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VOL. 3, NO. 11 / AUGUST 25, 2011

• Helping Grieving Children Heal • Sam Houston Jones State Park • New Leash on Life


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AUGUST 25, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 11


GENERAL 715 Kirby St., Lake Charles, LA 70601 Phone: 337-436-7800 Fax: 337-990-0262 www.thejambalayanews.com PUBLISHER Phil de Albuquerque publisher@thejambalayanews.com

NEWS EXECUTIVE EDITOR Lauren de Albuquerque lauren@thejambalayanews.com

CONTRIBUTORS Lisa Addison Leslie Berman George Cline James Doyle Dan Ellender Maria Alcantara Faul Erica McCreedy Mike McHugh Candice Pauley Mary Louise Ruehr Brandon Shoumaker Karla Tullos ADVERTISING sales@thejambalayanews.com

SALES ASSOCIATES Katy Corbello Faye Drake Lindy George Karla Tullos GRAPHICS ART/PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Darrell Buck ART/PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Michelle LaVoie BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER Kay Andrews

contents

On Cover: Ronnie Bias with star patient Kinzey Wray and Ericka Babineaux. Photo by Michelle LaVoie

August 25, 2011 • Volume 3 • Issue 11

COVER STORY 25

Lake Area Prosthetics and Orthotics

REGULARS 7 11 12 13 14 30

The Boiling Pot Tips from Tip The Dang Yankee Doyle’s Place Speakeasy Sports Report

FEATURES 5 16 18 20 22

Helping Grieving Children Heal Sam Houston Jones State Park A New Leash on Life August is Psoriasis Month Adverse Drug Reactions

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ENTERTAINMENT 32 34 35 37 40 44 46 47

Red Hot Books Funbolaya Family Night at the Movies Society Spice Jambalaya Jam Local Jam Eclectic Company Killin’ Time Crossword

Clarification: In Society Spice in the last issue, it was stated that Mark Pettaway directed “ACTS Goes to the Movies.” The director was Kristina Perez.

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Legal Disclaimer The views expressed by The Jambalaya News columnists are their own and do not necessarily reflect the position of The Jambalaya News, its editors or staff. The Jambalaya News is solely owned, published by The Jambalaya News, LLC, 715 Kirby Street, Lake Charles Louisiana 70601. Phone (337) 436-7800. Whilst every effort was made to ensure the information in this magazine was correct at the time of going to press, the publishers cannot accept legal responsibility for any errors or omissions, nor can they accept responsibility of the standing of advertisers nor by the editorial contributions. The Jambalaya News cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or illustrations, even if they are sent to us accompanied by a selfaddressed envelope. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Copyright 2011 The Jambalaya News all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without prior written permission is prohibited. Volume 3 • Issue 11

20 We are now accepting credit cards! AUGUST 25, 2011

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A Note From Lauren Grow Old Along With Me I just returned from visiting family in Arizona. It was a time for great happiness: We celebrated my Aunt Gloria’s 90th birthday, and her and my uncle Ricky’s 62nd wedding anniversary. And there was a baby shower for my cousin Karen’s daughter, Joy, who’s expecting her first child with her husband, Ryan. Emma Grace will be Karen’s first grandchild, and her parents’ first great-grandchild. Gloria is the last of my mother’s siblings still alive, the fourth out of five children. And Joy is my godchild. I held her the night she was born. And now she’s having her own sweet baby. Living in Lake Charles, we’re so far removed from family that it was wonderful to connect again. And it was better for me to do it somewhere other than Boston, where I’m still having a hard time visiting. We talked about going back this fall—but no. Can’t quite do it yet. Karen, her husband Charlie and their daughter moved out to Phoenix in the mid-80s to try something new. Charlie sold his pharmacy in a suburb of Boston and decided he wanted to become a Harley mechanic. Back then, there were only two “Harley Schools” in the country, and one of them was in Arizona. So off they went. At that time, it really was the Wild West: miles of desert and cactus and rolling mountains and ranches. Subdivisions were springing up, but not at an alarming rate. The sky was big and the air was clean. When you were out there, you knew you were somewhere else. Now, so much of the rugged beauty has been bulldozed into super highways and acres of shopping malls, houses, restaurants and commercial space. Karen threw out all the Southwestern accents in her home, as did just about everyone else out there. The Look is now Tuscan, which is also The Look throughout most of the country. PAGE 4

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So the bottom line is, when you’re in the metro area of Phoenix, you could be just about anywhere in the United States. Progress always comes with a price. When they were younger, my aunt and uncle would drive out and spend several months there. But as they got older and more fragile, their visits ended. Karen always came back to Boston every summer, and often on the holidays, back to the first floor of that old three-decker we grew up in. Now used to living in brand-new homes built to her specifications, returning to the East Boston apartment was a challenge, with its small rooms and inadequate closet space, not to mention the metallic screeches of the MBTA

elderly people to give up everything they’ve ever known and go across the country? I don’t know how she did it, but Karen finally convinced them that they had no other option. Since my aunt is petrified of flying, they had to take the train, which my cousin said was a complete nightmare. (You try spending three days on a train with two cranky old people. Just think of the movie Throw Momma From the Train.) Karen rented them a lovely little furnished home in Sun City, but they never liked it. Her parents are chronic complainers, so nothing was ever right. The last straw was when they decided that their landlady was trying to poison them when she knocked on their door one morning with some

In the dining room after eating the “tough” meat.

trains behind the house and the drone of airplanes flying in to nearby Logan Airport. One man’s poison is another man’s pleasure. Gloria and Ricky had lived there most of their married life, and the older they got, the more they hung on to it, as old friends passed on and their health became more precarious. It finally reached the point where they were the only two left in the building. Karen knew she had to get them out to Arizona where she could take better care of them. How do you get two stubborn,

freshly squeezed orange juice from her tree. So Karen moved them into the senior complex where they now live. It’s wonderful. They have a brand-new, spacious one-bedroom apartment with a patio, full kitchen and two bathrooms. In addition, there’s a beautiful dining room where they can enjoy delicious meals and never cook again. Of course, they don’t like the food. According to them, the meat is tough. We ate there last Sunday, at their monthly champagne brunch. The meat isn’t

tough; they’re eating it with 90year-old teeth, so to them, everything that isn’t baby food is tough. There’s a computer room they’ve never set foot in (“No time,” they say), a weekly bingo they’ve never attended (no excuse, they’ve just never gone), a pool and a wellstocked library they’ve never used, daily excursions (can’t go, the van that takes them around is “too bumpy”) and a nightly movie that I believe they’ve maybe gone to a few times. I’m sure I’m leaving something out. The place was so awesome Phil and I wanted to move in. My aunt and uncle are unhappy. They want to move back to Boston, where there’s nothing left for them now but memories. They can’t accept the fact that those days are over, and don’t understand that they’re damn fortunate to be where they are now. But there’s no reasoning with them. And they’re driving their daughter crazy. That got Phil and I talking on the flight home. Is this how we’re going to end up one day? Unable to accept old age and the reduced circumstances it brings? Letting the pleasures of the present escape while dwelling on the past? I certainly hope not. My parents were never like that, although they both died in their 70s from cancer. They (and I) did not have to deal with the effects of lingering old age. But had they lived longer, they would have made the best of things. I know that. That’s just how they were. I guess there’s no answer. We’ll just continue to live every day to the fullest, and anticipate the future—one that includes Emma Grace, who is due on the day my mother left this world. Life goes on, in all its glory. TJN

– Lauren de Albuquerque

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Grief is a challenging process at any age, but to a child, the death of a loved one can be especially complicated and confusing as the concept of death is usually difficult for children to grasp. As they experience these losses, they will grieve. This grief must be supported, not ignored. Just turn on the news and inevitably; you will hear about a tragedy that often means a significant person in a child’s life is gone. “Today’s children face an increasing need for help in coping with the death of loved ones,” said Julio Galan, President and CEO of Family & Youth Counseling Agency (Family & Youth). While children are often viewed as being resilient, grieving children need to be given special attention and consideration. This will help them move forward through accept-

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ing the loss and developing the skills needed to understand such difficult emotions. “A child’s grief can manifest in many ways,” said Dr. Candis Carr, senior vice president of Family and Youth. This includes shutting down, regressing to infantile behavior, withdrawing from friends, difficulty sleeping or sleeping too much, change in appetite, anger, nightmares, acting out, shyness, quietness, putting up walls, and persistent confusion. “Recognizing a vital need in the community, the Shannon Cox Counseling Center offers grief counseling services for children who have lost a significant person in their lives,” Galan said. The Shannon Cox Counseling Center, a program of Family and Youth, provides a wide range of constructive and life-changing services

in the form of counseling, consultation and education to benefit individuals and families in Southwest Louisiana. Shannon Cox was a local advocate for the underprivileged and exploited who was tragically killed in a car accident in 2010. “Shannon made it her life’s work to help people who couldn’t help themselves,” said close friend Ginny Henning. The center, named in her memory, provides a safe place for children to express their emotions, to learn that their feelings are natural, and to help them move through their grief. “Children grieve differently than adults. The center works with each child individually to help them build a bridge on their road to recovery,” Galan added. Treatment for each child is based on his or her needs. Once they are determined, an individualized treat-

ment plan is developed and implemented. The child then participates in individual as well as group therapy sessions. “During a typical session, a child spends time engaging in activities such as drawing or spending time in the play room,” said Sara McDonald, Family and Youth counselor. Here, they have the opportunity to go through the 9 Core Lessons of Grief: • Telling their Story • Exploring Death • Identifying Changes • Memories and Remembering • Identifying and Expressing Feelings • Coping with Feelings • Learning Self-Care and Support • Learning to Say Good-Bye

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Art design by Candice Alexander PAGE 6

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They then join other children in group therapy sessions. “Studies show that children who attend group therapy sessions are better able to cope with their loss,” states Dr. Carr. Children are individually assessed to identify if they are appropriate to attend group, or if they would benefit primarily from individual counseling. “Group sessions are held for different ages and development levels, as well as circumstances,” McDonald said. “Some children may have experienced loss through natural causes such as illness or accidental deaths, while others experience loss through violent causes including suicide and homicide.” The Shannon Cox Counseling Center also aims to provide training for service providers so that they can help children deal with their loss. Erin Dugan, Ph.D., registered play therapist and asst. professor at LSU Health Sciences Center, and Jean Valliere, LCSW, asst. professor at LSU Health Sciences Center recently provided grief-counseling training to over 71 licensed professional counselors and social workers at L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort. Dugan provided participants with a hands-on experience in creating “Bibliotherapy” for children affected by

traumatic events in their lives, while Valliere provided clinicians with a conceptual base to understand the dynamics of grief and loss for children. Since May 15, 2010, The Shannon Cox Counseling Center staff has provided services to over 33 children. They hope to serve at least 125 children by the end of the year. In order to assure that the center continues to provide vital services to the community, The 2011 Shannon Cox Memorial Tennis Tournament was organized by close friends of Cox. Set to take place Aug. 26-28 at Lake Charles Racquet Club, proceeds will benefit the Shannon Cox Counseling Center. “Shannon loved kids and she loved tennis,” said Marti Lundy, tournament chairperson. “A fun-filled weekend of tennis, while supporting a worthy cause, is a fitting way to celebrate Shannon’s life and legacy.” For more information about The Shannon Cox Counseling Center and the 2011 Shannon Cox Memorial Tennis Tournament, visit www.fyca.org or call (337) 436-9533.

TJN

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The

Boiling

P l

Please submit press releases to lauren@thejambalayanews.com

BBBS WELCOMES NEW BOARD MEMBER Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southwest Louisiana’s Board of Directors would like to welcome new board member Sabrina Sonnier of Lake Charles Memorial Hospital. Sonnier has been a Big Sister in the program for nine years and actively participates in the Bowl For Kids’ Sake fundraiser, as well as supporting several non-profits throughout the community. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southwest Louisiana is a professionally supported volunteer movement proven to change how our children grow up in America. For more information, call 478-KIDS (5437) or visit www.bbbs-swla.net.

the state for achieving certain improvements in the quality of health care given to their patients. CAMERON COMMUNICATIONS IS WES CAL ARENA SPONSOR Cameron Communications is pleased to again be a corporate sponsor of the West Cal Arena with a donation of $2,500. The arena is an open-air style facility with permanent seating for 1,800 people. It’s best known for providing a local venue for youth, high school and national equestrian and rodeo events. For more information, visit their website at www.westcalarena.com.

Sabrina Sonnier

DEROUEN NEW REP FOR NORTHWEST MUTUAL Marty DeRouen has been appointed financial representative by the Northwestern Mutual Financial Network in Lake Charles. DeRouen will join a network of specialists providing expert guidance and innovative solutions for a variety of financial needs and goals. DeRouen is a native of Lake Charles and graduated magna cum laude with a mechanical engineering degree from McNeese in 1987. He is also a Marty DeRouen former Captain in the US ARMY Reserve and a veteran of Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm. Currently, DeRouen is an active member of the Immaculate Conception Cathedral Church. He resides in Lake Charles with his wife Julie and their two children, Andy and Emily.

Cameron Communications’ Public Relations Coordinator Trina Johnson presents the West Cal Arena’s Executive Director Adrian Moreno with a sponsorship check for $2,500.

CPSB TECHNOLOGY LEADERS WIN BLACKBOARD CATALYST AWARD Kim Leblanc, technology training coordinator and Pam Nicholson, technology facilitator from the Calcasieu Parish School Board won a Blackboard Catalyst Award for Exemplary Course Program. The award honors members of the community who design and develop exciting and innovative courses that represent the very best in technology and learning. Over 100 entries were evaluated in a rigorous peer-review process by more than 200 faculty and instructional designers. Blackboard is a global leader in enterprise technology and innovative solutions that improve the experience of millions of students and learners around the world every day.

ORANGE LEAF FROZEN YOGURT TO OPEN IN LC OLYLA, LLC, of Lafayette, has announced that its seventh franchised Orange Leaf Frozen Yogurt location will open in Lake Charles on Nelson Road by the new Chick- Fil-A in October 2011. Current locations of OLYLA stores are Monroe, New Iberia, and the newly opened Sulphur. OLYLA, LLC brings the total to eight, including Houma as its newest member of the group. Construction on the West Monroe location also began in June, and Natchitoches, Mandeville, and Houma locations are in the design phase. OLYLA, LLC has plans to open 15 stores in Louisiana in the next four years.

JENNINGS AMERICAN LEGION HOSPITAL RECEIVES LOUISIANA HOSPITAL CAPSTONE QUALITY AWARD Jennings American Legion Hospital has received the 2010 Louisiana Hospital Capstone Quality Award, presented by eQHealth Solutions, the Medicare Quality Improvement Organization for Louisiana. This award recognizes Jennings American Legion Hospital as one of only 38 hospitals in

IBERIABANK LAUNCHES COMMUNITY CAMPAIGN IBERIABANK (formerly Cameron State Bank) is pleased to launch its “Change is Good” campaign that provides an opportunity to turn small pocket change into larger dollars for local non-profit organizations. Donations collected from clients throughout August will be matched by IBERIABANK and then donated to non-profit organizations in Southwest Louisiana. The part-

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nerships vary in each community and include the Family and Youth Counseling Agency, Inc., Cameron Council on Aging, Ministerial Alliance of Vinton, Allen Parish 4-H and the Volunteer Fire Departments of Hackberry, Oakdale, DeQuincy and Kinder. For more information, contact Beth Ardoin at 521-4701.

“I feel it is my duty to restore the public’s faith and trust in the Assessor’s office.” – Wendy Curphy Aguillard, CLA Calcasieu Parish Assessor • Currently serving as Assessor • Certified LA Assessor with 15 years experience • Implemented new financial/ administrative policies

Join Up and Join In! www.lwv-lc.org email: info@lwv-lc.org (337) 474-1864 WHEREAS, the women of the United States have been treated as second-class citizens and have not been entitled the full rights and privileges, public or private, legal or institutional, which are available to male citizens of the United States;... The observance of Women’s Equality Day on August 26 each year, commemorates the passage of the 19th Amendment and calls attention to women’s continuing efforts toward full equality.

LC URGENT CARE NOW OPEN Lake Charles Urgent Care opened on Aug. 12 and is located at 1905 Country Club Rd., one block west of Nelson. The hours of operation are Mon. – Fri. from 8 a.m. – 8 p.m. and Sat./Sun. from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Lake Charles Urgent Care provides walk-in care for minor illnesses and injuries. The state-of-the-art facility is equipped with advanced technology including digital x-ray and an electronic medical records (EMR) system. Dr. Melvin “Jay” Marque, III, a native of New Roads, Dr. Melvin Marque, III is the medical director. He is board certified in emergency medicine, is a Fellow of the American Academy of Emergency Medicine and is a decorated veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom. For more information, contact Taylor Rainey at (225) 214-9352. CHRISTUS WELCOMES THOMAS LABORDE, M.D. Thomas LaBorde, M.D., has joined CHRISTUS St. Patrick Medical Group and CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital. His outpatient practice, CHRISTUS St. Patrick Medical Group Rehabilitation Services, is now open at 1605 Foster Street. He is also the new medical director of CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital’s Regional Physical Rehabilitation Center. Board certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation, Dr. LaBorde completed his residency at Baylor College of Dr. Thomas LaBorde Medicine. He is a native of Lafayette and a wellrespected rehabilitation specialist across the region. Dr. LaBorde is accepting new patients by appointment only.  To schedule an appointment with CHRISTUS St. Patrick Medical Group Rehabilitation Services, call (337) 430-3270. To schedule an appointment with CHRISTUS St. Patrick Rehabilitation Center, call (337) 491-7106. L’AUBERGE SPONSORS ARTS & CRABS FEST L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort recently presented a $5,000 donation to the Arts & Humanities Council of Southwest Louisiana as a headlining sponsor of the Arts & Crabs Fest scheduled for August 20 at the Lake Charles Civic Center. L’Auberge is an active supporter of the Arts & Humanities Council and their programs, which unite our cultural identity, the arts, and Louisiana’s invaluable seafood industry to educate locals and visitors about Southwest Louisiana.

Left to right: Mathew Welsh, L’Auberge special events manager and Arts & Humanities board member; Kerry Andersen, Pinnacle Entertainment regional director; Kaysie Bolton, board president; and Matt Young, executive director.

AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL ADVISORS ATTEND CONFERENCE Robert Mendelson, financial advisor/VP, CFP® and Richard Hinton, financial advisor, CFP®, at Amerirprise recently attended a professional PAGE 8

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development conference in Minneapolis. Industry leading speakers at the conference covered a variety of topics regarding wealth accumulation, income protection and retirement. Mendelson and Hinton’s office is located at 3101 Lake Street, Suite 102. They can be reached at (337) 477-1866 or by website at ameripriseadvisors.com/robert.r.mendelson or ameripriseadvisors.com/richard.a.hinton

Win a New Car! The race to win a new car is on, and the odds of driving away in the car are really good! The winner of a 2010 Chevrolet Camaro will be selected on Oct. 22, during the McNeese State University Homecoming Football Game. “To date, we have sold over 700 tickets, so the odds are still pretty good,” said Cheryl Bertrand, project chairperson. Tickets cost $10 each and can be purchased at Merchants & Farmers Bank & Trust Company, Business First Bank, Churchman Family Dentistry, City Savings Bank, Clarke Insurance, Doug Cooley, CPA Gulf Coast Carpet & Wallpaper Outlet, and South City

Paint & Supply in Lake Charles; as well as Lake Charles Lloyd Lauw Collision Repair in Sulphur. Tickets will also be sold from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., at Sam’s on Nelson Road in Lake Charles, on Aug. 27, Sept. 3 and 4, and Oct. 1. The winner does not have to be present to win. Proceeds from the event will benefit the McNeese Women’s Softball Program, the McNeese Foundation, the Millennium Park project, Rotary International Foundation, the SOWELA Foundation, and SOWELA Technical Automotive Program. TJN

Carl Broussard, Cameron Lions’ Club treasurer, receives donation from Cameron Communications’ PR coordinator, Trina Johnson.

CAMERON COMMUNICATIONS DONATES TO CAMERON FISHING FESTIVAL Cameron Communications was proud to again sponsor the Cameron Fishing Festival. The festival occurred at the Jetty Pier in Cameron August 5-6. Cameron Communications donated $1000 towards the event, which helps support the local Lions club. Funds raised by the festival go to support the Cameron Lion’s Club, including the Eye Glass Foundation, the Crippled Children’s Camp and the Cameron Parish Scholarship Fund. TJN

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Sam Houston HS Ten-Year Reunion

Meet Scrubbs! Scrubbs says that he wants to go home with a family soon. He is so confused. He is young and wellbehaved, so why is he at a kennel? He needs to be lounging around with his loving family and showing them how great he can be! Scrubbs is a Golden Retriever/Brittany Spaniel mix and weighs about 20-25 pounds. He is very gentle and loving and eager to learn. He will promise to welcome you home as soon as you come in the door, and he will always be in a great mood and

give you unconditional love! Scrubbs is a good candidate for the job of canine companion. He would like an interview with you soon, please. An application can found online at www.4PawsSocietyInc.com and faxed to (337) 558-6331 or emailed to fourpawssociety@aol.com. A vet reference and home visit is included with each adoption process. Hurry, Scrubbs is waiting! TJN

Calcasieu Boat Club Poker Run Sat., Sept. 10 Early Registration: $25 per person After Sept. 2: $30 per person • Includes fun stops, poker hand, meal and door prizes • Only participants with arm bands allowed at stops • Must be 21 or over and be present at check-in to have armband put on.

Call (800) 642-2968, M-F 8-5, ask for Barbara and mention Calcasieu Boat Club Poker Run.

TJN

REGISTRATION FORM: One per person (copies ok) Name Address

**Check-in is from 9 to 11a.m.** City

Make checks payable to: Calcasieu Boat Club Mail to: Joe Vezina 9285 Lanier Rd. Lake Charles, La. 70607 For information contact: Joe Vezina at 337-912-1034 or 337-905-0140 e-mail: vjvezina@camtel.net Inn on Bayou has blocked rooms. Must register by Sept 2. PAGE 10

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State

Zip

Phone E-mail address All entries are final, no refunds

On Sat., Oct. 8, the Sam Houston High School Class of 2002 will have their ten-year reunion starting at 7:30 p.m. at the Brick house on 110 West Pine Street, Downtown Lake Charles. There will be a DJ plus live music from the band STATIC. Reunion festivities will also include a “Family Fun Day” at Sam Houston Jones State Park, a golf tournament

at Graywood Golf Course, a float in the homecoming parade, tickets to the pre-homecoming game tea hosted by the Student Council, tickets to the homecoming game, and a bon-fire after the game on Friday night. For more information, contact Kerri Hebert (337) 515-2998 or Tiffany Guidry (337) 526-8207, Facebook/Group/SHHS 02 Reunion TJN

BBB Swamped with Calls on HomeServe USA The Better Business Bureau of Southwest Louisiana (BBB) is receiving a large number of calls regarding a mailing local consumers have received from HomeServe USA. The mailing informs recipients that they are responsible for the maintenance and repairs of their exterior water lines, leaving them liable for repairs, which could potentially cost thousands of dollars. It then provides an 800 number and a deadline to enroll in their Water Service Line Coverage. Some consumers have stated the mailing appears to be from a government or parish agency. The BBB is advising consumers to read these notices very carefully, particularly the portion that says, “HomeServe is an independent company separate from your local utility or community.” The BBB notes that while the company is correct when they say homeowners are responsible for the maintenance and repair of their water lines -– from the street to their meters -– the warranty coverage they offer is optional, not mandatory. “Similar to any warranty, service plan, or insurance policy, it is up to the consumer to determine its value and if it’s

worth purchasing. Consumers should consider their need for coverage and should get a clear explanation of the terms of the policy in writing,” says Carmen Million, BBB president. BBB recommends the following tips to consumers who receive a call or letter from Home Service USA or similar companies: Never agree to any contract over the phone without first receiving it in writing. Read the service contract very carefully and make sure you have a clear understanding of it, especially each of the exclusions, before agreeing to purchase. Review your homeowner’s insurance policy to see if coverage is already provided. Contact your insurance company to ask how this coverage would work in conjunction with your current policy. Make sure the company has a reasonable cancellation policy in case you change your mind after signing up. Check the company’s BBB Business Review to see if there is any unanswered, unresolved and/or unusual pattern of complaints at www.bbb.org or by calling BBB at (337) 4786253. TJN Volume 3 • Issue 11


By George “Tip” Cline

INFLATION SITUATION We’ve all noticed how food prices have been more than just creeping up. With the present economic downfall, there’s no alternative. With our devalued dollar, now worth approximately 1/1700 of the price of an ounce of gold, inflation demands that we give over more of our dollars for the same goods and services than we have in the recent past. You may feel that we are no longer on the gold standard. That’s officially true. The standard of our dollar’s value may be measured by whatever commodity you wish—gold just having been the item used for the last several thousand years. Our most available defense is to only purchase those items that you really need until you can find a deal on an item that you can stock up on. Buying something that you never use is worse than not buying it at all. SCHOOLS ARE OPEN! It’s school traffic headache time again. Time to be aware of school zone speed limits and those little folks who are so easily distracted and vulnerable. For the last few months, we did not have to face the morning drop off and afternoon pick up lines around our schools, but it’s time to get back into our routines. We keep hoping that these traffic-clogging situations will improve, but in the meantime, take your time and leave a little bit earlier. DWI AND FACEBOOK I am firmly against drunk driving and believe that anyone above the legal limit should not be behind the wheel. Hopefully, someone in that condition will either have a friend see Volume 3 • Issue 11

them safely home or else take a cab. It was inevitable that with all the increased traffic enforcement details (you know, the “for public safety” campaigns that just happen to be a handy source of revenue for the public coffers) that Facebook and other websites have become more informational to the motoring public. The DWI checkpoint on your city’s Facebook page features persons reporting on radar speed traps and DWI setups. Our local television station, KPLC-TV, did a piece on the Lake Charles site, questioning the worth of such an enterprise. The law enforcement agency that responded to them knew about the site, and it appears that the websites do lead to more awareness on the part of drivers. As always, it pays to be conscious of your own behavior and to pay attention to your own responsibilities.

EAST HALE ST., LAKE CHARLES 2 bed / 2 bath • Approx. 1,250 sq. ft. Washer & Dryer | All appliances furnished Central location off of Ryan Street

SUPERMARKET ROUNDUP The shopping report on the date of August 17, 2011, reflects the posted prices where the product was displayed for sale at Albertsons-Country Club Road, Kroger-McNeese Street, Market Basket-Nelson Road and Walmart-Nelson Road. The following products were selected: Hormel Tamales (per 28-oz. can): Albertsons $3.49, Kroger $2.99, Market Basket $2.97, Walmart $2.48. Iceberg Lettuce (per head): Albertsons $1, Kroger $1.18, Market Basket $1.29, Walmart $1.14. Wheat Thin Crackers (10-oz. box) Albertsons $3.79, Kroger $2.98, Market Basket $3.69, Walmart $2.50. Oscar Mayer Classic Wieners (16-oz. package): Albertsons $2.99, Kroger $2.49, Market Basket $3.19, Walmart $1.98.

TJN

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Dang Yankee The

By Mike McHugh

Bulls, Bears, and Baloney Just when I thought I might be able to retire sometime this century, the stock market lost 600 points in one day. So now, with the Donald having to open up a lemonade stand in front of Trump Towers, what are we small-time investors to do? If you’re like me, you probably feel like pulling out the few dollars you have left in your brokerage account and investing it in hard assets like gold, silver, or Bacardi 151. But before you do that, let me reassure you that it’s hard to find a better investment for the long term than the stocks of blue

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chip companies. Okay, you do have Nigerian e-mail solicitations, but that’s about it. These days especially, it’s easy to open an online account with a discount broker. Years ago, you had to sign on with a full service broker in order to invest in stocks. The broker would call you about an opportunity to get in on the bottom floor of a start-up venture that makes microdigital servo-bionic rectifiers. Even though you have no idea what that is, you don’t want to seem stupid, because you are a sophisticated

investor. There won’t be any old, boring brick-making companies in your portfolio, that’s for sure! All is good until about a week later. You get another call from your broker, who is in the Cayman Islands enjoying rum drinks with the commissions he made on your transaction. It turns out that another company, one in which you are not invested, of course, has come out with an improved, nano-digital servo-bionic rectifier, making your company’s product obsolete and your shares worth less than a fistful of losing raffle tickets. The situation is much better for today’s individual investor. You can now easily access a wealth of research material over the Internet. Unfortunately, it takes a high-rise building full of accountants to interpret it all, so you probably won’t read any of it. Rather, the extent of your research is more likely to be limited to a hot tip from the Domino’s delivery boy. But you have bypassed the middleman, and so after you lose your shirt, at least you won’t be sitting around wishing for a hurricane to reduce your broker’s island paradise to a sand bar. After enough of such frustrating experiences, you might be tempted to

rely on “inside information” as a short cut to riches. I would be remiss if I didn’t warn you against this practice. It’s illegal, and sooner or later you are bound to be caught. Consider Martha Stewart, who tried this, only to end up being hustled off to prison in handcuffs that clashed with her earrings. Besides, even if you are fortunate enough to know the CEO of a major corporation, he probably has no idea what his company actually does except that it pays his country club dues. All that being said, if the idea of investing in stocks still appeals to you, it first of all tells me you have about as much brains as a corn dog. Secondly, I need to warn you: investing is highly addictive. Before you know it, you’ll have watched nothing but “Bloomberg News” for two weeks straight. You won’t even remember the last time you saw ESPN Sports Center, and so you have no idea how the Astros have been doing lately. (Here’s an update: you’re better off.) You just can’t get enough of those TV talking heads, who must know what they’re talking about since they all wear tailored Italian suits and use big words like “arbitrage.” And you want to be able to afford those suits, too. It’s not that you’d ever wear one, of course; after all, you wore camouflage to your mother-in-law’s funeral. But that doesn’t matter; you’re no different than any other investor who wants to be able to boast at cocktail parties how he is “outperforming the market.” So what if martinis are not your thing? Just imagine the conversation at the deer camp over a couple of Lone Stars: YOU: “Hey Earl, did I tell you I’m outperforming the market?” EARL: “Say what?” YOU: “You know, the stock market. I’m outperforming it.” EARL: “So you finally figured out how to make a roux better than Richard’s?” YOU: “No, you simpleton. I’m talking about securities.” EARL: “Oh, I get it. You mean it’s all okay now between you and the missus about that thing you said not to tell the other guys about.” So, none of your friends will really understand, but that’s okay, because you have as much chance of “outperforming the market” as you do being able to figure out what “arbitrage” means. I just have one final bit of advice if you’re still thinking about investing in stocks. Be sure you have a vending permit from the city before you open that lemonade stand. TJN Volume 3 • Issue 11


oyle By Jim D

of gray. Only black and white, mostly black, like my mood. The next morning I got up and rummaged through my drawer for another copy of the original watch, wound it up, and set it on my table. It didn’t work, either. Big surprise. Never a minute’s trouble with any of them, and now... So I pulled out the watch Daddy gave me, wound it up, and it ran perfectly. I thought back to what Thomas said to me. And this time, I listened. There are those of you who will grok this, and those of you who won’t.

But I’m convinced Daddy wanted me to wear his watch again, and striking the copies dead was his way of nudging me in that direction, reminding me I’m not alone. And God let him do that for me, reminding me to listen more than I talk. It’s a good lesson. Things have brightened since then, and I’m used to the idea that some days will be better than others. Continual thanks to all of you who have lifted a prayer or a good thought on my behalf. Keep ‘em coming. See y’all on the flip. TJN

This Time, I Listened Did you ever have one of those days? You know the kind I mean, days when everything seems to turn out wrong, nothing works like it’s supposed to, add in some mixed crises at work and a little bad news and you’ve got a real Ann Murray song on your hands. That was my day last Monday. Towards the end of it, events were set in motion, which lead me to the kernel of good news I’m giving you today. I made a stop on my way home to visit with some friends and while I was there, checked the time. “Oh, it’s 11:20,” I said, knowing it was well into the late afternoon. My watch had stopped. This requires a little explanation. I always wear a pocket watch. But not just any pocket watch. Part of that is because I am by nature a little oldfashioned, but most of it is because I can’t wear a wristwatch on my left arm. It’s a dialysis thing. Anyway. The pocket watch I always wear is a particular model of a Bulova Swiss watch my Dad gave me as a senior in high school as a reward for volunteering to lead the junior choir at my church. As a teenager I would wear the watch all the time, and I was forever breaking the crystal, which was kind of a sore point with Daddy, who maintained pride in the gift he had given me. As well he should have. So did I. But because it seemed like I broke it every time I wore it, the last time it happened, I put the watch in its blue original case in my mother’s bedroom and left it there when I left for college. Daddy, as we all called him, contracted throat cancer as a result of smoking two or three packs of unfiltered Camels every day, and despite the best efforts of medical science, he died in April 40 years ago. Hard to believe it’s been that long. I’ve written Volume 3 • Issue 11

about him before, some of you may remember the column. He was a great person and a profound influence on my life in many ways, even though we were kind of oil and water. As my brother Thomas often says, my political opinions would have provided enough energy for my father to introduce manned space flight all on his own. I’m left, he was right. He had a good heart, though, and the watch he gave me, while it was far from the only thing, was the most tangible memory I had of him. So when he died, naturally I wanted to wear it to his funeral. I couldn’t find it where I’d left it, and remember to this day how frantic and helpless I felt when I thought I’d lost it. But about two weeks later, my mother called me and told me she had found my watch. Daddy had taken it to a jeweler in Jackson, the small city about 25 miles from my little hometown, to repair its broken crystal. I kept the watch put away since then. But when Ebay came along I bought every identical watch I could find. Passed some of them out to my sons, and started the habit of wearing one of the copies. Gave one to a very special friend this year, and still had three of them. So, when I wound the watch while visiting last Monday, I fully expected it to work when I got home. I’d never had a minute’s trouble with any of them. But it didn’t run. Some kind of a glitch. Later that night, I called my brother. I was really low. He reminded me that he, and many others, were praying for me daily and that I should do so myself. “Thomas, I don’t think He’s listening to me any more,” I said. “Brother, the problem isn’t that He’s not listening to you,” Thomas said. “It’s that you’re not listening to Him.” Probably. But when you’ve had one of those days, there are no shades AUGUST 25, 2011

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By Lauren de Albuquerque This really was an amazing summer in the Lake Area. I honestly don’t know how anyone can be bored living here. No, we’re not Austin or New Orleans, but there’s always something going on. If you can’t find anything to do, it’s your own fault. The Jambalaya News was well represented at The American Cancer Society’s annual gala, “A

Night in Tuscany” held at the Isle of Capri recently. There was an exclusive patron party, live and silent auctions, dinner and entertainment. We were out of town and are sorry we missed it—but there’s always next year! Hope you were at the Arts & Crab Fest at the Lake Charles Civic Center last Saturday. Organized to benefit the Arts and

Faye and Tommy Drake at The American Cancer Society’s annual gala. Kay Andrews with her grandson Justin.

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Humanities Council. Director Matt Young was thrilled to tell me that they’d actually sold ALL of their tickets! Good for them. I think they’ve found a winner with this fundraiser. Everyone enjoyed crab dishes from various local restaurants, paired with samples of Abita beer. There were crabstuffed jalapenos from Sha-Sha’s, crab/avocado salad from Pujo St. Café, crab au gratin from Steamboat Bill’s…you get the picture. Top that off with local artists and vendors selling their wares, and you’ve got a fabulous time— and desperately needed funds for the arts. Speaking of beer, the first Louisiana Beer Fest is coming to town on Sat., Sept. 24 at the Civic

Center. There will be over 100 beers from all over the world to sample, food booths, beer brewing classes, etc. Who doesn’t like a cold beer on a hot day? Sounds like fun. Go to www.louisianabeerfest.com for all the info! Rep. Mike Danahy (D-LA) was the guest speaker at the August meeting of the WestCal Association of Commerce. That organization just keeps growing, thanks to their Dianne Dronet and her fantastic board! For the door prize, The Jam raffled off chances to win a free ad in our publication. The director of finance for the City of Westlake, Jimmy Ashworth, was the winner. Congrats, Jimmy! See you in The Jam soon! TJN

Dance • Cheer Competition Team • SWLA Ballet Company

The Jambalaya staff at Arts & Crabs. With Jam’s Katy Corbello and Jody Barilleaux of Hixson’s Funeral Home at West Cal’s August meeting.

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AUGUST 25, 2011

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By Lauren de Albuquerque

I’ll never forget the first time we went to Sam Houston Jones State Park. It was Christmas Day, and we’d been in Lake Charles less than two months. Our friends Laura and Steve came down to visit for the

holidays. These two have backpacked all over the world, so we thought a hike in the park would be fun for them. It was a wonderful day. Decent weather; in the high 50s and dry. Of course, no one was there but us—Christmas isn’t exactly the high season for state parks! That made it all the better. It was our own little world for a while. Originally named for Sam Houston, the Texas folk hero who traveled throughout Southwest Louisiana, the park was given its

current name in honor of the state’s 37th governor, who was involved in setting aside this tract of land for the public to enjoy. I never realized how big it is. Altogether, it consists of 1,087 acres of woodlands, lakes and rivers, plenty of space for all kinds of wildlife, including deer, squirrels, bobcats, rabbits, alligators, otters, nutria rats (ugh!), raccoons, foxes, and over 200 species of birds during the migration seasons. We saw the herd of deer that are kept in a special area of the park, and the ducks and geese enjoying a lazy afternoon on the ponds. The tree-filled lagoons are the

407 Sam Houston Jones Pkwy., Suite A Moss Bluff, LA Office (337) 905-9595 Fax (337) 905-9596 Cell (337) 515-9276 coneal@lamaisonproperties.com

716 N. Hwy 171 Moss Bluff, LA (337) 217-8001

Dennis Lambert started in the mobile home moving business in 1974. His son, Clint, remembers going on jobs with his dad since he was old enough to ride in the truck, and coming home to tell his mom about his day. Today, he and his dad are in business together. In 2001, Dennis, his wife Pat and Clint opened Moss Bluff Portable Buildings on Highway 171 North in Moss Bluff. Moss Bluff Portable Buildings is family-owned and operated and prides itself on the ability to not only provide superior storage options to customers, but to create lasting friendships with them long after the sale is over. This business does it all. They sell portable buildings, carports, RV covers and horse barns. They also move and tiedown portable buildings. Their portable buildings come in a variety of styles to accommodate each customer’s needs. PAGE 16

AUGUST 25, 2011

Whether it’s for residential or commercial use, they’ve got the style that’s right for you. “Our mission is to provide each customer with superior quality manufactured storage options that are both cost effective and reliable,” said Pat Lambert. “Our honesty and customer service is why we continue to serve this area proudly since 2001.” Their unique customer service includes a rent-to-own program and regular financing on buildings. They also take custom orders. At Moss Bluff Portable Buildings, there is always an owner on-site. “We’re here to stay and we always stand behind what we sell,” Clint said. Whether it’s a portable building, carport or RV cover – they’ve got you covered! www.mossbluffportablebuildings.com

epitome of Louisiana, along with the bald cypress trees. As we hiked along the trail, I made a mental note to come back in the spring to see the flowers blooming and watch the birds as they return. The park is located in the Central Migratory Flyway, just north of the most productive birding region in Louisiana. There’s a lot to see and do. Facilities here include campsites, cabins, a boat launch, and a scenic picnic area with pavilions, a playground and restrooms. I’d love to spend the night in one of those cabins. If I do, I’ll tell you all about it! Keep in mind that boat rentals

La Maison Properties is a full-service real estate company working with buyers, sellers, investors and contractors. They are located at 407 Sam Houston Jones Parkway in Suite A of Unique Plaza in Moss Bluff. “We handle all aspects of real estate, residential, commercial, investments, and property management,” said Cheryl O’Neal, who is the broker at La Maison Properties. Because La Maison is a family-owned business, they have a great understanding of a family’s needs and desires for their loved ones. We work together to meet those needs,” O’Neal said. Sharel Hebert, Mariella Welch, David O’Neal, Teni Tillery and Veronica Williams are the agents for La Maison Properties. Completing the team are assistants, Nicole O’Neal and Ashlee LaRocque. “We have a long and varied back-

ground in the business, legal, insurance, and management fields. That experience has proven very valuable to our clients.” Going the extra mile is the norm at La Maison. “We work diligently and tirelessly for our clients with the utmost integrity,” O’Neal said. In addition, O’Neal said the company strongly supports the Moss Bluff area and is actively involved in the community in many ways. We know the Moss Bluff area, as we live and raise our families here. “I was raised here, as were my children and now my grandchildren,” added O’Neal, “ I love Moss Bluff and that was why we chose to open our business here.” We welcome the opportunity to serve our community with their real estate needs at La Maison Properties.

www.lamaisonproperties.com. Volume 3 • Issue 11


have been temporarily discontinued due to the construction on a new outdoor amphitheatre and efforts to combat excessive greenery in the lagoon. No word yet on when that will change. Here are the trails available for hiking. We went on the Longleaf Pine Trail. It was just beautiful.

• Riverwalk Trail — 1.6 miles • Cypress Tupelo Trail — 1/2 mile • Swamp Walk Trail — 1.1 miles • Longleaf Pine Trail — 3-1/2 miles • Longleaf Pine Extension — 1.3 miles Hours of operation are 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., Sunday through Thursday. All park sites close at 10 p.m. on Friday, Saturday and days preceding holidays. TJN

407 Sam Houston Jones Pkwy., Suite E Lake Charles, LA (337) 905-8352 Mon.-Fri. 10-5, Sat. 10-4

With a retail background, Tela Lambert always wanted to open a shop of her own that carried unique things. “I used to love to go shopping out of town because there are some really good gift shops with things that we just didn’t have here,” she said. I'm blessed to have the support of my husband Dusty of seven years, three children, family and the love of my extended church family of eleven years, Christian World Ministries. She finally made her dream come true this past April with the opening of Tela’s Things in Moss Bluff.

“I search online for unique products, and also for any specific items that customers want,” she said. “I want to cater to the customer.” Tela's Thing's has something for everyone in "your" family, from the ever so popular "Swamp People" t-shirts that dad is sure to love, stylish comfortable fashions for mom, MudPie fashions for the kids, Carriage Candles make perfect gifts and sooo much more. Tela’s carries Carriage Candles, Swamp People T-shirts, Mud Pie infant and children’s clothing, Louisiana children’s books and cookbooks and so much more. Come in and see for yourself!

271 N. Hwy 171 Ste. 1400, Moss Village Shopping Center 337-905-9348 (X-FIT) The mission statement of the Moss Bluff recreational Football Team is a good one: “The goal of the Moss Bluff Recreational Football program is to develop and promote the ideals of teamwork, responsibility, sportsmanship, hard work, character, and self-confidence in a fundamentally safe and constructive environment. The growth of MBRFL is enhanced through the spirit of competition, discipline and fair play. These objectives are accomplished by providing a structured program to educate the participants in all aspects of the American tradition of football. The MBRFL is committed to providing a program that maintains the highest standards while insuring that fun is the top priority. The league will always make the welfare of the players first and void of the adult quest for glory.”

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Last chance for registration will be Sat., Aug. 27. There will be three age groups this year: • Pee Wee: Ages 7-8 • Juniors: Ages 9-10 • Seniors: Ages 11-12 The ages are based upon your child’s age as of May 1, 2011. For example, if he turned 9 on May 3, 2011, then he would play as an 8year-old this year. If your child is going into the 8th grade, please be sure to print out the coaches release form and have his middle school coach sign and return. All required forms can be found in the handout section of the MBRFL website at www. eteamz.com/mbrfl/ Remember, no one is allowed to play in the league this year that is older than 12 as of May 1, 2011 or enrolled as a freshman in high school in the fall. TJN

Cathie and Troy Hoover live in Moss Bluff. They love the community, and although opening their store in a more populated area would probably have helped them grow faster, they recognized the need for a supplement and nutrition store in Moss Bluff. “We felt that by supporting this community by investing in a small business, we would also be an inspiration for other new businesses to open here,” Cathie said. Along with the convenience, they offer competitive pricing. X-Factor carries a full line of vitamins, herbal and sports supplements, diet aids, and body building elite products. They also carry an exclusive line of gym wear: Better Bodies, athletic wear and the GASP hardcore gym wear by Branch Warren, which can’t be found anywhere else in the area. “Troy and I have both committed to

providing products you won’t find in other supplement stores, due to our alliance with some of the newest emerging companies putting out cutting-edge products that would not be able to supply larger chain store demands, “ Cathie said. “This allows us to partner with some of the companies putting out the newest sports products on the market, while providing them to our customers at near Internet pricing.” Cathie said they discount some of the new products to get feedback on their effectiveness, and to really hone in on products that do what they promise. “Our customers win, and we win by finding some great products that we can recommend,” she said. Open since August of 2010, they’re thrilled to be celebrating their first year in business. “We’ve had such tremendous support and encouragement from our customers,” Cathie said. “We feel we made the right move to invest here!” X-Factor Supplements and Nutrition info@xfactorsupplementstore.com www.xfactorsupplementstore.com AUGUST 25, 2011

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By Candice Pauley

When Beth Zilbert met the emaciated and sickly retriever, Luke, for the first time, it was love at first sight. Despite his slight frame and illness, there was a tenderness about him that could not be denied. Beth decided that she had to take him in and care for him. After a close call and a struggle to stay alive in ICU, Luke made it through a rough start in his new life with Zilbert. Since that rocky beginning, the two have been making up for lost time in earnest. Zilbert’s first inclination was that there was something very special about Luke, and in her never-ending quest to do for others; she decided that Luke would make the perfect pet therapy dog. The two set off on a journey that has created a number of programs to reach out to troubled youth, the elderly, the sick and the recovering, and they have no plans to stop anytime soon. Luke’s origins are a mystery, but his impact on the lives of others is not. After Luke received his certification as a service dog, Zilbert started making phone calls to nursing homes, extended care facilities, hospitals, physical therapy units, and the juvenile detention center to offer their services to others. But it was a struggle getting anyone to take an active interest in what she was offering at first. People seemed skeptical and unsure of the idea of pet therapy. “It hadn’t existed in Lake Charles before me and Luke,” Zilbert said. They started with their first “love visits” to the physical therapy units at St. Patrick’s Hospital several years ago. The idea of the love visits was simple: People in pain or dealing

with stress or depression need to feel better. The simple act of petting a dog releases much-needed endorphins that do just that: make people feel better. Luke was a hit with the patients in the physical therapy units. After his success, it was only natural to want to branch out and use his talents to help more people. As a founding member of the People’s Advocate, a non-profit organization dedicated to representing children caught in the juvenile justice and family court systems, Zilbert has spent years using her skills as an attorney to advocate for troubled youth. She has found that teaching children through service learning is a highly effective way to build their self-esteem and decrease their recidivism rates. She focuses on having troubled teens learn to do for themselves by doing for others. Not only do they see that service makes a difference in someone else’s life, they get to feel good about having truly accomplished something that benefits not only themselves but others. As president of the Southwest Louisiana Humane Society,

Zilbert couldn’t think of a better way to teach children empathy, love and compassion than to have them work with animals. One of the few organizations to return her calls and express a level of interest in what she and Luke were offering was the Juvenile Detention Center (JDC). At first, the idea was to bring Luke in for love visits as part of a new Cell Dog Project with the children in the center. “There are no real rehabilitation programs for kids in juvenile centers,” Zilbert said. With the help of Luke, the Humane Society, and professional dog trainer Britney Blanchette, this lack of services is changing. Dogs show unconditional love, and the children in the facility are often in desperate need

of affection without condition. Zilbert and Luke would visit the JDC to allow the teens to pet and interact with him. It seemed a simple act, but the JDC security guards noticed a change in the children who were participating in the visits. “The children were better the day before, the day of, and the day after Luke’s visits,” Zilbert said. Over time, the program developed and became much more. Now the JDC has teamed

Beth Zilbert with her happy guy, Luke.

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up with the Humane Society and Calcasieu Parish to create the New Leash on Life program to rehabilitate both dogs and troubled teens. As part of the program, the teens must clean, care for, feed, train and rehabilitate abandoned dogs from Calcasieu Parish Animal Services in order to find them new, permanent homes. This creates both an avenue for the parish to save more animals by clearing out some space for new rescues, and an incentive for the participating children to maintain good behavior. In order to participate in the program, the teens must stay out of trouble during the week to be allowed to continue working with the animals. Humane Society volunteers visit the JDC twice a week to teach the teens to train their animals. The children must use only positive feedback to teach the dogs behavioral skills, which in turn teaches the children positive ways to work with other living creatures. In three years, New Leash on Life has rehabilitated 50 dogs, and has seen 90 teens go through the program.

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Those teens’ recidivism rates are half that of the others housed at the JDC. In Zilbert’s eyes, service learning is an absolute necessity to building self-respect and self-esteem. By working with the abandoned dogs and rehabilitating them by using only positive feedback, the teens feel good knowing that they saved the life of an innocent animal by creating no harm to that animal. These skills are easily translated into life situations with family and peers. “The kids are learning to receive by giving,” Zilbert said. “We call it ‘meeting two needs with one deed.’” Pet therapy and visits to the JDC are not all Zilbert and Luke have in

store for the Lake Area. With the help of Blanchette and the Humane Society, Zilbert intends to start a local Pets for Vets program that will train dogs to be service animals for servicemen and women returning from deployment suffering from physical and psychological trauma. By giving, we receive, and by accepting help, we allow others to grow and learn through service. This is the lesson that Zilbert and Luke have to share. To learn more about volunteering with the Humane Society or becoming part of the pet therapy program with your dog, contact Beth Zilbert at (337) 436-3475. TJN

AUGUST 25, 2011

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experience joint inflammation that produces symptoms of arthritis. This condition is called psoriatic arthritis. In many cases, there is a family history of psoriasis. Researchers have studied a large number of families affected by it and identified genes linked to the disease. People with psoriasis may notice that there are times when their skin worsens (called flares), then improves. Conditions that may cause flares include infections, stress, and changes in climate that dry the skin. Also, certain medicines, including beta-blockers, which are prescribed for high blood pressure, and lithium may trigger an outbreak or worsen the disease.

WHAT CAUSES PSORIASIS? Psoriasis is a skin disorder driven by the immune system, especially involving a type of white blood cell called a T cell. Normally, T cells help protect the body against infection and disease. In the case of psoriasis, T cells are put into action by mistake and become so active that they trigger other immune responses, which lead to inflammation and to rapid turnover of skin cells. PAGE 20

AUGUST 25, 2011

What is psoriasis? It’s a chronic, autoimmune disease that appears on the skin, occurring when the immune system sends out faulty signals that speed up the growth cycle of skin cells. Psoriasis is not contagious. Psoriasis affects greater than 3 percent of the United States population, or more than 5 million adults. Although the disease occurs in all age groups, it primarily affects adults, and appears about equally in males and females. Psoriasis occurs when skin cells quickly rise from their origin below the surface of the skin and pile up on the surface before they have a chance to mature. Usually this movement (also called turnover) takes about a month, but in psoriasis it may occur in only a few days. In its typical form, psoriasis results in patches of thick, red skin covered with silvery scales. These patches, which are sometimes referred to as plaques, usually itch or feel sore. They most often occur on the elbows, knees, other parts of the legs, scalp, lower back, face, palms, and soles of the feet, but they can occur on skin anywhere on the body. The disease may also affect the fingernails, the toenails, and the soft tissues of the genitals, and inside the mouth. Although it is not unusual for the skin around affected joints to crack, about 30 percent of those with psoriasis

HOW DOES PSORIASIS AFFECT QUALITY OF LIFE? Individuals with psoriasis may experience significant physical discomfort and some disability. Itching and pain can interfere with basic functions, such as self-care, walking, and sleep. Plaques on hands and feet can prevent individuals from working at certain occupations, playing some sports, and caring for family members or a home. The frequency of medical care is costly and can interfere with an employment or school schedule. People with moderate to severe psoriasis may feel self-conscious about their appearance and have a poor self-image that stems from fear of public rejection and psychosexual concerns. Psychological distress can lead to significant depression and social isolation. HOW IS PSORIASIS TREATED? Doctors generally treat psoriasis in steps based on the severity of the disease, size of the areas involved, type of psoriasis, and the patient’s response to initial treatments. This is sometimes called the “1-2-3” approach. In step 1, medicines are applied to the skin (topical treatment). Step 2 uses light treatments (phototherapy). Step 3 involves taking medicines by mouth or injection that treat the whole immune system (called systemic therapy). Over time, affected skin can become resistant to treatment, especially when topical corticosteroids are used. Also, a treatment that works very well in one person may have little effect in another. Thus, doctors often use a trial-and-error approach to find a treatment that works, and they may switch treatments periodically (for examVolume 3 • Issue 11


ple, every 12 to 24 months) if a treatment does not work or if adverse reactions occur. STEP 1: TOPICAL TREATMENT Treatments applied directly to the skin may improve its condition. Doctors find that some patients respond well to ointment or cream forms of corticosteroids, vitamin D3, retinoids, coal tar, or anthralin. Bath solutions and lubricants may be soothing, but they are seldom strong enough to improve the condition of the skin. Therefore, they usually are

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combined with stronger remedies. STEP 2: LIGHT THERAPY Natural ultraviolet light from the sun and controlled delivery of artificial ultraviolet light are used in treating psoriasis. It is important that a doctor administer light therapy, since spending time in the sun or a tanning bed can cause skin damage and can increase the risk of skin cancer. STEP 3: SYSTEMIC TREATMENT For more severe forms of psoriasis, doctors sometimes prescribe medi-

cines that are taken internally by pill or injection. This is called systemic treatment. COMBINATION THERAPY Combining various topical, light, and systemic treatments often permits lower doses of each and can result in increased effectiveness. There are many approaches for treating psoriasis. Therefore, doctors are paying more attention to combination therapy. PSYCHOLOGICAL SUPPORT Some individuals with moderate to

severe psoriasis may benefit from counseling or participation in a support group to reduce self-consciousness about their appearance or relieve psychological distress resulting from fear of social rejection. For more information, contact the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) 6600 SW 92nd Ave., Suite 300, Portland, OR 97223-7195. Phone: (503) 244-7404; Toll Free: (800) 7239166; Fax: (503) 245-0626; Email: getinfo@npfusa.org Website: http://www.psoriasis.org

TJN

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Today’s medicines cure infectious diseases, prevent problems from chronic diseases, and alleviate pain for millions of Americans. But medicines can also cause harm. Adverse drug events cause over 700,000 emergency department visits each year. There are a number of things you can do to help reduce the risk of harm from medicines. For starters, learn how to properly take, monitor, and store your medicines. Medication safety includes a number of things that you can do to

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make sure that you get the most benefit from medications with the least risk of harm. ARE ADVERSE DRUG EVENTS A BIG PROBLEM? There are many ways to measure the size of the problem of medication safety. Recent work at CDC has focused on the short-term, severe problems of medicines taken by people outside of hospital settings. It is estimated that there are more than 700,000 visits to emergency departments for adverse drug events each year in the United States. Nearly 120,000 of these patients need to be hospitalized for further treatment. This is an important patient safety problem, but many of these adverse drug events are preventable.

WHO IS AT RISK? Anyone who takes medicines has some risk of a harmful effect. How high that risk is depends on the individual patient’s health, the particular medicines a patient is using, and how patients use their medicines. Nevertheless, national data suggest there are some key risks and risk groups: • Young Children: Children less than 5 years old are twice as likely as older children to be taken to emergency departments for adverse drug events (nearly 98,000 emergency visits each year). Most of these emergency visits are due to young children finding and eating or drinking medicines on their own, without adult supervision. • Older Adults: Older adults (65 years or older) are also twice as likely as others to come to emergency

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departments for adverse drug events (over 177,000 emergency visits each year). Older adults are nearly seven times more likely to be hospitalized after an emergency visit, but most of these hospitalizations are due to just a few drugs known to require careful monitoring to prevent problems. Common drugs that can require monitoring are blood thinners and diabetes and seizure medications. • All Adults: The death rate from unintentional prescription drug overdoses is highest among middle-aged adults (40–49 years old). In 2004, over 7,500 Americans died of unintentional overdoses of opioid (or narcotic) analgesics (pain medications such as methadone, oxycodone, and hydrocodone) than from cocaine or heroin. WHAT YOU CAN DO • Know your medicines. Keep a list of their names, how much you take, and when you take them. Include over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and supplements and herbs. Take this list to all your doctor visits. • Follow the directions. Take your medicines exactly as prescribed. Don’t take medications prescribed for someone else. • Ask if you need blood testing. If you take any medicines that require special testing, pay particular attention to taking these properly and get regular blood testing • Ask questions. If you don’t know the answers to these questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist: - Why am I taking this medicine? - What are the common problems to watch out for? - What should I do if they occur? - When should I stop this medicine? - Can I take this medicine with the other medicines on my list?

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IF YOU HAVE CHILDREN • Store medicines safety and securely out of the reach of children. Leave medicines in their original packaging and make sure the caps are always secured. Never tell children that medication is candy. • Avoid unnecessary medicines. Antibiotics and cough and cold medications will not cure most colds, coughs, flu, sore throats, or runny noses. These medicines can sometimes cause more harm than good. Source: Centers for Disease Control

TJN Volume 3 • Issue 11

AUGUST 25, 2011

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Local Runners Win Medals at National Qualifying Meet After competing in the Regional Meet in New Orleans and the ESPN Rise AAU National Qualifying meet in Orlando, aspiring Olympic athletes Nique Griffin, 13 and her sister Frankie, 11, headed to New Orleans for the 2011 AAU National Junior Olympics—the world’s largest youth track meet from July 30 – Aug. 6.  Over 12,000 athletes from 46 states and Puerto Rico attended. The top 8 finishers in each event of each age group were awarded medals.  Results of the 2011 AAU National Junior Olympics are as follows. The ranking of each girl in each event is where she is currently ranked in the NATION. Frankie Griffin: High Jump - 1st Place  Pentathlon - 3rd Place 80 meter Hurdles - 4th Place Long Jump - 5th Place

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Frankie jumped her personal best in the long jump with a jump of 15’ 1” and a personal best in the 80meter hurdles with a time of 13.93 seconds. She also attempted to break the National record in the high jump, which was 5 feet, but didn’t quite get it. She won with a jump of 4’ 10”. Nique Griffin Long Jump - 3rd Place 100-meter dash - 26th Place 200-meter dash - 15th Place  400-meter dash - 10th Place Nique ran her personal best time in the 400-meter dash with a time of 58.24 seconds. Nique and Frankie, daughters of Kenneth and Mona Griffin, reside in Iowa and attend Hamilton Christian Academy. The girls are coached by Johnny Giordano. TJN

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Story By Lisa Addison Photos by Michelle LaVoie

A few years ago, Juanita McCullough fell from an attic and severely injured her leg. She had 14 surgeries in the span of two years. Doctors did everything they could to save her leg, but to no avail. After an amputation, McCullough, 70, eventually sought to get fitted for a prosthetic leg. “Let me tell you, I went to a couple of different places and got no help at all,” she said. “I felt like they didn’t listen to me or respect me. But then I found Ronnie Bias at Lake Area Prosthetics and Orthotics and I’ve been so happy. Ronnie and his staff will work with patients and do whatever they need to do to make things work. I have a prosthesis, but you can’t even tell that I have one. I tell everyone I know who is in my type of situation that they should go to Lake Area Prosthetics and Orthotics because they are truly wonderful.”

Juanita McCullough, pictured with owner Ronnie Bias, is proud of her left prosthetic leg. “Accidents happen and Ronnie Bias was the answer to my prayers. Thanks to Ronnie Bias and my prosthetic leg, there's no stopping me!” Volume 3 • Issue 11

LAKE AREA PROSTHETICS & ORTHOTICS CHANGED PATIENT’S LIFE In fact, McCullough, who has been married to her husband Roy for 54 years, says that Bias and his staff changed her life. “I’ve been going to him since 2002,” she said. “I don’t know of anyone who does house calls these days but Ronnie does. I broke the prosthesis and he actually came to my home. That’s just unheard of! It really is. He cares and he will go the extra mile to do anything that he can. He’s not after the ‘Almighty Dollar’ and he just really wants to help people. I’m very fortunate that I found him.” Bias, a native of Lake Charles, feels the same way about his patients -– fortunate that they choose his facility when they have a need. “We strive for 100 percent satisfaction from both our patients and referring physicians, and in our production of artificial limbs and orthopedic appliances,” he said. The business of prosthetics and orthotics is the kind of business that you don’t really have a need for – that is, until you really do have a need for it. People who have been in an accident and lost a limb, or those who have lost a limb due to complications of diabetes are among the types of patients who might visit the facility. AUGUST 25, 2011

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Ronnie Bias, owner, American Board Certified Orthotist, Prosthetist and Pedorthist; with star patient Kinzey Wray and Ericka Babineaux, American Board Certified Orthotist

REACHING OUT TO MAKE LIFE BETTER Who would you turn to if you lost a limb? Or, what would you do if you were told your child may never walk? That’s the situation Ron Wray found himself in when his son Kinzey was born with cerebral palsy. “I remember when he was born, I stood over him and told his mother that I would never, ever give up on him,” Wray said. “But we were told by specialists that he would never walk. Shriner’s Children’s Hospital said that. Tulane Medical Center said that. Other experts told us that. I never did give up on him, though. I refused to give up on my son.” The years went by and they brought many challenges. Just before Hurricane Rita struck in 2005, Wray’s wife and the mother of his children passed away. Then, the family lost everything in the devastating storm. Everything but their faith. As Wray began to put the pieces of their lives back together again, he continued to try to find something that could help his son. He did his own research, prayed a lot, and stayed up late at night Googling medical information on cerebral palsy. Then, one night, something happened. “I woke up and just sat straight up in my bed,” Wray recalled. “I went to the computer and clicked on the same medical sites that I always looked at, but this time I saw something different. There was a specialist in St. Louis who was doing a type of surgery that would help release Kinzey’s spasticity, which in turn would lead to some other changes so that he could possibly walk.” SON WALKS FOR FIRST TIME! Wray was so excited that he couldn’t sleep and he called the hospital the next morning. And that started the ball rolling toward real progress for his son. Kenzey, 8, had the spinal surgery, which did indeed release his spasticity. “Within two months of the surgery, and some rehab, he was fitted with cable braces and shoes at Lake Area Prosthetics & Orthotics,” Wray said. “For the first time in his life, he began walking with the aid of a walker. It’s a miracle to see him come this far! Without Ericka Babineaux (a certified orthotist) at Lake Area Prosthetics, who has helped Kenzey so much and given us hope, I don’t think he would have ever taken that first step. A lot of people thought he would be in a wheelchair

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Volume 3 • Issue 11


James Landers pictured with Ronnie Bias. Even the most challenging oppositions, with care and determination can result in changing someones life as James is living proof with his below the knee prosthetic designed by Ronnie Bias.

for life, but I always knew that Kenzey would walk one day.” For another patient, James Landers, 70, of Sulphur, finding Bias and his staff changed his life as well. “I had a blood clot in my leg and had to have it amputated,” Landers said. “I went to another place to get my

prosthesis, but it kept breaking down and they couldn’t seem to help me. When I found Lake Area Prosthetics & Orthotics, they kept working with me until we got it right. It took about four tries but they didn’t give up and that was the key. I’m very happy now.” Andrew Eaglin of Lake Charles is also extremely pleased with the service he has gotten from Lake Area Prosthetics & Orthotics. He said, “Mr. Ronnie and his staff basically helped me have the kind of life I had before. I have a prosthetic arm but I can do anything and everything that I was able to do before. It’s really amazing how much Mr. Ronnie cares.”

Eaglin said that Bias is there for him if he needs something and that he made it an easy process for him. “I’m able to work and do anything that needs to be done. So, whether it’s work, doing things around the house, or having a social life, I can do all of those things because of Lake Area Prosthetics & Orthotics. I would recommend them to anyone!” BIAS FOLLOWED HIS PASSION Just as one incident can alter the life of a person who has an illness, devastating accident, or a health issue, a similar situation affected Bias. His older brother had an accident at an early age that caused him to lose a limb. As a result, he later began working in the Prosthetics and Orthotics field. Bias’ brother was 15 years older, but had always been an inspiration to him. So much so that Bias decided to follow in his footsteps career-wise. “It’s incredible to be able to do what you are passionate about,” Bias said. “For me, my passion is providing quality of life back to people of all ages. It’s [worth] more than money could ever buy. At Lake Area Prosthetics & Orthotics, with our

Comfort: A more relaxing experience An extra-large opening means it can comfortably accommodate patients of different shapes and sizes and can help reduce anxiety and claustrophobia. Speed: A quicker exam Exclusive Tim™ (Total imaging matrix) technology helps make exams faster. Confidence: Detailed images for your doctor Extraordinary images with exceptional details—your doctors will have the information they need to help make a more confident diagnosis.

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AUGUST 25, 2011

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A smile is worth a thousand words, just look as Andrew Eaglin demonstrates his amazing myoelectric hand, designed by Ronnie Bias.

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intense attention to detail and patient satisfaction, both my staff and I are rewarded daily.” Serving Louisiana and East Texas, the business offers custom fit orthotics for lower and upper extremities and spinal and cervical supports, and prosthetics for lower and upper extremities. Orthotics is a specialty within the medical field concerned with the design, manufacture and application of orthopedic devices that support or correct the function of a limb or the torso. For example, an orthopedic brace is used to: • Control, guide, limit and/or immobilize an extremity, joint or body segment, • Restrict movement in a given direction, • Assist movement generally, • Reduce weight bearing forces for a particular purpose, • Aid rehabilitation from fractures after the removal of a cast, or • Otherwise correct the shape and/or function of the body, to provide easier movement capability or reduce pain. VARIETY OF PROSTHETICS AVAILABLE Lake Area Prosthetics & Orthotics offers a variety of prosthetics to fit a patient’s every need, from surgical stockings to back supports to wrist splints. It’s great to know that there’s a place with a fully informed, caring staff including board-certified practitioners to answer questions, address concerns, and fit you with the appropriate device. A prosthesis is an artificial device extension that replaces a missing

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body part. When a person loses an arm or a leg, they can be fitted with a device that will enable them to continue to lead active lives.  Losing a limb, as devastating as that may be, does not mean you need to alter your lifestyle. According to the National Limb Loss Information Center, approximately 1.7 million people in the United States are living with limb loss. It’s estimated that one out of every 200 people in the U.S. has had an amputation. Each year, the majority of new amputations occur due to complications of the vascular system, especially from diabetes. Although rates of cancer and trauma-related amputations are decreasing, rates for dysvascular amputations are on the rise. On average, Bias sees approximately 30 amputees a month, but in one recent week alone, he saw 12 patients. Lake Area Prosthetics & Orthotics accepts assignment and bills Medicare, Medicaid, and private health insurance companies for items that are covered under these health plans. Prescriptions are required for most of their services. BUSINESS HAS AN ON-SITE LAB “Our excellent turn-around time enables custom-made devices to be delivered in two to ten days,” Bias stated. The business boasts an on-site lab where Bias and his techs make specialized prosthetics and orthotics. The accredited facility consists of 18 highly qualified staff and board-certified practitioners with over 60 years combined experience. Something else that Bias is really excited about is a form of prosthesis Volume 3 • Issue 11


called the Elevated Vacuum Suspension. This type of prosthesis solves the problem of fit and volume fluctuations by combining an elevated vacuum environment with a Total Surface Weight Bearing (TSWB) Socket. With this prosthesis, the result for the user is that the liner is drawn completely into the socket for a more intimate fit, allowing fluids to be more easily drawn back into the leg during each swing phase, which increases healthy fluid flow and maintains consistent limb volume to reduce forces on the limb. “This vacuum technology is good for the everyday walker; increases blood flow; and will fit open wounds,” Bias said. “It’s more timeconsuming to do it, but it’s worth it for our patients. It’s something I really believe in. Did you know that patient evaluations are free at Lake Area Prosthetics & Orthotics? We put our patients first always. I can tell you that there are times we have literally given things away. We’ve helped people when there was something they couldn’t take care of. We’re very compassionate toward our patients.” Lake Area Prosthetics offers a friendly, clean and courteous environment for patient care. Residential visits for homebound, hospital and nursing facility visits are also available, as well as a payment plan. “Our staff is eager to assist you in your orthopedic needs,” said Bias. “We’ll make a difference in your life.” For more information on Lake Area Prosthetics & Orthotics, call (337) 474-2989 or visit the offices at 505 W. College St. TJN Lisa Addison has been a writer for more than 30 years. She writes for local, regional and national publications.

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High School Football Countdown There was a point in time during my days in undergraduate school when I thought I wanted to leave the writing business for the radio business.

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I wanted to leave it all behind, career-wise, and become a radio station owner and disc jockey, playing Tom Waits music all day while driving those corporate-owned, Nickelback-playing loser stations out of business with my sheer coolness. Thankfully, I sucker-punched that dream, and whatever aspirations I had for coolness, in the face while they weren’t looking and continued writing. But, thanks to that week of radiodial dreaming and the movie High Fidelity, I came away with a strong affinity for music countdown lists.

Write an article about the Top 10 Beatles lyrics? I will read it. Replays of old Casey Kasem American Top 40 shows? I’ll be there listening. With this in mind and in honor of the upcoming start of the high school football season, I thought I might put together a Top 5 list of my own. So, here it is, a not-so-long distance dedication to the new football season. 5. “Sounds of Silence” – Simon & Garfunkle: Typically this time of year, you begin hearing the first, serious predictions about which teams are going to be among the state’s best, and this year is no different. However, what is different is the vast silence

regarding teams in Southwest Louisiana. I don’t think I’ve read a single magazine article, newspaper story, or even a message board rant that mentioned any local team among the state’s elite. This is all very surprising, at least in my humble opinion. Southwest Louisiana is a very football-rich part of the state and teams here are generally well-regarded statewide. So to hear folks talk about how good Carencro is supposed to be this year or whether Westgate can win a state championship and not even mention Barbe is fairly shocking. 4. “Welcome Back” – John Sebastian: A hearty welcome back to the Westlake Rams and Iowa

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Yellowjackets. Westlake and Iowa return to a more locally centralized district after two years of exile in one of the most convoluted, illogical districts, geographically speaking, in the state. Whatever crack the LHSAA was smoking when it decided it was a good idea to send Westlake and Iowa all the way out to Opelousas for district games (when fellow 3A school and former district rival Rayne sits 30 miles closer) appears to have run out and the two teams have been redistricted back into a less insane district. The new-look District 4-3A includes—in addition to Westlake and Iowa—Crowley, Jennings, Notre Dame and South Beauregard. Crowley was in the old, wacko district while Jennings is returning to Class 3A after a short run in Class 4A. Of course, returning to a more travel-friendly district is the carrot in this situation. The stick, however, is perennial state title contender Notre Dame. Rounding out the district field is South Beauregard, which will be playing in its first season at the 3A level. Speaking of South Beauregard… 3. “New Kid in Town” – The Eagles: South Beauregard moves up from Class 2A to 3A this season and, boy howdy, are the Knights in for a rude welcome. The Knights move up to a district that traditionally houses some of the state’s best 3A teams, after dominating District 4-2A for the past few seasons. Westlake will be first up on South Beau’s district slate, followed by Crowley, Iowa and Jennings before ending the season on the road at Notre Dame. Believe you me, Notre Dame is no East Beauregard and it will take South Beauregard a while to get acclimated to life at this level of football. But the Knights have a more-than-capable coaching staff that will be able to help the team navigate uncharted district waters this season. 2. “Changes” – David Bowie: Several teams will be under the direction of new head coaches this season. The biggest change will be at Barbe where Jimmy Shaver retired after serving as head coach for 29 years. His replacement, Paul Demarie, is a longtime Bucs assistant coach, which should serve to smooth the transition. At Sam Houston, Vaughn Eggleston, another longtime local assistant coach, will take over from Russ Sutherland, who accepted a position in Texas. And Vinton will be in its first season under head coach Tarius Davis. Davis, a star at Lake Arthur and McNeese State in the 1990s, will look to return the Lions to the winning ways of the past. The Lions haven’t reached the playoffs since 2006, going 7-30 in four seasons

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under previous head coach Wendell LeJeune. Davis most recently served as offensive coordinator at Iowa. And, finally, number one with a bullet…1. “Leader of the Pack” – The Shangri-Las: So, which area teams will be among the state’s elite this year? Traditionally tough teams like Barbe and St. Louis are once again primed to make another deep playoff run. But don’t sleep on teams like LaGrange and WashingtonMarion. LaGrange has improved drastically since Jules Sullen took over as head coach a few years back and,

with the Gators dropping back down to Class 4A, look for them to make some serious noise in the playoffs. In addition, Washington-Marion showed signs of serious improvement in its first year under head coach Freddie Harrison. Look for the Indians to make even more significant strides this season. And so ends this Top 5 countdown. To all of you out there I’d like to say, with credit to Mr. Kasem, keep your feet on the ground and keep reaching for the stars. Until next time.

Brandon Shoumaker is a graduate of McNeese State University and has covered sports for more than seven years for various publications. Coaches Brandon Shoumaker or parents with story tips may contact Brandon at bshoumaker@yahoo.com or send him a message on Twitter (@bshoumaker).

TJN

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By Mary Louise Ruehr

Literary Gems Transport Readers to Faraway Lands I have lately been treated to one of my favorite things in life: stories that take me to faraway places. And these happen to be written beautifully. In State of Wonder, author Ann Patchett sets us down in the jungles of Brazil, where we ride up the Amazon River with her memorable characters. The story starts with a pharmaceutical company in Minnesota. One of its employees, Dr. Annick Swenson, has been living among the indigenous people of Brazil, doing secret research on a possible new drug, but she seems to

have gone rogue; she hasn’t kept the company apprised of her progress for years. A fellow research scientist, Anders Eckman, was recently sent to the Amazon to check on her work, but Swenson has just informed the company’s CEO that Eckman died in Brazil, with no explanation of what happened. The company wants to know how he died and what’s going on with Swenson. To this end, Eckman’s lab associate, Dr. Marina Singh, is sent to South America to find the truth and to bring his body home.

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Marina really does not want to go and finds the entire mission oppressive. Stepping off the plane in Brazil, Marina feels that “The outside air was heavy enough to be bitten and chewed.” She gets sick and almost dies even before the arrogant but fascinating Dr. Swenson and her native companion, a deaf boy, take her with them up the Amazon to their jungle village home. Along the river, Marina discovers things to fear: snakes disguised as a pile of leaves, ants as long as a thumbnail that bite through clothing, microscopic fish in the water that will swim up the urethra “with catastrophic results,” anacondas, mosquitoes, and, possibly, cannibals. The plot is pretty gripping stuff, but it’s the beauty of the writing that I want to share with you. Read what happens on the boat at night: “In an instant the veil of insects lifted and Marina saw nothing as she had never seen nothing before. It was as if God Himself had turned out the lights, every last one, and left them in the gaping darkness of His abandonment.” It’s downright transformative. On the boat, there is some very smart dialogue between Marina and Swenson about doctors, medicine, ethics and miracles. The author also has a sense of humor, as when the preoccupied Swenson first encounters her

colleague: “She would not have noticed Marina had Marina been dipped in yellow paint.” The book is a cross between Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, a sci-fi other-planetary adventure, and a treatise on medical ethics, with a kind of warped love story thrown in. It’s visual, it’s nail-biting, it’s thought-provoking. When it ended, I wished I could keep following what happened to the characters afterward. Book clubs take note: It’s a dazzler. Partitions is award-winning poet Amit Majmudar’s debut novel, and the fact that it’s his first is almost unbelievable to me, because it’s such a finely crafted work of art. I would venture to say that most Americans know very little about the 1947 partition of India, when parts of it were carved away — basically along religious lines — to form the newly created nation of Pakistan. The author takes us there, to “the new border,” the as-yet undrawn boundary between Pakistan and India, when people from each side are fleeing to the other side — running for their lives, often with few or no possessions. (“They left in a rush, food still on the plates.”) The Hindu narrator of the story is dead, and therefore able to observe all the characters but not intervene. (“I am here because I am everyVolume 3 • Issue 11


where.”) He watches his wife and twin boys at the train station, where people are desperate to get on the packed last train for “the frantic move” to the other side of the border. On the train, the mother is separated from her boys, who spend the rest of the book trying to reconnect with her. On the other side, there is a Muslim doctor whose house is burned down because he didn’t move to Pakistan soon enough. And there is the teenage daughter of a Sikh man who would rather kill his own children than let the Muslims capture them. Then there are the predators — thieves, murderers and others — wait-

ing around every corner as these travelers — a young woman, two little boys and an elderly doctor — run toward the relative “safety” of the other side and eventually come together. The reader can feel their panic at the trains: “Faster runners stick their hands between slower runners and widen their own way. Bodies erupt through bodies, the way smoke billows through smoke when a truck burns and the flame finds the fuel. … Running risks stumbling, and stumbling means getting trampled.” The attacks on both sides are violent. The doctor pauses “to suture and dress the crude things these people have

done to each other with their daggers and scythes.” He “never knows when he crosses the border. It is too early in the border’s life cycle: it hasn’t budded checkpoints and manned booths yet, hasn’t sprouted its barbed wire thorns.” The author’s words are lyrical, as he reveals the thoughts of the young woman: “Periodically, her thinking drifts into fantasy — like living the rest of her life in this tree, brought berries by birds she would whistle to and train. The Mussulmaans would be so busy hunting Hindus and Sikhs on the ground, their torches would seep and daggers slash well below her feet. … And if their torchlit eyes flashed her

way one night, she would widen her eyes, and they would think her an owl. Years would pass, her eating berries and keeping her mouth open overnight to get the same sprinkle of dew as the leaves, until finally, when everyone had gone quiet, she could go down and see if her village was still there.” This is a wonderful book. The writing is gorgeous, rich and extraordinary. The history-based tale reads like post-apocalyptic fiction. As for the title, there are several kinds of partitions; the reader must find them. Copyright © 2011 by Mary Louise Ruehr. TJN

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r m ende's Museu l l E an en By D e Childr of th r o t c Dire

The Help (DreamWorks, 2011) “You is kind. You is smart. You is important.” These are the words of a black maid to the baby daughter of the white woman she works for. They sum up the spirit of The Help. Based on the 2009 book, The Help is a rollicking, heartwarming, and sometimes uncomfortable movie that just might help us work through some unfavorable parts of our country’s past. Aibileen (Viola Davis) is a maid in Jackson, Mississippi in the early 60s. Like many of her friends from church and her neighborhood, she rides a bus into the white part of town. There she

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cooks, cleans, and takes care of children of the society moms. For the first time in her life, she’s being asked a question: What is it like being a black woman working as a maid in Jackson, Mississippi? The person doing the asking is a young woman, Skeeter Phelan, herself raised by a maid, right here in Jackson. Skeeter is working on a book about the subject. Such activity is a crime in the state of Mississippi in 1962. Anything that would get black folks riled up is a crime, evidently. It is a terrible time for blacks. The society diva, Hilly Holbrook, is instigating a rule that colored maids have to use separate bathrooms in the white homes. Many are the granddaughters of slaves and are still treated as such, paid below a minimum wage and subject to dismissal at any time, for any reason. Set in this uncomfortable and dangerous time, The Help manages to cre-

ate laugh-out-loud comedy. This is done mostly at the expense of the white folks, particularly Hilly, played to the villainous hilt by Bryce Dallas Howard. Most of the movie, you just want to slap her. Hilly’s main adversary is her maid, Minnie, an outspoken woman who has to caution her own young daughter not to backtalk the whites that the girl will soon be working for.The heroines, Aibileen, Minnie, and Skeeter, risk their lives and their freedom working on Skeeter’s book, which a New York editor is pushing her to write. The movie transcends just about any category you try to put it in. It’s a woman’s movie, a social mores movie, a comedy, a drama, and historical fiction. One thing The Help is not, is simple to describe. The characters are all larger than life, yet they embody people we’ve all met. You could criticize the movie, arguing that The Help sugar coats history with its heartwarming moments and Steel Magnolias tone. But I would argue that a new generation needs to get past old times and move on. I saw The Help in a packed theater with what was the most homogenous movie crowd I can remember. As a white Southern male, I wasn’t represented very favorably in the film. (I think “jerk” was the term used for the

guy seeing Skeeter.) But that didn’t matter. Much of what was on the screen I remember living through right here in Louisiana. As a young child, most of the racial strife was invisible to me, but I was later made aware of it by the prejudices and comments of several of my friends, and some of my relatives. My hope is that all of you reading this will go see the movie, especially if you’ve grown up in the South. It was encouraging to see how far we’ve come since 1962, and troublesome to realize how far we’ve yet to go. The Help is rated PG-13, mainly for the persistent use of one four letter word rhyming with “spit.” I don’t see any way they could have left it out.

TJN

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AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY GALA The ambience of “A Night in Tuscany” set the tone at the Isle of Capri Casino for guests and proud sponsors of the American Cancer Society to gather together for the celebration of lives with more birthdays and a world with less cancer. The social hour included cocktails and the opportunity to place silent bids on valuable donated prizes. A live auction followed, along with an elegant dinner and a rousing performance by Soul Vacation. Cheers to one more year of birthdays!

Denise Hoene with Lindy George

Patricia and Brian Prudhomme with Katie McCarty

Mable East and Laurene Broussard

Gwen, Jordon and Clay Ashworth

Melissa Calloway and Kayla Sherer

Todd Hebert with Dr. Stephanie Richard

Scott and Alison Hancock, Bill, Kari and Michael Hankins

TOURNAMENT OF THE STARS Hoops, there it was! Fans gathered at the Lake Charles Civic Center for the final games of the 17th annual Tournament of The Stars Pro Am Basketball Classic. The crowd-pleasing Harlem Legends kicked off the tournament with an exhibition game against the media at Barbe High School. The series of games played out through the weekend, as celebrities such as Big Baby, TJ Ford, Steven Jackson, James Hardin and more gave opponents a run for their money. The final men’s and women’s championship games wrapped up this event, giving fans something to really cheer about! Karlis Gardner and Krystle Johnson Volume 3 • Issue 11

Michelle Milton and Robin Binkley AUGUST 25, 2011

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Korin T and Nicole Young

Katie Conner and Garett Tomplait

Latoya Joseph and Nikyia Alfred

LEGIS- GATOR LUNCHEON The Chamber SWLA held its 6th annual Legis-Gator luncheon at L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort. This year’s event proved to be the frontrunner, with House and Senate leadership, several members of the Louisiana Congressional Delegation and many statewide elected officials attending. Louisiana legislators and members of Congress were recognized for their efforts; the Spirit of Enterprise and the Legis-Gator of the Year Award were among the prestigious wards given out. All in all, this event was a huge success! Justin McMillin and Liz Deville

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Mike Heinen and Monique Thiery

Congressman John Fleming and Lee Turner

Kelly Roark, Alaina Hebert, Janet Faulk and Tina Begnad

Ginger and Stuart Moss

Lacey Toledano, Billy Nungesser and Dawn Sharpe

Roxanne Bagget and Amanda Pitre

Jody Montelaro and Catherine Smith

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REGGIE KEOGH PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT How many photographers does it take to change a light bulb? With his great since of humor, internationally known local artist and photographer Reggie Keogh answered that and more as he hosted an interactive gallery talk to share his love of photography and travel at the Historic City Hall Arts and Cultural Center. On exhibit are 77 colorful, captivating photographs of Keogh’s “Places, Faces and Wildlife Around the World.” To top off the opening night of this amazing exhibit, we were treated to a wonderful reception--a grand finale to any evening!

TJN Jenny and Reggie Keogh with daughter Kim Palermo

Martha Fry and Anne Netlles

Emily Tanner and Daniel Eastman

ABBEVILLE

LAKE CHARLES

WELSH

(337) 893-1451

(337) 436-4366

(337) 734-2166

D’Ellen Myers and Denise Fasske

Linda and Lamar Ory

www.hendersonimplement.com Volume 3 • Issue 11

AUGUST 25, 2011

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WRITING/CARTOONING WORKSHOPS AUG. 26-27 Mike Artell, an award-winning author, illustrator, TV cartoonist, marketing consultant and trainer, will present workshops on cartooning and writing children’s book in the Calcasieu Parish Public Library. Writing Children’s Books Aug. 26 • 10 - 11 a.m. Moss Bluff Library, 261 Parish Road, 721-7128. For adults, registration required. Register using our online calendar at http:calcasieulibrary.org/library or call the host library. Family Program Aug. 26 • 4 – 5 p.m. Hayes Library, 7709 Perier Street, 721-7098 or 622-3605 for Hayes residents. Artell will read from some of his books and talk about where his ideas come from for writing. He will also demonstrate how to draw cartoons. Storytelling and Cartooning Aug. 27 • 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Iowa Arts & Crafts Festival, Iowa Community Center, 209 Highway 90 West in Iowa, LA. Call the Iowa Library, 721-7101 for information. Cartooning Workshop For Teens and College Students Aug. 27 • 2-3 p.m. Central Library, 301 W. Claude Street, 721-7116. Space is limited and registration is required. Please register using our online calendar at http:calcasieulibrary.org/library or call the host library.

benefit the Shannon Cox Counseling Center, a program of Family & Youth. Shannon, a local advocate for the underprivileged and exploited, made it her life’s work to help people who couldn’t help themselves, and was tragically killed in a car accident in 2010. To honor her, the Shannon Cox Counseling Center was established, which will provide much needed support to grieving children and their families in Southwest Louisiana. Registration fee is $75 and includes playing in four events and meals. Mixed doubles will play on Fri., Aug. 26, and men’s and women’s doubles on Sat., Aug. 27. Men’s and women’s singles will be on Sun. morning, Aug. 28, with adult and child matches in the afternoon. For more information, call 436-9533. IOWA ARTS AND CRAFTS FESTIVAL AUG. 27 The annual Iowa Arts and Crafts Festival will take place 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sat., Aug. 27 at the Iowa Community Center, 209 Highway 90 West. There will be live music by The Attaboys, refreshments, arts and crafts demonstrations and exhibits, storytelling, and displays. Free pony rides will be available for children, along with free ice cream for everyone. Among the artists in attendance, Mike Artell, an award-winning author and illustrator, will entertain with cartooning and stories. Shreveport artist Rod Talbot will be on hand to discuss his work and assist guests in creating artist trading cards.  For information, contact the Iowa Public Library at (337) 721-7101, or (337) 582-3597 if calling from within Iowa. FAMILY AND YOUTH FESTIVAL AUG. 27 Family & Youth Festival 2011 will take place on Sat., Aug. 27 at the Lake Charles Civic Center from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $2 for children and $3 for adults. Featured again this year is Career Paths, a place for teens to explore career choices in a hands-on environment. Family & Youth Festival is a fun event promoting family life and family values in a safe and exciting environment. It is a day of appreciation to the people of Southwest Louisiana, as well as a United Way Community Impact Day. Enjoy games, making crafts, food, and live music in the air-conditioned comfort of the Lake Charles Civic Center. Tickets are available from Family & Youth at 220 Louie Street, Lake Charles, by calling 436-9533, or at the door the day of the event. The festival is an alcohol-free event. JUNIOR LEAGUE WINE TASTING AUG. 27 The Junior League of Lake Charles, Inc. will be hosting a tasting event for its award-winning cookbook Marshes to Mansions at Accessory Zone on Aug. 27 from noon to 3 p.m. The cookbook celebrates

SHANNON COX MEMORIAL TENNIS TOURNAMENT AUG. 26-28 The 2011 Shannon Cox Memorial Tennis Tournament will take place Aug. 26-28 at Lake Charles Racquet Club. The event will Mike Artell PAGE 40

AUGUST 25, 2011

Iowa Arts and Crafts Festival Volume 3 • Issue 11


Louisiana culture and includes facts about people, places and events throughout the state as well as beautiful photographs by local photographer Victor Monsour. It will be available for purchase at the event. Stop by for delicious samples and great fun! Proceeds from Marshes to Mansions sales go directly to funding the projects dedicated to improving the communities of Southwest Louisiana. IMAGINATION CELEBRATION AUG. 27 Head to the Lake Charles Civic Center Exhibition Hall on Aug. 27 at 6:30 p.m. for a fantastic night of celebrity karaoke, music and fun as the Children’s Museum presents the 9th annual Imagination Celebration! This year, the event will host the first ever Celebrity Karaoke Sing Off! Come out and cheer on your favorite local celebrities as they compete for the title. Enjoy the delicious food from the area’s best restaurants and relax by the cash bar. The silent auction and famous live auction, with auctioneer Hal McMillin, will offer unique, must-have items. Please feel free to come dressed in 1950s attire and compete in our bestdressed contest. Enjoy fantastic music by the Boomerang Experience and rock the night away! Tickets are $50 per person. For sponsorship or ticket information, contact the museum office at (337) 433-9420. BOOZOO’S LABOR DAY FESTIVAL SEPT. 5 Our rich musical heritage continues to live on with Boozoo’s Labor Day Festival. A day of great food and Zydeco, the entire family is invited to come out and celebrate the festival’s 27th year in grand style. Fill up on crawfish etouffee, red beans and rice with sausage and BBQ sandwiches. Truly a family affair, enjoy the sounds of the Doghill Stompers and Geno Delafosse & French Rockin’ Boogie. Doors open at 10 a.m., with the bands beginning at 11 a.m. Admission is $12 and $2 for kids 10

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and under. The festival has relocated this year to the Lake Charles Civic Center. For booth rental or more info, call 438-3482. PRIDE, PLATES AND PUMPS SEPT. 9 Pujo Street Café, in conjunction with Lake Charles Pride and Southwest Louisiana AIDS Council, introduces a new event to the Lake Area: “Pride, Plates and Pumps Dinner and a Show” (“It’s almost dinner theatre”) benefitting Lake Charles Pride and Southwest Louisiana AIDS Council with guest of honor Kandice Munro. Cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and dinner will be included in the ticket price of $75 per person or $600 for a table. It will be held in the Ballroom at The Charleston, downtown Lake Charles at 7 p.m., Sept. 9. The event will also serve as a kick-off party for Lake Charles Pride. For more information, contact Candice Pauley, media coordinator, at (337) 249-6950 or candicep@slac.org. Or e-mail prideplatespumps@aol.com. HEALTHY WOMAN ANNIVERSARY EVENT SEPT. 8 Women and Children’s Hospital’s Healthy Woman First Anniversary Event will be held on

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Thurs., Sept. 8 at Treasures of Marilyn’s in Lake Charles.  Guest speaker will be Dale Smith Thomas, who will give an empowering and entertaining presentation that will provide women with the tools to become their personal best. Enjoy the free Women’s Health Fair & Expo from 5 6 p.m.; hors d’ oeuvres and music from 6 - 6:30 p.m., and dinner from 6:30 - 8 p.m. Tickets are $20 per person or $160 to reserve a table of eight. For more information, call (337) 475-4064 or e-mail nadia.nazeer@women-childrens.com. BON TON FESTIVAL SEPT. 9-11 St. Theresa’s Bon Ton Festival is a local tradition. A family-friendly festival, it’s known for its music, rides and especially food. Enjoy bingo, live and silent auctions, a country store, a sweet shop and garage sale. There will be a covered pavilion with plenty of room for dancing, eating and visiting. It will be held at St. Theresa’s Catholic Church in Sulphur. Hours are Sept. 9, 5-10:30 p.m.; Sept. 10, 10 a.m.- 10:30 p.m.; and Sept. 11, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. For more information, call 583-4800. USS ORLECK PATRIOT RIDE SEPT. 11 The USS ORLECK Naval Museum is proud to host the USS ORLECK Patriot Ride on Sun., Sept. 11. It will serve to commemorate the 10th anniversary of 9/11, and to honor the service and sacrifice of our active duty military, veterans, police officers and firefighters. Registration is from 8:30- 10 a.m. at the LC Civic Center Amphitheater. Opening ceremonies begin at 10 a.m. and ride begins at 11 a.m. Riders meet back at Amphitheater at 4 p.m. for memorial service. At 5:30, the closing ceremony and prize announcements will be held at the Isle of Capri Casino Hotel. Post-event concert will begin at 6 p.m. Pre-registration fees are $20 per initial rider and $10 per additional rider; $30 and

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AUGUST 25, 2011

$10 on the day of the event. Register online at www.orleck.org . Call Penny Miller at (337) 438-3038 for more information. WALK A MILE IN HER SHOES SEPT. 17 On Sept. 17, men from all walks of life will walk one mile inside Prien Lake Mall in women’s high-heeled shoes to protest rape, sexual assault and domestic violence. This event is coordinated by the Sexual Assault Response Team (SART). Registration begins at 8 p.m. with the march scheduled for 10:30 p.m. Men, women, and children are invited to participate and pre-registration is welcome. The registration fee is $20 per person, $15 for students, or $100 for a team with a maximum of six members. All participants registering prior to Sept. 5 are guaranteed to receive a free event T-shirt. Men are required to walk in a minimum of 2” high heels. They may wear a more comfortable woman’s shoe if they raise more than $1,000 in pledges. For additional information or to register, please visit www.walkamileswla.org or call (337) 494-7273. LCF SALUTES THE USO FUNDRAISER SEPT. 24 The Louisiana Choral Foundation will celebrate the 70th anniversary of the USO with dinner, dancing to big band sounds, and a musical show “Hooray for the USO!” On Sat., Sept. 24, at 6 p.m., Paxton Hall in First United Methodist Church in Lake Charles will be transformed into a 1940’s USO canteen. A delicious meal with exciting entertainment by LCF members, local dance troupes and musicians will honor the USO tradition of serving our troops. Tickets (for limited seating) are $25 and will be available at Swicegood Music or by calling 491-9348.

Volume 3 • Issue 11


CALCA-CHEW FOOD FESTIVAL SEPT. 25 Don’t miss some of the best cooking in Calcasieu Parish at the 27th annual CalcaChew Food Festival, which will be held at the St. Margaret Catholic Church Family Center. Sponsored by the church, all dishes are prepared by parishioners. The event will kick off with a festival mass at 7 a.m. Throughout the day, visitors will enjoy crafts, Cajun French music, prizes, raffles, a live auction and a children’s area with train rides, games and a live petting zoo. Plus, feast on everything Cajun including shrimp étouffée, boudin, fried fish, cracklins, gumbo and barbecue. The event will take place on the corner of 17th Street and Enterprise Blvd. in Lake Charles. For more info, call 439-4585. GALLERY PROMENADE SEPT. 30 Get ready for Gallery Promenade! Galleries throughout the Lake Area will be open, showcasing works by local and regional artists. What better time to get outside and enjoy the area…while the sun goes down and the night lights up? Take a stroll through downtown Lake Charles and visit the many galleries showcasing a tantalizing variety of artwork. Enjoy chatting with locals and admiring the talent of local hands, while sampling the fare of local eateries in the newly recognized Charlestown Cultural District.  All original art and fine crafts purchased in the downtown area are exempt from local and state sales tax!  For more information on Gallery Promenade, including locations, visit www.artsandhumanitiesswla.org, or call (337) 439-ARTS (2787). For general festival information, visit www.visitlakecharles.org.

TJN

2011 CVB Christmas Brochure Call for Entries: Deadline, Aug. 26 Tis the season! Looking to get the word out about your Christmas event or festival for free? If so, you’re in luck as the Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana Convention & Visitors Bureau is currently receiving information to be featured in its 2011 Christmas brochure. Each year, the bureau prints 10,000 copies of the popular piece, which covers events held in Southwest Louisiana during the Christmas season. In addition, information gathered for the calendar appears on www.visitlakecharles.org in the Visitors Guide to Southwest Louisiana. Events are also submitted for inclusion in Louisiana Life magazine and the quarterly events calendar produced by the Louisiana Office of Tourism. The bureau also Tweets about events on www.Twitter.com/ LakeCharlesCVB and promotes events through other social networking sites.

The deadline for entries is Fri., Aug. 26. To submit an event, contact Angie Manning-Istre, communications manager at aistre@visitlakecharles.org or call (337) 4369588. The entry form is also available at www.visitlakecharles.org/ CajunChristmas.

TJN

Chick-fil-A Opens on Nelson Road Following tradition, 100 determined souls registered at the new Chick-fil-A on Nelson Road the day before the grand opening in anticipation of receiving a year’s worth of Chick-fil-A! The chicken lovers camped out for 24 hours, bringing tents, lawn chairs, computers and radios to ease the wait. At 6 a.m. the following morning, the doors opened for the chicken lovers to receive their prizes. Since the event began in 2003, Chick-fil-A has given away more than $13 million in free food at its restaurant grand

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openings, with nearly $2.3 million slated to be awarded to First 100 participants in 2011. The opening of the first standalone Chick-fil-A restaurant in Lake Charles comes 25 years after the chain first moved from the malls, where it helped to pioneer the inmall food concept, to the street with the opening of its first stand-alone restaurant in its hometown of Atlanta in 1986. The first Lake Charles Chick-fil-A opened in Prien Lake Mall in October 1998.

TJN

AUGUST 25, 2011

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To list your event e-mail: lauren@thejambalayanews.com

The

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Brad Broussard @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Paul Gonsoulin @ The Porch, 8 p.m. • Blues Grenade @ Cigar Club, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, AUGUST 25 • Lesa Cormier & The Sundown Playboys @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Dustin Ray @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • John Cessac @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • Brian Moore @ The Porch, 8 p.m. • The Posse @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Cam Pyle @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, AUGUST 26 • Louisiana Indie Radio Launch Party @ The Porch, 6 p.m. • Briggs Brown & The Bayou Cajuns @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Street Side Jazz @ Stellar Beans, 7 p.m. • Chubby Carrier & The Bayou Swamp Band @ The Regatta, Lake Arthur, 7 p.m.

• ISIS @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Reed Planchard @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • David Locklear @ The Cigar Club, 8 p.m. • Marcus Ardoin @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Kory Fontenot @ Cigar Club, 9 p.m. • Louisiana Fiya @ Yesterday’s, 9 p.m. • Jose Mata @ Big Kahuna’s, 9 p.m. • DJ Smelly @ Bob & Pete’s, Sulphur, 9 p.m. • Artimer Box @ Twiggy’s, 10 p.m. • After 8 @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. • Kadillacs @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 10 p.m. SATURDAY, AUGUST 27 • Jamie Berzas @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Kool & The Gang @ Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 7 p.m. • Zydefest VII @ Delta Event Center, Delta Downs, Vinton, 7 p.m. • ISIS @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Cecil’s Band @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m.

• HeadMINE/2nd Party Program @ Twiggy’s, 8 p.m. • Step Rideau @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Brandon Ledet & Creole Touch @ The Porch, 9 p.m. • Geno Delafosse & French Rockin’ Boogie @ Yesterday’s, 9 p.m. • Inked-Up Eighty-Ones @ Cigar Club, 9 p.m. • X-It 43 @ Cocahoe’s, 9 p.m. • After 8 @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. • Soul Vacation @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 10 p.m. SUNDAY, AUGUST 28 • Foret Tradition @ Yesterday’s, 6 p.m. TUESDAY, AUGUST 30 • Paul Gonsoulin @ Luna Live, 9 p.m. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 31 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Judd Bares @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Paul Gonsoulin @ The Porch, 8 p.m. • William Christian @ Cigar Club, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 • Briggs Brown & The Bayou Cajuns @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Bernie Alan @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Musician’s Night @ The Porch, 8 p.m.

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 • Don Fontenot et les Cajuns de la Prairie @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Ganey Arsement & The Lakeside Gamblers @ Sabine Pass Crab Shack, 7 p.m. • Lesa Cormier & The Sundown Playboys @ Aucoin’s Restaurant, Hayes, 7 p.m. • First Friday Reading Series @ The Porch, 7 p.m. • No Idea @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Smokey Robinson @ L’Auberge Event Center, L’Auberge du Lac Casino, 8:30 p.m. • Fallen Embers @ Luna Live, 9 p.m. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 • HeadMINE @ Happy Hippie Pizza, 1 p.m. • Howard Noel & Cajun Boogie @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Kansas @ Isle Event Center, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 7 p.m. • Lesa Cormier & The Sundown Playboys @ Aucoin’s Restaurant, Hayes, 7 p.m. • No Idea @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • X-It 43 @ Dirty Rice, Iowa, 8 p.m. • Lingus @ The Porch, 9 p.m. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 • Perfectly Good Airplane @ Mary’s Lounge, 4 p.m. • The Charlie Daniels Band @ Delta Event Center, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 • Vinyl & Wine VI @ The Porch, 7 p.m. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Matt Moss @ Cigar Club, 8 p.m. • Hip Hop Night @ The Porch, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8 • Homer LeJeune & The Kajun Kings @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Warren Storm/Willie Tee & Cypress @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. TJN

MONDAY NIGHTS: Abita Beer Night

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS: Mondo Martini Night

THURSDAY NIGHTS: Be Well Night

LUNA GOODS ON SALE: Luna Classic Tee $15 Luna Guitar Tee $15 Luna Ball Cap $15 Luna Dressings $6 (16oz.) Citrus Vinaigrette Balsamic Vinaigrette Raspberry Vinaigrette Cosmic

Thurs., August 25 @ 9 pm LUNA LADIES NIGHT! FEATURING DJ JOHN FLOYD Fri., August 26 @ 9 pm CARLTON PRIDE AND MIGHTY ZION Sat., August 27 @ 9 pm ASHES OF BABYLON Wed., August 31 @ 9 pm HEADMINE Fri., September 2 @ 9 pm LOOKS THAT KILL & FALLEN EMBERS Sat., September 3 @ 9 pm JOHN LEFLER (OF DASHBOARD CONFESSIONAL) Fri., September 9 @ 9 pm SOUL TRACK MIND

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AUGUST 25, 2011

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Yes, ma’a re had a r er so rare It wa d momen going to see, as or two wo iration sin o seen. d f d of Sou never befo I’ve seen h hen my er Senat out being about share s, sizes and wante m, except on and adm ised to rea e r i I’ve and of h but w not ab d hearing, f all stripe ng and see th with affect ht be surp nce, and retha, pected to, in a group klin o st A lo e g , t i t s d u n e m w o e x o n e ing an retha fans t singing a en her mo ed ab es low ns. You re to j etha Fra e aN m v e y a t e s a r v r m l n t u A a e a e e a s with sions, abo words to g with sh that I Jill invited tdoor Ar klyn, as p my te ames in th The Jamb for the pa . n a I u o e i s , l e d u o n o n h i u s r s r i ba her frien s at a free Island, B cert serie ,“ per ing ALL t s, and sm ing with ctheir ally here, tastes ntioned eit d o g u y g n i d y w g n d c e o n n i o m l e n s C so on I’l kn e id n frie esp n – co hbors e old Sure, t in C easide s I’ve la Ono a ever m bscur at our neig nd came o , two keyoncer orough’s S n myself. “ y heart wa o c where nths, but n y are Yoko s t B ba ai m e and deligh d then the iano, drum ree female of the barely cont ile inside y painful 30 mo once. Th spired eir n i h p l h t n n e t , a , p d v w sin . e A t n coul casually, ozen swe es on ina wom Franklin se two ha imitate th Nelso rcussionis retha’s cou ), d e h , r e a d d s d F l e h h i a A u t p r dy . tor I sa ing and Are prised? T who wou for more ood c o my head and a s including er son Ted o an h s d d d t l s e r i a n s e a i h h Sur u t o r t e (h bo int fc in th yt po ali p sing ett, guitar launching its, and ries o s popped hinking of of you,” dated eir person ere to testif ddened u o i k m c m i e a t b t b m a oy in rns – a Cor d I’m atest h and th inking iate b d . I’m h and m Brend nd eight ho hang’s gre as hit mor propr reaming an and I’m th Ms. music ve decades charmed I’ve realize g T d a i i , g d y , n s f l d s y n n s o al bas re of Mi than alternate reflectio t the stan ry “Da aydreami (Later, so . r sang r s e e e ps overtu hummed o t. you/d to myself. ut I digres ay from they’v t on deepe tha have s almost ev nd cla stage a i w s l B e h u r l d k g h r a e r u f ) a B n . r a A g o o . y a e h u e P s e n s a w an I e h ot lt m nd ripple use, o e mea into m lin. Ye ese m t ther he Be oko a phed d then, to a ble of appla rple sleeve Frank we drove t Island. Go Famous H that Y by which I’v rmer all th u k , n l p o ’s y m i d f o s s s A n e a a u S n dard emale per to a r o year Natha ching the ro ent in to Co f ilding , resplend a long mat , a string ut Yok I reviewed Queens ugh to buy tion down orward u o b b other a ith iled e ze eno ng f lo ca ef ingly hen she sa tin gown w on the bre elet, a early rom their ine, shuffli od and years. rote admir e Voice, w f anger, gri , c o n f a l d a a f i g o a Iw Dogs en wait in ers full of un and ra r- less s that floate d pearl br hand and e Vill her album ennon’s h T r e s e l n r p e h h f L a h t o shaw te pearls ing on on other, and hairs, ham o ward of nd parap ago f of Glass, ing John ays no ot i r n w w ith c mbrellas t iting-arou de it to of wh oth pearl ring on the tocratic w Seaso nging follo hed me in re.  a a u I m w , m d c e o o k r l f e m n u e n e a m i o o h W b ti g, aris m dr and which t the ot ncert site. Brooklyn’s z done e the first her r diam off her lon n, without l e l l d , l a a h a t h d a m t c o e i s kc d he an g lly de in stl settin ers. And t started roc , at the 6 p.m., an rty Markow an 90 al epi her work s ly, especia , she t h a i t i r l o a a b g n m fin tha e be und ed Ma e th me mF ts aro President, show mor ted at 8:15 I’d lov 1971 albu Me.” For erstood anist’s anfare, Are d oh, prais a i e p s an rf gh the nd her star g und ouch furthe d clapping, “Higher a our Borou emceeing e overture ant?” he heard Will You T eminist I’d d John san y ’s w d f n “ ing an ie Wilson Brooklyn, nd starte s before th Brooklyn nd into an d song e first real lly; Yoko a Woman is k a e c s “ e t a h a r it’s Ja r,” and “O me/highe minu “What doe his free h ” we shout was th han viscer ist anthem ing my k e g t t : n g T h i n n a d o iftin nded an Hig E C between or s d, pumpi more roto-femi World,” st men reth . we eeps l ESP e g t p love k ” as we pou ted out like e, shout ad fist. “R second’s la their gger of the g not a few heir benefi s r s e i i n t ded highe d and shou nd of cour overh ith only a er. the N , and maki mine and ko’s voice oon fa at on e w w o n s , s t o Y f r i t k n e , e i c , s a t s l s f a e r clapp church. A show, we b be us the and er a , as we s alue e o v h n m s l n a o in i a m o t – t e d the wer ques sultry su y twilight le plastic socie t song, as evocative atchet an est of r e e b z a h h h a n s e ’s t h t t e t e t d T e ev br for for e pu On etty, but i a blunte a voic , get up ng n easy uncom nd sh s were. sang, with ned by age into a creasingly daring to fear of losi not pr vely as both u knife – a n she want e t i s r a h i o e n i t r n o S h n t i f c r s , o e , w G t s u f n r d o o g d ef ed an g chai om ru eeds t havin g h.  -hone thinn foldin rief bathro seats, and finely what she n yelp, or lau for a b tenth row across to cry, or our you

ppy a H e an Di C I Now

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AUGUST 25, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 11


but nevertheless as emotionally powerful as ever, and we sang along with the Aretha who was the first woman inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the Aretha who wouldn’t have missed singing at President Barack Obama’s inauguration no matter how she was feeling, the Aretha who demanded and earned our respect. And the band plied its arrangements over familiar territory, and we snapped Aretha’s photo, watch-

ing her shake her money maker, pirouetting across the stage despite a broken toe, and in gigantic closeups on the video screens on either side of the stage as the sun set and the night grew dark with twinkling stars. The show (with intermission) covered a lot of ground from “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” to “Think,” “Jump To It,” “Freeway of Love,” “Chain of Fools,” “Moody’s Mood For Love,” and a new song, “How Long I’ve Waited” from her recent

album, A Woman Falling Out Of Love, released on her own label, and available only from Wal-Mart. But the highlights of the show came in two spots: Aretha bashing away at the piano, turning “Bridge Over Troubled Water” into a gospel medley that began slowly with “Don’t Trouble The Water,” and ended with shouting and ululations and amens, and you can see it yourself on YouTube, so why should I give you any further inadequate words?

And to end the night, as the last encore, of course, Ms. Aretha Franklin sang “Respect,” and we shook our fingers at imaginary lovers, and stood our ground, feeling our power, just as, off to our right, fireworks lit up the sky, bursting throughout the outro vamp and Mayor Markowitz’s string of breathlessly repeated thank yous and good nights until we were truly replete. Unbelievable. I swear; I can now die happy. TJN

Killin’ Time Crossword

Crossword puzzles provided by BestCrosswords.com (www.bestcrosswords.com). Used with permission. Volume 3 • Issue 11

AUGUST 25, 2011

PAGE 47


The Jambalaya News - Vol. 3 No. 11  

August 25, 2011 Lake Area Prosthetics & Orthotics: Healing & Restoring Lives

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