda Raye Crowell, a biological science senior from West Monroe, have been selected Mr. McNeese and Miss McNeese of the 2012 Spring Court. Other court members are: Rebecca Landry, New Iberia, and Leslie Wells, Sulphur, seniors; Sara Dupre, Grand Lake, Will Hetzel, Hathaway, Jeremiah Johnson, DeRidder, and Kelley Verrette, Lake Charles, juniors; Andrew Armand, Lake Charles, and Leah Moore, Welsh, sophomores; and Heather Morrissey, Moss Bluff, freshman.

Austin Bourgeois and Miranda Raye Crowell

IBERIABANK NAMES BUSINESS BANKING RELATIONSHIP MANAGER IBERIABANK, the 125-year-old subsidiary of IBERIABANK Corporation, is pleased to announce the recent naming of Barry B. Brown as assistant vice president and business banking relationship manager for Southwest Louisiana. Brown joins the company with strong commercial and agricultural banking experience. He most recently served as commercial lender for Ouachita Independent Bank in Monroe. Brown is a graduate of the University of Louisiana at Monroe where he earned a degree in finance. He is located at 1900 Maplewood Drive in Sulphur, and can be reached by phone at (337) 312-7033 or by email at Barry Brown barry.brown@iberiabank.com. Volume 4 • Issue 4


CITY OF LAKE CHARLES RECEIVES AWARD The City of Lake Charles was recently informed by the Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada that it had received the GFOA’s Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for its Fiscal Year 2012 budget. The award reflects the commitment of the governing body and staff to meeting the highest principals of governmental budgeting. A Certificate of Recognition was presented to Director of Finance Karen D. Harrell. It is presented to the individual or department designated as being primarily responsible for receiving this award. LOCAL FINANCIAL REPRESENTATIVE RECEIVES AWARD Jonathan Conrad, a financial representative with Northwestern Mutual of Lake Charles, was recently awarded Pacesetter First 40 Award. Less than nine percent of the company’s new financial representatives achieve this prestigious award and have the highest career retention rate in the company. A native of Sulphur, Conrad received a double major at McNeese Jonathan Conrad State University with a degree in accounting and finance and was a pitcher for the McNeese Cowboys for five years. Northwestern Mutual has helped clients achieve financial security for more than 150 years. FONTENOT NAMED OUTSTANDING DIETICIAN OF THE YEAR Beth Winslett Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN, of Lake Charles was named Outstanding Dietitian of the Year by the Louisiana Dietetic Association. The award is granted to an active LDA member who performs with outstanding competence, leadership and service in the practice areas of dietetics. Fontenot received a bachelor’s degree in home economics/nutrition from McNeese State University and a master of science degree in human resources/nutrition from the University of Louisiana - Lafayette. She has worked in various clinical settings in the area and formerly taught in and directed the undergraduate dietetics program at McNeese State University. She currently works as a freelance nutrition writer. NEW DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT AT ST. LOUIS HS Susan Percle was recently named director of development at St. Louis Catholic High School. A native of Lake Charles, Percle is a 1989 graduate of Saint Louis Catholic High School. She received a bachelor’s degree in Mass Communications and English from the University of Alabama and has most recently worked at Immaculate Conception Cathedral School where she directed the Cathedral School’s Capital Campaign. She also served as Susan Percle public relations director and liaison to all school fundraising. Percle brings nine years of experience in Catholic education and school development. She is a parishioner of Immaculate Conception Cathedral and an active volunteer in the community. Susan is married to Gregory Percle and they have four children, John-Gregory, Jacob-Paul, Joseph and Eliza. TJN

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By George “Tip” Cline

Meet Jacques! A tiny poodle guy with great house manners and a big personality, this boy gets along well with other dogs and is a real sweetheart. He likes to be held like a baby on his back and have his tummy rubbed, and will stand on his back legs for a treat and dance around. He loves to go outside and browse around but he also loves to be in the house on his person’s lap. Jacques does well riding in a car and is good on a leash. This is a super 8-year-old tiny guy whose Mom died recently. He needs another wonderful home to call his own, preferably without young children. Contact Wanda at (337) 287-3552 or Stephanie at (337) 658-9959 to learn

more about Jacques. You can also email fourpawssociety@aol.com. An adoption application can be found online at www.4PawsSocietyInc.com under the “Forms” tab and faxed to (337) 558-6331 or emailed to fourpawssociety@aol.com. A vet reference and home visit are part of the adoption process to ensure a good match for both the dog and owner. Hurry, Jacques is waiting! TJN

LEAVE THE LAKEFRONT ALONE It has come out recently that the group that wants to take our Civic Center land and obscure part of our downtown lakefront view with a questionably needed hotel now wants the city to lend them money to get the job done. As I have always said, if private enterprise saw a need on the lakefront, and believed money could be made, the doors would be busting down for the opportunity to do so. No one has to stand clear to avoid the rush; there is no crying need to make our Civic Center grounds and lakefront a cluster of buildings. Can we not enjoy the area as it is and not make it into some commercial venture that does not belong there? RETURNING FROM THE ASHES We dodged another bullet with the Sunday fire at Lake Charles’ beloved Darrell’s on College Street. I have had friends and family calling from all over after hearing of the fire, wondering just how bad the damage was. I had to see for myself, so I passed by around 2 p.m. on the day of the fire and spoke to one of the employees who was cleaning up. He informed me that it would be a month before they reopened. What a relief! I think the time frame of a month is a worst-case scenario. Hopefully, it will reopen sooner. We all have friends that plan their arrivals or departures to include a Darrell’s Poboy as part of their visit to Lake Charles. For a restaurant whose whole menu is much less than 10 sandwiches and a choice of different potato chip flavors, you know they do it really right to be appreciated so far and wide. I go back a long way with Darrell’s, from it’s start in the old

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Frank and Emile’s building (the last operation there was Cedar’s Restaurant), where the story goes that Darrell went through 13 different kinds of bread before he found the one he wanted. Darrell would not put out a product until it was just right. We are also awaiting Cormie’s return from the ashes from their fire a year ago. Progress is being made towards its reopening, and I pass by often to keep an eye on the recovery of this beloved landmark piece of Lake Charles. Cormie’s was one of the few places where you could purchase USDA prime beef, and their chicken salad rivaled The Boarding House’s version of that old favorite. Some time back, we hosted a gathering that featured a medieval theme and ordered several dozen roasted turkey legs that were a huge hit with our guests. It will be interesting to see the new and improved store. I hope they’re keeping all the old favorites and adding new ones. My wife is particularly fond of their fried chicken. SUPERMARKET ROUNDUP Our shopping comparison for this issue is for May 9, 2012 at Albertsons, Country Club Road; Market Basket, Lake Street; Kroger, McNeese Street and Walmart, Nelson Road. These are the posted prices on the shelf where the product was placed for sale. Heinz White Vinegar, 32-ounce bottle: Albertsons $2.49; Market Basket $1.79; Kroger $1.59; Walmart $1.38. Onions, yellow, bulk, per pound: Albertsons $.99; Market Basket $.99; Kroger $1.59; Walmart $.98. Nabisco Premium Saltines, Original, 1-pound box: Albertsons $2.99; Market Basket $2.59; Kroger $3.19; Walmart $2.50. Baby Back Pork Ribs, per pound: Albertsons $2.77; Market Basket $4.69; Kroger $3.49; Walmart $2.97.

TJN Volume 4 • Issue 4


Dang Yankee The

By Mike McHugh

Piratocracy

Another Contraband Days festival has come and gone here in Lake Charles. The Buccaneers have returned control of the city to its duly elected officials. Here in Louisiana, this of course means that it is back in the hands of real pirates. During Contraband Days, the City of Lake Charles operates under a unique system of government. A band of pirates who call themselves the Buccaneers land their ships at the lakefront, seize the mayor, and send him on a short walk, which is exactly one step further than the length of the pine board that extends from the side of their flagship. The Skull and Crossbones is then hoisted up the flagpole, and their captain—one Jean Laffite— assumes control of the city for the duration of the festival. This system of government, known as a “Piratocracy,” seems to be going viral. This year, for example, the mayors of five surrounding cities joined the Lake Charles chief executive on his briny walk. We can only hope that this trend will spread further, like maybe all the way to Washington, D.C. Let’s face it; pirate rule would represent a vast improvement over the current system of federal governance. Our current representatives in Congress cannot even agree on a budget. If pirates were in charge, they would come to an immediate consensus, with the majority of federal funds earmarked towards grog. (The rest would go to gunpowder.) Elections would be a thing of the past, which does not sound so good until you realize that it also means the end of negative campaign ads. Instead of debates, which have all the allure of a reality show about people who write Wikipedia articles, the networks would show the candidates engaging in swordplay Volume 4 • Issue 4

So indeed, the changes brought by Piratocracy would carry some disadvantages. Take, for example, Medicare, whose rules would be amended to cover only prosthetics that are made of wood. And you can forget about subsidies for biofuels, as blending with gasoline would be considered a total waste of alcohol. And I don’t even want to think about the revised procedures for IRS audits. Given such drawbacks, Piratocracy has a lot of hurdles to overcome if it is to become the law

of the land. Those on the right would have to come to grips with Wall Street being converted into a black market, where the shares of Apple Computer are valued in quantities of sheep and goats. Those on the left would have to accept the food stamp program going over to a system where recipients get daily rations of hardtack and ale. For these reasons, I fear that the eagle won’t be replaced with the parrot anytime soon. TJN

while swinging from the ropes of a galleon anchored in the Potomac River. The losers would be drawn and quartered, or worse yet, dropped off alone on a D.C. street at 2 a.m. True, Piratocracy is a one-party system. But that is not so bad, either, when you consider that the party is centered on a barrel of rum. We would no longer have need for Homeland Security. No AlQaida terrorist in his right mind (if there is such a thing) would dare stage an attack against a country that flies the Jolly Roger. The Secret Service would also be obsolete, as the President (or Captain, as the office would be re-named) would use his own crew for his personal protection. Of course, they would be bound to the same code of conduct, except that the only scandal would involve those who did not visit a brothel while on duty in South America. The Department of Education would certainly see some changes. I could envision the “Race to the Top” program having its objectives revised to somehow involve a crow’s nest. Those who want to do away with the Federal Reserve System would find much to like about a Piratocracy. There would no longer be a need for it. All of the government’s monetary assets would simply be buried, its location recorded with an “X” on a map that could only be read under a full moon through a looking glass of crystal that that is broken into three pieces and placed in the possession of the Captain, his mate, and the quartermaster. In this way, misappropriation of government funds would drop to zero. On the other hand, Social Security recipients would need a shovel to get their monthly stipend. MAY 17, 2012

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Sarina Clooney and Roberta Lawson

Annette Garber and Marilyn Sullins

Women & Children’s Hospital Celebrates National Hospital Week In honor of National Hospital Week, May 6 – 12, Women & Children’s Hospital (WCH) hosted several appreciation activities for their employees, physicians and volunteers including: May 7: Snack Day May 8: Pancake and eggs breakfast; pizza dinner for night shift May 9: Smoothies May 10: Crawfish boil May 11: Ice cream sundaes All activities took place on the hospital campus located at 4200 Nelson Rd. In addition to the weeklong treats, each employee also received a blue cooler tote bag with an imprint of the hospital logo.

“WCH is lucky to have such a great team of employees, physicians and volunteers who choice to work with us,” said WCH CEO Bryan S. Bateman. “We always enjoy showing our appreciation for them throughout the year, but there’s really something special about hospital week. The crawfish boil is the highlight of the week and many employees even come in on their day off to participate.” The WCH management team would like to thank all of their employees for their dedication to the facility and for caring for Southwest Louisiana residents for nearly 28 years.

TJN

Kathy Armentor, Debbie Boudreaux and CEO Bryan S. Bateman PAGE 12

MAY 17, 2012

Volume 4 • Issue 4


McNeese Summer Reading Clinic June 4-28 The McNeese State University Summer Reading Clinic will be offered from 9-11:30 a.m. Mon.-Thurs., June 4-28, for elementary students entering grades 1-6. The students will receive one-on-one tutoring for 60 minutes a day and participate in reading enriched activities with a master teacher. The fee is $175, which includes a deposit of $50 with the completed application. Will be held at McNeese in Farrar Hall, Room 323. For more information or to request an application, call (337) 475-5471. Foreman-Reynaud Community Center Summer Camp June 4-July 31 The Foreman-Reynaud Community Center is accepting registration for summer camp, which begins June 4. Registration is $25; tuition is $65 per week. Camp is Mon.- Fri. from 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Call (337) 436-2500 for more information. SPAR Swim Lessons There will be three sessions of swim classes held at SPAR Waterpark this summer. Session 1: June 4-14; Session 2, June 18-28; and Session 3, July 9-19. Lessons are conducted Mon.- Thurs. for two consecutive weeks. Registration will be held May 22-23 from 3-6 p.m. and June1-July 1 during regular hours. Fee is $45 per session and $40 for each additional child. Open to ages 6 months to adult. For more information, call (337) 625-9791. SPAR Tween Fitness Classes June 5 – Aug. 2 SPAR Recreation and Aquatics Center in Sulphur will hold fitness classes on for children ages 8-14 every Tuesday and Thursday from 4:30-5 p.m. Classes include warm-up, cardiovascular exercises, body-weight strength training, and cool-down and stretching. Daily admission is $3 for participants in-district and $4 for those out of district. Parents must remain within SPAR. Call (337) 721-3040 for more information. Summer Arts Camp June 5-28 The theme for Summer Arts Camp 2012 is “The Sound of Art,” and classes exploring this theme are offered in a variety of visual arts media and in performing arts. Students who have completed kindergarten through eighth grade are invited to attend. Camp begins June 5 and ends June 28 at Lake Charles Boston Academy, 1509 Enterprise Boulevard in Lake Charles. June 29 has been set aside to pick up children’s artwork. The tuition of $235 covers three classes of specialized instruction for the entire month, all art supplies, themed T-shirt, and an open house reception. Registration forms may be obtained from the Arts and Humanities Council office located in Central School or the office at Lake Charles Boston Academy. Reduced rates are available for families with more than one child attending Arts Camp. For more information, call 526-2908. Louisiana ACE Camp June 18-29 ACE Camp is a summer day camp for teenagers between grades 7-12 who are considering a career in aviation or pursuing it as a leisure passion. During the course of two weeks, participants will focus on the knowledge needed to pass the Private Pilot Written Exam. At the same time, they will be introduced to a wide variety of aviation career opportunities, ranging from commercial pilot to airport management. The camp staff has been selected from an elite group of college students who are also preparing for an aviation career. The camp will be held at Chennault International Airport. Registration fee is $200. For more information, call Anthony Ware at (337) 491-9961. St. Margaret Basketball Camp June 25-28 St. Margaret Basketball Camp will be held from June 25-28 for boys and girls ages 6-12. Fee is $45 for one child, $85 for two and $110 for three. Camp will be held from 9 a.m.- noon and will include T-shirts, trophies and drawings. For more information, call Director Brandon Simon at 439-4585. Volume 4 • Issue 4

MAY 17, 2012

PAGE 13


Summer Art Classes for Children at Stark Museum The Stark Museum of Art in Orange, Texas will offer free art classes this summer for children entering grades 1-12 through their summer ArtQuest program. Registration is currently open, and families are encouraged to send in completed applications as soon as possible. Advance application is required. Classes will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis, with a maximum of 20 children per class. Applications are currently available for download at www.starkmuseum.org or may be picked-up in person at the museum’s information desk during open hours. Completed applications are due no later than June 4.  June 12-14 Art Detectives                  (For students entering grades 6-8) 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

July 17-19 Printmaking Power                              (For students entering grades 1-2) 9:00 a.m. - noon

June 26-28 Passion for Paint (For students entering grades 3-5) 9 a.m. - noon

Aug. 7-9 Coil, Cast and Carve           (For students entering grades 3-5) 9 a.m. - noon

July 10-12 Museum Connection (For students entering grades 9-12) 9 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Aug. 14-16 Thirst for 3-D           (For students entering grades 1-2) 9 a.m. - noon

Summer Eco-Rangers Classes at Shangri La Gardens Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center in Orange, Texas will offer Eco-Rangers classes for students entering grades 3-9. Classes will introduce students to different concepts of nature, art and science. Applications are required and are available for download at www.shangrilagardens.org. Completed applications are due no later than June 1. Enrollment is on a first-come, first-serve basis to applicants who complete all paperwork. Classes are as follows: June 25-29 Fun Science at Shangri La (For students entering grades 5-6) 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

July 16-20 Let’s Go Fishing! (For students entering grades 3-4) 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

July 2-6 The Art of Animals, in partnership with Stark Museum (For students entering grades 3-4) 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

July 23-27 Plants in Perspective, in partnership with Stark Museum (For students entering grades 5-6) 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

July 9-13 The Animal Kingdom (For students entering grades 7-8) 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

July 30–Aug. 3 Baskets, Bowls, & Botany, in partnership with Stark Museum (For students entering grades 7-9) 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Spanish Cultural Camp June 25-29; July 9-13 LaFamilia Resource Center is hosting the second annual Spanish Cultural Camp: two exciting weeks filled with the Spanish language and history. This year’s camp will feature an innovative hands-on approach for your child through arts and crafts, games, music, food, guest speakers and much more! Session 1 is June 25-29 and Session 2 is July 9-13, both from 9:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m. Pricing is $50 for your first child and $35 for each additional child per week. Registration is now open! Call (337) 312-2906 for more information or go to www.lafamiliaresourcecenter.weebly.com. Cowboy Camp July 13 The fifth annual summer Cowboy Camp will be held from 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. July 13 for those first-time freshmen and transfer students attending McNeese State University this fall who want to learn more about McNeese history and Cowboy traditions. This includes touring the campus, learning McNeese traditions such as “Joli Blon” and “On McNeese” for Saturday night football in “the hole” and participating in a game show at the end of the day with a chance to win over $1,000 in scholarships and cash prizes. Activities for this one-day event are led by the Rowdy Riders: 25 to 30 McNeese students who are involved with student organizations on campus. The camp is limited to the first 125 students and the cost is $20 per student, which includes lunch and a T-shirt. For more information, call 475-5609 or email campuslife@mcneese.edu. PAGE 14

MAY 17, 2012

Volume 4 • Issue 4


Dynamic Dimensions Summer Camp July 16-20 Dynamic Dimensions in Sulphur will host a summer camp for kids. Camp 3D: A New Dimension of Fun will be held July 16 through 20 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. and is open to children ages seven to 11. The cost is $75 for members of Dynamic Dimensions and $99 for non-members. Lunch and snacks will be provided. Deadline for registration is July 9 and limited space is available. Activities include games, crafts, nutrition activities (including hands-on preparation of lunch and snacks), fitness education and pool time. To register, call (337) 527-5459. Summer Engineering Academy July 16-Aug. 3 McNeese State University’s College of Engineering and Engineering Technology will offer a Summer Engineering Academy July 16-Aug. 3 for high school juniors and seniors interested in pursuing science and engineering careers. The summer program give students a broad exposure to engineering disciplines by offering hands-on projects dealing with real life engineering issues. Classes will be offered from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.- Fri. in Drew Hall. Cost is $1,500 per student and includes on-campus housing, meals, transportation, lab supplies and chemicals. Day trips are scheduled to the NASA Space Center in Houston, Creole Nature Trail, Avery Island and a canoe trip on the Ouiska Chitto. Weather permitting, participants will also have the opportunity to visit the STARLAB Portable Planetarium and learn how to navigate the night sky using a variety of telescopes. For more information, email nikosk@mcneese.edu or call (337) 475-5875.

TJN

Summer Fun at USS Orleck Built in 1945 by Consolidated Steel Shipbuilding in Orange, Texas, The USS ORLECK DD886 is a national treasure and is dedicated to its mission of remembering and honoring those who served to secure our freedoms, along with educating adults and children alike through interpretive, social, and recreational programs. Opened to the public in April 2010, the USS ORLECK Naval Museum provides guided tours and has spaces available for rent for private parties or other events. Over the past year, thousands of visitors from all over the world have enjoyed touring the ship and attending everything from birth-

day parties to participating in laser tag gaming with state-of-the-art laser tag equipment. This summer, the USS ORLECK Naval Museum will expand its programs to include summer day camps targeted to children ages 9 to 16. Programs and hands-on activities will include nautical subjects such as navigation, knottying, and leaning about a sailor’s life aboard the ship. An art and drawing camp, scavenger hunts, and laser tag gaming will also be included. For more information, call (337) 214-SHIP (7447) or visit them online at www.orleck.org. TJN

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STOP IN FOR A FREE TRAIL ANY DAY!

2015 RYAN ST. LAKE CHARLES | (337) 564-5261

Saddle up for Summer Horsemanship Camp with The Stables at Le Bocage! If your children are even a little bit horse crazy, they will have a great time and learn a lot at summer riding camp. At Le Bocage, it’s all about horses and the love of horses. The program is designed to benefit beginner, intermediate and advance riders. Campers will learn horse identification, anatomy, grooming, conditioning, nutrition, health, tack, and horsemanship skills. But there’s so much more. Participating in a riding camp is a great way to build a child’s self-confidence and self-discipline and helps develop good decision-making skills. Volume 4 • Issue 4

The Stables at Le Bocage believe the strength of a camp depends upon the people behind it. The professional staff offers highest quality of leadership and provides positive guidance to all campers. Let your child experience the wonderful world of horses at Southwest Louisiana’s premier equestrian facility. Le Bocage makes learning horsemanship fun and exciting, and your child will make friendships that will last a lifetime. To register or for more information, call (337) 905-JUMP (5867) or visit them online at www.thestablesatlebocage.com. TJN MAY 17, 2012

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3210 Power Centre Parkway Lake Charles

(337) 990-0112

FOOTBALL CAMPS Grambling State University one day satellite camp. June 8, 6pm-8pm for high schools 11th and 12th graders. $25.00 at Power Centre. Willie Brown football camp July 13-14 at Power Centre.

BASKETBALL CAMPS Lake Charles Ward 3 Recreation Boys basketball camp June 25-28 at Pryce/Miller Recreation Center. Ages 5-11 years old. Conducted by MSU men's coaching staff. $25.00, 8am-12noon. Ward 3 Girls basketball camp Date June 11-13 at Power Centre Complex. Ages 5-11 years old. Conducted by MSU women's coaching staff. $25.00, lpm-3pm.

TENNIS CAMPS Lake Charles Ward 3 Recreation Tennis Camp June 18-20 at University Park. Ages 8-12 will have camp from 8am-9am limit 9 kids. Ages 13-16 will have camp from 9am-10am limit 9 kids. $25.00.

Youth Aviation Camp Offered by Chennault Young people interested in exploring aviation-related careers are invited to sign up for the second annual Aviation Career Education (ACE) Summer Camp, which is expanding to two weeks this year. The day camp will take place weekdays, Mon.-Fri., June 18-22 and June 25-29 and is open to all youth in grades 7-12. “ACE Summer Camp is a handson way for students to learn up close about all the opportunities in aviation — from cockpit, to tower, to runway,” said Anthony “Tony” Ware, deputy director of Chennault International Airport and coordinator of the local program. Chennault is the home base for the camp. Three other Southwest Louisiana airports will take part this year: Lake Charles Regional Airport, Southland Field in Carlyss and DeQuincy Industrial Airpark.

Campers will get hands-on experience as they learn how to “preflight” an airplane, create flight plans, make radio calls, decode weather and design a model airport. They’ll also learn about aviation career opportunities ranging from commercial pilot to airport management. Students also will be introduced to the knowledge needed for the Private Pilot Written Exam. Camp instructors will be Louisiana Tech students majoring in aviation-related studies. The camp will feature bus trips to the three other airports and guest speakers during lunchtime. Registration is $200 and includes lunch each day. To register or for more information, call Chennault at 491-9961 or email Ware at aware@chennault.org or Andrea Pelloquin at apelloquin@chennault.org. TJN

VOLLEYBALL CAMPS Lake Charles Ward 3 Recreation volleyball camp. Date: June 27-29. Location: Enos Derbonne Sports Complex. Ages 5-14 years old. $25.00.

SUMMER DAY CAMP Lake Charles Ward 3 Recreation Summer Day camp. June 4-July 27. Full day option 7:30am-5:30pm. Half-day option 7:30am-12 noon or 12 noon-5:30pm. Ages 5-12. Location at the Enos Derbonne Sports Complex 7903 Lake St. 337-502-5214.

FREE SKATEBOARD CAMP Beginners: Age(s) 5-8 Intermediate: Age(s) 9-12 Advanced: Age(s) 12-15. Time: 8:00am-Noon Location: Power Centre Skate Park June 11-12 **Limited Space**

FREE FISHING CAMP Date: June 23, 2012. Location: Fitzenreiter Road Park. Age(s): 5-16 Time: 8am-noon.

SOCCER CAMP Lake Charles Ward 3 Recreation Soccer Camps. Session 1 will be held at Zion Tabernacle Date: June 13-15. Session 2 will be held at St. John Elementary July 11-13. Ages 5-12 years old. $25.00.

OTHER CAMPS & EVENTS MSU Soccer Camp Session 1 June 11-14 at the Power Centre 5pm-7:30pm. Session 2 July 23-26 at the Power Centre 5pm-7:30pm. Big Baby Basketball Camp August 9-10th Power Centre Gym PAGE 16

MAY 17, 2012

FREE Midnight Basketball June 8-July 27, 2012 216 Albert St., Age(s): 8-16 337-502-5231 • 8p.m.-12am FREE Midnight Indoor Soccer June 8-27, 2012 7903 Lake St., Age(s): 8-16; 17-up 337-502-5214 • 8pm-12am • 12am-2am Volume 4 • Issue 4


The day camp promotes a close examination of the ships artifacts and how the crew lived, worked and played aboard the ship. This will be a summer camp that you will not want to miss. This years summer day camps will be held on July 9th, 11th, and 13th from 8am – 5pm. The summer camp will offer students ages 9-16 a rare glimpse into the life of sailor aboard the 1945 Destroyer. Summer camp days are limited to 30 participants per day. Registration will begin on June 1st. Additional information can be found at

www.orleck.org

THE DAY CAMPS WILL INCLUDE: • Extensive ship tour exclusive only to summer camp participants • Conquer and Destroy training missions • Adventurous Scavenger Hunt • Knot tying taught by Military Veterans • State of the Art Laser Tag experience

or by calling

(337) 214-SHIP Swimming is not only an adventure; it’s a life-saving skill that lasts a lifetime. To prevent tragic accidents, get your child started early, says Judi McIntosh, president of Swimsational Swim School. She insists that the earlier you start this process, the more natural it is. An American Pediatric Association study in 2010 suggested that early swim training may actually lower drowning rates in children under the age of four. “Just plant the seed and watch it grow,” she said. “It’s truly amazing to see a child who lets go of the fear and realizes the joy water can bring to them.” Instruction can start for infants as young as two months old. “We’ve learned through our education that there are a number of infant reflexes,” McIntosh said. “When you watch us work with the two-to sixmonths infants, you may observe them moving their arms and legs as if they are swimming, but realistically, what you are seeing is an automatic swimming reflex.” Children six months and younger also have a wonderful natural diving reflex that keeps water from entering their lungs. This assists teachers in getting the children water acclimated and ready for the swimming lessons process. “As experts in infant swimming, we have been trained thoroughly how to utilize this technique,” McIntosh explained. “This reflex starts to dissipate quickly after six months. We are teaching infants [to swim] and parents how to enjoy their children safely in the water while building skills one splash at a time.” Volume 4 • Issue 4

McIntosh warned that even though your children may swim well, they still need to be supervised at all times while in the water. “Children are never completely safe when they are around the water,” she pointed out. “Just because your child has had swimming lessons does not mean you should watch them any less!” Ultimately, the highest compliment a swim teacher can receive is knowing that the lessons that were taught saved a student’s life. “I had the pleasure of teaching the grandson of a man I will call ‘Mr. Sonny’ to swim since the age of one,” McIntosh said. “He told me that one day, he was fishing at his pond when his wife called out to him that their grandson wanted to come down and meet him.” As Mr. Sonny headed around the pond to meet the child, the unthinkable happened. The toddler ran toward the pond and in his excitement, stumbled and fell into the water. “Mr. Sonny said he ran as fast as he could to get there,” she said. “By the time he got there, the boy had turned himself around and kicked his way back to the water’s edge and was crawling up the bank through the weeds. He said, ‘I kept kicking and reaching just like Miss Judi said, Grandpa.’” In her 40 years of teaching, McIntosh has heard many similar stories. “That is why I do what I do,” McIntosh said. “If I can make a difference in one child, it is absolutely priceless.” For more information, call (337) 527-0950 or visit Swimsational online at www.swimsational.net. TJN

REGISTRATION OPEN HOUSE: July 19-21 from 5-7 July 30-August 3, from 9-12 Ages: 2 years old to Adult Classes

SUMMER DANCE WORKSHOP: July 27 & 28, call for more information. Tap, Jazz, Ballet, Hip Hop, Tumbling, Clogging, Flexibility, Dance Line Prep, Pointe, Turns, Lyrical

Dance Force Competition Team Try Outs July 30 - August 3, 2012, Application Forms available at Studio or call for more information.

MAY 17, 2012

PAGE 17


Bret Michaels

Ashes of Babylon

Galactic

Jamey Johnson

Uncle Kracker

Aaron Lewis

L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles kicks off its annual summer concert series, Liquid Society’s Party by the Pool, on May 24. They’ve scheduled a red-hot roster of 15 concerts every Thursday through August 30. “Party by the Pool has been a popular weekly summer social event for Lake Charles for the past five years,” said L’Auberge’s Regional Entertainment Manager Ron Richey. “We average anywhere between 2,500 to 3,000 people, depending on who is playing.” Concertgoers come not only from Lake Charles, but also from Baton Rouge and Lafayette, Alexandria, Beaumont and East Texas. When scheduling this year’s performers, Richey focused on bringing a

By Angie Kay Dilmore

PAGE 18

MAY 17, 2012

variety of high caliber entertainment to the Lake area. The lineup includes a mix of national bands from the 80’s and 90’s and current stars, as well as local Louisiana headliners. Whether you’re a country music fan or a heavy metal rocker, L’Auberge’s Party by the Pool promises to entertain. Feel free to bring your swimsuits and beach towels. That’s part of what “Liquid Society” is about – the pool! L’Auberge added this name change two years ago. “Liquid Society means you can go into the pool,” Richey said. “Before, you could not.

“I love the Party by the Pool! It’s something fun and different to do. They usually have great bands that play there. It’s just an all around great atmosphere. I like that this year the prices of the concerts tickets went down to $10. It’s outside and you can swim in the pool while the band is playing. Also, the hotel is a very nice place to stay.” – Ashley Chafin Volume 4 • Issue 4


Gavin DeGraw

Colbie Caillat

Candlebox

But customers wanted to swim—and we take care of our customers.” LOW-DOWN ON THE LINE-UP The series opens May 24 with famed rocker Bret Michaels. He was the front man of the 1980s rock band Poison. Their hit “Every Rose Has Its Thorn” was inspired by one of his personal relationships. Michaels moved on to a successful solo career, starred in his own reality television show Rock of Love and won NBC’s

Eve 6

Theory of a Deadman

reality show Celebrity Apprentice 3. In addition to his first love, rock and roll, Michaels has also been successful in the country music genre. He released his country rock album Freedom of Sound in 2005. Originally from Lake Charles, Ashes of Babylon will transport you to the shores of a Caribbean island with their reggae harmonies. Wellknown for their improvisational jam sessions, the eight-piece band has been playing together since 2006, and

Andy Grammer

now calls Austin, Texas, their home. Galactic plays New Orleans Funk and are the quintessential Mardi Gras party band. For 18 years, these guys have entertained across Louisiana and the South. Grammy Award-nominated country music star Jamey Johnson has recorded hits such as “The Dollar” and has written many chart-toppers for other artists, such as George Strait’s “Give it Away” and Trace Adkins’ “Ladies Love Country Boys.”

We’ll get a trio of a treat when Colbie Caillat, Gavin DeGraw, and Andy Grammer—three of today’s top pop artists—perform together on the Liquid Society stage. A rapper-turned-rocker, Matthew Shafer is the man known as Uncle Kracker. He hit the music scene in 2000 when he recorded his first album, Double Wide. Rocker-turned-country singer, Aaron Lewis originally sang lead with the rock band Staind. He now

“Last year, we went four or five times. It’s a great deal – you get a concert for $10 and great atmosphere.” – Kathleen Breaux

LIQUID SOCIETY’S PARTY BY THE POOL CONCERT SCHEDULE

Better Than Ezra

MAY 24............... Bret Michaels – Rock MAY 31............... Ashes of Babylon – Reggae JUNE 7 ................ Galactic– New Orleans Funk JUNE 14 ............. Jamey Johnson – Country/Southern Rock JUNE 21 ............. Colbie Caillat, Gavin DeGraw, Andy Grammer—Pop JUNE 28 ............. Uncle Kracker – Rock JULY 5................. Aaron Lewis – Country/Southern Rock JULY 12 .............. Candlebox – Rock JULY 19 .............. Theory of a Deadman — Rock JULY 26 .............. Eve 6 & DJ Pauly D — Pop/Punk AUGUST 2 ......... Travis Matte & Chris Ardoin — Zydeco AUGUST 9 ......... Vertical Horizon — Alternative Rock AUGUST 16 ...... Finger Eleven — Rock AUGUST 23 ...... Better Than Ezra — Rock AUGUST 30 ...... All American Rejects – Rock

Volume 4 • Issue 4

DJ Pauly D MAY 17, 2012

PAGE 19


Vertical Horizon

All American Rejects

focuses on country/southern rock music and has recorded hits like “What Hurts the Most” and “Country Boy.” Candlebox plays alternative rock and calls Seattle home. They’ve been making music since 1990. Canadian band Theory of a Deadman plays rock with hints of country and acoustic, post-grunge and alternative rock. They’ve recorded several songs used by the WWE (World Wrestling Entertainment). The name of the band comes from a song on their first album that

describes a man preparing to commit suicide. Rock band Eve 6 is well-known for their hit singles “Inside Out” and “Here’s to the Night.” DJ Pauly D, of Jersey Shore fame, plays pop/hip hop tunes at the JD’s after party immediately following Liquid Society. Louisiana native Travis Matte plays with the Kingpins, a popular Zydeco band. Chris Ardoin is a young artist who helped develop “nouveau Zydeco,” a new genre of music that fuses traditional Zydeco with various styles of music includ-

Finger Eleven

ing hip-hop, reggae and R&B. Vertical Horizon plays alternative rock and is known for the popular songs “Best I Ever Had (Gray Sky Morning)” and “Everything You Want.” Finger Eleven, from Ontario, has been playing rock since 1989 and are best known for their hit single “One Thing.” Louisiana-bred rockers Better Than Ezra came together in 1988. Despite various theories, the band refuses to reveal the origin of their name. You’re likely familiar with their song “Good.”

Liquid Society closes out its 2012 concert season with the All American Rejects. Since they formed in 1999, this band has sold over 10 million albums worldwide. Their many hits include “Dirty Little Secret” and “Gives You Hell.” TICKET PACKAGES Shows start at 8:30 p.m. and end at 11 p.m. Tickets for each show are a bargain at only $10. A season pass, good for all 15 shows, can be purchased for $120 and includes six drink tickets and a commemorative

“What I find interesting is the diversity in the ages of the people there.” – Lana Bodin

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MAY 17, 2012

Volume 4 • Issue 4


Chris Ardoin

Travis Matte beach towel. You can also buy a Liquid Society 6-Pack for $40. These include admission to six shows plus six drink tickets. Show choices must be made at the time of purchase and no substitutions are allowed. Come early for a good spot and enjoy the sounds of a DJ playing from the island. The doors open at 7 p.m. If you have a large group of friends and want to guarantee a prime spot to watch the show, reserve one of L’Auberge’s seven poolside cabanas, which are covered sideenclosed structures with comfortable furniture. Cabana rentals include ten concert tickets and varying levels of service, depending on the package purchased. For information on reserving a cabana, call the Spa du Lac at L’Auberge at (337) 395-7768. L’Auberge will sell food this year and, of course, drinks! Enjoy weekly beer and drink specials served by the lovely Ladies of L’Auberge. On

L’Auberge Casino Resort is located on 242 acres of land in Lake Charles, two hours east of the Houston metropolitan area. This premier facility is ideal for the business traveler or guest looking for the ultimate in hospitality and dining experiences, plus non-stop gaming action. The property includes a 26story hotel complex with approximately 1,000 spacious rooms and suites; an 18-hole golf course designed by Tom Fazio; 26,000 gross square feet of meeting space, including a full-service business center and landscaped terrace space plus outdoor poolside lawn; two resort swimming pools, lazy river and private cabana courtyard; full-service barber shop, salon, spa and cardio fitness center; retail stores; ten innovative dining outlets; Volume 4 • Issue 4

Fridays, stick around for the postparty on the patio at Jack Daniel’s® Bar & Grill for Jack After Dark or meander into the casino for some late-night gaming. Liquid Society is also featuring a Bikini Bombshell Contest. Preliminary judging will be July 12 and 19. The finals will be hosted by Jersey Shore’s Pauly D on July 26. Purchase your concert tickets at www.ticketmaster.com or at L’Auberge’s Business Center. You can also buy tickets the night of the show in Legends. You must be 21 to attend. The event location is subject to change or cancellation if the weather is not conducive to a good time. For more information on Liquid Society, log on to www.ldlcasino.com/ entertainment or visit them on Facebook for the latest concert updates and giveaways. TJN

beachside bar, grill and marina; and top-name entertainment. The expansive 70,000 square foot casino features Vegas-like gaming action with 70 table games and approximately 1,600 slot machines, including a luxurious 7-table Poker Room, VIP Lounge and elegant High Limit Salon. To learn more about L’Auberge, call reservations at (866) 580-7444; visit www.ldlcasino.com; or find them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ laubergedulac; or follow them on Twitter: @LAubergeLC. TJN

MAY 17, 2012

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ker n Shouma o d n a r B y B

The NBA Finals: What to Watch When Nothing Else is On So, it’s NBA playoffs time… (sigh) again. This used to be an exciting time of the year for me. Watching the old Pistons-Lakers “basketbrawl” series or the Michael Jordan-Larry Bird showdowns on CBS were part and

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MAY 17, 2012

parcel of the end of the school year for me back in the day. Now, I’ve got no love for the National Basketball Association or its postseason, and I am hesitant to write about them in this space. I mean, there are other things going on in the sports world: The National Hockey League is in the latter stages of its playoff schedule, Major League Baseball is about to hit its late-spring stride, the Preakness Stakes is coming up soon. But none of these things are very inspiring to me. The NHL exists in a media black hole roughly the size of

Saskatchewan, thus making informed writing nearly impossible. My beloved Boston Red Sox are in the toilet so I don’t want to poke at that wound right now, and the winner of the Kentucky Derby is a contender at best at the Preakness Stakes, so there’s no Triple Crown excitement to be had. NBA basketball it is, then. I guess. Sounds like I just wrote the league’s new promotional slogan. Well, if Chuck Klosterman can gut out back-to-back concerts featuring Creed and Nickelback in the same night, then I can come up with a few

words about the NBA postseason. It’s kind of like eating your vegetables. But what is it about the NBA, and the playoffs in particular, that bring out such ennui and boredom in a guy that, typically, will watch just about any sporting event on at any time? For one thing, professional basketball, at least in the NBA, is rigged and has been rigged at least as long as NBA commissioner David Stern has been in charge. At least it seems that way. This begs the question: why would I invest my time in a playoff for which the outcome has already been, for the most part, decided in advance?

Volume 4 • Issue 4


There is no schedule for the NBA You know and I know that Stern Finals this year, but last year the is aching (aching!) for a Los Angeles playoffs began on April 16 and the Lakers-Miami Heat matchup in the Dallas Mavericks clinched the chamFinals. The thought of all of the pionship on June 12. That’s 58 days, money, media attention and televijust shy of two whole months, of sion ratings for a Kobe Bryantplayoff basketball. There is only so LeBron James showdown must keep much bad shooting, bad passing, and Stern awake at night in rapture. bad defense I can take. Which means, if he (or one of his I suppose it wouldn’t be so bad subordinates) tells a referee, say Dick and seem so gosh-darn eternal if the Bavetta, to call any hand-checking product weren’t so poor. I mean, as on Kobe a foul or to disregard it corrupt and backward as the NCAA when LeBron takes literally six steps has become, the men’s basketball without dribbling, it means anytime championships (March Madness) usuanyone gets within 50 feet of the ally produces some of the best-played Black Mamba or King James forgets and exciting basketball in the country. that dribbling is a basic tenet of the That’s something I can (and do) game, Bavetta is going to toe the watch regularly. company line. But college basketball is done for Those fouls and those no-calls the year, which leaves me with few add up and the sum is victories. viewing options. I will definitely be Speaking of referees and rigged watching the end of the English socgames, consider ex-NBA referee Tim cer season as Tottenham Hotspur Donaghy. He admitted to betting on (my team…the team regardless of games in which he was an official what those Arsenal fans say) limps and statistics showed that, in those into a possible Champions League games, the point spreads moved spot. And the College World Series, abnormally in his favor. Ask the another truly exciting competition Sacramento Kings if they think they will be starting up soon. LSU is a were robbed by the referees in 2002, likely contender for a championship or ask the Phoenix Suns about their late-season run of “bad luck” in 2007. and I’ll be tuning in for their postseason run as well. So not only is the outcome of As for the NBA Playoffs, I somethese playoff games, by and large, pretimes miss the old days, but, to quote destined, but there are just so cottonsinger-songwriter Ryan Adams, “I picking many games to begin with. used to be sad, now I’m just bored In short, the NBA playoffs are with you.” interminable. The NBA playoffs are so slow it takes them an hour and a Brandon Shoumaker is a half to watch 60 Minutes. graduate of McNeese State Ba dum dum. University and has covered Bad jokes aside, the sports for more than a playoffs have been moving decade for various publicain slow motion ever since tions. Coaches or parents the NBA expanded the with story tips or comments first round from a best-ofmay contact Brandon at five to a best-of-seven forbshoumaker@yahoo.com or mat in 2003. The regular send him a message on season ended on April 26 Twitter (@bshoumaker). and the playoffs began two days later on the 28th. Brandon Shoumaker TJN

Volume 4 • Issue 4

We Save Lives and Our Environment Everyday Through Science and Research.

Join Us and Buy at Wholesale. www.shaklee.net/patsnc

(337) 824-6765 or (337) 230-3598 Pat Landreneau, Nutrition Consultant Lake Charles & Jennings

MAY 17, 2012

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By Mary Louise Ruehr

Families are Complicated Family life is complicated: relationships evolve, parents are tested by children, emotions run high, and outsiders may be shunned. The highly emotional Another Piece of My Heart by Jane Green is a tribute to blended families that made me want to take my hat off to anyone with stepchildren. Andi has married the love of her life, Ethan (“Andi couldn’t have imagined a more perfect man for her had she tried”), a divorced father with two daughters, making Andi the stepmother of young Sophia and

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teenage Emily. Andi, who has always wanted to be a mother, embraces the girls as her own. But Emily sees Andi as a threat to Ethan’s love. Emily is demanding and belligerent — really horrible — to Andi while putting on a whiny, sweet-assugar act to her father. Since Ethan doesn’t realize this is an act, he

thinks Andi is being unfair to Emily, and this creates a wall between husband and wife. It doesn’t help that Ethan’s exwife is an alcoholic. Or that Andi, who wants very much to give birth to her own child, is having trouble conceiving. Emily acts out, and as she grows up, her behavior gets both better and worse. She is not just an immature drama queen; to me, she seems to be disturbed. But I really like her when she’s with her childhood best friend, Michael. The author presents events as Andi sees them, then as Emily sees them, showing that nothing in relationships is simply black and white. The audio version of the book is read by the author, who has a soothing voice. It is a pleasure to listen to her as she brings the characters to life. She actually screams, cries, whispers, sobs and laughs as she reads. vAdult language and situations. Home Front by Kristin Hannah is a homage to America’s troops serving overseas — particularly the women — and to their families back home. It’s 2005. Jolene, 41, is a helicopter pilot in the Army National Guard. “It was the best part-time job on the planet,” she says in the book. She’s also a wife and mother, as is her best friend, Tami, also a helicopter pilot. Jolene’s middle-school daughter is embarrassed by her: the uniform and

her weekend military service make her different from other moms. Her husband, Michael, has never understood Jolene’s pull to military duty. The husband and wife are drifting apart, and one night he tells her he doesn’t love her anymore. Suddenly, Jolene and Tami are deployed to Iraq. Jolene is in anguish about being separated from her husband and daughters: “She’s always been two women — a mother and soldier, and this deployment ripped her in half,” but “It was Jolene’s time to give back to the army,” even if her children needed her. “She wanted to go — she just didn’t want to leave.” We follow her to Iraq, where we learn about the conditions there and the horrors she encounters. When it’s time for her to return home, we see her struggles as she tries to reintegrate into the family and into society. “There was so much training before one goes to war, and so little for one’s return,” thinks Jolene. While she’s away, attorney Michael finds himself wishing he hadn’t been so cruel to her. When he must defend a soldier suffering from PTSD, he gains an appreciation for what Jolene has been doing for her country. I thought this story made a good argument for not sending mothers to a foreign war, but then I realized it also makes a good argument for not sending fathers, either. Volume 4 • Issue 4


Any reader will come away with even more respect for our troops in uniform. Adult language. (Come on, it’s the Army.) In The Dog Who Danced by Susan Wilson, the main character tells us, “My name is Justine Meade and in forty-three years there have only been a handful of people that I have loved. No, that’s an exaggeration. Two. Two that I lost because of stupidity and selfishness. One was my son. The other was my dog.” Her dog Mack is a Sheltie. She tells us “Mack is more than a dog to me. He’s my partner. We dance.” And she means it — she’s trained him to dance, with videos on YouTube to prove it. Justine, who’s always been a wanderer, is called to Boston to the bedside of her dying father. She’s traveling across the country with Mack when they become separated. She’s frantic: without Mack, she feels like an incomplete person. How can she find her dog? Where should she look? But first, she still has to go to Boston, to see her father before he dies. Meanwhile, the clever, wonderful dog tells his own part of the tale. Abandoned along the road, he is trying to figure out how to get back to his beloved Justine when Alice and Ed Parmalee find him and take him home. They also take him into their hearts, as he sort of fills the hole left by the daughter they lost several years before. As Justine’s in Boston dealing with her father, her abusive stepmother, and her past, the Parmalees are falling more in love with the dog, and they aren’t going to want to give him up. As Mack pines for Justine but begins to love a second family, Justine finds herself on more than one kind of journey. Loss is the obvious theme of the dual story lines. The opening of the book was pretty tense for me as a pet owner, especially when Justine first loses her dog, and the ending looked like it was going to go one way, but then took a quick turn. I think you’ll fall in love with Mack, just as I did. The audiobook is read by Fred Berman for Mack’s chapters and Christina Delaine for Jolene’s. You can read a chapter or listen to excerpts from the entertaining audio versions of all three books at http://us.macmillan.com/Audio.aspx.

Ron Fogal Gen. Mgr.

Chris Best Ryan St. Mgr.

Chris Sanders Sulphur Mgr.

Dustin Corbello Hwy. 14 Mgr.

Copyright © 2012 by Mary Louise Ruehr. TJN Oliver McDonald Hwy. 14 Volume 4 • Issue 4

Mark Fuselier Sulphur

Rita Atkins Sulphur

Ron Ardoin Warehouse Mgr. MAY 17, 2012

Danny Brown Ryan St. PAGE 25


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Baseball Beach Camp Carnival Fishing

Jet Ski Picnic Sail Boat Sand Castle Sno Cones

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box and take another turn. When all dots are connected, the player with the most boxes wins.

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Volume 4 • Issue 4


r m ende's Museu l l E an en By D e Childr of th r o t c Dire

The Avengers (Disney, Marvel, Paramount, 2012) At long last, The Avengers is here, and the universe will never be the same. With several earlier movies featuring Thor, Iron Man, the Hulk, and others, this main event has been years in the making. Finally, with cooperation between Paramount and Marvel owner Disney (who bought the comic book franchise for a cool $4 billion), the latest movie of the decade is in theaters. You might say it’s the right movie at the right time. Geekdom is at an all

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time high, thanks to our current love affair with technology. The Avengers plays to its audience in superb style. The plot: SHIELD, a techno arm of the Defense Department, has gotten hold of a tesseract, a four-dimensional cube that serves as a portal to other galaxies. SHIELD doesn’t realize that Norse God Thor’s half-brother, Loki, plans to use the tesseract as a gateway for an invading alien army. Earth is just the drop-off point. Their goal is the entire Milky Way. Yep, the world is about to be invaded again. I hate it when that happens. It is against just such an extreme threat that the Avengers initiative has been constructed by SHIELD: Enlist a group of separate super heroes into a team that can fight human annihilation, should it happen to come up. (In

the Marvel Universe, this happens multiple times each month when new comic book issues hit the newsstands.) How do you shoehorn several major super heroes, each with their own backstory, film deals, and guest stars, into one movie? Well, it took several years, that’s how. All of the parts are played by the actors in the original movies. The stars had to be perfectly aligned. And believe it or not, The Avengers works. Sometimes like a time bomb, sometimes like a sledgehammer, but we find ourselves cheering for this crowd of muscle bound misfits. Part of the reason is the script. Everything from snappy oneliners to the unintentional humor of Thor (Thor: I don’t care for how you speak. Loki is beyond reason, but he is of Asgard, and he’s my brother. Natasha Romanoff: He killed 80 people in two days! Thor: He’s adopted.) But there’s another dimension, and it’s the geek dimension, especially when Tony Stark/Iron Man confers with Bruce Banner/The Hulk. (Tony Stark: It’s good to meet you, Dr. Banner. Your work on anti-electron collisions is unparalleled. And I’m a huge fan of the way you lose control and turn into an enormous green rage monster.) Here are two geniuses trad-

ing theories and repartee. It’s like The Big Bang Theory on methandrostenalone. (Steroids, to you non-geeks.) Then there is the alluded romance between Hawkeye and The Black Widow. This hunk and babe duo have a backstory that stretches back to the Cold War, yet both somehow still almost rip out of their bodysuits. Oh, the beauty of the comic book. The Avengers is rated PG-13 and that’s a shame, but necessary. The movie is over two hours of mostly non-stop intensity and old-style comic book violence. To its credit, only one person gets killed on screen, even though Manhattan is turned into a pile of broken glass and concrete. I really have to caution parents of younger children, unless the tykes spend their weekends playing Worlds of Warcraft online: this is one intense movie. Debris and ear-shattering decibel levels aside, The Avengers is a fairly clean film, and most of the violence is directed against the invaders, who seem more like machines than life forms. So leave your small ones with a sitter and get out and see The Avengers. And do stay till after the credits for the Marvel double stingers. ‘Nuff said!

TJN

MAY 17, 2012

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HEALTHY WOMAN SPA DAY Women and Children’s Hospital hosted its second annual Pamper Party for women on the WCH hospital campus. Designed to help women maintain a healthy mind, body and spirit, attendees enjoyed a wide range of seminars, demos and screenings. They were able to relax and unwind with chair massages, pump it up with fitness lessons and sample an array of smart and healthy food choices. It’s fun to stay healthy!

Michelle Poche, Lisa Bateman, Debbie Boudreaux and Carla Clark

Melissa Smith and Harmony Jackson

Angela Trahan and Gwen Savoy

Annette Garber and Nadia Nazeer

Jennifer Brocato and Camille Bradstreet

Karen Lewis and Schun Clark

Jackie Simon, Joani Smith and Sarah Victorian

WILD BEAST FEAST The Lake Charles Symphony’s 11th annual Beast Feast was held at the Cash & Carry Event Center, and what a feast it was! A large crowd with hearty appetites sampled culinary creations from local sportsmen and teams of chefs cooking it up just right! From alligator to oysters, antelope to rabbit, deer to catfish, these savory dishes had the crowd coming back for more. Congrats to the cooking teams for keeping it wild! Randy Biggs and John Pohorelsky Volume 4 • Issue 4

Michael Mathis and Mike Smith MAY 17, 2012

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Lisa Guillory and Ryan Simien

Bill Monk, Keith Duplechin and Lee Boyer

Summer Templeton and Sherri Shetler

ADAM TRENT MAGIC SHOW Hope you didn’t miss the Adam Trent Magic Show, held recently at the Rosa Hart Theater. The live performance by this multi-talented Disney “Shake it Up” star wowed the crowd, entertaining big and little kids alike. An actor, singer and magician, Trent combined all of his talents into an action-packed, toe tapping, energetic performance. It was magic! Chris, Chloe and Susan Landry

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Johnny, Ethan and Tyler Lacomb

Alexis Robinson and Gay Gehrig

Chad and Swinton Ross

Liz, Caden and Tod Johnson

Daniel and Deuce Evans with Riley Belile

Azalynn and Josh Belile

Kathy, Sarah and Meredith Owen

MAY 17, 2012

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CONTRABAND DAYS LOUISIANA PIRATE FESTIVAL Pirates of all ages came out to the Civic Center grounds to experience events and activities for the whole family. Celebrating its 55th anniversary, Contraband Days has a new name and a new look! There was more kid-friendly entertainment and nonstop music on multiple stages. Everyone enjoyed the wide variety of vendors, carnival rides and delicious finger-licking good food. The Buccaneers of Lake Charles forced more than one mayor to walk the plank! Aaaarrrgh!

TJN Allen Abshire and Jean Lafitte 2012 Eddie Langley

Chris DuBois with Gloria Craig

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Samantha Garrett, Cristyen Fowler and Rachelle Wilson

Amanda, Hayden and Jacob Murphy

Helena Kittrell with Jenna Spivey

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entered into door prize drawings for a battery-operated car and many other great door prizes.

STARKS MAYHAW FESTIVAL MAY 17-19 The Starks Mayhaw festival will be held May 1719 and will have it all, from Mayhaw jelly and Mayhaw butter to Mayhaw berries and more. Festivalgoers can try their hand at jelly or just try all the delicious Mayhaw goodies. Saturday morning, early birds will be able to start their morning off right with hot biscuits, homemade Mayhaw jelly and freshly churned butter. With carnival rides, live music, delicious Southern food and enough berries and jelly to go around, the Starks Mayhaw Festival is one of the sweetest events in Southwest Louisiana! For more information, call 743-6297. COUSHATTA FOUNDATION GOLF TOURNAMENT MAY 17 The Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana will hold its 11th Annual Chairman’s Cup Foundation Golf Tournament on Thurs., May 17 to raise money for charitable organizations in SWLA. This year’s tournament will feature 152 golfers from around the country playing in a four-man scramble format. The tournament is an annual fundraiser hosted by the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana and held at Koasati Pines at Coushatta. Local and area businesses participate as sponsors. Food and drinks will be offered on the course during play. A new addition is “Casino Night,” a special pre-tournament fundraiser for the golfers and their families, featuring cocktails, hors d’ oeuvres, and poker and blackjack tournaments for special prizes. Casino Night will take place on Wed., May 16. The reception is at 7 p.m. and will be held at the Veranda at Koasati Pines at Coushatta. For more information, email randerson@CoushattaTribeLA.org. BUSINESS AFTER HOURS AT NAVARRE’S CADILLAC SHOWROOM MAY 17 Business people from all over the region are invited to the Chamber Southwest’s Business After Hours hosted by Billy Navarre at his new Cadillac dealership at 1310 E. College St. in Lake Charles at 5:30 p.m. on May 17. Help cut the ribbon at the grand opening of their newly remodeled Chevrolet Cadillac showroom floor. All attendees will receive a voucher for a free carwash at their new carwash facility (which will open within 90 days) and will be

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BELLATOR 69 MAY 18 The focus of the mixed martial arts world will be on the Bellator cage on Fri., May 18 as the long-awaited battle between No. 1 ranked women’s 115-pound fighter Megumi Fujii takes on No. 2 ranked Jessica Aguilar at Bellator 69 LIVE from L’Auberge Casino Resort in Lake Charles. The night will also feature the finals of the $100,000 Bellator Lightweight Tournament, as well as a Heavyweight Tournament qualifier as knockout specialist Ron Sparks takes on rising star Kevin Asplund. Tickets are now on sale from $40-$65 and can be purchased online at Ticketmaster.com or at the L’Auberge box office. Doors open at 5 p.m., with the first fight scheduled for 5:30 p.m. A BREWER’S PLATE MAY 18 There’s a good time brewing at A Brewer’s Plate on Fri., May 18 at 6 p.m. at the historic Cash & Carry building in downtown Lake Charles. The event benefits St. Nicholas Center for Early Intervention, a local nonprofit dedicated to providing services to children with autism and developmental delays. The fourth annual event features a six-course meal and premium beer pairing with an auction and live music by community favorites, the Al Becker Band. The attire is dressy casual and the vibe is lively! Tables of 8 are just $800 dollars and sponsorships are available. For ticket information, sponsorships, or to donate an auction item, call 491-0800.  RELAY FOR LIFE MAY 18 The American Cancer Society will host Relay For Life of Lake Charles on May 18 at the Lake Charles Civic Center. Teams of 8-15 members camp out overnight with tents and sleeping bags, each with the goal of keeping one person on the track at all times. Since cancer never sleeps, for one night a year, neither do volunteers, survivors and caregivers. Relay For Life brings together friends, families, businesses, hospitals, schools, and churches. Teams seek sponsorship prior to Relay For Life. For information about volunteering or about the event, call (337) 4335817 or visit RelayForLife.org/lakecharles. INTERNATIONAL MUSEUM DAY MAY 18 Stark Museum of Art in Orange, Texas will be open for special evening viewing hours on Fri., May 18 from 5-8 p.m. in honor of International Museum Day. The program will feature spotlight presentations about works of art in museum galleries throughout the evening. The museum is offering visitors an opportunity to revisit the past as it is presented in the works of four artists in the museum collection: John Mix Stanley, Ernest Leonard Blumenschein, Nicolai Fechin and Leon

Volume 4 • Issue 4


Gaspard. Light refreshments will be provided and admission is free of charge. For more information, call (409) 886-ARTS (2787) or visit www.starkmuseum.org. DOWNTOWN AT SUNDOWN MAY 18, 25 The City of Lake Charles will host their annual Downtown at Sundown concert series from 6-9 p.m. on May 18 (Boomerang) and May 25 (Chris Ardoin and NuStep). The event will also feature food and beverage booths, tabletop galleries, and kids’ activities. This year’s event will take place within the 600 block of Ryan Street between Division and Mill Streets. The former site of the event will be open and available for parking cars. If inclement weather prevails, the concerts will be held inside the Lake Charles Civic Center. Concertgoers are encouraged to bring their lawn chairs; however, no outside beverages or pets are allowed onsite. For more information, call 491-9147 or visit www.CityOfLakeCharles.com. MARCH OF DIMES MARCH FOR BABIES MAY 19 Join the March of Dimes in the fight against premature birth, the leading cause of newborn death in America. March for Babies walk will take place on Sat., May 19 at the Lake Charles

Volume 4 • Issue 4

Civic Center Amphitheater. Registration begins at 8 a.m. and the three-mile walk begins at 9 a.m. There will be children’s activities, food, fun and entertainment for all ages. If you would like to start a team, become a sponsor, or to volunteer, please call the March of Dimes office at (337) 233-8476 or register online at www.marchforbabies.org.

Lake Charles Civic Ballet

HEAVENLY FISH FEST MAY 19 Our Lady Queen of Heaven School invites one and all to the Heavenly Fish Fest, which will be held Sat., May 19 at Calcasieu Point. Fishing begins at 6 a.m.; weigh-in is at 11 a.m. Each entrant may weigh one fish only. Hearty lunch and drinks will be provided. Individual registration is $25, $60 for family. Thousands of dollars in prizes for Youth, Adult and Wharf Divisions. For more information, call 477-7349. LAKE CHARLES CIVIC BALLET MAY 20 Lake Charles Civic Ballet presents its Spring 2012 performance on Sun., May 20 at 3 p.m. at the Rosa Hart Theatre. Admission is free. The ballet company will

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present four works, including Stars and Stripes and Sheer Whimsy, both classics from the LCCB Repertoire, and new works from Elizabeth Gates and Andrew Anderson, as well as pieces featuring students of Lady Leah Lafargue School of the Dance. For more information, like Lake Charles Civic Ballet on Facebook, follow @LC_CivicBallet on Twitter, or visit www.lakecharlescivicballet.com. RETIREMENT EVENT FOR COACH MAX CALDARERA MAY 22 Westlake High School will celebrate the retirement of Coach Max Caldarera on Tues., May 22 in the school cafeteria. Caldarera is retiring from coaching after 34 years, and family, friends and football players are invited to attend. The school is located at 1000 Garden Drive in Westlake. For more information, contact Melanie Lanthier at Westlake High School at 217-4950, ext. 7056.

15% Senior Discount All Doctors’ Prescriptions Accepted Experienced Professional Staff • Most Insurance Accepted ‘POETRY OF COLOR’ OPENS MAY 24 The City of Lake Charles will present “Poetry of Color,” by Edward Woods at Historic City Hall Arts and Cultural Center. The exhibition will open with a reception hosted by Mr. Woods on Thurs. May 24 from 5:308 p.m. Woods says, “I love to capture movement, motion, color, depth and atmosphere through the poetry of paint and art media. The excitement is in seeing the piece evolve as I push forward to create something that didn’t exist before.” The exhibit will hang through July 21. Historic City Hall is open Mon. – Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sat., 10 a.m.-2 p.m.  Admission is free, but donations are gladly accepted. For more information, call 491-9147 or visit www.cityoflakecharles.com. SULPHUR HERITAGE DAYS MAY 25-26 Bring the whole family out to celebrate the rich history of Sulphur! Enjoy arts and crafts booths, great music, food vendors, carnival rides and even the queens of the festival! Enter the Grill-off, where all proceeds benefit the Brimstone Historical Society. If you’re not a cook, you can sample all of the different entries until the food runs out for a small fee. The event will be held Fri., May 25, 5-10 p.m. and Sat., May 26, 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. in Heritage Square, 923 Ruth Street, Sulphur. For more information, call Sulphur City Hall at (337) 527-4505. For information on the cook-off, call (337) 527-0357. WOMEN’S ROLLER DERBY MAY 26 Lafitte’s Ladies will go against the Red Stick Capital Defenders of the Gulf Coast on May 26. Doors open at 6 p.m., bout starts at 7. Admission is $10 for adults, $6 for children. BYOB—and chairs! The event will be held at The Grindhouse, 932 Enterprise, Ste. C in Lake Charles. Don’t miss it! TASTE OF LOUISIANA FESTIVAL MAY 26 The 2nd Annual Taste of Louisiana Festival will be held Sat. May 26 at The Lake Charles Civic Center Arcade Amphitheater. Enjoy culinary creations while listening to the sounds of Cajun, Zydeco, country, blues and New Orleans brass bands to experience the rhythm of Louisiana. There will be various history lessons at the Culture Corner, a free lesson

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and recipes at Chef’s Corner, and a barbecue rib cookoff.  Visit the French Market to find oneof-a kind collectibles, arts and crafts, and authentic Louisiana items. For more information, visit www.thetasteoflouisiana.com. LOUISIANA HS AND JR. HS RODEO FINALS JUNE 1-9 The Louisiana High School and Junior High Rodeo Finals return to the Burton Coliseum for the first time since 2001. SWLA is ready to get back in the saddle again after hosting the finals for more than 53 years. They will be held in Lake Charles at Burton Coliseum, with the Jr. High finals taking place June 1-3 and the High School finals taking place June 5-9. On Sat., June 9, bring the whole family out for a kid’s clinic, alumni rodeo, a barbecue cook-off, military and elected officials appreciation night and more! Junior High performances will be at 6 p.m. on Fri., June 1, 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. on Sat., June 2 and 9 a.m. on Sunday, June 3. High School performances will be at 7 p.m. Tues., June 5 through Sat., June 9. For more information, call (337) 802 8726 or go to www.visitlakecharles.org/rodeo. BARBE CLASS OF 1982 REUNION JUNE 22-23 The Barbe High School Class of 1982 is celebrating its 30-year class reunion on June 22-23 at The Lake Charles Country Club. Classmates are encouraged to reserve their tickets in advance by going to www.barbe1982.com, and clicking on the “attend event” link. The weekend will consist of a Friday night pool party mixer from 7-11 p.m., and a Saturday night dance from 7-11 p.m. with live music by classmates’ band “Mirage” featuring Paul Groves. There will also by a DJ playing music between band sets. For more information, contact Ann Ritter at 842-1191, join the Barbe 1982 30-year reunion group on Facebook, or visit www.barbe1982.com. BAYOUCON JUNE 30-JULY 1 This anime, comics, sci-fi and gaming convention, is back for its fourth year June 30—July 1 at the Lake Charles Civic Center Exhibition Hall. Special media guests are J.G. Hertzler and Robert O’Reilly, both from the Star Trek franchise. There will be photo opportunities, a Klingon Breakfast, Cosplay contest and tabletop gaming tournaments. Other activities include a film festival, makeup prosthetic creation, comic arts demonstrations, concerts and more. Weekend Superpass is $20 for adults, $15 for children 11-14. Saturday-only admission is $15 for adults and $10 for children. Sunday-only admission is $10 for adults and $5 for children. Children 10 and under are admitted free with a parent. Complete details about the convention or sponsorship opportunities can be found at www.bayoucon.net.

TJN

Congratulations Graduates Lana Watkins Welsh High School Congratulations Lana on your graduation from Welsh High! As you leave your high school days behind, we will always remember how proud you made us competing on the tennis team and performing with the band as drum major and trombonist. Good luck at Northwestern this fall, Lovey! — Love, Dad, Betsy, and the kids

Hayden Chene Blount Sam Houston High School Congratulations to Hayden Chene Blount, son of Steve Blount and Christina Smith. Hayden lettered in both Varsity Soccer and Cross Country for Sam Houston High School while maintaining a 3.3 GPA. He plays the guitar, piano and violin, and enjoys writing music. Hayden will be attending McNeese in the fall, pursuing a double major in Music Education and Music Performance.

Rachelle Savonnah Heihn Lamar University Congradulations Rachelle. We are very proud of you. — Love, uncle Jerry, Aunt Michele, Tanner and Jonathon. Good luck at UT next year.

Jonathon Clack Our Lady’s School Congratulations on graduating from Pre-K. You are growing up so fast, we are so proud of you. We love you! — Mommy, Daddy and Tanner. Have a great summer!

Volume 4 • Issue 4

MAY 17, 2012

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Sponsored by

To list your event e-mail: lauren@thejambalayanews.com

The

WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • JAG @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 17 • Brice Perrin @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 4 p.m. • Travis Benoit & Allons Dancer @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Bernie Alan @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Derryl Perry @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 18 • Alistair White/Blake Sticker @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 4 p.m. • Bellator 69 @ L’Auberge Event Center, L’Auberge Casino, 6 p.m. • Poetry Reading/Music Jam @ Stellar Beans, 6 p.m. • Morgan Brown & Tit Monde @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • ISIS @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Bernie Alan @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • Greg Martinez & The Delta Kings @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 9 p.m.

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MAY 17, 2012

SATURDAY, MAY 19 • Joe Simon & Louisiana Cajun @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • ISIS @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Sean Vidrine @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • Greg Martinez & The Delta Kings @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 9 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MAY 23 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Centerfire @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 24 • The Good Wood @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 4 p.m. • Jeff Thibodeaux & Friends @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Zydecane @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • The Posse @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Bret Michaels @ Liquid Society, L’Auberge Casino, 8:30 p.m. • DJ Cage @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, MAY 25 • Second Nature @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 4 p.m. • Briggs Brown & The Bayou Cajuns @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Ancient Eden @ Stellar Beans, 7 p.m. • Karma @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Kenny Loggins @ L’Auberge Event Center, L’Auberge Casino, 8:30 p.m. • X-It 43 @ Linda’s Lounge, 9 p.m. • Herbie Stutes & The Grand Shin @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • Ka-Nection @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 9 p.m. • Bobcat @ Luna Live, 10 p.m. • Large Marge/4MAG Nitrous/Survive the Musical @ Happy Hippie Pizza, 10 p.m. • DJ Jose Mata @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 26 • Scotty Pousson & The Pointe aux Loups Playboys @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Street Side Jazz Band @ Stellar Beans, 7 p.m. • Karma @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Jen Kober @ Luna Live, 8 p.m. • Rick Marcel & The Radiance Band @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • Ka-Nection @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 9 p.m. • DJ Jose Mata @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m.

Volume 4 • Issue 4


SUNDAY, MAY 27 • The Original Wailers @ Touloulou’s Beach, L’Auberge Casino, 2 p.m. • World Wrestling Entertainment @ Lake Charles Civic Center, 7 p.m. • Joel Martin Project @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MAY 30 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Shot Glass @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 31 • Clay & Markie @ Otis & Henry’s, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 4 p.m. • Lesa Cormier & The Sundown Playboys @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Friends of Louisiana @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, 7 p.m. • X-It 43 @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Ashes of Babylon @ Liquid Society, L’Auberge Casino, 8:30 p.m. • DJ Cage @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge Casino, 10 p.m. TJN

Volume 4 • Issue 4

According to a 2001 study of intentional animal abuse published by the Humane Society of the United States, 13 percent of these cases involved incidents of domestic violence, 7 percent coincided with child abuse and 1 percent with elder abuse. Sponsored by

MAY 17, 2012

PAGE 37


Leslie B e four dec rman’s career in ades, an music folksing er, mus d includes stin spans ic teach ts as a booker, e c tival dir oncert promote r, coffeehouse r e notes w ctor, music jou , publicist, fesr r nalist, a it e r , a organiz ation pr rtist manager lbum , t e attorney s , and p ident, entertain rade r ment e Museum sident o f She pre of Southwest the Music fe L eclectic rs all things ouisiana. , and musicall GRAM y votes M Recordin Ys as a mem on the g Aca ber o reached at leslie@ demy. She c f the an leslieber man.co be m. olv e t a m n re ti rticip ed mo ing and pa social actio unerative d n r e m a untee progressiv t did in re arket i dio m ) a e r k ing in ents than r he lat Yo .org to w u e m e m N e, as t close out f v l o e c w f r f h t i m t o a c t ng to fe’s a ties. ded i e else FM in activi ll, all my li Chapin sa he last few (91.1 everywher g, she han nts – just y e n a i rr W ve In t online e too wear at of my p in Sonny’s ter Ha concerts. e man I lo and i r w e t w s m s h a o e i t a l e e c l h c r i h h t o e f t g t f s b ju wi eo DJ by ity to er ry on moved in and social on Long h e v g e n me to r opportun i ter wn, stes hs, I e , help t mont musical ta atch my o d and smar tr kids pper Wes p anoth ps. e h g m e a u n U e i whos s histories ’s better re with the o me footst er babysitt lub on the a worksho e n , c e o c Aft i g m s a n politic no less. H re in touch im to keep u i k m tan, putt il’s n ally l h , o f f d P o n a m r s d o er end at he y on h nd Isla run am an ay, so I rel to recomm Manh in her brot al, and gen and any ki in I f m o n t e a u th Sid ians the d I fell lubs e abo festiv , and break music local folk th her to c ng at consionat e first time . I was a ges of d updated upport. s a r a r o f p him a ping i i n a s r h n s e e w t e e a g v r g i t e a b n d u e t n g u i t o r n s e o n b s u n ee o I’v awa we lend y life, olitical folk student, b ed run atting arou s, and volu ended up a s, able t gence in k to s m a e n w i r t d i c e e o I i c l i p r e wh e’v tor just nce is di eek, musi was with ineer pian hen I dec g him hare s nd co vals, w t w t Last w d him for h introducin . It was a bars a s and festi ho get to s in conven ast love, i bescent mu ic devotee, ia “Sonny” l r wa ight t by e e d w n s and re tically aler hs Song N s of Phil’s tferenc ld friends l fresco an ostly north pre-pu opular mu ns from So 960s’ topica o i c li e a o p h 1 m us po at a Phil O erformanc cal songwr rabid guitar lesso f Phil, the lan rival, w ith good and music variety of es. i t y p p s h n s e f o o i e g l w i y a t t o l n e ci au al , g So mea nters, in to tak lder sister nd Bob D struggling is venin e of the fin s playing r around adian ys, Sonny t ith e n e t a a o h c a , r r C e o s e n e t w ts gr ist da nd tio Och songwrit 6 aft al injury by som oncer ’s ve art played op ican a udent / n 197 t e. songs progressi uses and c ws in Phil Amer k in my st s could be the doo-w lk singer is own life i on, near-fa of his mus d o o l c g n h l s o i a f e a n e o B ers coffe ork f besid d the took h on, depress e departure s at the ost so rA tings, y, whose w i hat m hords, and e 1950s, an n my n h t e H t t o c e i s e d W s d m en tou n e Y m d l e a r a t c , b h o p t s n M e e u y d f u e v Y r o a a o gr co an oll o pl t thr soci t ic ince our co ps. hts ha vocal ny taught Hartm Hebrew as way, jus rock and r y learned t haped plas y g Nig d Canada s eep her e t n s o t S b o a s d d Son ’s t o s k a i t f e e an ch an to k Roc ok (tha roved I’d alr marin Phil O ited States cided that h them to in Far to songs -issued sub ette – she p Phil’s slyest n e tion) ork, and I ear U a d e e y t c ers l y ing th hen Sonn ve, and to oung sing inschoo er – the ton of brother ngs. New Y or about a d y i w e l e f e 1983, r’s works a he needed et Phil to r record g me som olitician so es to the them she provid at t s e n h y , p m c i ru k t broth nerations o’d never teach r and anti- ened my e vents, taug hat st before ertainmen layt e s h p g e g a i o w t n t p new usicians antiw se songs of curren ving cand his so the en t Mitzvah, cal m ho form he es ser r t d T s i e a f f t n aveled u l i p a o a B l e c o s s d y m an ave tr g on dp ing side nd valt s of h y n n e l l u i . a l s r r s s o t a e p i k s d l g i r c d r n i t o te o p ,a un ing fo and leadin of onizin s of ar nal ch be sus itolders ctrum e , perso now, dozen g and harm more me to nd office h olitical spe with the b songs s with thos ing s a p By layin n and g dates ment and experience ngs still galon kids attend o nny, p best-know g some com o S o n e s r g h , e t t e a i ly gov y teen the 75 ere willing - w e of Phil’s , and singin ten by the . Thos unate m ted m ess of love gh, unfort are as time w o a gs rit s d o i h w etn re son umbers w is show .  hou entaries e u t s g l c   w 0 . a n s s 7 ea , ‘ n b r i s n y o a d te join ntary een th rs, som 9, she comm e 60s an nd tod pleme mers. I’ve s ver the yea g In 196 y Sweet resou f his social e in the 19 songs all th r o at m a perfor ous times o storytellin s Song most as they we oved on to falling for again party for , ’s r i w m y y l o l I n m d n a , e nume ith Sonny turns. Th ucly time g, eventu !) and left se Sixte elect crow y r w c i e s s v e u rod O s singin nd opera ( t in all the at I tim een the m re brief int usic, more en it was m r at e r e w h u w a kids country, a ehind. B casions t gs, bet , there we s and the m to and th teach guit ars b c e o Night f the artist for chords the punk, usical love 2, on the o topical son k, turn t rtman Y. Y ve a o 1 n o m r s o t i a o a b s r tions more room ngs to bre f ir e I w or well-w my check ec the H hen the d n o i s g s w years hear new ching for ocial mov ay givin ut and for air. later, pstate New ge, t s w U n a ring o ger on the atured eigh r would myself rea rogressive eeling the m fro t O ads n e a i f f d o p l E n t n y g a i l h d o f i k an I’d venin lo (Jo dtrac entar York t rsey to bro lk g in to The e s – one so e tunin bsite, mom en the soun , sharp and J o f r o w y l r e e k N e we wh felt lud- perform er we ment’s sually did up of heart ork life inc cast h show on U u e w I M d F that s. My as ma music m radio W life w opical song r y o f s m e h e fr ant t Phil Oc poign

To t o G I w 1 o t H r a P — e Her

PAGE 38

MAY 17, 2012

Volume 4 • Issue 4


Flynn), two duos (emmas revolution featuring Pat Humphries and Sandy O, and Magpie featuring Terry Leonino and Greg Artzner), and a trio (Brother Sun, including Greg Greenway, Joe Jencks and Pat Wictor) – singing and playing individually and in almost every imaginable combination of voices and instruments. They opened as a group with Phil’s anthem for America, “Power and Glory,” a truly patriotic paean (with the chorus “Here is a land

full of power and glory / beauty that words cannot recall / oh her power shall rest on the strength of her freedom / her glory shall rest on us all”), closed as a group once again with “I Ain’t Marching Anymore,” that reminds us “It’s always the old / to lead us to the war / it’s always the young to fall,” and as an encore, sang Phil’s “When I’m Gone,” a moving litany that reminded me I only get one chance to do the things I find meaningful – while I’m here. TJN

The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization encouraging informed and active participation in government. It influences public policy through education and advocacy. Want more info? Like us on Facebook at Lake Charles League of Women Voters JOIN UP AND JOIN IN!

To join - Go to www.lwv-lc.org, Email info@lwv-lc.org or Call (337)474-1864 P.O. Box 180, Lake Charles, LA 70602

Killin’ Time Crossword ACROSS

DOWN

1. Take out of the freezer 5. Windy City rail inits. 8. Omar of "House" 12. Diminish 13. Part of H.M.S. 14. Surrealist Salvador 15. Embellish 17. "Darn!" 18. Number crunchers 20. All the rage 21. Joan of "The Last Emperor" 22. Fail to win 25. ___ Lilly and Co. 26. Spanish bear 29. Soul-searching 33. "___ bad!" 34. Routing word 35. Diatribe 36. Augury 38. Black or Red, e.g. 40. Indiscernible 46. Spinnaker 47. Removal 48. Come-on 49. ___ Tin Tin 50. Norwegian king 51. Perimeter 52. Country singer Joe 53. ___ Martin (cognac)

1. Terrible time? 2. Stag 3. Tennis star Kournikova 4. Newscast segment 5. Where the heart is 6. Circus sight 7. Time piece? 8. Crooner Fisher 9. Persecution complex 10. Blueprint 11. Prepares to be shot 16. "O Sole ___" 19. A la mode 22. Burning 23. LennonÔøΩs love 24. Bending 25. Waste watchers (abbr.) 27. "My boy" 28. Can. province 30. Done with 31. Heartfelt 32. Judas 37. Fight 38. Thorny 39. And more 40. Archipelago part 41. Motel employee 42. The dark force 43. Digestion aid

Volume 4 • Issue 4

44. Good earth 45. Covet

© Lovatts Publications Pty Ltd

MAY 17, 2012

PAGE 39


The Jambalaya News - Vol. 4 No. 4  

May 17, 2012 L'auberge Casino Resort Presents Party By the Pool

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