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VOL. 3, NO. 3 / MAY 5, 2011

ALSO: The Joys of Being a Mother • Summer Fun for Kids SWLA: Journey to Recovery


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MAY 5, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 3


GENERAL 715 Kirby St., Lake Charles, LA 70601 Phone: 337-436-7800 Fax: 337-990-0262 www.thejambalayanews.com PUBLISHER Phil de Albuquerque

contents COVER STORY 24

publisher@thejambalayanews.com

NEWS EXECUTIVE EDITOR Lauren de Albuquerque lauren@thejambalayanews.com

CONTRIBUTORS Lisa Addison Leslie Berman Renee Carthan George Cline James Doyle Dan Ellender Maria Alcantara Faul Derenda Grubb Angie Manning Istre Mike McHugh Mary Louise Ruehr Brandon Shoumaker Karla Tullos ADVERTISING sales@thejambalayanews.com

SALES ASSOCIATES Katy Corbello Faye Drake Karla Tullos GRAPHICS ART/PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Darrell Buck

May 5, 2011 • Volume 3 • Issue 3

CHRISTUS St. Patrick’s Hospital: Promoting a Healthy Lifestyle

REGULARS 7 10 11 12 13 16 18 32

The Boiling Pot The Dang Yankee Tips from Tip Adoption Corner Doyle’s Place A Greener World What’s Cookin’ Sports Report

FEATURES 5 14 20 22 29

It’s Softball Time! National Tourism Week Goes Social! SWLA: Journey to Recovery The Joys of Being a Mother Summer Fun

24 16

ENTERTAINMENT 34 36 37 38 41 44 46 47

Red Hot Books Funbolaya Family Night at the Movies Society Spice Jambalaya Jam Local Jam Eclectic Company Killin’ Time Crossword

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ART/PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Michelle LaVoie BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER Kay Andrews

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Legal Disclaimer The views expressed by The Jambalaya News columnists are their own and do not necessarily reflect the position of The Jambalaya News, its editors or staff. The Jambalaya News is solely owned, published by The Jambalaya News, LLC, 715 Kirby Street, Lake Charles Louisiana 70601. Phone (337) 436-7800. Whilst every effort was made to ensure the information in this magazine was correct at the time of going to press, the publishers cannot accept legal responsibility for any errors or omissions, nor can they accept responsibility of the standing of advertisers nor by the editorial contributions. The Jambalaya News cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or illustrations, even if they are sent to us accompanied by a selfaddressed envelope. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Copyright 2011 The Jambalaya News all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without prior written permission is prohibited. Volume 3 • Issue 3

29 We are now accepting credit cards! MAY 5, 2011

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A Note From Lauren The Memory of Scent It will be Mother’s Day in a few days, and I’ve been thinking about mine a lot lately. Not that I don’t think about her every day, but at this time of year, I miss her all the more. I was thinking about all the things that remind me of her, and the first thing that came to mind was her perfume. Scent is a powerful memory trigger, isn’t it? Mom’s middle name was Violet, so of course, she loved all things violet. Way back when, there was a perfume by Yardley of London called April Violets. So when I was growing up, I’d always give her a gift set that included soap, perfume and dusting powder for Mother’s Day. Violet is a rather strong, unique scent that you either love or hate. I never would wear it myself, but I totally identify it with her because I’ve never, ever come across anyone wearing that perfume. I found out recently that Yardley has actually resurrected April Violets, so I plan on getting a bottle—and opening it whenever I

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want to feel closer to her. Another scent that reminds me of her is Pond’s Cold Cream. Nowadays, you can only get small jars and it isn’t very popular, but it used to come in big jars and is still the perfect makeup remover. Mom used it every night, and when she kissed me goodnight, I would always smell that cream. After I moved out, I would occasionally stay overnight on the weekend. And there she was at night in her robe and nightgown, with that scent of Pond’s Cold Cream, and I was a little girl once again, lucky enough to have had a childhood where I would be safe and sound all night; where nothing bad would ever happen. I keep a jar in my bathroom cabinet, and I hope they never discontinue it. I’ll never forget the cooking smells that would permeate the house when Mom was making dinner. She was an amazing cook; not only Italian food, she’d try anything that caught her fancy. Because of her, I was exposed to all kinds of food and acquired a very

“sophisticated palate,” as she used to say, at a young age. When my father would come home from work, I would make him guess what we were having for dinner just from the smell. Often he could, other times he was completely baffled. Either way, he knew there would be something delicious on his plate. In the summertime, Mom kept the back door open to let the breeze in since we had no air-conditioning. My relatives, who lived in the two apartments below us, kept theirs open as well, and at suppertime you could hear the sounds of their dinners being prepared; pots and pans clanging on the stove, wine bottles being uncorked, silverware rattling, and of course, you’d always get a whiff of what was cooking. What memories. Scented candles and incense have been used throughout history as an aid to send petitions and offerings up to the Divine. My cousin Karen had given Mom a violet-scented candle the

Christmas before she died. I lit that candle and placed it by her bed on the last day of her life, and I like to think that when her soul departed her body, she was borne straight up to heaven on that scent she loved so well. TJN

– Lauren de Albuquerque

Volume 3 • Issue 3


Divas (L-R) Emma Faul, Taylor Barber, Olivia Moncrief and Madison Plumb are all smiles before a game.

By Maria Alcantara Faul In the spring of every year, families assemble at College Oaks’ baseball diamonds to enjoy the game of softball. It’s a direct descendant of baseball with some key differences: Softballs are larger than baseballs; the pitches are thrown underhand rather than overhand; and softball is played on a smaller diamond than in baseball. Despite the game’s name, the standard softball is not soft; in fact, it is harder than a baseball. The eight and nine-year-old members of the Diamond Divas team play softball through the Lake Charles Softball Little League. “Over 250 girls, ages four through 16, have signed up to play in the 2011 Spring League,” said Charlie LeBlanc, 2011 president. “All of the teams are coached by volunteer coaches who have passed all the necessary background checks.” The league currently has a total of 22 teams spread over six divisions: TBall U4 and U5, U8 Coach Pitch, U10 Semi Kid Pitch, U12 Kid Pitch and U16 Kid Pitch. The Divas’ coach Brenna Hebert and the other coaches help the girls warm up and prepare during practice and before each ballgame. They lob them pitches in the batting cage and help them improve their catching skills in general. Hebert, who played ball for St. Louis High School, says she is regularly surprised by how Volume 3 • Issue 3

much improvement the girls show. “Each year, the girls learn more and more,” she said. Most of the girls in the U8 Divas started playing little league ball around the age of four, participating in TBall, where the ball is placed on an adjustable tee atop the home plate for the girls to strike. “In TBall, my goal was just to get the girls to align themselves up to the tee without my help, and to help them learn how to run through first base, field grounders, and listen to base coaches,” Hebert said. Hebert’s daughter Julia, eight, started playing when she was four years old. It was at this time that Hebert started coaching the Divas. “I coach because I absolutely love it,” she said. “Sharing that time with my daughter is definitely an added bonus.” This year is the Divas’ fifth season in the fast-pitch league. The girls are in the U8 coach-pitch division, where the coaches pitch to the hitters. “The girls are learning to hit a true fast-pitch,” Hebert said. “They’re also learning to address defense situations, forced running, tagging up, and tagging runners. They’re also required to learn something new each game and share it with the team afterwards in the huddle.” In a few years, the players will start pitching to each other. “The girls start pitching to each other, most of the time,

Julia Dore’ running to catch a grounder. MAY 5, 2011

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when they’re in the U10 Division,” LeBlanc said. “The girls start off pitching. When they’ve thrown three balls, the coach has the option to pitch or the girls can continue pitching.” When they start playing U12, the coaches are simply “coaching”; everything else is up to the girls. Some may go on to advanced levels, playing in high school or even college. Others take a more casual approach and simply play for fun. Either way, the girls have a blast on the field. “They’re excited to be out here,” Hebert said. The Diamond Divas players regularly work hard and stay focused, giving it their all on the field. Rachel Chiasson’s daughter Chaney, nine, plays for the team. “My favorite thing about Chaney playing ball is watching her at the plate, and seeing the intensity in her face,” said Chiasson, who played little league, high school and college ball. “Chaney really enjoys hitting the ball, and I believe she enjoys working with her teammates to win.” The Divas have fun when they’re not on the field. “The girls enjoy playing, but I think the social time and the cheers are a major part of the experience,” said Janet Faul, grandmother to nine year-old Emma Faul. Emma loves it. “I get to hit and catch the ball, and I get to do cheers with my friends!” she said.

The sport is excellent way to instill the values of an active lifestyle at a young age, and it’s fun for the grown-ups, too. Before each game, parents usually chat and visit as the girls warm up. And it keeps them fit. “They’re outdoors and they’re running around,” Faul said. “It definitely helps with their health and fitness.” Coaches and parents also say that playing ball teaches the children valuable life lessons without preaching to them. “I love to watch selfconfidence and self-esteem blossom in the girls,” Hebert said. There are so many positive experiences that come out of playing softball: the players learn dedication; the value of practice; and accountability to teammates, which ranges from solid play on the field to cheering their fellow players on. They also learn respect for themselves, the coaches, their parents, and the umpires. These are valuable skills that they will, hopefully, take with them towards a bigger dream of becoming a mother, a teacher, a politician, a doctor, a lawyer…or maybe even a softball coach.  For more information about the Lake Charles Softball Little League, contact lakecharlessoftball@yahoo.com. TJN

Chaney Chiasson hitting a solid one. Divas “huddle up” after a game.

2770 Third Avenue, Suite 125 • Lake Charles, LA 70601 Located in the Medical Office Building on the Lake Charles Memorial Hospital campus.

Phone (337) 494-AMRI PAGE 6

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Volume 3 • Issue 3


The

Boiling

P l

Please submit press releases to lauren@thejambalayanews.com

PINNACLE PROMOTES KERRY ANDERSEN Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. announces the recent promotion of Kerry Andersen to regional director of community & public affairs. Andersen will have direct oversight of Louisiana media relations, public relations and community affairs at L’Auberge du Lac, Boomtown New Orleans and Boomtown Bossier. She is the first team member hired at L’Auberge du Lac, joining the project in November 2003. She represents L’Auberge and Pinnacle as a community liaison and passionate volunteer on numerous civic boards. Andersen will be Kerry Andersen based in Lake Charles and will report to Sr. Vice President and General Manager Geno Iafrate while maintaining her companywide role as spokesperson for Pinnacle Entertainment. INTERNAL MEDICINE CLINIC WELCOMES DR. LEWIS The Internal Medicine Clinic welcomes Ronald Lewis, Jr., MD, board-certified internal medicine physician, to their practice and to the staff of Lake Charles Memorial Hospital as of May 1. Dr. Lewis graduated from the University of Mississippi School of Medicine in Jackson. He then went on to complete both his internship and residency in internal medicine at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Prior to joining the staff of Lake Charles Memorial Hospital and the Dr. Ronald Lewis Internal Medicine Clinic of Lake Charles, Dr. Lewis was with the Lake Charles Medical and Surgical Clinic. He is experienced in the care and treatment of such conditions as diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. For more information, or to schedule an appointment, call Internal Medicine Clinic at (337) 494-6800. WELCH NAMED WCCH EMPLOYEE OF THE QUARTER West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital recently named Glenda Welch, food service aide, as its second quarter Employee of the Quarter. In her current position, Welch works to ensure that the food service needs of hospital patients and visitors are met. According to Fran Landry, director of nutrition services, Glenda is an outstanding employee who displays kindness and compassion in every aspect of her duties. Welch is a resident of Hackberry and has worked at WCCH for over nine years.

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NEW CASA VOLUNTEERS SWORN IN Judge Cutrer, from the 14th Judicial District Family Court, recently swore in ten Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) volunteers. CASA, a program of Family & Youth, recruits and trains volunteers who advocate in court for the best interests of abused and neglected children. CASA volunteers serve as the eyes and ears of the court, gathering information on each child’s situation. April is child abuse awareness month, and CASA volunteers provide an important service to abused children. Training and orientation for anyone who wants to become a CASA is Saturdays, June 18 and 25 and July 9 and 16 1 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. There is no special background required. Potential volunteers must be able to pass a criminal background check, have a love of children and a desire to help. For more information about CASA call (337) 436-9533.

LAKE CHARLES FIRE DEPARTMENT RECEIVES MDA GOLD AWARD The Lake Charles Fire Department was recently awarded the MDA Gold Award by the Muscular Dystrophy Association for helping advance research and health services programs. The award was formally presented to Lake Charles Fire Department Chief Keith Murray by Louisiana State Fire Chiefs Association president Ed Smith on behalf of the state chapter of the MDA at the 2011 Louisiana State Fire Chiefs Association conference.

LC Fire Department Captain Will Veuleman (Local Firefighter Union 561 President), and Lake Charles Fire Department Chief Keith Murray.

Glenda Welch

FAIR HOUSING APPRECIATION BANQUET Leonard Knapp, Jr. was honored recently for his years of support with equal-housing programs and initiatives in Southwest Louisiana at the Fair Housing banquet. The yearly event is hosted by the Calcasieu Parish Office of Housing and the Community Housing Resource Board of Southwest Louisiana (CHRBSWLA). Senator Willie Mount was the guest speaker. In addition, Calcasieu Housing Counseling Agency clients Tyler and Jessica Potts along MAY 5, 2011

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with Shawn Bittorio from the LSU Ag Center First Time Homebuyer Class were presented with a $500 gift card from Stine’s during the luncheon. CALCASIEU WOMEN’S SHELTER WINNER IN FUELING GOOD PROGRAM CITGO Petroleum Corp. has named the Calcasieu Women’s Shelter of Lake Charles the latest grand prize winner in the CITGO Fueling Good program. In recognition of its work providing shelter, support, and counseling to victims of domestic and sexual violence across Southwest Louisiana, the nonprofit organization has been awarded a year’s supply of quality CITGO fuel and a case of CITGO motor oil. Since 1979, the Calcasieu Women’s Shelter has been dedicated to the elimination of personal and societal violence across Southwest Louisiana.

L to R: Jim Click, CITGO; Najam Mufti, Sonia Petroleum, Tanisha Conn, Children's Advocate at the Shelter; Zahid Mohammad, Sonia Petroleum; Kathy Williams, Executive Director of the Shelter; Dana Keel, CITGO Lake Charles Refinery; Ashley Chretien, Director of Children's Programs at the Shelter. WCCH ANNOUNCES SAFETY AWARD WINNERS West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital recently named Kelley Franks, RN, and Amanda Bryant, RN, infection control nurse, as recipients of its new Safety Award. The award, which honors employees for their promotion of safety and safety awareness in and around the hospital, is distributed monthly to those employees that demonstrate extraordinary awareness and action in minimizing potential safety risks.

L to R: Bill Hankins, CEO, Kelley Franks, RN, Paul Hymes, vice president of facility services and Janie Fruge’, RN, COO/CNO

L to R: Bill Hankins, CEO, Amanda Bryant, RN, infection control nurse, Paul Hymes, vice president of facility services and Kathy Doty, director of quality management PAGE 8

MAY 5, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 3


BBBS NAMES 2011-2012 BOARD Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southwest Louisiana’s board of directors held its election of officers for 2011-2012. Jack Drouilhet, owner of SERVPRO of Lake Charles was elected president; Denise Rau, Rau Financial Group, vice-president; Denny Clark, PPG retired, Jack Drouilhet Denise Rau treasurer; and Shirley Henning, BBBS board member six years, secretary two years, re-elected secretary. The board also welcomed new board members Tim Dusseau, Pepsi-Cola Lake Charles; John Fontenot, Lake Charles Memorial Hospital; and Randy Robb, Chennault International Airport Authority. For more information on mentoring opportunities offered by Shirley Henning Denny Clark the United Way agency of Big Brothers Big Sisters please call 478-KIDS (5437) or visit www.bbbs-swla.net. ASSOCIATE LOUISIANA ARTISTS ANNOUNCE ART SHOW WINNERS Associated Louisiana Artists announced the winners of its Annual Juried Regional Art recently. Winners at the regional level have the opportunity to compete at the juried Lone Star Art League annual convention in Houston. Best of Show from the ALA show is an oil painting titled “The Boys,” by local artist Helga Gravitt.  First place winners include Kevin Leveque, professional oil; Tony Forrest, professional watercolor; Gloria Yang, professional pastel; Debbie Lavergne, pottery; Marilyn Wheeldon, professional photography; Sharon Benedict, non-professional oil; Theresa Dewey, non-professional watercolor; and Josh Fountain, student artwork. 

JEFF DAVIS BANK DONATES TO BANNERS Jeff Davis Bank & Trust Company has donated $10,000 for the 2011 Banners Cultural Series. The series offers family entertainment, classical music, jazz, lectures and so much more and is annually supported by donations from area corporate sponsors such as Jeff Davis Bank. OLQH STUDENTS DONATE EASTER BASKETS TO HOSPICE PATIENTS The 6th Grade BETA Club of Our Lady Queen of Heaven donated Easter baskets recently to patients at CHRISTUS Hospice and Palliative Care. Mrs. Hearns and her class gave out 53 baskets that brightened the Easter season for those who really needed it. 

TJN

Sixth-graders from OLQH are ready to deliver Easter baskets to CHRISTUS Hospice.

L to R: Bryan Leach, Regional Director for Delta Waterfowl Gulf Coast Chapter; Dr. David Kestel, Chairman of the Delta Waterfowl Gulf Coast Chapter; Zachary Haunce, Troop 107 Eagle Candidate; Scott Broussard, Treasurer of the Delta Waterfowl Gulf Coast Chapter; “Sadie Girl” Broussard and Kevin McMurrian, Scout Executive of the Calcasieu Area Council, Boy Scouts of America. LOCAL DELTA WATERFOWL CHAPTER USES FUNDS LOCALLY The Gulf Coast Chapter of Delta Waterfowl is pleased to announce that it has teamed up with the Calcasieu Area Council – Boy Scouts of America to build wood duck boxes that will be erected along the Calcasieu River.  Nestbox programs such as this one have demonstrated that local wood duck populations can be increased through erection of properly constructed boxes. Delta Waterfowl has donated $2,000 for box materials and scouts from Troop 107 will construct and erect boxes as part of an Eagle Scout Project sponsored by Our Lady Queen of Heaven Catholic Church. Delta Waterfowl also announces the grant of two $500 scholarships to two McNeese State University students seeking wildlife management diplomas. For information about Delta Waterfowl, call Bryan Leach at (337) 739-5774. For more information about Boy Scouts, contact Kevin McMurrian at (337) 436-3376. Volume 3 • Issue 3

MAY 5, 2011

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Dang Yankee The

By Mike McHugh

Bachelor For The Weekend One weekend every year, my wife and her sister go off, just the two of them, to spend some quality time together. I have no doubt that their experience is most delightful. Yet, it is entirely possible that I have the better part of this deal. It’s not supposed to be that way, of course. No siree. I say this understanding full well that a couple of sisters can have great time together no matter where they

go or what they do, unlike their male counterparts. For brothers to enjoy themselves together, they have to be doing something exciting, like hunting big game in Alaska or getting thrown out of a bar in Pittsburgh for talking trash about the Steelers. So, it makes me wonder why my wife had to go to Galveston to meet her sister. This is a place she has no idea how to get to. By my reckoning, they’d have had just as good a time

together at the Holiday Inn Express on Highway 171, a place she can drive to in her sleep. They’d knock themselves out just enjoying each other’s company, doing nothing more than watching Days Of Our Lives and then going out on the balcony to hear the traffic whiz by on I-10, just a block away. No, it had to be Galveston. Personally, I wouldn’t have cared if they went to Timbuktu, as long as I didn’t have to talk her through the entire drive over the cell phone to make sure she didn’t get lost. Now I know how it feels to stand in an airport tower talking somebody through the intricacies of landing a plane. Like Lloyd Bridges in the movie Airplane!, I realized I picked the wrong week to stop sniffing glue. To illustrate, here is an except from the transcript: SHE: “I’m not exactly sure where I am right now.” ME: “Okay, fine. There’s no need to panic. Can you tell me what it is you see?” SHE: “Yes, there are all kinds of sand and seagulls, and there’s water up to the wheel wells of the car.”

ME: “Okay, babe, no problem. You’re in the Gulf of Mexico. You’ve just gone a bit too far and need to turn around.” Once I had safely navigated my lady through to her destination, it was time for me to get to the business of the weekend. She and I had very different ideas as to the exact nature of such business but, fortunately for me, I controlled the agenda from this point forward. Her ideas were outlined in detail on a legal pad that she’d left rather conspicuously on the kitchen table. On that pad was a meticulous list of chores that she must have collected over the past year. The items ranged from simple tasks like “Water my tomato plant,” to grandiose schemes she probably concocted while watching one of those remodeling shows on HGTV. For instance, there was, “Re-visit the color scheme in the dining room and re-decorate with warm pastels more compatible with afternoon sun.” I thought about what a loving a gesture it was for her to take the time to make these detailed notes so as to ensure I wouldn’t suffer boredom during my weekend alone. That was right before I lit the match. Do you realize that a legal pad works real nice for starting the fire on a barbecue pit? The barbecue pit was another item that was on my agenda, but not on hers. No, if I had followed the menu she left for me, I’d have eaten the box of super high-fiber cereal rather than do what I actually did with it, which was use it to mulch her tomato plant, a use to which it was much better suited. Also, that way, I would only have to water the tomato plant maybe once. Honestly, is it at all reasonable for a wife to expect anything less than bachelor-like behavior when she leaves her husband at home alone? I only get this chance once a year, so I’m going to make the most of it. And that means leaving my dirty clothes all over the house without having to be told to pick them up, and watching auto racing all weekend, even if the only thing that happens to be on is the soapbox derby. And it in no way involves any making of beds, or actually putting dishes into the dishwasher. At least, not until about a halfhour until she’s expected back home.

TJN PAGE 10

MAY 5, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 3


By George “Tip” Cline

SECURITY CONCERNS AT NEW MARINA The new marina is now open and operating on the Bord du Lac in Lake Charles, and it’s a much welcomed and needed addition to our Civic Center environs. It’s so nice when really useful and usable projects come to fruition such as the marina, the Dog Park and Prien Lake Park. There’s a downloadable brochure online that gives boaters the necessary information on the marina (go to www.cityoflakeCharles.com/ and click on “visitors”). The brochure is also available at no charge at both the Civic Center and the Visitors Bureau on North Lakeshore Drive. It includes phone numbers, rules, rates and maps of the lake and the 40 boat slips, along with other pertinent data. Several friends have already used the Bord du Lac Marina and have been very impressed with it. At the same time, they’ve expressed concern over the lack of security in the area and the open access to any boat there—especially overnight. No one wants strangers or uninvited guest to be able to walk right up to your boat whenever they choose. I’m sure this gap in security is a concern to the City and hopefully, there will be some steps taken to address these potential concerns before an unpleasant incident occurs. DECEPTIVE PRICING My readers are well aware of my position on deceptive pricing. I fail to understand why supposedly reputable merchants feel that they can build customer loyalty by routinely using signage that can only make for an unhappy patron. Twice in the last week, I found signs indicating a lower than normal price above a display, only to discover at the register that the cost of the item was higher than what was indicated on the sign. Volume 3 • Issue 3

When I questioned the difference, the response was that the price displayed was not for that product, but for a similar version of that product, that may or may not have been available in that display. The only results of such practices are confusion and dissatisfaction. When you encounter this kind of deception, it is essential that you voice your displeasure with the management. Letting something like this pass will only continue the practice. If businesses know that their customers see the deception and are unhappy about it, changes will be made. If the store is part of a large chain, you need to go further up the ladder and register your displeasure with higher management. Misleading practices normally come from lower levels rather than the larger corporate structure. Pressure from above will certainly curtail local missteps. COUPON KING We all like a good deal, and take great pleasure in telling friends and family just what a great bargain there is to be had at this or that location. It’s almost a badge of honor when you can prove that you know of the best deal going. I have a friend that must have a warehouse of coupons. He seems to always be able to pull one out for any purchase at any location. The really nice thing about his coupon usage is that he loves to share them and lets us know where and how to get them. He pulled one out the other evening as we were chatting at a local restaurant that allowed him a free appetizer—a coupon he cut from the side of a pizza box. Coupons are a great way for merchants to promote different products that they want to move, but remember, it is only a bargain if you really can use it. If you buy something just because it’s marked down or part of some promotion and you don’t use it, then you’ve done your pocketbook some harm and you surely did yourself no favor. Look before you leap—just like your mother always told you. TJN MAY 5, 2011

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League Of Women Voters Honors Local Member The League of Women Voters of Lake Charles began the new year with their annual banquet on Tues., April 12 at Reeves Uptown Catering. Outgoing President Kay Andrews bestowed a very special honor on a Lake Charles LWV member: Dorothy Roach was presented with an honorary membership in recognition of over 50 years of membership. The new

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president is Molly Morgan, and new board members are Robin Baudoin, 1st vice president; Leslie Landry, treasurer; Matilda Miller, secretary; Francessca Howard, director; and Sandra Walker, director. The featured speaker for the evening was McNeese State University President, Dr. Philip C. Williams. TJN

Meet Happy! Happy is a special little bitty boy who needs a loving home. He lost his last owner because the landlord made her get rid of him—and he was so confused. But he’s in a foster home now, where he has shown what an affectionate and sweet boy he is. He’s a few years old, about 5 pounds, and loves to run and play with other small dogs. He’s an expert flycatcher, and will crawl in your lap to cuddle or give smooches. When he wags his tail, his whole body wags! He would do best

in a home without toddlers since he is so small. He’s been neutered and is up to date on all his shots. For more info on Happy, call his foster mom at (337) 533-8212. Happy’s adoption fee is $150. An application can be found online at www.4PawsSocietyInc.com and faxed to 337-4744552 (Attn: Sheila G.) or e-mailed to sheilag20@yahoo.com A vet reference and home visit are part of the adoption process. If you live outside the general area, a “virtual” home visit can be done.

TJN

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oyle By Jim D

I Remember As all of us, especially baby boomers like me, watch our countdown clocks getting closer to zero hour, we’re more likely to read Page 2 of the American Press before Page 1. When I did that last week, I was especially sad to see a name I knew, John Lawrence Cox III. He was 62. I met Jay only once, at his dad’s funeral. J.L. Cox was a partner in the law firm that recruited me to our fair city in 1983. There were so many special things about J.L. and that firm as it then existed. One of those was his affection, and worry, for his son. As we now know officially from his obituary, but as I knew from talking to J.L. back in the early ‘80s, Jay was a CIA operative handling dangerous matters under deep cover. One day, J.L. told me of his pride, and worry, for his son. “I asked him how I would ever know if something happened to him,” J.L. said. “He told me, ‘Dad, I’m in touch with my office every day. If there ever comes a day when I’m not, you’ll be the first to know.’” According to the account in the local paper, Jay used his electrical engineering degree to concentrate on “nuclear weapons” matters. That raises the imagination, and the eyebrows, just a tad. But it brought to mind an interesting parallel between Jay and his dad. You see, J.L. had been a bomber pilot in World War II, and when he finished his missions, he was assigned as an instructor at what is now Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. He trained many pilots in the finer points of flying bombers, some on special missions, some on the new model B-29 Superfortress towards the end of the war. One of his students was Colonel Paul Tibbets. Colonel Tibbets piloted the Enola Gay, which dropped the atomic Volume 3 • Issue 3

bomb on Hiroshima. There are characters in this world and I’ve known many of them. You know that from my column. But J.L. wasn’t a character. He was a brilliant scholar, a devoted husband, a fine trial lawyer, and a gentle man. Let me tell you a little about him. He was raised in Lake Charles. His dad worked at Love’s Men’s store selling suits. J.L. had spent time in his youth playing piano for a living, ostensibly in a house of ill repute (but I doubt that’s true). J.L. was first cousin to Will and Jimmy Cox, two other fine lawyers I met right after moving here. J.L. moved on from his piano gigs to more academic pursuits. For years he was a law professor at the University of Houston until Ed Barnett and John Camp talked him into returning home to practice law. One of his students there was Richard T. Haynes, also known as “Racehorse.” J.L. was his professor for a torts class. He and I represented the same party in a wrongful death case tried here in 1982. The case lasted for almost three weeks, a long time for a jury trial by anybody’s standards, but particularly in those days. I lived in Baton Rouge at the time and Lake Charles might as well have been somewhere near El Paso as far as I was concerned. But the case had a rich roster of characters as lawyers, including Bret Barham for the plaintiff; and Joe Brame, Fred Cappel, and Tom Sanders for the defendants. Warren Hood was the judge, chainsmoking light cigarettes from the bench. And believe it or not, Thad Minaldi, whom I had covered when he was a defensive back at LSU and I was a sportswriter, was the foreman of the jury. Thad, whom my friend Coach Mac

always called “Tad McNaldy,” had finished law school but wasn’t yet sworn in as a lawyer. In those days, lawyers were exempt from jury service. So, he made the cut to get on the jury. I’m sure it was a great education. During the trial, J.L. and I became great friends. It was also the first time I used an investigator in Lake Charles. The defendants jointly retained Huey Littleton and, by consensus, I was chosen to be his liaison to the defendants. Now folks, that will be a column about a true character. But that’s for another day. Those of you who know me well will understand when I say it’s an exaggeration to represent that I learned many lessons from J.L. Let’s just say our temperaments are completely different. But he was a great trial lawyer, and helping him put a case together for our joint client taught me many valuable lessons. Right after that case, I had another trial over here with Judge Charles King, now long gone. I went by J.L.’s office afterwards and he asked me if I’d consider moving to Lake Charles. I had only been here two or three times. After some forays into the

legal market in Baton Rouge I decided to cast my lot with the firm of Woodley, Barnett, Cox, Williams, Fenet, and Palmer, and the rest, as they say, is history. I thought of J.L. the other day when reaching for the name of a female acquaintance I should have known. In that case, being a Southerner, I will invariably use the generic “Sweetie” when I can’t remember anything else. But J.L., who devoted his adult life to caring for his wife Ouida who was in a wheelchair because of multiple sclerosis, was a little different. He couldn’t remember the names of any of the secretaries in the office. So when he wanted to speak to one of them, he called her “Young Lady.” That worked for everybody. When J.L. died in 1985, there was a large wreath at the funeral with a tag on it reading, simply, “Young Lady.” Seeing his son’s obituary in the local paper made me miss them both. But I’m proud to have known them both. I hope some of you did, too. See y’all on the flip. TJN

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By Angie Manning-Istre, www.VisitLakeCharles.org/Social It’s time to get connected! Every year during National Tourism Week, the Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana Convention & Visitors Bureau (CVB) highlights the impact that tourism has on the local economy, with tourism bringing $335 million to Calcasieu Parish and saving every taxpayer $510 annually. That’s major news! But, this year, in addition to that message, the bureau is focusing on the social media aspects of tourism and how locals can benefit. So how can you as a resident, representative of an organization or company plug into this robust and diverse industry? The bureau is encouraging locals to engage and use the CVB as the clearinghouse for all event information in Southwest Louisiana so that we have one cohesive voice online for potential visitors to hear. Plus, it’s fun, exciting and rewarding on many levels. So, what’s the deal with getting social, say, on Twitter? If you have never explored Twitter, it is almost like an underground world where you can find all sorts of treasures, little golden nuggets of useful information. You can tune into whatever interests you. Without doing more than “following” a Twitter account that you PAGE 14

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like, you will be updated and fed information on a daily basis whenever you sign in. What’s great about following the CVB on Twitter is that the information coming your way is all geared around fun things to see and do in the area. It’s a real person at the CVB sending out useful information too— not some robotic program that sends out calendar information! The CVB’s goal is to inform, make you smile each day, and potentially, help you have more action-packed weekends because you get inspired to get out and do things. The CVB has already seen great results from engaging with social media from making contact with media, bloggers, the State Office of Tourism, leisure travelers and locals. It’s the classic case of the “ripple effect.” The CVB throws information into the Twitter pond, and some of the ripples go far and wide! Check out the CVB on Twitter by going to Twitter.com/LakeCharlesCVB. If you’re familiar with Twitter, here’s our hash tag: #TweetLC! The CVB also has a Facebook page: Facebook.com/LakeCharlesCVB. If you “Like” the CVB on Facebook, you will be able to see the CVB in action Volume 3 • Issue 3


with media tours as well as be in the know for major events. Many local businesses and festivals also have Facebook Fan Pages. If you have a Fan Page, let the CVB know, and the two pages can be connected for crosspromotional purposes. It’s win-win! Not to mention, if you are an event planner, musician or business owner, be sure to submit events or have a listing on VisitLakeCharles.org. Click on the calendar and submit an event. It’s that easy. The CVB’s Web site is brimming with information on Southwest Louisiana, and the more contact the bureau has with locals and the more current information that is on hand, the better! Utilizing the full force of the CVB’s free online services is the best way to make sure your information is being disseminated to all channels. The bureau works hard to promote every shred of information to make the Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana destination enticing and inviting. To learn more about what the CVB can do for you, your organization or group, log on to www.visitlakecharles.org/NTW. There, you will also find activities held during National Tourism Week, such as Children’s Day, Sat., May 7 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. at the bureau, 1205 N. Lakeshore Drive. Also, get details on Restaurant Day, May 10 from 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m., which will be held at the Lake Charles Civic Center. If you’re new to social media, the CVB also has an entertaining fact page created especially for you! Log on to www.visitlakecharles.org/social. Or, to sign up for our Game Plan enewsletter that goes out twice per month, send an e-mail to Angie Manning-Istre at aistre@visitlakecharles.org. For general information on the area, contact the Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana CVB at 436-9588. TJN

Volume 3 • Issue 3

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A Greener

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The Garden of Hope

By Renee R. Carthan; Intern, The People's Advocate

When most people think of food, we automatically think of how it tastes and the satisfaction it brings. Not much thought goes into nourishment at the initial moment of delight. So it goes without saying that most of us take for granted the fact that it also nourishes our souls. That type of nourishment and sense of community was not wasted on the two-dozen volunteers who convened at The Potter’s House recently. THE BEGINNING Almost two years ago, The Garden of Hope first began to take seed as Beth Zilbert of The People’s Advocate saw the need to not only lend a hand to Rev. Leona Benoit, who founded and runs The Potter’s House (home to nearly three dozen homeless women and children) but to make an on-going effort that would do more than just feed hungry bellies. It’s estimated that in 2010, 128 women and children received refuge and shelter there, and more than 16,000 meals were served. The initial dig proved to be much more complicated than originally expected, as many of the ladies and volunteers didn’t exactly have green thumbs. But after a few hours, mounds of dirt and buckets of sweat on that humid July morning, the daunting task seemed more necessary than ever. The sense of hope, self-sufficiency, and accomplishment that everyone felt was enough to make Benoit and Zilbert decide to go bigger and better. The garden soon became an idea of not only growing plants, but also positivity and life skills. The People’s Advocate worked to find ways to get the SWLA community involved. Zilbert sought to make the Garden “feed two birds with one seed,” by getting the Parish Office of Juvenile Justice Services (OJJS) involved, giving juvenile court judges and probation officers a new option for rehabilitating troubled Lake Area teens. Much like the “New Leash on Life” project at the parish Juvenile Detention Center where youth under the direct supervision of OJJS have the opportunity to learn skills through animal rescue and training, her idea was to have the Garden of Hope give at-risk youth the opportunity to give back in a different way. They would be directly influencing the nourishment of the bodies and souls of the shelter’s residents, while at the same time nourishing their own. They’d learn valuable skills while gardening, but most importantly, learn that their hands can be used not only to destroy, but also to create. Hopefully, the seed of brotherhood and giving to the community would be planted and ultimately blossom.

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Next, two local restaurants, Cedars and The Harlequin Steak House, agreed to buy the excess crops from the Garden and use them to prepare some of their most popular dishes. The Tuesday afternoon Farmer’s Market at the Cash and Carry building located at the corner of Enterprise Boulevard and Broad Street is available for the ladies to sell their organic produce, helping them make the Garden self-sustaining. The Kiwanis Club of South Lake Charles adopted the Garden, bringing in human power and the supplies needed to dig and plant, as well as donating time, money, and resources. Donna and Rick Richard, through The Richard Family Charitable Foundation Trust, gave a generous “seed” grant to make sure that the Garden had all the supplies needed to get started. TIME TO GET DIRTY The Kiwanis Club and People’s Advocate volunteers, Potter’s House residents, even Lake Charles Mayor

Randy Roach conquered the soil and the Louisiana sun for about three hours recently. The land was prepared and planted. The garden is starting as a 20’ x 50’ plot of future tomatoes, cucumbers, eggplants and peppers. The Kiwanis Club members also donated a small greenhouse for herbs. “The Big Dig,” as the event was named, is not the end of the story. The garden will have to be watered; the plants will need to be fed. Weeds and pests have to be repelled—all through organic means, of course. It will take time, energy, and commitment. Mostly, it’s going to take people, giving of themselves physically and spiritually. Hope, like a seed, can be planted and bloom. All it takes is a little work. For more information on how you can be a part of The Garden of Hope, contact The People’s Advocate at (337) 436-3475 or thepeoplesadvocateswla@yahoo.com. TJN

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Volume 3 • Issue 3

MAY 5, 2011

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What’s Cookin’

A Sweet Escape at L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort Looking for great ideas for mom for Mother’s Day? See what’s cookin’ over at L’Auberge. Desserts is the place to indulge your taste for something sweet. Enjoy tasty house-made gelato, decadent homemade pastries and signature chocolates. Top that off with gourmet coffee selections from Starbucks® enjoyed in a cozy, intimate setting, or wrapped up “to go.” Doesn’t your mom deserve the very best? If so, treat her to Mother’s Day specialties, including fruit tarts, chocolate-covered strawberries or delicious strawberry shortcakes. Sweets and pastries are an unforgettable part of Le Beaucoup Buffet as well. Just check the display case for daily offerings and have your server box up your favorite sweets to enjoy later. PAGE 18

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All of the tasty treats are prepared by award-winning pastry chefs, including L’Auberge Pastry Chef Bill Foltz, who recently received the top special prize in the category of “Sugar” at the Coupe du Monde de la Pâtisserie. Visit Desserts and get mom her favorite sweet or place an order for her very own custom cake available with 72 hours advance notice. The choice is yours at L’Auberge! Desserts hours: Mon. – Thurs., 4 – 10 p.m.; Friday, 4 p.m. – Midnight; Sat., 11 a.m. – Midnight; Sun., 11 a.m. – 10 p.m. For more information, call Desserts at (337) 395-7075. Go to www.facebook.com/laubergedulac for the latest specials and giveaways, and www.ldlcasino.com. Volume 3 • Issue 3


Jack Daniel’s Chocolate Pecan Torte This wonderful torte is available at Desserts and is a special creation of Bill Foltz. Yum! INGREDIENTS • 7 oz. butter • 7 oz. dark chocolate • 10 oz. granulated sugar • 3-½ oz. cocoa powder • 5 eggs • 2 oz. Jack Daniel’s® Whiskey • 6 oz. toasted pecan halves PREPARATION • Melt together butter and dark chocolate. Using a paddle mixer, mix sugar, cocoa, whiskey and eggs. • Add melted chocolate mixture. Scrape well. • Stir in pecans. Pour into a greased pan lined with wax paper. • Bake in a water bath at 350degrees for approximately 50 minutes, or until center is 170-degrees. Chill. Serve cold or at room temperature with your favorite fruit or caramel sauce. • Makes one 10” cake; serves 8-10. Enjoy! TJN

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By Derenda Grubb, CCPS, CRMS, ABR, GRI, CRS, President of LA Realtors

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Knowledgeable people have been watching Louisiana— and SWLA in particular. They’ve watched as we had our teeth kicked in twice by major hurricanes, and each time, we returned to clean up, rebuild and move on. They’ve watched as our leaders have started to get the idea that our town, parishes, and local governments must work together if we are going to move forward. A recent article in another local publication demonstrated little confidence and enthusiasm for our area. I was less than impressed with the summary of our accomplishments and progress—and would like to set that story straight. Southwest Louisiana has received too many accolades for me to recap in this article. Forbes Magazine ranked Louisiana as number one in 2010 as the “Best State to Generate Business Facilities” and ranked Lake Charles as number nine of 10 up and coming cities in the United States. We all should take pride in this, as they define the population in this area as 194,000, which we know is more than the proper city limits. It was ranked for the region, with the city as its core.

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Bloomberg Business Week predicts SWLA has gone through the worst of it, and that Lake Charles will be one of the best performing small housing markets for 2011. What factors have created the phenomena of placing Louisiana in the spotlight of so many business and economic evaluators? The answer is the development of better state and local government, and a tax base that is welcoming to business and capital investors and conducive to home ownership. It has led Bloomberg Business Weekly to also name Lake Charles “The Best Place to Raise Your Kid in Louisiana. “ The amount of capital investment in SWLA is explosive. I can name a few—and I apologize, because I know that I’ve omitted some: • The Shaw Group’s installation to construct components for nuclear power plants is well on its way at an initial $2.8 billion investment. • We have two thriving casinos, and now, Mojito Pointe Casino & Resort will soon make number three. Mojito Pointe will result in a wonderful $400 million facility, providing 2,000 construction jobs

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and 1,500 permanent jobs. • An article in American Association of Port Authorities gave accolades to The Port of Lake Charles Vessel Cleaning Project, which created not only 1,000 jobs, but also helped our environment after the BP oil spill. • The Port of Lake Charles announced the construction of a $59.2 million grain port terminal, which will turn our port into a premier point for the export of grains from throughout the nation. • The ground was reportedly cleared this month for The Port of Lake Charles’ Leucadia’s Lake Charles Cogeneration Project— estimated at $1.6 billion. • The aeronautics industry located at Chennault International Airbase continues strong with Northrop Grumman’s Lake Charles Center selected as Aviation Week Magazine’s MRO (Maintenance, Repair, & Overhaul) Center for 2011. Aeroframe continues with second expansion in Lake Charles. 100 jobs have been added to payroll with plans for a total of 650 employees with annual payroll of $35.7 million. • Trunkline LNG Terminal, located

south of Lake Charles, is consid ered the largest import terminal in the world. Add the Cheniere Energy Terminal near Sabine Pass and the Sempra Terminal located in Hackberry, and this makes our area dominant in the nation for LNG capture and mass transport. The Sempra terminal alone was another $900 million in capital investment, creating 60 new jobs with an average annual salary of $63,000. • In February, Sasol announced it would be constructing the world’s first commercial ethylene tetramerization unit. This will expand the facility/workforce by about 10 percent, adding 36 full time employees, retaining 350 existing jobs, 12 contract jobs, and 500 construction jobs. The average annual salary is $62,000, with $170 million in capital investment. • On April 21, there will be an official groundbreaking ceremony for a 20-acre premier facility to be located at the corner of Nelson Road and Ham Reid. Russell Stutes Construction will develop this new business park that will combine residential, commercial and retail space in one location.

This does not include the many other expansion projects with other major corporations; highway construction; and new restaurants, hotels and stores. If you think of the many businesses that are not on this list, you’ll realize the difference between now and the 1980s, when people were very fearful. The area business disciplines we attract are diversified. Diversification is always good—whether talking about businesses within a marketplace or your investment portfolio. We have all struggled in the past seven years. The people of SWLA have survived and emerged from the storm stronger, more capable, and more determined than ever to make our area the one destination most desired as the location for their home, recreation and next business. Derenda S. Grubb CENTURY 21 Bessette Realty, Inc. 3025 Lake Street - Lake Charles, LA 70601 Office: (337) 474-2185 Ext. 158 Direct Line: (337) 310-2158 Fax: (337) 310-2031 Cell: (337) 842-2696 Email: Derenda@Derenda.com Web sites: www.Derenda.com, www.LakeCharlesHomes.com, www.SWLAShowcase.com TJN

Ben Harper and Cee Lo Green to Perform at Saturday in the Park Festival July 2 Main stage artists Ben Harper and Cee Lo Green, along with Grace Potter & the Nocturnals and Los Lonely Boys, have been announced to perform at the Long Lines Wireless Saturday in the Park Festival, to be held at Grandview Park in Sioux City, Iowa, on Sat., July 2, from noon to 10:30 p.m. The FREE outdoor music festival will celebrate its 21st anniversary in 2011, and draws tens of thousands of people each year. Last year, performers Santana, Steve Winwood, and Michael Franti & Spearhead drew record crowds to the festival’s 20th anniversary celebration. The Lake Charles contingent of the Krewe de Charlie Sioux travels to Sioux City every summer to bring Mardi Gras to the Midwest! The concert is a big part of the fun. For more information, contact blane bourgeois at winbou@msn.com. TJN

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Volume 3 • Issue 3

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In honor of Mother’s Day, three local women share the very special joys they’ve experienced as mothers.

LISA ADDISON What are the most rewarding aspects of being a parent? It’s the feeling of pride I have when I see my 3-year-old daughter Lexi or 6-year-old son Hadley accomplish something for themselves instead of asking me for help. It’s the sweet kisses and unexpected hugs they give me when I least expect it. It’s the warmth I feel that comes from having two little beings to care for. I never knew I would derive such pleasure from the simplest of things: Folding their tiny clothes; making their meals; picking out their birthday presents; saving up money to buy something for them instead of myself; braiding my daughter’s hair; having lunch with my son at his school; bringing them to church; teaching them right from wrong; attending PAGE 22

MAY 5, 2011

family functions together. I don’t know how I got so blessed with two of the most precious children. Having traveled through the Louisiana Foster Care System, both of them have their own stories, their own legacies. I hope they will share their stories with the world some day, because each of my children is a miracle. The fact that they are alive, thriving, healthy, and beautiful is only a small part of their stories. They each overcame so much to be where they are today. They make me incredibly proud. I am their mother and they are my children— forever. I never would have thought it, but the best part of being a parent? It’s being their mom.

Through the journey of guidance, I realize we are providing them with the potential to choose and become anything in life they desire. It is my goal as their mom to prepare and equip them with respectable characteristics to become the best version, of the best vision, they hold within themselves. Teaching them discipline, accountability, and respect are necessary tools not only to survive, but to thrive. As I see them flourish, it is the greatest of blessings to witness the tough and unconditional love they are receiving. The amazement of it all is that the lessons they learn as children will follow them into adulthood, and shape who they are as people and parents. For me, this is an exceptional element of our journey.

CARRIE NAVARRE Raising twins (Bryce and Kaitlyn) for the last five years has been one of the greatest blessings from God. The joys have been boundless, seeing them become such unique individuals. The reciprocated, unconditional love is like no other. As parents, we have taught them the foundation of life’s lessons, values, morals, manners, and love for God. To observe the process of them learning has become one of the most rewarding experiences. Volume 3 • Issue 3


MARLENE C. (HOBBS) GREEN Almost 24 years ago, I gave birth to a beautiful baby girl, Jennifer Claire Hobbs— my one and only. A mother-daughter relationship is a very special and rewarding experience. As she entered elementary school, I volunteered as much as a working mom could to be a part of her school life. We also shared all the fun things, such as dance recitals, school dances, homecoming, proms, shopping trips, hair and make-up appointments, vacations and going to concerts. But there were sad moments. Both of my parents passed way in a 16-month span with no warning when she was in fourth and fifth grade. It was a devastating time for both of us. My mother passed away suddenly on Easter week. At the cemetery, Jennifer held my hand and looked at me as we both cried and said, “Granny is with Paw Paw and the angels in heaven; she has risen with Jesus and will watch over us.” Death perceived through my daughter’s eyes. The proudest moments were high school and college graduations. Watching Jennifer receive her high school diploma, with awards, scholarships, and honor cords was

overwhelming. Even better, five years later, she graduated from McNeese with a Civil Engineering degree and even more awards. She recently bought her first home of her own with money she had saved. She still sought my advice on purchasing a home, décor, furnishings, paint, landscaping, etc. She moved in Easter weekend. This year will be the most special Mother’s Day yet, as she and I will celebrate the day in her new home. I cherish every day since I became a mother. And every day is Mother’s Day with Jennifer in my life. She is my love, my life and my inspiration. To all the wonderful moms and daughters, Happy Mother’s Day!

TJN

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Volume 3 • Issue 3

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MAY 5, 2011

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By Lisa Addison

The idea of the triangle of body, mind and spirit was brought to the forefront of the public arena in the 1990s through such avenues as the popular “Finding Your Spirit” segment on the Oprah television show and in books and magazine articles, but the concept has been around for ages. The interrelation of the body, mind and spirit is all about achieving a balance of sorts in one’s life. Health professionals at CHRISTUS St. Patrick know that when one of those areas in a person’s life isn’t working, then it’s likely the other areas aren’t clicking either. At CHRISTUS, there are many paths available that a person can take to work toward achieving that balance. One of them is the Women’s Health Network, a special program for women dedicated to improving overall health and offering support to one another. With the fast-paced world we live in, it’s more important than ever to be attentive to your mental and physical well being, and the professionals in the network are there to help women do just that. Some of the features that women in the network can enjoy are the “Heartfelt Screening”; “7 Healthy Habits” information; “Healthy Living Screenings”; online educational seminars; entertaining activity opportunities; award certificates, special offers and

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discounts for CHRISTUS Healthy Living MarketPlace; exclusive sales notifications; and much more. HEALTHY CHOICES So, if you’ve been meaning to start an exercise program, eat healthier, and get your yearly checkups but just keep placing those things on the back burner, there’s no time like the present to get your life back on track. The physicians, nurses, and support staff at CHRISTUS St. Patrick believe that it’s never too late to take care of yourself. A good way to begin is by making healthier choices, which can lower the risks for Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes. Reducing your risk may tie directly to the choices you make or changes you implement in your lifestyle. Diabetes can ravage kidney function, eyesight, circulation, and even the ability to fight infection. Ethnicity and family history may be risk factors, but personal choices can

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prevent the disease -- especially what we eat and how much we exercise. Think about it in these simple yet vivid terms: In every forkful of food, the sugars and starches are broken down into glucose to fuel the cells in the body. Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into cells. In Type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells ignore the insulin. Glucose then builds up in the blood instead of going into cells. In other words, we truly are what we eat. LOWERING RISK Here are some choices that a health-conscious person could make to reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes: • Be more active. Engaging in physical activity lowers your “blood sugar,” or glucose level. It also increases your sensitivity to insulin, so your body will keep blood sugar levels normal. Aerobic exercise and resistance training both help to reduce the risk of diabetes as well. • Lose weight. Did you know that you reduce your risk with every pound you drop? Prevention magazine cites a study in which overweight adults who exercised and lost 5-10 percent of their body weight actually reduced their diabetes risk by 58 percent over three years.

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• Forget the quick fix and instead, get serious about changing your eating habits for the long term. If you swear off of carbs or go on a low-glycemic crash diet you end up denying yourself muchneeded nutrients from a variety of healthful foods. • Add fiber. Boosting fiber helps to improve your blood sugar control. Add more fruit, vegetables, beans, nuts, and seeds to your diet. Also, look for the “whole grain” varieties of bread, pasta and cereal. • Get tested. Get a blood glucose screening if you are 45 or older and are overweight. Ask about testing if you are under the age of 45, overweight and have a family history of diabetes or do not lead an active lifestyle. • Keep your blood pressure in check. • Know your cholesterol levels. • Don’t smoke.

“In Southwest Louisiana, eating has become a social activity,” she said. “Sometimes, we eat without even thinking about it. It’s an emotional thing. And, the portions are often much larger than we need. But when you take control of the choices you’re making it’s a great feeling and it’s healthier for you as well.” Rider said healthy habits start at home and smaller portions are a big key to getting healthier and maintaining a weight that’s good for you. “Nutrition can affect your energy, your health, and so many areas of your life. It really is never too late to start those healthy habits. Start today!”

Rider offers a few tips to help you get started: • Be really careful of fried foods. If you must have them, do so in moderation. • Exercise portion control. • Stay hydrated. • There are some foods that we call “Power Foods” and these are good for you and can help maintain that healthy lifestyle you’re working toward. They include blueberries, nuts and seeds, fish, sweet potatoes, and dark green leafy vegetables. • Don’t forget to include some exercise in your daily life.

MODERATION IS KEY When it comes to establishing healthy eating habits and coming up with a plan that works for you, remember that you don’t have to say goodbye to favorite foods. Samantha Rider, Clinical Nutrition Manager at CHRISTUS St. Patrick said that, as with most things, moderation is the key.

MAY 5, 2011

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• Practice moderation when having diet drinks. “Many of the nursing journals point to the research of the links between diet drinks and vascular diseases, deep declines in kidney function, and memory loss,” said Rider.” HEARTFELT SCREENING Members of the Women’s Health Network are living healthier lives thanks to the Heartfelt Screening program. One member reports that her primary care physician received the results of her screening that afternoon and called her in for an appointment the very next day. Since the main issue was an increase in her blood sugar, dietitian Julie Doucet showed her how to eat correctly to control the “sugar highs” she had been experiencing. The patient saw a huge difference, and has lost weight by making sure that she is eating good carbohydrates and that she’s counting her carb intake at meals. CUTTING –EDGE QUALITY SERVICES Most women are already aware of the things they need to do to take care of themselves, such as getting annual checkups, adopting healthy eating habits, exercising, and getting regular mammograms. But it’s finding the time to do those things that can often be the roadblock. Gwen Champagne, Breast Imaging Coordinator at the CHRISTUS St. Patrick Women’s Health Center, knows that women sometimes put themselves last on the list, but she would like to see them put themselves first. “It’s so

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important to take care of yourself,” Champagne said. “I tell women that it’s vital that you really know what your breasts look and feel like and immediately report any changes to your doctor. Make sure you get your regular mammograms, feel comfortable about it, and be able to talk to your mammographer.” The Women’s Health Center offers cutting-edge quality services focused on providing a full diagnostic health work-up in one visit at one convenient location. At the center, women can receive: • Digital mammography. • Bone density services. • Ultrasound. • Breast MRI. • Consultation by on-site radiologist.  Still think you’re too busy to get that very important annual mammogram? Champagne said it’s possible to schedule a mammogram during your lunch hour. How much easier could it be? “I know that some women have heard that mammograms are painful but I think that our mammograms are actually very comfortable,” she said. “When you come in for your mammogram, make sure to ask for our MammoPad®. It’s a soft, foam pad that creates a cushion between you and the mammography machine.” Detecting breast cancer at an early stage dramatically improves a woman’s chance of survival. An annual mammogram is the best chance of early detection. “I hope that more women will also encourage their family and friends to get their mammograms,” said Champagne. “It’s one way they can share in our urgent mission of saving lives.”

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If some women aren’t prone to discussing mammograms, then they’ll likely be even less prone to talk about menstrual cycles. But there probably isn’t a woman in the world who hasn’t wondered if her own menstrual cycle is normal. What’s normal? Gynecologist Lee J. Monlezun Jr., M.D., says there is a broad range of “normal” for women’s menstrual cycles. Unpredictable or long menstrual cycles are normal for teenagers and women in their 40s. “If you are a teen, you can expect cycles to even out over time. If you are nearing the age of menopause, you can expect menstrual cycles to become longer and eventually to stop,” he said. BE AWARE OF SUDDEN CHANGES Dr. Monlezun says that it’s a good idea to keep a calendar to track your menstrual cycles and symptoms to alert yourself to any sudden changes in your period such as unusual pain, a longer cycle or a heavier flow (this means that you are passing large clots or soaking through your usual pads or tampons each hour for two or more hours). “A woman should talk to her doctor if she notices any big changes in her cycle,” Dr. Monlezun says. “It’s especially important to check with your doctor if you have three or more cycles that last longer than seven days or are very heavy.” Other symptoms that should be checked by your doctor include pelvic pain that is not linked to menstrual bleeding and lasts longer than a day, or bleeding between menstrual periods. Periods may become irregular due to birth control pills, low body fat, excessive weight loss, or being overweight. Stress or very hard exercise also can change your cycle, as well as changes in hormone levels. For example, teens tend to have low or changing progesterone levels. This is also true Volume 3 • Issue 3

for women close to menopause. That is why teens and women in their 40s may have heavy menstrual bleeding and cycles that change in length. You can improve your body’s ability to handle menstrual changes by getting regular exercise, eating a healthy diet, limiting alcohol and caffeine intake, and reducing stress. Nonprescription pain relievers can also help reduce some symptoms. Taking care of the mind and body are important, but it’s equally important to nurture the spirit as well. For some women, finding balance in their lives is always just out of their reach. According to the health experts at CHRISTUS St. Patrick, one way to get closer to achieving that balance is by putting yourself and your health at the top of your list. In other words, “just do it.” The Healthy Living MarketPlace at CHRISTUS can help with the spirit part of the triangle as well as the mind and body. Adjacent to the main lobby at CHRISTUS is a little slice of serenity - an area with a coffee shop, tables and chairs for relaxing, and the lovely MarketPlace. “You’re here already, so come in and find some special items,” said Anita Guillory, MarketPlace Retail Manager “We call it ‘shopping with a mission.’ Whatever you purchase goes right back into CHRISTUS.”

4710 Common St., Suite A • (337) 564-5769 www.theporchcoffeehouse.com

COZY GIFT SHOP A cozy gift shop filled with crosses, books, jewelry, wind chimes, purses, wreaths, and more, it’s a quiet place to collect your thoughts or to find that just-right item for a friend recuperating from an illness. There’s also an area of the shop called the “Clinical Connection,” which carries things like bandages, pain-relieving cream, cold and hot packs, etc. Another section has a line of mineral makeup that, according to Guillory, is popular not only with patients and hospital associMAY 5, 2011

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Lori Robertson, Retail Sales Specialist and Anita Guillory, Retail Manager ates but with the public as well.   The MarketPlace has something that other hospitals probably don’t have. That’s a “Jill of All Trades” in the form of Lori Robertson, the Retail Sales Specialist. Robertson loves going the extra mile. “She makes the most beautiful gift baskets,” Guillory said. “It’s not really part of her job, but it’s something she’s become known for. People who aren’t even affiliated with the hospital find out about it and call her and she’ll make one on the spot. She’s also been known to get some makeup from the shop and go and help a patient with a makeover. She’ll make coffee, help order supplies, and fill the shelves. You know, it’s all about teamwork, pulling together, and helping one another.”  

Women often spend their time taking care of the needs of everyone but themselves. Isn’t it time to take charge of your life and your health? You can do it with the help of the health professionals at CHRISTUS St. Patrick, a hospital that appears to have all of the angles taken care of when it comes to tending to the mind, body, and spirit. Consider putting the management of your health needs right at the top of your “to-do” list for today. Think of it as one of the best gifts you could ever give to yourself. Lisa Addison has been a writer for more than 30 years. She writes for local, regional and national publications.  TJN

15% Senior Discount All Doctors’ Prescriptions Accepted Experienced Professional Staff • Most Insurance Accepted

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MAY 5, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 3


Arts Summer Arts Camp 2011 Sponsored by the Arts & Humanities Council of Southwest Louisiana and the Calcasieu Parish School System. Three classes daily from 8:30-11:30 a.m. June 6-July 1 at the Lake Charles Boston Learning Academy, 1509 Enterprise Blvd. Open to students completing grades kindergarten through eighth. Campers have the opportunity to choose a variety of class options. For more information, call Bobbi Yancey, 526-2908. Lake Charles Civic Ballet Workshop Six-week summer intensive workshop from June 20July 30 for sixth grade through college. Classical, jazz, contemporary, character, pointe and musical theatre. Lectures on nutrition, stage makeup and injury prevention. For information, call 304-5445. Children’s Theatre Summer Workshops The Children’s Theatre, located at 809 Kirby Street, Suite 313, will host a variety of events for children this summer. For more information, contact the Children’s Theatre at 433-7323, or register online at www.childrenstheatre.cc.

It’s never too early to start planning summer fun for your children. The following listings should help.

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Imperial Calcasieu Museum The 2011 Summer Art Camp, “The Land of the Pharaohs” is scheduled for the entire four weeks in July. Open registration will be held on May 17. Registration is on a first come, first served basis and spots are limited! Costs are $55 for members of the museum and $65 for non-members. For more information, call 439-3792 or 437-3797.

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Educational Calcasieu Parish Library Summer Reading Program “Make a Splash—READ!” is the theme. Children will explore the world of water and water fun through stories, songs, games and other activities about oceans, rivers, lakes, and pools and the creatures that live there. Call the library at 721-7170 for more information. Camp SPARK Join a WILD animal adventure and explore the most spectacular and inventive animals on the planet. June 13- 17 at Dolby Elementary. For more information, call (800) 968-4332. Mathnasium Provide your kids with a foundation for a lifetime of math success. For more information, call 478-0550.

Fitness Health & Fitness Kid Power of Southwest Louisiana An eight-week healthy nutrition and physical activity weight loss program uniquely designed for area children, ages 6 to 14. Call 478-3780 for more information.

Many Lake Area children who are overweight or obese are at risk for obesity-related health conditions such as type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. Obesity also impacts many systems of the body including the cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal systems, as well as orthopedics. Kid Power of Southwest Louisiana is an eight-week weight loss program uniquely designed for area children ages 6 to 14. The program will take place this summer, June 4 through July 30. Throughout this eight-week period, participants will be offered an array of physical fitness activity choices and healthy eating education seminars. Those achieving weekly weight goals will be rewarded with great prizes! PAGE 30

MAY 5, 2011

LA Fitness Children’s swimming lessons will be offered throughout the summer at their new upgraded facility at 4324 Lake Street. For information on classes and prices, call 478-8686. Winshape C3 Camp Will be held July 25-29 at Trinity Baptist Church. The camp is for children who will have completed grades 1-6 by May 2011. Activities: science, athletics, dance, food prep, secret ops, crafts, music and drama. For information or to register, visit www.winshape.org/camps.

For a little bit of everything check out: • Camp Fire: Camp Wi-Ta-Wentin day camps and resident camps available. 478-6550. • City of Lake Charles Department of Recreation and Parks Summer Day Camps 491-1280. • OLQH Family Life Center 474-6814 • Sulphur Parks and Recreations 721-3040 • Ward 3 Parks and Recreation 990-0112 TJN

To qualify for the program, participants must be overweight and must go through a one-time health screening process, which will include a height and weight check and health history questionnaire. The Kid Power health screening sessions are scheduled for Mon., May 2 and Mon., May 9 from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Calcasieu Community Clinic, located at 550 East Sale Road. Cost of the program is $10 cash per child per household and $5 cash for each additional sibling. Payment is required at the time of the screening – cash only please. For more information, or to register for any of the upcoming Kid Power health screening sessions, please call Kid Power of SWLA at (337) 478-3780. TJN Volume 3 • Issue 3


The CPPL Summer Reading Program Kick-off will be held 4-7 p.m. Fri., May 27, at the Harbor’s Edge Pavilion of Prien Lake Park. Families are invited to enjoy the activities at the event while signing up for the reading programs offered to all ages during the summer. Geebo the Clown will amaze the crowd with magic tricks, while face painting and temporary tattooing will be offered on the shady veranda. Families can try their hands at juggling on the lawn. Inside will be opportunities for cookie decorating, making bookmarks, visiting the dress-up corner, and watching Habibi Clowns make balloon creations to take home. Those in attendance can sign up for activities in June and July. Calendars of each library’s summer activities will be available. Sign-ups may also be done at each library. The Adult Reading Program, “Novel Destinations,” will be centered on travel programs to include music, food, guest

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speakers, and author events. That wonderful crooner and piano player from New Orleans, Philip Melancon, will return to entertain the adults in July. He takes song requests, and always delivers! “One World, Many Stories” is the theme for the 2011 Summer Reading Program for children. They will be given a reading log, with the goal of reading 10 books of their choice during the sixweek program. Those too young to read may have ten books read to them. Weekly programs will be offered at each parish library. Each week in June and July, library branches will have themed story times, and lots of special guests. The end of the summer reading program will feature Harvey Rabbit and Friends at the Starks and Vinton Libraries, and performances by The Storycrafters at the other branches. Fun With Fideaux will continue to be an event at Central Library on the first Tuesday of each month. The Teen Reading Program, “You Are

Here,” will include weekly activities in libraries throughout the parish, such as game days, making and playing Australian didgeridoos, creating dream catchers, a video battle of the bands, digital storytelling, and watching chefs from L’Auberge du Lac prepare Asian food. Teens are invited to join The Tale Weavers, a group that writes and performs stories. They will start writing and rehearsing in June and will perform for younger children in the libraries the week of July 10. Watch for more information as it becomes available on the library Web site at http://calcasieulibrary.org

TJN

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houmaker S n o d n a r By B

All About the Dollars You: Hey, Brandon. What’s up? Me: (sniffle) Oh, uh, hey there. Nothing. What’s (sniffle) up with you? You: Are you okay? Me: What? I don’t know what you’re talking about. You: Uh, have you been crying?

Me: Crying? No way. I’m not crying. You: Why is your face wet then? Me: It’s, uh, sweat. Yeah. It’s been powerful humid the last couple of weeks and I was outside just now, uh, washing my car. Yeah, that too. You: Right. And I suppose this has nothing to do with the latest college football news, too. Me: I don’t know what you’re, um, talking about. You: A likely story. I know you’ve been watching SportsCenter these past couple of weeks and you’ve

heard all about the newest allegations against head coach Jim Tressel over at Ohio State. That he lied to school officials and the NCAA about whether or not he had knowledge his players had violated NCAA rules when he allowed them to play last season. You’re telling me you don’t know anything about that? Me: Okay, fine! I’ve been watching the coverage non-stop since the story broke. Are you happy? I even paid the cable company extra for the Big Ten Channel just so I could keep up. I’m just so worried that major college football is moving

away from amateurism and becoming like a minor league for the NFL. You: Where have you been living? Big-time college football has been the Triple-A of the NFL for the past 20 years or more and these eligibility scandals are happening all over major college football. Even as we speak. I mean, name just about any FBS powerhouse and I guarantee you, the head coach is working harder to keep that star quarterback or defensive tackle on the field in the face of potential NCAA violations than he is working on the game plan for his team’s season-opener. I mean, these days, one loss and you’re practically packing for the

Jana P. Kaimal, M.D. Michelle Zimmerman, N.P.

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MAY 5, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 3


Capital One Bowl, so these coaches have to make sure their star players are actually able to play. If that means paying a student to write papers for the running backs or giving a beat cop a pair of sideline passes on the sly to keep that free safety’s DUI stop on the QT—or even if it means lying to the NCAA about whether you know your quarterback traded an autographed game jersey for a tattoo, then so be it. And this isn’t even the worst violation this year. Me: I don’t want to know. You: Oh, please. You already know about that business with Cam Newton. That happens all the time, too. You think the majority of these stud football players choose where to go to college based on visits and academic potential? Give me a break. They are following the money and almost all of them will get away with it. Why? Because the NCAA doesn’t care, really, about maintaining the sanctity of amateur athletics. It’s all about dollars. It’s only in cases like Cam Newton’s or Reggie Bush’s where they have to stop bathing in hundred-dollar bills like Scrooge McDuck and make a statement “for the good of the game.” And, honestly, the only reason those two got caught is because someone close to them either couldn’t keep their trap shut or couldn’t be cool with the money once they got it: An agent close to Bush sued him for not repaying $290,000 in gifts while Cecil Newton’s (Cam’s father) church, on the verge of being condemned, suddenly has $50,000 to repair its building. Me: I feel sick. You: Get over it, will you? Besides, it’s easier to watch major college football once you’ve surrendered the notion that most of those guys are “student-athletes” and are rather, for lack of a better term, semi-professional football players. In fact, you kind of get a new appreciation of college football at the lower levels of Division I. I’m not saying that any of this nastiness doesn’t happen in the FCS or Division II (Division III football is non-scholarship, so you’re not likely to see too many shenanigans down there) from time to time, but, for the most part, these are just guys who want to play football. Me: It’s just so difficult to wrap my head around. I mean, when the NCAA says that these guys at Ohio

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State or Alabama or Florida are student-athletes, then who am I to say they’re wrong? I mean, every game they show the Scholar Athlete of the Week. Some of those guys have 4.0 grade point averages. In kinesiology. That sounds like a tough major. What is kinesiology, anyway? You: Most of the time it’s code for “majoring in football.” Me: Oh (sniffle). You: Good grief. Get a hold of yourself, man. Me: I’m trying. It’s just tough

when all of your illusions about major college athletics are shattered all at once like this. But, thank you for the tough love. I’m sure I’ll get over it all before next football season. And you’re probably right. I think it will be easier to watch the big boys play football this season without all that “student-athlete” stuff distracting me. You: (eye roll) You’re welcome. Me: (sniffle). You: Don’t you know there’s no crying in sports writing?

Brandon Shoumaker is a graduate of McNeese State University and has covered sports for more than seven years for various publications. Coaches Brandon Shoumaker or parents with story tips may contact Brandon at bshoumaker@yahoo.com or send him a message on Twitter (@bshoumaker).

TJN

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By Mary Louise Ruehr

New Entries in Some Favorite Mystery Series To my delight, I have been enjoying brand new tales filled with intrigue and familiar personalities from some of my favorite mystery series. Dead by Midnight by Carolyn Hart is one of the most satisfying mysteries I’ve read recently. It’s always a pleasure to read her books, and this island cozy proves that Hart knows what she’s doing. As she brings back the loving couple of Max and Annie Darling for

their 21st romp through crime solving, we meet again some of her recurring characters, including the staff of Annie’s Death on Demand mystery bookstore, as well as a whole batch of new people who make colorful suspects. It’s June on the island of Broward’s Rock in South Carolina. A drug overdose that’s been ruled a suicide has amateur sleuth Annie Darling questioning the evidence. Then another death

has her convinced that the first was murder, and that the two are related. The police say no, but they let her go on investigating. She wonders: Is one of a law firm’s fired employees looking for revenge? Or is it about inheritance? Could blackmail be involved? Each character seems to have both good and bad points. I was having a good time fitting the pieces of this puzzle together to figure out who did what, when suddenly my prime suspect was found murdered. Oops. Ah, well. I always enjoy it when I guess at least part of the solution. Hart brings humor and warmth to her solid murder plot, along with clever writing such as this: “Marian rarely quidded without a pro quo.” Hart’s Death on Demand books are perfect for any mystery lover because, besides a great story, Hart gives us suggestions of literally dozens of other mystery books and authors to look up. If you read all of Hart’s books and PAGE 34

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read all the books she and her characters recommend, you will never be without a mystery. The Saturday Big Tent Wedding Party by Alexander McCall Smith is the 12th No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency novel, set in Botswana. Mma Ramotswe’s husband has given her a lovely blue van to drive around the countryside, but she is “haunted” by visions of her old, beloved little white van. And she isn’t the only one. Meanwhile, it seems that Charlie, one of the apprentices at the mechanic shop, is now the father of twins, but has he abandoned their mother? And finally, who is killing a client’s cattle at night, and why? While all this is going on, it’s time for the long-awaited wedding of Grace Makutsi and Phuti Radiphuti. Cattle must be exchanged; a feast must be preVolume 3 • Issue 3


pared; and Mma Makutsi, who is crazy about shoes, who says shoes talk to her, must select the most perfect, most beautiful shoes for her big day. The wise and wonderful Mma Ramotswe, proprietor of the detective agency, is a natural investigator — she’s observant, she listens, she surmises. As she was growing up, her father “had never suggested that there were any limits to what she could do with her life.” When she sees the behavior of a bully, she remembers that “Such men who put women down were really rather weak themselves, building themselves up by belittling women. A truly strong man would never want that.” Her joy in living and her love for Botswana are inspiring. She says, “Here there were no real strangers — even if you did not know a person, he was still the brother or cousin of somebody whom you might know, or whom somebody else would know. And people did not come from nowhere, as seemed to be the case in those distant big cities; every-

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one had a place to which they were anchored by ties of blood, by ties of land.” The books are always uplifting, filled with the musings of Mma Ramotswe: “That we have the people we have in this life, rather than others, is miraculous, she thought; a miraculous gift.” A Red Herring Without Mustard by Alan Bradley is the

third Flavia de Luce novel, set in the British village of Bishop’s Lacey in about 1950. Flavia, 11, has two older sisters who are unbelievably mean to her. She wonders, “What had I ever done to make them detest me so?” But their cruelty does not exceed Flavia’s patience and ingenuity in exacting her elaborate revenge. A gypsy woman has come to the village, and Flavia (without her father’s knowledge) lets her camp on the family land. When the gypsy is brutally attacked, Flavia has some explaining to do. Later, the body of a man who was killed with a piece of the family cutlery is found near the family home. The plot also involves theft, kidnapping, and possible infanticide. And something smells fishy — well, many things do, really. “It was enough to make an archangel spit,” says Flavia. Flavia often makes me laugh. She is, by turns, brilliant and a pain in the neck. Besides riding her beloved bicycle, Gladys, around the village, her hobby is tinkering in her uncle’s chemistry

lab, located in an unused wing of the family mansion. But don’t think a mansion indicates wealth: Her widowed father is having money troubles — chiefly, the absence of it. Flavia is a complete character. She enjoys being by herself: “Alone at last! Whenever I’m with other people, part of me shrinks a little. Only when I am alone can I fully enjoy my own company.” She also occasionally finds someone she really likes, who respects her ideas, such as police inspector Hewitt: “How I adored this man! Here we were, the two of us, engaged in a mental game of chess in which both of us knew that one of us was cheating.” It’s a clever romp with a captivating heroine, a spunky girl who isn’t afraid to inspect the cellar at midnight — a Nancy Drew for our time. This book’s as good as the first of the series, The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie. Copyright © 2011 by Mary Louise Ruehr TJN

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U A B A F N OLY

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Volume 3 • Issue 3


der useum n e l l n E dren's M a D By e Chil f th o r o ct Dire

Water For Elephants (20th Century Fox, 2011) In Water for Elephants, the circus is coming to town, courtesy of The Grapes of Wrath. It’s 1931 and the Great Depression is raging. Jacob Jankowski is a son of Polish immigrants. His father is wealthy enough to send him to Cornell, where he studies veterinary science. While he’s at school, Jacob learns his parents have been killed in an accident. In the midst of his tears, he also finds that his parents went in hock to send him to Cornell. Now their house has to be sold to pay the debt. Homeless

and all alone in the world, Jacob ditches Cornell and in the cliché of clichés, hitchhikes aboard what turns out to be a circus train. The Benzini Brothers Circus is a struggling, small-time affair, a Ringling Brothers wannabee. Its ferocious male lion is an old fleabag, and the small company can’t afford elephants. But when the circus comes to town and starts setting up the big top, excitement is in the air, and Jacob wants to be a part of it. The problem is, he’s there as a stowaway. And it’s a time when men would kill rather than have someone else threatening to take work away from them. Like so many movies before it, Water for Elephants shows how dark the 1930s were, with people literally starving to death. More than one small circus didn’t make it, and Benzini Brothers hobbled along by

buying out closing acts at bargain prices. The tough times often made men and women into animals scratching for survival, and some of them joined the traveling circuses. Jacob is quickly introduced to all the strange characters on the Benzini circus train. Perhaps the strangest of all is the circus owner and ringmaster. August Rosenbluth is at once the soul and the tyrant of Benzini Brothers. A cruel and desperate man, he will do anything to keep the circus from going under. His wife, Marlena (Reese Witherspoon) is the bleached blonde mistress of a troupe of horses. One of the horses has developed a limp, and this alone saves Jacob, the Cornell veterinarian, from being brutally thrown off the moving circus train by August’s bouncers. Water for Elephants is at once a romance, a melodrama, and a sharply focused snapshot of an earlier time. The film is a visual treat, and we get swept up in the five-cent drama of a brutal time in American history. Owner August is quite willing to abuse his circus animals, feeding them rotten meat; whatever he can find, to keep them alive long enough for one more show. He doesn’t do

much different with his human employees. In fact, though the movie revolves around Jacob’s coming-ofage and his relationship with Marlena, what saves it from being another Notebook romance, besides the circus itself, is August, diabolically played by Christoph Waltz (Inglorious Basterds). Here is someone who is truly scary as a person, even more so when he’s having a good time. I found myself both liking August and hating him, almost at the same time. Surely, there’s an Academy Award lurking somewhere in here. Rarely will you see a movie that tugs on you in so many ways and on so many levels. You may be surprised to find that they can still make movies like this, without robots, animated characters, space ships and computer screens. For good and bad, did America really once live this way? Rated PG-13 for a seedy love scene and animal cruelty, Water for Elephants will carry you along a path that some of us only know from old photographs and circus posters.

TJN

Add some spice to your life! The Jambalaya News is looking for a Media Sales Representative. Full-time position, prior sales experience required. E-mail resume to lauren@thejambalayanews.com or call (337) 436-7800 ext. 106 for more information.

715 Kirby Street, Lake Charles, 70601 Volume 3 • Issue 3

MAY 5, 2011

PAGE 37


ICM’S BOOGALO FUNDRAISER For one night, the Buccaneer Room at the Lake Charles Civic Center was transformed into the City of Lights for one of the liveliest parties of the year: The Imperial Calcasieu Museum’s Boogaloo! This fashionable crowd boogied down to the music of the Super-T Tyrone Smith Revue, enjoyed Chef Justin Rutley’s divine cuisine, and had their caricatures done by a talented artist. This annual fundraiser was, as they say in Paree, C’est magnifique!

Kathryn Filo and Susan Reed with Kendra-Cutrer Dietrich

Kim and Chad Moreno

Julio and Maria Galan

Kelly Vastine, Chris Khoury, Danielle Granger and Ashley Fontenot

Blake Soto with Annie Maselli

Matt Viator with Robby O’Quinn

Barbara Dubose with daughter Cindy Cormier

THE JAMBALAYA NEWS SECOND ANNIVERSARY! Cheers to all of The Jambalaya News clients, friends and loyal fans! Thanks to you, we’ve had another successful year! Judging by the smiles, heaping plates of Mel Estess’ amazing jambalaya (what else), lines for the strawberry daiquiris and margaritas, and loads of laughter—there’s no monkeying around at The Jam— we all deserve a big banana! Lisa Yates with Bea Hebert PAGE 38

MAY 5, 2011

Monika and Dr. Bruce Maerhofer Volume 3 • Issue 3


Craig and Karen LaRocca

Sondra and Roland Moss

Faye Drake with Stephanie Karpovs

THE RAT PACK IS BACK! What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas? Not this evening, as patrons at the Rosa Hart Theatre were treated to fabulous performances by “Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis, Jr., Dean Marin and Joey Bishop.” The City of Lake Charles and McNeese’s Banner Series presented the vocal recreations of Vegas’ four favorite sons, backed by a hot, 12-piece orchestra taking the packed house back to hear “My Way,” “Mr. Bojangles,” and so much more. It was a swinging, ring-a-ding show! Joe Ceroni with Randy Fuerst

Jam columnist Leslie Berman with Mary Richardson

Terri and Tom Theaux with Pat Post

Paula Morris with Dell Deshotel

Lonnie McGee with Kay House

Dr. Gay Gomez with Gayle Smith and Diana LaRussa

Maegan McBroom with Ranae McCulloch

Carol and James Willis

Volume 3 • Issue 3

MAY 5, 2011

PAGE 39


TENTH ANNUAL WILD BEAST FEAST The Beast was on the loose at the newly renovated Cash and Carry last weekend! Hungry supporters of the Lake Charles Symphony showed their “wild” side as they sank their teeth into a variety of chomping good eats like game, pork, poultry and seafood prepared by game cooks and volunteers from throughout the community. To beef up the pot, sportsman Hal McMillin kicked off the live auction bid of generous ,hearty donations contributed by local businesses. As Justin Wilson would say…I garontee, this mixture of fun, food, drinks and more fun was nothing but bon appétit!

TJN

Jeff and Tiffany Lee with Cindy and Shawn Fontenot

PAGE 40

MAY 5, 2011

Katie and Gray Stream

Diane Dunphy and Barbara Barrett

Hannah Wilkinson and Andrew Beasley

Ben and Terri Talbot with Ashley Foret and John Dees

Volume 3 • Issue 3


Altima or on a Harley Davidson for a hole-in-one. All proceeds benefit student organizations as well as endow a scholarship in the business college. For registration information or to become a sponsor, e-mail msu-rhinch@student.mcneese.edu or call (337) 475-5554.

THE MCNEESE CHOIRS MAY 5 The McNeese State University Department of Performing Arts will present the McNeese choirs in a free concert at 7:30 p.m. Thurs., May 5, in the Shearman Fine Arts Theatre at MSU. The Vocal Ensemble will present madrigals from the Renaissance and Contemporary periods. Concert Chorale will perform selections and Chamber Singers will present selections old and new. The choirs are under the direction of Darryl Jones, director of choral activities. Accompanists for the evening will include Yiseul Kim for Concert Chorale and Lina Morita, assistant professor of piano, for Chamber Singers.

MSU SPRING ART SALE MAY 6 The McNeese State University Student Art Association’s annual spring art sale will be held from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Fri., May 6, in the lobby of the Shearman Fine Arts Annex. McNeese art students and faculty will be displaying over 300 artworks produced during the spring semester. Works will include wheel-thrown as well as hand-built ceramic vessels, photographs, drawings, paintings, mixed media works and a wide range of printing processes. For more information, contact the McNeese Department of Visual Arts at 475-5060. HEART ASSOCIATION GALA MAY 6 The American Heart Association hosts its Red Dress, Red Tie, Red Wine cocktail Heart Gala on May 6 at L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort.  There will be gourmet dining, silent and live auctions, and music by the band Sweet Root.  Attendees are encouraged to wear red.  Contributions raised at the Heart Gala directly benefit the community through the continued funding of biomedical research and ongoing educational programs, resulting in lives saved and enhanced health and wellness. For more information about the event or to purchase tickets, call Kristi Peek at SWLA American Heart Association (225) 248-7716. VOWG KENTUCKY DERBY PARTY MAY 7 The Value Oriented Wine Group (VOWG) is inviting all wine enthusiasts, bourbon lovers, fashionistas, and derby devotees to the 2011 Kentucky Derby Party. It will be held at Graywood Plantation in the Evergreen Room on May 7 from 3-7 p.m. Derby food, a wine tasting, bourbon tasting, and mint juleps are all included in the entry fee. Ticket costs are $50 for VOWG members and $75 for nonmembers. Everyone is invited to become a member for $50 per person. Buy tickets online at www.VOWGtoday.com. For more information, e-mail VOWG at info@VOWGtoday.com.

MSU GOLF TOURNAMENT FUNDRAISER AT L’AUBERGE MAY 6 The McNeese State University College of Business is hosting its first golf tournament fundraiser May 6 at the Contraband Bayou Golf Club at L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort. Registration and lunch begin at 11 a.m. with tee off at noon. The format is a four-man scramble and cost is $125 per person. Price includes 18 holes of golf, riding cart, customized score card, lunch, golf shirt and team photo. Participants also have the opportunity to drive off in a Nissan

Volume 3 • Issue 3

‘LYRICS AND LAYUPS’ MAY 10 Country music songwriter Randy Boudreaux will once again be the main attraction at the McNeese women’s basketball’s third annual “Lyrics and Layups” concert and silent auction sponsored by Jeff Davis Bank.  All proceeds will benefit the Cowgirl basketball program.  The event is scheduled for 6:30 p.m., Tues., May 10 at Luna Live at 710 Ryan Street in downtown Lake Charles. Cost is $50 per person and tickets can be purchased by calling (337) 475-5473 or at Luna Live the night of the concert.

MAY 5, 2011

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Joining Boudreaux will be the Crystal Creek Band. Reserve seating for a table of eight is $1,000, table of four is $500 and a table for two is $250 and is available by request.  All tables are on a first-come, firstserve basis.   DOWNTOWN AT SUNDOWN KICKS OFF MAY 13 The City of Lake Charles and the Arts and Humanities Council of SWLA presents Downtown at Sundown. For four consecutive Fridays, from May 13 to June 3, Downtown at Sundown will showcase the finest in regional art, music, and food. It will officially launch on May 13, with the 2011 Grammy winner for best Zydeco album, Chubby Carrier and the Bayou Swamp Band. Downtown at Sundown also features children’s activities, food from downtown restaurants, table-top art galleries, and arts and craft sales. The event is held at the Downtown Merchants parking lot on the corner of Broad and Ryan Street from 6 to 9 p.m. and is free. All beverage sales benefit the Arts Council. No ice chests are allowed; guests are welcome to bring chairs. For more information, call the Arts Council at (337) 439-2787. PAINTING WITH THE FAMILY MAY 15 Holy Family Catholic School presents Painting With the Family on Sat., May 14 from 10 a.m. to noon. Kids and adult sessions are available. Boys can paint footballs with favorite team logos or fleur de lis; girls can paint peace sign with flowers; and adults can paint fleur de lis or dogwood flowers. Cost is $35 for adults, $25 for children and $110 for a group of four. Gift certificates are available upon request.

BYOB; snacks will be available. For more information, call (337) 855-9465. LADIES AFTERNOON AT TRINITY LUTHERAN MAY 15 Single moms and widows can relax and enjoy a ladies afternoon of pampering on Sun., May 15, from 2 - 5 p.m. Free haircuts, manicure, pedicures, etc. Childcare and refreshments provided. Hosted by Trinity Lutheran Church, 1400 S. Post Oak Rd. Sulphur. Call 302-4426 for more information. LAKE CHARLES CIVIC BALLET MAY 15 The Lake Charles Civic Ballet (LCCB) will give a free spring performance at the Lake Charles Civic Center’s Rosa Hart Theater on Sun., May 15 at 3 p.m. The performance includes The LSU Ballet,

Photo by Mike White

Are YOU registered to vote?

It’s easy! • Go to lwv-lc.org • Click on Links • Click on The Democracy Network to get answers about voter registration and more. www.lwv-lc.org or email info@lwv-lc.org or call 474-1864 PAGE 42

MAY 5, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 3


Faux Pas, Black Canvas, and the Tarantella performed at full speed. For more information, call 513-5808. ‘BOOGIE FOR BOOKS’ MAY 21 The Literacy Council of Southwest Louisiana Presents the musical fundraiser “Boogie For Books: Live Music For Literacy.” The event will feature bands from across Louisiana including Bobcat, Sean Ardoin, John Guidroz, Paul Gonsoulin, The Kid Carsons, Fresh Nectar and Flatbed Honeymoon. Enjoy great drinks, music and delicious food from participating vendors. The Literacy Council has information on all of its programs, such as G.E.D and adult English as a Second Language classes. There will also be a Book Swap, so bring a book you have read to swap it out for a new one! It’s all happening at the amphitheater at the Lake Charles Civic Center. Tickets are $15 for adults; kids 10 and under get in free. MAC BURNS/WCCH FOUNDATION GOLF TOURNAMENT MAY 21 The 2011 Mac Burns/West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital Foundation Golf Tournament will be held on Sat., May 21 at Frasch Golf Course in Sulphur.  This year’s tournament marks the second year that the Mac Burns tournament and the hospital Foundation golf tournament will be held jointly. The tournament will follow a 4-man scramble format with a double shotgun start at 8 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.  This year’s entry fee is $320 per team and covers food, drinks, range balls and mulligans.  Various levels of sponsorships, as well as hole sponsorships, are available.  For more information or to participate in the tournament, call Ashley Andrepont, tournament chair, at (337) 527-4241 or Debby Nabours, WCCH Foundation executive director, at (337) 527-4144.

Completely Customizable Invitations for ANY event! Wedding { Party & Shower Invites, Save The Dates, Wedding Invites, Ceremony Programs, Place Cards and Thank You Cards } Birthdays, Birth Announcements and Baby Showers Southwest Louisiana’s ONLY Envelopments® Dealer/Designer Contact us at shopaureadesigns@yahoo.com

ROLLER DERBY PROM MAY 21 Head on out to the Grindhouse at 932 Enterprise St., Lake Charles, for the Roller Derby Prom. Come dressed as famous couples in history. There will be prom pictures, refreshments, and music by the Von Dukes and DJ StyleZ. Cost is $10 for singles, $15 for couples. 18+ only. The event is from 8 p.m.-2 a.m. For more information, go to www.gulfcoaststrollergirls.com LOUISIANA SPORTS FESTIVAL AND GAMES MAY 21 The Louisiana Sports Festival and Games is scheduled for Sat., May 21 from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. at the Lake Charles Civic Center. Included in the day’s lineup is an adult and kids 5K and 1 mile run at 7:30 am, kayak demonstrations around the lake; standup paddleboarding; competitions; a boat show, a farmer’s market and much more. Vendor booths are currently available for $100. Proceeds benefit Cops and Jocks, a local fundraiser for athletes and the families of Lake Charles police officers. Sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information, call (626) 523-1123, visit www.LaSportsFest.com or go to the Louisiana Sports and Fitness Festival on Facebook. LC SAIL & POWER SQUADRON PUBLIC BOATING COURSE MAY 28 The next public boating course from the Lake Charles Sail and Power Squadron has been scheduled for May 28. The course is designed to familiarize students with the fundamentals of safe boating and qualify them for certification before operating a watercraft. The cost of the complete course is $10, which includes lunch. Topics include types of boats and boating terminology, boating regulations and navigation rules, lines and knots, charts and aids to navigation, and much more. The course will be held at 8:30 a.m. at LCSPS Anchorage, Israel LaFleur Park (north side of I-210 beach). To reserve a seat, call (337) 474-0730. To learn more about the Power Squadron’s public boating education, go to the Web site at www.americasboatingcourse.com. TJN

Volume 3 • Issue 3

• Saturday, May 7 3:00 p.m. - Baseball vs. Lamar • Sunday, May 8 1:00 p.m. - Baseball vs. Lamar • Friday, May 13 6:30 p.m. - Baseball vs. UTSA • Saturday, May 14 3:00 p.m. - Baseball vs. UTSA • Sunday, May 15 1:00 p.m. - Baseball vs. UTSA

Please contact the special services and equality office at least 72 hours before any home event to request accommodations for individuals with disabilities. This includes the need for materials in an alternative format such as large print or Braille, sign language interpreters, accessible seating, and accessible parking information. Ph: (337) 475-5428.

MAY 5, 2011

PAGE 43


To list your event e-mail: lauren@thejambalayanews.com

The

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Ryan Pelton @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 5 • Don Fontenot et les Cajuns de la Prairie @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Musician’s Night @ The Porch, 8 p.m. • TBA @ Delta Event Center, Delta Downs, 8 p.m. • Timmy Dugas & Zydecane @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Lifehouse @ Party by the Pool, L’Auberge du Lac Casino, 8:30 p.m. • Leroy Thomas & The Zydeco Roadrunners @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • TBA @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 6 • Travis Benoit & Allons Dancer @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Poetry Night/Wendy Colonna @ The Porch, 7 p.m. • Lesa Cormier & The Sundown Playboys @ Aucoin’s Cajun Restaurant, Hayes, 7 p.m. • Ryan Pelton & Karma @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m.

PAGE 44

MAY 5, 2011

• Forever Falls/Losers Reunion @ Luna Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • TBA @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. • Don Fontenot et les Amis de la Louisiane @ Club 1Sixty5, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 8 p.m. • Gregg Martinez & The Delta Kings @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8:30 p.m. • TBA @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 7 • Howard Noel & Cajun Boogie @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Lesa Cormier & The Sundown Playboys @ Aucoin’s Cajun Restaurant, Hayes, 7 p.m. • Ryan Pelton & Karma @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • NIAYH @ Luna Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • TBA @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. • Don Fontenot et les Amis de la Louisiane @ Club 1Sixty5, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 8 p.m. • Gregg Martinez & The Delta Kings @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8:30 p.m. • Giles Sonnier & The Bayou Idols @ Bob & Pete’s, Sulphur, 9 p.m. • TBA @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m.

TUESDAY, MAY 10 • Sons of Bill/The Wheeler Brothers @ Luna Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MAY 11 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • The Freemas(s)ons @ The Porch, 8 p.m. • Open Mike Night @ Luna Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 12 • The Hotel Cazin Band @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Big J & The Zydeco Dogpound @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Gin Blossoms @ Party by the Pool, L’Auberge du Lac Casino, 8:30 p.m. • The Lee Boys @ The Porch, 9 p.m. • TBA @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 13 • Briggs Brown & The Bayou Cajuns @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Shimmur @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • TBA @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. • Chicken on the Bone @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • TBA @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m.

Volume 3 • Issue 3


SATURDAY, MAY 14 • Mack Manuel & The Lake Charles Ramblers @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Shimmur @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • TBA @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. • Chicken on the Bone @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8:30 p.m. • Mark Stephen Jones @ The Porch, 9 p.m. • Signature @ Bob & Pete’s, Sulphur, 9 p.m. • TBA @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m.

(337) 478-8530 Ext. 120 CELL (337) 802-7410 FAX (337) 477-7217 bnavarre@flavinrealty.com www.flavinrealty.com

3221 Ryan St. Lake Charles

WEDNESDAY, MAY 18 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • The Free Mas(s)ons @ The Porch, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 19 • Homer LeJeune & The Kajun Kings @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Warren Storm/Willie Tee & Cypress @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • LA Express @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Fuel/Lit @ Party by the Pool, L’Auberge du Lac Casino, 8:30 p.m. • Daniel Whittington @ The Porch, 9 p.m. • TBA @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 20 • Joe Simon & Louisiana Cajun @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • ISIS @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • TBA @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. • Bernie Alan @ Club 1Sixty5, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 8 p.m. • LA Express @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8:30 p.m. • Slim Harper @ The Porch, 9 p.m. • TBA @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m.

TJN

MONDAY NIGHTS:

Alcoholic & Non­Alcoholic Fun for Everyone! Weddings • Holidays • Birthdays We bring the party to you!

Abita Beer Night

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS: Mondo Martini Night

THURSDAY NIGHTS: Be Well Night

337­304­4652

www.mrmargaritalakecharles.com NEW KITCHEN HOURS: Mon. - Tues. 11 am - 10 pm Wed. - Sat.11 am - 11 pm Closed Sunday

LUNA GOODS ON SALE: Luna Classic Tee $15 Luna Guitar Tee $15 Luna Ball Cap $15 Luna Dressings $6 (16oz.) Citrus Vinaigrette Balsamic Vinaigrette Raspberry Vinaigrette Cosmic

Fri., May 6 @ 9 pm LOSERS' REUNION, FOREVER FALLS & AURA Sat., May 7 @ 9 pm WHEN THE WORD WAS SOUND & NIAYH Fri., May 13 @ 9 pm MOONLIGHT TOWERS Sat., May 14 @ 9 pm MOBLEY W/ ROYAL TEETH Fri., May 20 @ 9 pm SONS OF BILL, THE WHEELER BROTHERS & THE KID CARSONS

Volume 3 • Issue 3

MAY 5, 2011

PAGE 45


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T in 1960 o sax glit h ly ( t r t s , l a e e a e a r o h g M L c t r d B e t r a d a s an the ings a band, ick fo mbled le of l weeks y muc ways yed le rious their even ghtclub sht ing the d asse it, who pla k Is Back” a differI’ve al razzle-dazz s, so I prett Banners a o l h g f i lm hen g ni y pent the how Cond he Rat Pac road (with ery proud pals s Hotel doin ys at work loved sed stage s eeks ago w ack” to pla “T sv the a w B s r ’s d ute in me from said he wa embers of l f e Sand and their . rehea razy a few at Pack Is vic Center c n a m to d ar 1 agi c R spoke d tour) an ese faculty t Pack Is kicks, l Ocean’s 1 harles appe ction man went t in “The se in the C e n a a a u h C N n u R b d g i c “ o e a t o g k r y en ori brou packed h any M mong the Rose (trom -up b sthe La Is Back,” p dancer!?!) s, m r . m e o e r e h a r a F t l y t h l s t of Bi , Ja hea to ack ic w and mou ate sian the voice bone) Rat P omed olyne gradu Hart t luding Rosa er a brief c a mop wig on a tuxe g “The d former P brought in and under tly and band, inc illen (trom eters (trum lly d ” P n t , a h i f e n A Back Tim McM s), Ricky x), especi er (a open sed in , play ectors ho tig rdejon s , a r dres and drape piece band tands ee Ca ighting dir rd Hall, w icians l o t n i o n bone) (upright ba rce (alto s area gigs ga D s a l j us d 12ich e gr nd n m a a h r R e l t i n b a r r i a d , e o P , e l e f d e i n c n s k e e w in nd re ce Ec sou bandlead nd regio tach emi-fam l, then -act d Just at there ar ians can fi blazon famous fa t a n s a s m a r d l , e a ) e a d e t ” t c h e a e o t p lo R sic w sta reh do “RP ntage of ering ozen al mu hour aced t e iginal their inds consid profession led a d h one two- nute fast-p ess casual from ematic mo rom the or lently on th hese k ar,” t f o i r e f g n i r i r e d u ye whe ork.  throu the 90+ m board in ct porkpi as a c and events ra played s e or fo n a typical n e r e y h d f w e e e t e r s t r k t a u la ust’v a pe duc rom the sigh Las Vegas em.  ht do arles i one c ed by f h here m “I mig n Lake Ch g that no a by playth i w show wear topp , Pack’s s behind t um roll? T knew the r i are ws ethe ainin r ’s n r of sho t said, expl iving in the talist who hipste nd tog oey Bishop 0 curtai s there a d because we n would a y l g n l i J e a 2 n l, Wa hat.  forming si dpanning ore than ly Cond a full-time y instrum er work, and nd De m rol r a dru en Frank a t cigarettes hey dea Per ng m n t on e e make sic, so eve re finds oth it, Rose b oseph quartet sa h represen s of et wh g li J r t n e u i y n h v e e h t m a k l ay e Cond s e; ing Mic lines, the ers, whic ’s decade mom onstage w ails.  And ed in coo s to st ing music. at McNee e s b k t é p c o e k u m e a a o c d q r h nu ht ch co s ris sd at P gh “You’r stri s teac , and ll taug nown the R r face o), s. I wa ishing s such a ker have a stlake High Lewis well-k raction of htily throu You” (Din e brand our familia red leg suit 50s and 60 c ’s f s n f ig e and E also at We at Sulphur were, ocket, tap k to the 19 small scree d a tiny winging m body Love my), “Fly M e ’s s e c r h n p e s m a e a hits, y ‘Til Som agic” (Sa t’s Why] T s- Eck llen teach slash ed right b ss films on the lights ians i d o a e e music nd McM School. Nobo Old Black Mank), “[Th le), and cl e slamm in countl rawn in by p made on v i f e n l ,a b f r n t o Midd e brought i w Orleans show, I’d see descreen, d Joey Bish bout Dick th “Tha e Moon” (F (the ensem of “Birth o e i i a n les N “W To Th s A Tramp” g rendition nderous and w mour. The arky jokes “Volare” w ston, Lake Char came u o H I n u a n i Hall from the gl ignature s artin sang iming in, st Lady th a storm earning th on.  or the s sed Lafayette f se, Richard n I peri i h M y t u c o l s j w a t i n p r v i h u h g a o d g o e o f n i i r h n g Y o in t whe f cou tyke, D ues,” r ams a andin ence c nine.  and o e tour.  Bu w last year pus the Bl se and a st ned progr m of depar Van D jestic audi t to cloud agic. r h g a a h with t in the sho tte, and Co alf applau er they’d si steady stre st and crew the m ent straig was pure m ets, Joey h d d e t a e w n s t c a Af form ont, Lafay with about rand I be there; i f two taut Davis Jr. a s with mbers, the m, and I a o t e o m p o y d h o Beau i, I worke ians who for p ience me reen Roo ader for had t the space tin, Samm from the t d c t e G i i l r r s u e s i k d e a d o a c h F Chr same mu art,” Con ing ean M d come ba ciscan com d to t .-born ban e D n , r i e e p H t r u h n o s a e a K t o U. of adj Bish Sinatra h y San Fra n Mickey r ’s sub rs, th t Ros ed the e b med a In past yea at e show ays with r h o t f snagg Frank hanneled -dance ma ten Island s a “ e. igs ew hta c ly pl d told m ccasional g chat.  ll told me h ng he rare sident nig dead, d song-an -trained St e Drew e i o n z r a n a k H were mea n they’re dian (Joey), jaz n look-ali that voice, e ader ( ti h tute le se gents wh Josep Dean Mar hony (ooh the Ant and

ime k T ' o One Mhe Rat Pac With T

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MAY 5, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 3


Coushatta, and these days at L‘Auberge.  Considering the size of Lake Charles, it’s fantastic that we have so many players who can work on these types of shows when they come our way.” Backstage, I chatted with C.J. Sinestro about historically-accurate stagewear (he fingered his tux’s skinny lapels, and said he was looking for another vintage bowtie to flesh out his collection), with Drew Anthony about the work of performing as Martin every night

(“he really didn’t drink as much as audiences thought he did”) and with Mickey Joseph about making time to do his own standup act when he’s off the road. But I forgot to ask them how they felt about having to smoke so much onstage, because true to their admirers, followers, and cohorts in era of Mad Men, the Rat Pack smoked like chimneys and drank like fish, so the “Rat Pack Is Back” is replete with reminders of both excesses.  

Kenny Jones had a niece in town so he didn’t stick around after the show, and I didn’t get to ask how he’d gotten to sing the lion’s share of the show’s solo numbers in his pure, clear sweet voice, or which song he liked best.  My own favorite? Hands down, it was “Mr. Bojangles,” which I’ve loved since the first time I heard it, performed with heartbreaking intensity by songwriter Jerry Jeff Walker’s sometime sideman, the incredible guitarist and big band

leader David Bromberg, at the Philadelphia Folk Festival, many years ago.  Bromberg still tours, mostly in the east, and Walker occasionally graces the stage at a Lake Charles casino, so you can hear acoustic versions of the song to compare with Jones’s lithe and limber version when you’re next in Vegas. TJN

Killin’ Time Crossword

Crossword puzzles provided by BestCrosswords.com (www.bestcrosswords.com). Used with permission. Volume 3 • Issue 3

MAY 5, 2011

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The Jambalaya News - Vol. 3 No. 3