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VOL. 3, NO. 1 / APRIL 7, 2011

ALSO: • Dining Out For Life • Spotlight on Locally Owned Businesses • Huddle-Up Sports Bar and Grill


2770 Third Avenue, Suite 125 • Lake Charles, LA 70601 Located in the Medical Office Building on the Lake Charles Memorial Hospital campus.

Phone (337) 494-AMRI

MONDAY, APRIL 18 - 6PM • 7PM • 8PM Sit back and enjoy the beautiful atmosphere of candlelight and soft music as you are treated to a hairstyle, a euphoric neck and shoulder massage, a therapeutic foot massage, and a soothing scalp and hand massage including a warm paraffin wax dip. Wine & Hors'douvres will be served. Availability is limited to eight people an hour so reserve your space today with a credit card or check... It's guaranteed to be an evening to remember! At only $50 a person, it's an offer have received their Keratin Cerification too good to pass up! All proceeds benefit salon Experience the revolutionary Keratin Therapy that reduces up to 95% continuing education; allowing us to attend of frizz and curl and adds amazing shine and silkiness to your hair. shows and bring back the latest in beauty trends!

Tracy A. Badgett and Kim Donham

Call Tracy or Kim to make your appointment today!

CALL TO RESERVE YOUR SPACE.

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APRIL 7, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 1


GENERAL 715 Kirby St., Lake Charles, LA 70601 Phone: 337-436-7800 Fax: 337-990-0262 www.thejambalayanews.com PUBLISHER Phil de Albuquerque publisher@thejambalayanews.com

NEWS EXECUTIVE EDITOR Lauren de Albuquerque lauren@thejambalayanews.com

CONTRIBUTORS Lisa Addison Leslie Berman George Cline Dan Ellender Maria Alcantara Faul Mike McHugh Mary Louise Ruehr Brandon Shoumaker Karla Tullos ADVERTISING sales@thejambalayanews.com

SALES ASSOCIATES Katy Corbello Faye Drake Karla Tullos GRAPHICS ART/PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Darrell Buck ART/PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Michelle LaVoie BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER Kay Andrews

contents

On Cover: Marilyn Dawdy with Dr. Walter Ledet and Dr. Geoffrey Collins. Photo by Darrell Buck.

April 7, 2011 • Volume 3 • Issue 1

COVER STORY 26 West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital: It’s How They Operate

REGULARS 7 10 11 12 14 31 32

The Boiling Pot The Dang Yankee Tips from Tip A Greener World What’s Cookin’ Adoption Corner Sports Report

FEATURES 5 Dining Out for Life 17 Support Our Locally Owned Businesses!

ENTERTAINMENT 34 36 37 38 39 42 45 47

Red Hot Books Funbolaya Family Night at the Movies Killin’ Time Crossword Society Spice Jambalaya Jam Local Jam Eclectic Company

26 17 37 5

Legal Disclaimer The views expressed by The Jambalaya News columnists are their own and do not necessarily reflect the position of The Jambalaya News, its editors or staff. The Jambalaya News is solely owned, published by The Jambalaya News, LLC, 715 Kirby Street, Lake Charles Louisiana 70601. Phone (337) 436-7800. Whilst every effort was made to ensure the information in this magazine was correct at the time of going to press, the publishers cannot accept legal responsibility for any errors or omissions, nor can they accept responsibility of the standing of advertisers nor by the editorial contributions. The Jambalaya News cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or illustrations, even if they are sent to us accompanied by a selfaddressed envelope. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Copyright 2011 The Jambalaya News all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without prior written permission is prohibited. Volume 3 • Issue 1

14 42 We are now accepting credit cards! APRIL 7, 2011

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A Note From Lauren Happy Anniversary to Us— Year Two! This issue marks the two-year anniversary of The Jambalaya News! Wow—time really does fly when you’re having fun! It wasn’t easy starting something new in a city that already had several established publications—but we did it. With another year under our belts, we continue with our goal of publishing news on the best that Southwest Louisiana has to offer. As always, we are so proud of our in-house team: art director Darrell Buck and his assistant, Michelle LaVoie (who created our Mardi Gras 2010 and 2011 issues); our sales associates Faye Drake, Katy Corbello and Karla Tullos; and our office manager, Kay Andrews, who keeps it all together!

Special thanks to our columnists and writers, whose eloquent words fill our pages, and make us laugh, cry and think. We would also like to extend our heartfelt gratitude to all of our wonderful readers, whose words of encouragement—by phone, e-mail or in person—have kept us going. From the beginning, we’ve strived to give Southwest Louisiana a publication to be proud of. And finally, I am so thankful for my husband, who continues to support my dream and take care of me. I couldn’t have done it without him. TJN

2009 RIL 9, . 1 / AP 1, NO VOL.

VOL. 2, NO. 25 /

MARCH 24, 2011

Vision lobal ith a G ess w e Chee rs for Barbe Chee Busin Thre ing rleaders! Local GardenSpice A • Up Your Look Makeover cate Reveal rganic Fun Facts About Golf ’s Advo ience of O eople ert: P The Exper Men’s Health ilb Z h Bet

– Lauren de Albuquerque

EDITOR’S NOTE: Our wonderful columnist Jim Doyle is experiencing some health issues, and has been unable to write for us lately. All of us at The Jambalaya News wish him a speedy recovery, and we hope to have him back with us very soon!

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Volume 3 • Issue 1


By Maria Alcantara Faul

Food and charity generally go hand-inhand in the Lake Charles community, and the Southwest Louisiana AIDS Council’s “Dining Out for Life” is no exception. Started in 1991 by an ActionAIDS volunteer in Philadelphia, “Dining Out For Life” is an annual fundraising event involving the generous participation of volunteers, corporate sponsors and restaurants. The concept is simple. Enjoy a great meal with family and friends at any participating restaurant on April 28 and help out the SLAC. A percentage of the participating restaurant’s gross sales from that evening benefits the programs and services of SLAC. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a disease characterized by progressive destruction of the body’s immune system. It is widely accepted that AIDS results from infection with HIV, and is currently considered incurable. The state of Louisiana is currently ranked fifth among states in the country with the most AIDS infection. Baton Rouge and New Orleans are in the Top 5 metro areas in the country with the highest HIV rates. Southwest Louisiana AIDS Council SLAC is a non-profit, community-based organization that started off as an advocacy

group to educate the community about AIDS. Through the years, the organization has grown to more than just advocacy work. Its current mission is to provide education to the people of Southwest Louisiana about AIDS and HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) prevention, as well as to offer assistance to those affected by the disease. Supported in part by grants from the HIV/AIDS Program of the Louisiana Office of Public Health, Department of Health and Hospitals, SLAC provides a variety of HIV prevention programs, as well as various direct services for persons living with HIV and AIDS. SLAC’s staff of 17 currently serves an average of 300 clients a year in the Lake Area. They also work closely with area hospitals to care for hospitalized AIDS and HIV-positive patients, where they serve approximately 500 clients a year. “These numbers only include people currently seeking care,” said Candice Pauley, SLCA community relations coordinator. “These numbers do not include people who have tested positive and are

Top Right: Candice Pauley and Christina Duhon. Bottom Right: Chris Allen and Barry Whitten.

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APRIL 7, 2011

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not seeking care, and even people who may be positive. We could easily be seeing twice the number of people we are seeing right now.” SLAC has educational programs about AIDS prevention, as well as living with AIDS. The organization promotes protected sex as well as regular testing for the HIV virus. “SLAC is one of several organizations providing free HIV testing in the community,” Pauley said. Other organizations that provide free testing in the area are the LA Health Units and SWLA Center for Health Service, as well as the Emergency Room at Moss Regional. HIV testing at SLAC is done by appointment only. “This ensures that the client has full privacy,” Pauley said. “Having testing appointments is also an efficient way to utilize funding for the programs,” added Christina Duhon, Dining Out for Life event coordinator. ‘Dining Out for Life’ “Dining Out of Life” currently takes place in over 55 cities throughout the United States and Canada. This is

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the second year that SLAC is holding the event. “We hope that April 28 will be the Lake Area’s busiest restaurant night of the year,” Duhon said. Over 25 of the area’s most popular restaurants are scheduled to participate, so there’s something to fit everyone’s tastes. Aside from raising much-needed funds for SLAC, the event is an opportunity for the community to learn about SLAC, and the issue of HIV and AIDS in the community. Cameron State Bank has been a sponsor of the event since it was launched here. “It is important for people of all ages in the community to be aware of the issue of AIDS,” said Amy Nyberg, CSB marketing director. “CSB is proud to do its part in helping raise funds for the SLAC, as well as help in providing a venue to discuss the issue.” Volunteers from SLAC will be present at each participating restaurant to visit with patrons, provide information about SLAC and its services, and sell tickets for raffle drawings that feature prizes such as two round-trip tickets on American Airlines; four VIP

tickets to see the Astros in Houston (dugout seats, diamond club access, VIP parking); a one-night pool-view room, plus dinner for two at Ember courtesy of L’Auberge Du Lac Casino Resort; and a one-night stay at the Isle of Capri and dinner for two at Otis & Henry, just to name a few. Dining out for Life will benefit hundreds of men, women, and children throughout the Lake Area.

So, chew for charity! Make plans to enjoy an evening out and help this worthy cause. For a complete list of participating restaurants, log onto www.diningoutforlife.com/swla. To help out with the event, or for more information about SLAC, call Candace Pauley at (337) 439-5861. TJN

Gilbert Brown and Christina Duhon.

Volume 3 • Issue 1


The

Boiling

P l

Please submit press releases to lauren@thejambalayanews.com

L’AUBERGE NAMES NEW VP OF FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION L’Auberge du Lac recently appointed Sean Demeule as vice president of finance and administration, pending regulatory approval. Demeule will manage accounting, finance, risk management, compliance, cashier and count team departments for the property, and will report to L’Auberge senior vice president and general manager Geno Iafrate. He most recently served as director of marketing for Sean Demeule Boomtown Bossier, but has extensive academic and professional experience in the field of finance. He earned an MBA from Duke University, a Master of Science in Administration from Central Michigan University and a B.S. in Political Science from the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York.

DR. BENJAMIN WILLIAMS JOINS THE CLINIC Family Medicine Specialist Benjamin Williams, MD, has joined Lake Charles Medical and Surgical Clinic’s physician staff. Dr. Williams is originally from Lake Charles and earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Spring Hill College in Mobile, Alabama. He received his medical degree from Saba University in the Netherlands-Antilles and completed his residency at the LSU Family Practice Residency Program at Lake Charles Memorial Hospital. Dr. Williams will be joining Drs. Primeaux, LeBeau and Wilder in The Benjamin Williams, MD Clinic’s family practice office at 771 Bayou Pines East in Lake Charles. Appointments can be scheduled with Dr. Williams by calling 433-1212. MEMORIAL CEO ELECTED TO LABI BOARD Larry Graham, FACHE, CEO of Lake Charles Memorial Hospital, was recently elected to the Louisiana Association of Business and Industry’s (LABI) board of directors for 2011 at the business organization’s 36th annual membership meeting in Baton Rouge. Founded in 1975, LABI is an association of 3,500 member companies representing approximately 6,600 business men and women across the state. LABI’s members share a common goal: to bring strategic focus to business issues before legislative, judicial and regulatory bodies in Louisiana and to improve the state’s business climate. Volume 3 • Issue 1

ORANGE LEAF FROZEN YOGURT TO OPEN IN SULPHUR OLYLA, LLC, of Lafayette has announced that its third franchised Orange Leaf Frozen Yogurt location will open in Sulphur in mid-May, with plans to open 15 stores in Louisiana in the next four years. Approximately 8-10 employees will be hired at the new location at 305 North Cities Service Highway next door to Rue 21. Orange leaf offers 16 yogurt flavors and toppings that include candy, nuts, cookies, cereal, etc. Visit their Facebook page for construction updates, grand opening specials and employment opportunities.

Left to right: Dr. Carrie Chrisco, mass communication department head, Green and Richard H. Reid, vice president of development and public affairs and executive vice president of the McNeese Foundation.

DR. GREEN DONATES TO MSU MASSCOMM DEPARTMENT Dr. Harriet Green has donated $5,000 to the McNeese State University Department of Mass Communication through the McNeese Foundation.

Larry Graham

CYNTHIA SELLERS NAMED AS PUBLIC TRUSTEE AWARD WINNER Cynthia Sellers, the president of the Cameron Parish Library Board of Control, was the recent recipient of the James O. Modisette Public Trustee Award, presented at the 2011 Louisiana Library Association Conference. Sellers has served as a trustee of the Cameron Parish Library Board for the past ten years, working diligently with FEMA in an effort to rebuild libraries lost to the hurricanes. Following Hurricane Ike, Sellers ensured that the Hackberry Library was almost ready to open by the time a replacement director was located. She was there to accept the bookmobile the Bill APRIL 7, 2011

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and Melinda Gates Foundation donated which became the Johnson Bayou Library for several years, and worked closely with parish administration and architects to develop and reopen several libraries LOCAL ARTIST DONATES TO FAMILY & YOUTH TASTING EVENT Renowned local artist Candice Alexander donated a canvas print depicting the inaugural “Tasting on the Terrace” event in December at L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort to Family and Youth Counseling Agency. Alexander generously created a limited number of prints from the original artwork created during the Tasting. Each limited edition print is hand-embellished and available in three standard frame sizes. Framing is also available. A portion of the proceeds will benefit Family & Youth’s Children’s Advocacy Center. Copies of the limited edition print are available through Alexander Art Studios located in Historic Central School on Kirby Street, or online at www.candicealexander.com. For more information about purchasing the print, or about Family and Youth’s Children’s Advocacy Center, call (337) 436-9533.

THE RELOCATION CENTER PARTNERS WITH PINNACLE ENTERTAINMENT, INC. The Relocation Center recently announced a new partnership with Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. to provide relocation services for Pinnacle team members, both eligible new hires and transfers. The new partnership echoes Pinnacle’s focus on operational excellence, efficiencies and commitment to support local businesses in the communities it serves. The Relocation Center, a full-service relation company based in Louisiana, will support Pinnacle employees with real estate assistance, relocation management, temporary housing, expense supervision and policy development. NEENA JAMES, MD, OPENS PRIVATE PRACTICE Neena James, MD, a board certified rheumatologist on staff at Lake Charles Memorial Hospital announces the opening of her practice, located at 2770 3rd Avenue, Suite 345. Dr. James earned her medical degree from the Boston University School of Medicine. She then completed her internship and residency in internal medicine at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and her fellowship in rheumatology at Case Western Metrohealth Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. James provides comprehensive Neena James, MD care in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of rheumatological conditions such as arthritis, lupus and gout. To schedule an appointment, call (337) 494-4785.

Julio Galan of Family and Youth with Candice Alexander

WOMEN’S COMMISSION DONATES TO ABRAHAM’S TENT The Women’s Commission of SWLA, Inc. recently contributed $1,000 to Abraham’s Tent. Mrs. Pearl Cole, director of Abraham’s Tent, received the 2010 Jack V. Doland Citizen of the Year award from the commission at the annual Fall Women’s Conference. Women’s Commissioner Sandra Jones delivered the $1,000 check to Cole at Abraham’s Tent in recognition of the commission’s 20th anniversary.

Global Management employee, Ann Simien (right), presents the check to the International Club of SWLA's advisory board member Dr. Delma McLeod-Porter (left), MSU writing director/English professor

GLOBAL MANAGEMENT DONATES TO INTERNATIONAL CLUB Global Management Enterprise, LLC recently donated $7,200 to the International Club of Southwest Louisiana. This Platinum Sponsor donation provides support for projects of the non-profit International Club, including its annual Christmas Gala, educational workshops, and its 2011 “Top Project” to create a non-profit educational-based daycare for the children of area working and student parents. L’AUBERGE DU LAC CASINO DONATES $5,000 TO JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT PROGRAM L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort recently donated $5,000 to Junior Achievement of Southwest Louisiana. Junior Achievement educates children grades K-12 in our community about business and economics through hands-on, interactive programs. L’Auberge team members are longtime Junior Achievement volunteers, donating time to teach engaging lessons about business in classrooms throughout Calcasieu Parish. Mrs. Pearl Cole and Sandra Jones PAGE 8

APRIL 7, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 1


CUSTOM IRON BY JOSH WINS AWARDS Custom Iron By Josh of 620 Miller Ave., Westlake has won two awards for outstanding craftsmanship in an international competition sponsored by the National Ornamental & Miscellaneous Metals Association (NOMMA). The event was open to over 700 member firms throughout the U.S. and in 12 foreign countries. Custom Iron By Josh received the Bronze award for Gates, Driveway (for Prien Oaks Driveway Entry), and the Silver award for Structural Josh Fabrication (for Lake Charles Bord du Lac Lakefront Promenade). To win an award, entrants must submit photos and a description of their work. This material is then publicly displayed in a gallery where NOMMA members vote. Winning a Top Job award has special meaning, since it represents a “voice of approval” from industry peers. To contact Josh for an appointment, call 794-4122.

L’AUBERGE DU LAC DONATES TO MAKE A WISH CHILD L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort recently provided limousine transportation and a giant cuddly teddy bear for Brooke, a 5-year-old Make a Wish Child from Lake Charles. The Southwest Louisiana Make a Wish Chapter sent Brooke and her family to Disney World, and L’Auberge limo driver Sylvia Ellis helped her travel in style with VIP limo service to and from the airport. L’Auberge has been a proud and active supporter of Make a Wish since 2005 and looks forward to seeing the smiling faces of these wonderful, strong children as they help make their wishes come true. TJN

L’Auberge limo driver Sylvia Ellis with Brooke and her family. Maria Alcantara Faul, VP-development for Family & Youth, Nicole Posch, chairman of Done in a Day for Junior League, and Deborah Bauman, VP-finance for Family & Youth and Junior League member

JUNIOR LEAGUE DONATES TO FAMILY FOUNDATION OF SWLA Family Foundation of Southwest Louisiana accepted a $2,000 Done in a Day grant from the Junior League of Lake Charles, Inc., to support two nonprofit sector development workshops. Family Foundation of Southwest Louisiana promotes excellence in the nonprofit sector through training, education and leadership. The first workshop, entitled “Advocacy, Marketing and Communications,” will be on Tues., April 12, 2011, 9 a.m. to noon at Family & Youth, 220 Louie Street in Lake Charles. Each session is $10 for Children & Families Action Network members and $25 for others. For more information, contact Laura at 436-9533 or laura@fyca.org. DELTA DOWNS DONATES TO UNITED WAY Delta Downs recently presented $80,120 to United Way of Southwest Louisiana in support of the 2010 Campaign.

Left to right: Steve Kuypers, VP/GM, Carol Core, director of human resources, and Denise Durel, president and CEO of United Way of Southwest Louisiana Volume 3 • Issue 1

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Dang Yankee The

By Mike McHugh

Happiness is a B11 in the Corner One of the first things that my wife and I did after moving to Louisiana was to join a local boat club. We didn’t let a trivial matter like not owning a boat stop us from doing this. After all, we were looking for a good way to get out and meet people in our new community, especially people that had boats. What’s more, the members of the boat club didn’t seem to have any issue with our boatlessness. We had something more important than a boat. We had money to pay dues.

So, there we were, enthusiastic new boat club members, looking forward to making lots of new friends, and enjoying lazy summer days partying with them on their boats. After all, there is nothing more fun than meeting new people, and as former boat owners ourselves, we have come to particularly appreciate the pleasures of spending time on Other People’s Boats (OPB). Of course, it’s really good when you meet a bunch of new people and

find out that you have certain things in common, and that was certainly true for us when we got to know the other club members. In this case, it turns out we all shared this same fondness for Other People’s Boats. What this meant, of course, was that, amongst all of the members of this particular boat club, not one of us actually owned so much as a rubber raft. This did present a minor dilemma: a bunch of avid boating enthusiasts, dressed up in our deck shoes and sailor hats, standing there on the pier without even a log to float on. So then, what is there for a bunch of shore-bound, wannabe mariners to do? I’ll tell you what we do: we play bingo. That’s right, bingo. What we figured was, why should we let those party animals in the nursing homes have all the fun? I was practically raised in a bingo hall. It was my first job as a teenager, working at a church fundraiser. Growing up, I attended one of those churches that funded a large portion of their budget from operating games of chance. You had to be careful in my neighborhood where to park if you bought a new car. If it was too close to the front of the church, they were liable to raffle it off.

Phil shows what a winning bingo card looks like. Mine never look like that. For those of you not familiar with the game, a bingo card has 25 squares, each with a combination of numbers between one and 75. There are 552,446,474,061,128,648,601,600,000 possible ways that these numbers can be arranged on a card. When I worked bingo as a teenager, I used to carry around a stack of cards that contained every one of those arrangements. That would have been okay, if it weren’t for the one lady who always wanted me to search through them all to find her a B11 in the corner. So, I wasn’t too disappointed to be there at the boat club holding a dauber in my hand instead of a fishing pole. Everyone else in the club was fine with it, too, because bingo is actually quite an exciting and challenging game. It requires a great deal of skill: making out the numbers on the card, and then properly aiming your dauber to hit the right square when you have a match. Don’t laugh. You try it after having a few Crown and Cokes— which happens to be the official beverage of the boat club bingo. What makes bingo really exciting, though, is to have a good caller. Ken is our caller at the boat club. The way he calls a bingo game makes the Kentucky Derby sound like a quantum physics lecture. To win at bingo, the object is to have the numbers on your card form a particular pattern. This pattern is announced at the start of the game by the caller. Common patterns include the line, the diamond, and the postage stamp. My card usually forms a pattern that looks like my back yard after Hurricane Rita. Unfortunately, Ken has yet to call a game as, “Mike’s Yard After Hurricane Rita.” He knows better. It would make me the Muhammad Ali of bingo.

TJN PAGE 10

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Volume 3 • Issue 1


By George “Tip” Cline

Wal-Mart (the great Satan) learned this in their attempt to lessen the number of different products they stocked to simplify their inventory. They soon discovered that when their customers couldn’t find their favorite products, they just went elsewhere— and purchased additional items that they usually bought from Wal-Mart. So, they’re now in the process of restocking a lot of items that they thought weren’t necessary. When a customer finds what they want elsewhere because their usual store doesn’t have it, the new store

keeps the old customer. Some manufacturers bring out new items in an attempt to increase their market share, only to discover that the new item only changed the buying habits of their customers. Yes, they switched products, but the product they switched from was one of their own. Still, if that new product creates sufficient demand and is profitable, common sense tells us that the merchant needs to continue that product. If not, that customer will just switch to someone else’s product. And so it goes—it’s just human nature. TJN

Where’s the Grease? Back in my younger years, I remember that in our house and in just about everyone else’s, there was a small can sitting on the stovetop. That can was where the drippings (oil and crusty little bits and pieces) were transferred after frying the morning bacon. These drippings solidified and sat there, just waiting to be used in future meals. In these days of supposedly healthier living, you don’t see those canisters anymore. My more mature readers know exactly what I’m talking about. Most of the older cookbooks refer to making your roux with bacon drippings, as it was a standard practice to utilize this already at-hand substance for your culinary preparations. Many younger cooks try to emulate an old family recipe and find that the outcome does not taste quite the same as when Mom made it. Of course, Mom always added love—but used bacon grease as well. I know what brought this back to my attention. Recently, after frying several pounds of bacon for some dishes we were making, I poured the bacon drippings into an empty can to solidify before putting it in the garbage. (Knowing not to pour hot grease into a garbage sack is not rocket science.) I placed the can in the freezer to speed up the cooling process, but soon it was out of sight and out of mind. Several days later, I encountered my well-solidified can as I was opening the freezer. I now had bacon grease ready to be used. Well, I just couldn’t resist the urge to see how an egg would taste fried in the drippings. Wow! It took me back. I mean, I have not experienced that taste in…well, I can’t remember when, or where. The cooking spray or vegVolume 3 • Issue 1

etable oil that I use to fry with now sure misses the “wow factor” that I had just rediscovered. Yes, I know that this is modern heresy, that every dietitian that sees this is cringing in spasms, that I surely will be damned for mentioning this, but guess what, folks, you have taste buds that haven’t been stirred in years. I’m not recommending that everything you fry, that every roux you make, that every chance you get, use bacon grease. I am merely mentioning an old-time way of doing something I had forgotten about. Use this information at your own peril. I don’t want to be the cause of your cholesterol count going up, your waistline going out, or your heart attack—just saying. THE SWITCH GAME A good friend pointed out to me how some stores are trying to force their customers to purchase products they wouldn’t normally use. It’s confusing when an item that you routinely count on is either out of stock or discontinued. I mean, if a product sells so well that there is none on the shelf because of its popularity, there is more than sufficient indication that the demand for that product surely merits a greater quantity being stocked. Merchants will often respond that the product did not sell well enough to keep. Well, if they had adequately stocked the product, the sales would have reflected the realistic demand. The old saying “You can’t do business with an empty wagon,” sure makes sense to me. Our old friend, the Law of Supply and Demand, tells us exactly what should be done, but some businesspeople seem to think that they are smarter or craftier and can get their customers to purchase a substitute. APRIL 7, 2011

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A Greener

W

Calcasieu Litter Program Revives “Adopt a Road” Project It takes a great deal of help to keep a parish as big as Calcasieu Parish litter free, and reviving the “Adopt a Road” program is one way to accomplish the task. Interested groups that sign up with the Calcasieu Parish Police Jury’s “Adopt a Road” program agree to pick up litter by a roadside area for the duration of a two-year period. After the organization completes the application process, a Public Works representative issues the volunteers’ safety vests and provides orientation regarding helpful safety tips. One of the first groups to participate in the program this year is

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the St. Martin DePorres Knights of Columbus group in Lake Charles. Approximately 50 members have committed to keeping Elliot Road in the vicinity of Saint Martin DePorres Church litter-free. Member John Fontenot says, “We wanted to fill a need in our area not only in adopting this spot, but also to provide good works that will affect the entire community.” If your group or organization would like to participate in the “Adopt a Road” program, contact the Office of Public Works at 7213700, or log on to the Parish’s Web site at: www.cppj.net. TJN

RLD

Gulf Coast Bird Club Announces Mystery Woodpecker Program The Gulf Coast Bird Club recently announced a program on the rare and endangered Ivorybilled Woodpecker. This bird has been believed extinct for a number of years and was believed rediscovered in Arkansas a few years ago. The meeting will be held at McNeese State University’s Frasch Hall

Auditorium on Thurs., April 14 at 7 p.m. It will cover the mystery, ecology and the biology of this endangered species in both Arkansas and Louisiana. The Gulf Coast Bird Club is dedicated to promoting the knowledge and conservation of birdlife, wildlife, natural habitats and natural resources; and to fostering an appreciation of our natural environment and of the significance of its influence upon human life. We welcome all who are interested in nature and birding to attend our informative meetings and participate in our field trips. The next field trips are scheduled for April 16 and May 14. The field trips will give participants opportunities to see the many colorful birds that inhabit and migrate through our area. For more information, contact David Booth at (337) 474-7325. For online information, visit www.sites.google.com/site/gulfcoastbirdclub TJN

Volume 3 • Issue 1


City of Lake Charles Entered into Cleanest City Contest The Lake Charles Garden Club and the Diggers and Weeders Garden Club of Lake Charles recently entered the City of Lake Charles in the Cleanest City Contest, a litter prevention program sponsored by the Louisiana Garden Club Federation, Inc. District judging will be on April 7. Lake Charles residents are encouraged to do their part to spruce up their yards prior to that day by picking up litter, planting flowers, and doing any landscaping that will improve the general appearance of their property.

“This will be the first time since Hurricane Rita that our city has been entered in the contest, and we hope that all residences and businesses will show their support of this very worthwhile competition,” said Nan Himel, president of the Lake Charles Garden Club. The district winner will move on to state competition and the winner there will hold bragging rights for a year as the Cleanest City in the state – a great honor, which elevates a city’s beauty status across the state and the nation.” For more information, call 477-5113. TJN

4710 Common St., Suite A • (337) 564-5769 www.theporchcoffeehouse.com

Fusion Five Goes Green at the Children’ s Museum! Fusion Fivers and their families are invited to the Second Annual Going Green event, which will be held on April 16 at The Children’s Museum (327 Broad Street, Lake Charles). Through the generous support of the Calcasieu Parish Police Jury, the first 50 Fusion Five men/women/kids get in FREE! If you are late, never fear, the Children's Museum is also offering a discounted rate that day for families of Fusion Five members! 10:30 a.m. Composting with Adriana Arango Learn how to turn table scraps and kitchen cast-offs into food for your family’s garden! Signatures’ Salon is donating 30 compost pails to the first 30 families who attend! 11 a.m. Recycling with Junior Team Green Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. Recycling means taking a product or material at the end of its useful life and turning it into a usable raw material to make another product. Stop throwing out computer paper, magazines, newspapers, phonebooks, boxes, aluminum cans, bills, envelopes and books.

11:30 a.m. Litter with Jason Barnes of the Calcasieu Parish Police Jury The Calcasieu Parish Police Jury says, “You Can’t Afford to be Trashy!” Come meet Trashsquash and learn more about keeping our roadways and waterways clean! Noon Wildlife Conservation with Friends of the Refuge Learn more about keeping the homes of our animal friends clean with the Friends of the Refuge! 12:30 p.m. Water Conservation with Barbara Monroe of the Calcasieu Parish Police Jury Less is more when it comes to water and household water usage! Learn about how water gets into your home, why it is important to use a little as possible, and where it goes when the toilet goes FLUSH! For more information about this event or Fusion Five, contact Amanda White at (337) 433-3632 or awhite@allianceswla.org. Fusion Five is for young professionals of every background and profession who have the desire to change the social and economic landscape of Southwest Louisiana.

15% Senior Discount All Doctors’ Prescriptions Accepted Experienced Professional Staff • Most Insurance Accepted

TJN Volume 3 • Issue 1

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By Lauren de Albuquerque

What’s Cookin’ The View on the Bayou Never Looked so Good Mark and Libbey Leone with daughters Mattie and Rachael.

The fabulous property on the site of The Landing has undergone yet another incarnation. The Huddle Up Sports Bar and Grill has moved into that wonderful space overlooking the bayou, and this new venture is here to stay. Mark Leone started his cooking career at Vee’s Donuts in Sulphur, and became an Aerospace Food Technician in the Air Force. After 27 years in the military, he saw an opportunity to fulfill his dream of owning his own restaurant. After dealing with the pitfalls of trying to acquire a franchise, Leone realized that it was time to do it on his own. “So, one night at the kitchen table, and a little…well, a whole lot of Jack [Daniels], Huddle Up Sports Bar and Grille was created out of the minds of the whole family,” Leone said. He was fortunate to find an outstanding property to house his dream—and his patrons agree. Enjoy appetizers, burgers, pizza, pasta PAGE 14

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dishes, and delicious sandwiches while watching the game on one of 20 TVs and two projection TVs. Huddle Up offers a great variety of domestic and imported beers, and prepare all kinds of specialty drinks. Make sure you look for their drink and Ladies Night specials. I adore Bloody Marys, and I have to say that theirs are phenomenal! And now that the warm weather is here,

you’ll love their outdoor seating and live entertainment. The whole Leone family is involved to ensure that the business will be a success. Daughter Mattie is the hostess and daughter Rachael helps manage the restaurant. Mark and his wife Libby pitch in to help when needed. “I hope you enjoy what we here at Huddle Up have to offer,” Leone said. “Please feel free to tell us what you like, and anything we can do better.” Huddle Up Sports Bar and Grill is open Mon.- Fri. 11 a.m. – midnight, Sat. 11 a.m. – 1 a.m., and Sun. 11 a.m. –midnight. Located at 1103 W. Prien Lake Rd. Lake Charles. Call (337) 656-2905 or go to their FB page for more information and their entertainment schedule. Volume 3 • Issue 1


The following tasty recipe is just what you need to dig into after busy day. Cajun comfort food at its best!

PASTA JAMBALAYA INGREDIENTS • 4 ounces of marinara sauce • 4 ounces of beef broth • 1.5 tsp. of your favorite Cajun seasoning • 4 ounces andouille sausage • 4 ounces cooked chicken breast, sliced or diced • 2 ounces green peppers thinly sliced • 2 ounces onions sliced • 12 ounces cooked bowtie pasta (do not overcook)

cooking the vegetables and meat while adding the mixture of beef broth, marinara and seasoning. When mixture begins to bubble, toss in the bowtie and stir until pasta is completely covered. Service with toasted garlic bread. Makes two servings. Enjoy!

TJN

PREPERATION Sautee’ onions and peppers until onions are transparent. Add sausage and chicken. Cook 10 minutes on medium heat, making sure to stir constantly. Combine first three ingredients. Continue

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Lake Area Shoppe Girls’ Mother’s Day Shopping Event Mother’s Day is fast approaching, but the sluggish economy could cast a shadow over gift-giving this Mother’s Day. However, The Lake Area Shoppe Girls, a networking group consisting of local female entrepreneurs, are actively working to prevent this. The Lake Area Shoppe Girls are urging Southwest Louisiana shoppers to consider Mother’s Day promotions and bargains offered by its members when making Mother’s Day gift selections. “By shopping with Lake Area Shoppe Girl merchants, you can boost the local economy and present your mother with a wonderful gift,” according to Rebekah Dressler, president of the group. To assist local shoppers in their quest to find an affordable Mother’s Day gift, the Lake Area Shoppe Girls are hosting a shopping extravaganza on Thurs., April 28, called “Love Your Mother.” The event will feature 16 locally owned Shoppe Girl businesses that will remain open for

extended hours on the day of the event. Each will offer special discounts to shoppers who visit their business on that day. Shoppers can purchase discounted products and services ranging from spa services to unique home accents and furnishings. They can also to enter into drawings for spectacular prizes. “Our featured businesses have donated $50 gift cards, spa services and a multitude of other wonderful prizes for our drawings,” said Dressler. Known for giving back to the community, the Shoppe Girls have also incorporated a fundraiser for the Potter’s House into this event. To learn more about the event, visit the Lake Area Shoppe Girl Web site at www.lashoppegirls.com or become a fan of the Lake Area Shoppe Girl Facebook Page by visiting www.facebook.com/ pages/LakeAreaShoppeGirls. To learn more about the Potter’s House or to make donations, call 337-477-1116.

TJN

Local Gymnastics and Martial Arts School Take a Stand Guzzy’s Gymnastics and Lake Charles Martial Arts are in one location and turning the tide to help kids and teens deal with today’s issues by implementing programs into their curriculum that teach their students how to be leaders and also to deal with bullying. In the leadership program, students choose a project that they care about. John Newport, head martial arts instructor, says, “If we assign the project, then they may do it because it is required. They won’t get the underlying lesson. If the students choose it, then it is done because they care about it. People support and care more about something if they help create it.” The students cannot expect rewards or recognition for the project they undertake. It must help someone or something other than the participants. The junior martial arts class is currently putting together a project to help two fellow students whose father’s deployment in Afghanistan has been extended. “We chose this project as a class when the students that we are helping were absent. We are doing this because it is the right thing to do,” Newport said. “I may teach how to punch and kick, but that is only half of martial arts,” he said. “Martial arts is about perfection of character and being a productive citizen of society. Leadership cannot simply be a byproduct anymore. It has to be taught.”

The students fully plan and organize the entire project with guidance from the instructors, following a detailed planner in setting up, carrying out, and completing the assignment. The bully program, which was recently released with a hard-hitting video on their Web site, shows the reality of how bullying can affect others. The classes pull some of the curriculum from the Teen Girls Self Defense classes. “This is a huge problem, and even with a zero tolerance in schools, and state laws, [we] can’t stop it, if it is not being reported,” Newport said. “Kids and teens are getting bullied 24 hours a day through text messaging, e-mail, and sites like Facebook. It is not like it was when I was in school. It can’t be solved through violence or direct confrontation.” The bully program is designed to show kids how to change their self image to lessen the impact of constant taunting. “We can’t change how other people act. We can change how it affects us,” Newport said. The classes do include some basic self defense with a focus on self image, self esteem, and resources available. A large part of the class is on how to communicate with parents and teachers to let them know what is going on. “This isn’t about recognition for good deeds,” Newport concluded. “This is about giving our future generation a chance to realize their full potential without fear of being the person they want to be.”

TJN

Trash Bash 2011 at New Location The City of Lake Charles and Team Green of Southwest Louisiana are pleased to announce Trash Bash 2011, which will be held on Sat., April 9, from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. at a new location – Chennault International Airport. Go to www.cityoflakecharles.com for the list of acceptable and unacceptable items to drop off. The order for loading disposable items into your vehicle should be as follows from first to last in your vehicle or trailer: scrap metal, electronics, trash, auto batteries, tires (only five per car and under 400 pounds per tire) oil and PAGE 16

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antifreeze, reusable items, confidential papers, mercury and paint. Paint will be the first item that will come off your vehicle or trailer. No preor post-dumping; the city littering ordinance will be enforced. Directions: Participants traveling east or west on J. Bennett Johnston Avenue will turn south onto Merganser St. and continue travelling south until they reach the entrance to the Trash Bash staging area on the left (next to the AEROFRAME sign). Once there, they will be directed through the unloading stations.

Participants should follow the directions to the entry point and continue moving. Parking is not allowed on Merganser St. Team Green is a city commissioned organization. Its mission is to develop and sponsor projects that enhance the region’s appearance and quality. Team Green of Southwest Louisiana Trash Bash 2011 is a Great American Cleanup project of Keep America Beautiful and Keep Louisiana Beautiful. For more information, call 491-1481. TJN Volume 3 • Issue 1


Locally owned businesses are the lifeblood of a community. There are chains and franchises all over the world, and while it may be comforting to find a Burger King in China, it’s the local businesses that represent the heart of a region. In the Lake Area, such businesses are still thriving, in spite of a troubled economy. Actually, Louisiana itself is on an upswing. Louisiana ranked fourth on the 2010 Kauffman Index of

Tasha Evans Dubus, owner of Salon Evans, has gone to great lengths to learn about “beauty.” Tasha, a master stylist/colorist and founder of Salon Evans in Lake Charles, said a good cut is the basis of good hair. She said beautiful hair has movement and shine, and begs to be touched. “The shape of your face and the texture of your hair determine what hairstyles will look good on you,” she said. Haircutting is not a matter of simple geometry – your haircut has to fit your lifestyle. Tasha and her team of stylists keep current on all of the red carpet looks. She said it’s vital in her industry to do so.

Volume 3 • Issue 1

One of the most innovative technologies in the beauty industry is Keratin Complex Smoothing Therapy, and it’s available at Salon Evans. It straightens curly hair – damage free. Tasha said her master stylists Johnny LaFleur was one of the first stylists certified to do the Keratin Complex Smoothing Therapy treatment in Southwest Louisiana. “It’s chemical-free, lasts three to five months and starts at $300.” Splurge on professional make-up lessons at Salon Evans. The make-up artists there will teach you advanced tricks like highlighting and contouring or help you create some evening looks. Tasha and her staff love doing make-up and hair for brides. Call (337) 477-6868 to schedule your appointment today. New clients get a FREE haircut with any color service booked with one of our new stylists.

Entrepreneurial Activity. Based on per capita number of business startups, the index listed Louisiana at a rate of 460 entrepreneurs per 100,000 state residents, up from number eight in 2009. This is GOOD news! So get out there and support your local businesses! We need them as much as they need us. TJN

Kizzy

In 1986, Harris O’Blanc opened a small restaurant in Hayes, Louisiana and named it Harris’ Seafood. He soon added live Cajun music and two other rooms to the establishment. After ten years in business, Harris sold it to his brother, who then sold the restaurant to Kizzy Sanford. Sanford renamed the business Aucoin’s, and has owned it for the past five years. Only 20 minutes from Lake Charles, Aucoin’s serves up some of the best Cajun dishes around.

Upon arriving, you’re immediately surrounded by the aroma of the wonderful cuisine and the sounds of authentic Cajun music. Weekends are packed with locals and tourists from all over the world experiencing a taste of Cajun life. Live Cajun music starts every Friday and Saturday night at 7 p.m., and ice-cold beer is sold by the bucket or on tap. You’ll love the wide variety of Cajun specialties featuring shrimp, catfish, oysters, frog legs, au gratin, alligator, crab served in a variety of ways, and ribeyes. Pour de bon manger, essayer Aucoin’s! (For good eats, try Aucoin’s!) Call (337)-622-3582 or check us out on Facebook.

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The Hebert family is pleased to welcome you to Sulphur with their newly acquired Buick franchise and their new modern facility. “It’s simply gorgeous!” is what many of their customers exclaim when they visit. “We are proud of our brand-new, two-story, 10,000 sq. foot showroom and accounting facilities. Our service department has been completely redesigned for comfort to better serve our customers,” said owner Jack Hebert. Allstar is proud of their new Buick franchise, along with the Buick LaCrosse and Buick LuCerne that are ranked among the top five models in the industry in long-term dependability, according to JD Power. “We are the only Buick dealer in Calcasieu Parish,” Hebert stated. “I always feel that I have the best deals around on Buick and GMC, and will gladly meet with any customer that walks in my door. In fact, I am one of the few dealers where customers can get prices

directly from the owner.” Allstar is a family-owned dealership, and they make sure that they treat their customers like family. Daughter Khristine is general sales manager and daughter Kelli is finance manager. “We have many long-term employees that have become like family, also,” Hebert said. Allstar Buick GMC invites you to go by today and become a part of their family! The Heberts and staff, left to right: Gabby Fisher, Kelli Hebert, Brittany Hebert, Courtney Hebert, Kallie Guidry, Kim Guidry and Ryan Davis. Seated: Grant Engel, Jack Hebert, Carley Heller and Khristine Hebert.

Australian Super Tans has the most to offer you, our customer! Owned by Staci and Wade Boudoin, we are the oldest and the most upscale tanning salon in the Lake Area. We have been in business for 18 years, and have been voted No. 1 tanning salon in SWLA every year since 2000. We were also chosen as one of the Top 250 tanning salons in the United States twice. We are the only salon with multiple locations to serve you in Lake Charles and Sulphur. Two are open seven days a week. Buy time at one store and tan at all three! We feature 38 of the most powerful WOLFF beds in the industry,

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Villa Décor, located in the Central Point complex at 943 E McNeese Street, is locally owned and operated by Sandra Kibodeaux. Sandra, a graduate and current supporter of McNeese State University said, “The staff and I love our city and the people in it! We strive to offer a unique shopping opportunity for everyone. If you haven’t been into our store yet, come by and see what we have to offer.” It's not an easy task for Sandra and her staff to locate quality and unusual furniture pieces and home decor and still get the absolute lowest prices imaginable, but they

offering many different levels of beds and stand-ups for you to choose from. We carry the highest quality equipment in the industry. No other equipment performs like our Ergoline equipment. Our beds have the highest bulb wattage, guaranteeing the darkest tan possible. All bulbs are new and are at their strongest at all times. We also have two Mystic Tan Booths (UV-free tanning). We pride ourselves on super-clean salons, excellent customer service, the highest quality equipment and knowledgeable staff. Look for our certificates as proof that we are a professional salon. At Australian Super Tans, all employees are “Smart Tan” certified and thoroughly trained on lotion and tanning products. They will help customize a special program that fits your budget and your schedule. We offer a large variety of tanning packages. You can purchase one visit, or come weekly, monthly or yearly. Pay in full, or use our payment plan options.

always manage to get it done. Villa Décor is well-known in this area for custom design floral pieces at incredibly low prices. Just bring your pictures, fabric or containers to Kim and she will create a design to make your space special. Having a problem with an area of your home, or do you just want a totally different look? Come in and speak with Kim or Sandra, and they will help you get the look you’re going for. “Stop by and see what we have to offer,” said Sandra. “Kim and I are looking forward to meeting you and helping you find the perfect home décor!” COMING SOON! New Freight Container of Quality Furniture and Home Decor at Wholesale Prices!

Enjoy our retail area, where you will find: • Elan clothing • AST clothing • Swimwear • Flip flops   • Luggage and purses  • Fleur de lis items • Wood Wick candles, reed diffusers and oils • Kids back packs, lunch bags, and more. We have monthly specials and student discounts. No appointment is necessary; walk-ins welcome. OUR LOCATIONS 4435 Nelson Road • 477-5014 Country Club Plaza 3113 Ryan Street • 491-0925 Pzazz Shopping Center 190 N. Cities Service Hwy. 626-0925 • Sulphur

Volume 3 • Issue 1


Danita, Robyn LeLeux Spikes and Myron pictured left to right. Not pictured are son Brandon LeLeux and son-in-law Corey Spikes.

Honesty. Integrity. Quality. These are the things Chris Hughes of Benchworks Fine Jewelers believes makes his business strong and his customers loyal. Benchworks has been in business for 21 years at the same location, 238 W. Prien Lake Rd., Lake Charles.  “Confidence and consistency is our key to customer satisfaction,” he said. If you need jewelry repair, stone setting, custom design, watch repair, pearls restrung—even eyeglass repair—let Chris help you with his 33 years of bench experience. In the market for a new diamond? Choose from their loose diamond selection. Chris can mount your diamond in an existing ring or new semi-mount, pendant or earrings.

“We can duplicate any piece of gold, sterling silver or costume jewelry, or create and design something original just for you,” Chris said. Benchworks is the exclusive dealer in this area for LUMINOX fine Swissmade watches, and for STAXX jewelry. Benchworks is the only retailer in Lake Charles to offer the MICHE BAG. Using interchangeable outer shells, women can change the look of their handbag in a matter of seconds. Giftwrapping is always complimentary. Benchworks does all repair work onsite. “Usually, repairs are finished within a day or two, and sometimes while you wait,” said Chris. The Hughes family— Chris, Lori, Jordan and Jacob—invite you to let them help you with all of your jewelry needs. Open: Tuesday - Friday, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Myron and Danita LeLeux were both working other jobs when they decided that they wanted to own their own restaurant. “We talked to a friend, Roger Benoit, about coming into business with us to help with the cooking. He was a cook offshore for years and had lots of experience,” says Danita Leleux. “Myron worked fast food for 20 years.” With all that experience, how could they miss? Southern Spice, family owned and operated, opened March 17, 1997. They serve breakfast from 710:30 a.m., along with lunch and dinner. You’ll enjoy their delicious home-style cooking, including fresh seafood, hand-cut steaks,

burgers, sandwiches and salads. And don’t miss the breakfast! They’ve won “best breakfast” for 7 years in a row in a local magazine poll. The owners have been active members of the community for 30 years. They belong to the Chamber Southwest, Better Business Bureau, La. Restaurant Association, Cowboy Club, the Petro-chemical Association and Our Lady of Good Counsel Catholic Church. The owners love what they do, and it shows. “We have become friends with so many people from the community and the outlying areas,” says Danita. “They have enriched our lives and made our jobs so much more enjoyable.”

Stanley

At TeCi’s Ladies Apparel, we offer the ladies of the Lake Area a unique shopping experience. We love pretty clothes and we love making our customers feel beautiful! We’ve served the Lake Area for the past 4 ½ years, and 2011 is proving to be our best year ever. We have so many exciting things to offer, with new merchandise arriving daily. Some of the lines we specialize in are Eileen Fisher, Nic & Zoe, Sharon Young, Ming Wang and Barbra Lesser. Sympli is our newest line—and we can’t say

Volume 3 • Issue 1

enough about it! If we can get you to put Sympli on, you’ll want to take it home! The trendy lady will love our fun lines like Gypsy Junkie, Mystree and Downeast. We also have an abundance of spring scarves and flowers for days that are a must for this season to accessorize your outfits. Our jewelry will add the finishing touch to your spring wardrobe! So, stop in and let the ladies of Teci’s help you to look your best! Join us on our facebook fan page @ Teci’s Ladies Apparel

s Johnnie, 1950

Johnnie’s Paint and Body Shop has been serving SWLA for over 50 years with vehicle repair and towing. “My father began the business in the late 1950's,” said Stanley Caldarera. “I practically grew up in and around the business.” Johnnie’s Paint and Body Shop remains family-owned and operated and is still at 1103 Broad Street, the same location where the late Johnnie Caldarera started his business 50 years ago. Stanley became president and manager of the company in 1995. Johnnie’s Paint and Body Shop does repairs on all makes and model vehicles; foreign or domestic. They use state-of-the-art equipment, and the technicians are ASE-certified and

ICAR-trained, assuring customers of topquality work. “Everyone can promise you something, “Caldarera stated. “It’s whether they deliver that counts.” All work is guaranteed at Johnnie’s Paint and Body Shop. The number of satisfied customers over the last half-century can attest to the fact that they deliver on their promises. They take all the work out of dealing with insurance companies by guiding customers through the claims process. Johnnie’s Paint and Body Shop works with all insurance companies and are “customer preferred.” They want you to know that you have the right to request them for all of your collision repairs. The company offers 24-hour towing, so be sure to request Johnnie’s Paint and Body Shop at the scene of an accident or breakdown.

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Jon Margeaux began as a wholesale company, working with manufacturers in India, to supply retailers across the US with beautiful tableware and serving pieces designed by the owner, Sarah Ehlers. Sarah founded Jon Margeaux in memory of her mother, Jeanne Marguerite, to share her mother’s joy, comfort, and passion for entertaining family and friends. In early 2008, the decision was made to become a wholesaler of only US products and to move to their current location on Hodges Street. An important part of their mission was to provide retailers across the US with Louisiana products. The following year Jon Margeaux was the Imperial Calcasieu Region winner of the prestigious Lantern Award by the Governor's office, awarded to manufacturers who excel and contribute to the community. Jon Margeaux was the only Louisiana

woman owned business winner for 2009! Moving to The Cottage Shops area in midtown enticed Sarah and her husband, Greg Mahoney, to offer a unique combination of gifts, home accents, jewelry & accessories, candles, and works of art created by local artists. Photography, watercolors, acrylic, & oil paintings adorn their walls, stained glass works sparkle in their windows, and gorgeous pottery pieces line their shelves. Sarah and Greg were instrumental in acquiring a Cultural District designation from the State of Louisiana in March, 2010. The Cultural District designation allows Jon Margeaux (and other businesses located in The Cottage Shops Cultural District) to sell all original works of art TAX FREE! Sarah’s drive to revitalize midtown Lake Charles, and desire to grow tourism in our area, was recognized when she became one of the first recipients of The Chamber of Commerce Business Women’s Network Leadership Awards in November, 2010.

Jan Guillory & Carol Henry

Need to find a gift for a loved one, friend or business acquaintance? One visit to The Perfect Gift is all it takes…. Carol Henry opened The Perfect Gift in February 2000 at 2712 Hodges St. with customer service in mind. “I bought the business because I love being around people and helping them,” she said. She enjoys finding the perfect gift for all occasions and offers personal friendly service with low prices. The Perfect Gift carries popular brands such as Lampe Berger, Switch Flops, and Fleur De Lis items. “We also have a selection of LSU items, initial gifts and accessories, T-shirts, sundresses,

Lake Charles native Lauren Monroe and her husband purchased Mimosa Boutique from the previous owners in July of 2010. “We’ve changed the boutique up a lot,” she said. “Instead of just highend apparel, I wanted to offer great-looking clothing at affordable prices so my boutique would appeal to everyone.” Monroe has always loved fashion since she was a little girl. Add a business degree from McNeese, and that spells success! Mimosa Boutique offers a great variety of women’s contemporary clothing— from classic pieces to the latest trends, from T-shirts and jeans to cocktail dresses. You’ll find racks of different styles, so you never have

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and unique women’s clothing, fun wine accessories, fun cookbooks, stylish purses, jewelry, and much more.” In addition, the Store offers free gift-wrapping. I want my customers to feel important,” Carol says. “I believe in treating the customer the way I would want to be treated.” As a member of the executive board of the Women’s Commission of Southwest Louisiana, a member of the Lake Area Shoppe Girls, and a board member of the local Better Business Bureau. Carol understands the importance of female business owners. “I know the significant role that women fulfill in today’s business world,” she said. “I believe in giving back to the community.”

to worry about running into the same dress at every function you attend. Mimosa carries BCB Generation, Free People, Pink Martini, French Connection, MM Couture, and other clothing lines. They have some of the latest trends that all the celebrities are wearing, and a great selection of jewelry, handbags and accessories. Mimosa Boutique is located at 3101 Ernest Street, right across from the Prien Lake Mall. Hours are Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. and Sat. 10 a.m.-4 pm. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook (Mimosa Boutique-Lake Charles). www.mimosa-boutique.com

Volume 3 • Issue 1


Slender Solutions is a licensed provider of The Body Wrap by Victoria Morton, who started Suddenly Slender in Florida 32 years ago. Dixette Williams opened the Lake Charles Slender Solutions 13 years ago. A paralegal for 26 years, she was frustrated with her weight. “I had tried all the usual weight loss stuff, but nothing worked for me,” she said. Desperate, she went on the Internet, and found a Suddenly Slender franchise in Lafayette. She went, and the inches came off. In six months, she had quit her job, and opened Slender Solutions in Lake Charles. “People were skeptical at first,” Dixette said. “But when clients started seeing results, the concept caught on.” The rest is history, as they say. After starting her business in a small rented building where there was room for only

While the auto industry was busy writing itself off, John Stelly, CEO of Paramount Companies, was unexpectedly expanding. Amid the industry turmoil, Stelly’s business acquired Gray Nissan and Gray Ford, a pair of dealerships in DeRidder. The company also acquired 15 acres of land in Silsbee, Texas, and built a state-of-the- art Nissan facility at a cost of $4 million. The automotive industry travails over the past few years are well-documented; sales in 2009 were the lowest since 1982. While it may seem illadvised to spend millions to expand sales capabilities during the industry’s worst slump, Stelly’s philosophy is being the biggest fish in a smaller pond. The five locations create a 200square mile triangle that guarantees Nissan’s excellent market penetration, which he predicts will more than double sales for 2011. U-TURN TO PROFITABILITY As the dealership is only an hour’s drive from Stelly’s Lake Charles showroom, common sense might dictate

Volume 3 • Issue 1

one wrap at a time, she was able to buy the spacious building on McNeese Street where her business is now. With three wrap techs on duty, three wraps can be done at the same time. Male clients are always wrapped separately; and couples that wrap together generally get their own time. We offer the detoxifyig Flat Tummy Mineral Wrap with a guarantee to look 10-30 inches slimmer. The process takes about one hour and you will feel clean, fresh, light and slimmer. In addition, there are a host of products in stock to enhance the results of the wraps. Other services offered at Slender Solutions include airbrush tanning, facial waxing, face taping and skin-conditioning masks. You’ll love glo minerals skin-nurturing, talc-free make-up and skin care with UV protection and antioxidant benefits. Ask us about our makeovers! Call 562-9400 and start taking those inches off!

that he’d be cannibalizing his current customer base with the acquisition. However, he would also be acquiring his closest competitor. “It works out great. I’m my own competition, which means I cover—from a Nissan perspective—more than 200 square miles of territory by buying these dealerships,” he says. “I’m the only Nissan dealer from Lake Charles to Shreveport, which covers 200 miles, roughly.” MINORITY REPORT Stelly’s success is rare in an environment where the number of minorityowned dealerships continues to dwindle. While there is stabilization that signals the worst is likely over, it’s taken a catastrophic toll. “The African American dealer count has had a significant amount of attrition. Out of 22,000, there are 300 black [auto] dealers in the country,” says Damon Lester, president of the National Association of Minority Automobile Dealers (NAMAD). Stelly stands to benefit from having profitable operations that could fuel

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Marsh

andi rd & S

Marsha McCarthy had been working for the previous owner of Renee’s Café and Gift Shop when the owner decided she wanted to sell. “I needed job security,” laughs McCarthy. “So I bought it myself!” That was four years ago and she’s never regretted that decision for a minute. “I wanted to keep things basically the same, since everyone knew the name and loved the food,” McCarthy said. Renee’s is open for breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. from 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. The food is homemade from scratch. They hand-slice the turkey and ham, and they’ve been told that their homemade chicken salad is the “best in town.” You’ll find breakfast and lunch specials, plus their regular menu

acquisitions to help penetrate new markets and grow his business. “[In] the current economic climate, it’s tough for dealers who either lack capital or access to capital. And Mr. Stelly’s first dealership in Lake Charles has been so successful for him, it’s allowed him to acquire additional properties and additional businesses,” says Mark Alan Rainey, senior manager, Dealer Network Strategy for Nissan North America. “I would say that as far as his acquisitions this year, he’s fared better than any of our other minority dealers.” “For us to retain the number of dealers that we have, as well as increase the minority network, we need access to capital,” says Lester. “We’re still seeing challenges from the banks to lend to automobile dealers, particularly those who don’t have the equity in their stores and in the real

items like sandwiches, wraps, homemade burgers and salads, as well as homemade soups and gumbo. The prices are great and the service is fast at Renee’s. They understand that some of their clients have a limited time for lunch, so Marsha, along with cook Sandi Parish and cashier and host Richard Combs, make sure customers get in and out in a timely manner. They also deliver downtown with a $20 minimum order. If you do have extra time for lunch, make sure you look at the purse and jewelry display at the restaurant entrance. And consider having your next lunch or nighttime meeting or party at Renee’s. They can accommodate 20-40 people and there’s no room charge, so plan your next group meeting there! For more info call (337) 439-6916 or e-mail reneescafe@hotmail.com.

estate that they once had.” For the relatively few who can gain access to capital, such as Stelly, opportunities remain. “The price to acquire dealerships is at an all-time low, so there’s a lot of opportunity for growth. In order for us to grow we have to be creative in how we do business; that means we have to be creative in partnering and using private equity as an additional source to obtain access to capital,” says Lester. “This is a very good time to buy stores. Stelly is an example of dealers who have cash, or access to it, who are capitalizing on the market conditions.” Stelly stands to benefit from having profitable operations that could fuel acquisitions to help penetrate new markets.

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Gulf Coast Carpet Staff founded in 1932 and celebrated its 75th anniversary in 2007. We are a third-generation family-owned and operff a st , and her nt Manager ta ated business, with five locais ss A l, cia Bore Seated: Feli tions in southern Louisiana. Lake Charles Office Supply provides Lake Charles Office Supply has sales and services on both office been in business under current supplies and office furniture, ownership since 1997. Located in totaling over 50,000 merchandise the heart of Lake Charles, we are items. easily able to serve the entire Lake Locally, we provide overnight Charles and Beaumont metropoli- service to ten Louisiana parishes tan areas. We have a large invento- and four Texas counties directly ry of the most common supply from our five Southern Louisiana items, as well as a showroom fealocations. We provide overnight turing many different types of delivery nationally to 48 states office furniture. Our five delivery through partnerships with our venvehicles are constantly running dor suppliers. Enjoy the best qualithroughout the day to provide fast ty, consistency and competitive and efficient deliveries. pricing anywhere in the Our parent organization was country.

Nina-P’s Café is owned by sisters Paulina Siebarth and Penny Fontenot. They serve hot daily plate lunches, New Orleans-style poboys, burgers, gumbo and more. They recently added a family recipe of chicken tortilla soup, which has turned out to be a hit. Nina-P’s strives to serve the local area with friendly service in an atmosphere that feels like home. The sisters got their start in the restaurant business years ago when they owned Dave’s Oyster House with their parents, Pat and Tim Evans. Their mother has owned many businesses in the Lake Area, passing her expertise

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down to Paulina and Penny. Nina-P’s is keeping the tradition of working with family, since all of their children have helped run the restaurant at one point or another. The café was opened 10 years ago with the help of Paulina’s oldest daughters Tiffany and Nikki, who have passed down the responsibilities to their youngest sister Fallon, and Penny’s son Devin, and in the near future, Penny’s daughter Darbi. They hope the to see their children and grandchildren managing the café in years to come. To-go orders are welcomed!!! Nina-P’s is open Mon-Sat from 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

John Fontenot opened Gulf Coast Carpet in 1994, and started out from the beginning offering any kind of flooring made. This hasn’t changed— they have the largest amounts of flooring in the area, including ceramic, wood and laminate, with the best prices. They also sell counter tops, and offer in-house professional installation for both flooring and counters. John has been selling floors for 35 years, and he and his experienced salespeople are

Business Health Partners was established in 1996 to provide quality occupational medical services to SWLA. Located in Sulphur, we serve over 90 percent of the industrial and maritime businesses in SWLA, providing muchneeded medical and safety services. We offer a full range of pre-employment and medical physicals, including FAA and military-required physicals. Come to us for DOT drug and alcohol testing, workmen’s compensation treatment, laboratory services, pulmonary function testing, fit testing, audiograms, and x-ray services. We also provide the flu vaccine, Hepatitis A and B vaccinations, and other much-needed vaccinations. Off-site and on-call services are available. BHP also provides safety and industrial training. We can cater to industry or non-industry businesses, customiz-

here to serve you! Gulf Coast Carpet also has over a hundred 8 x 11 rugs in stock starting at $199.99, along with beautiful framed pictures, lamps, decorative accessories, and wood furniture accents. They custom-make canvas and metal awnings and have the cheapest price on 2-inch faux wood blinds. In addition, they recently added a beautiful line of purses and fashion jewelry. “Our overhead is low, so we can sell for less!” says John. Come see for yourself!

ing the training topic to fit the individual company’s needs. Our trainers are all certified, and we are happy to come to your business location to train your employees. BHP is also a primary training provider through the Incumbent Worker Training Program, and can provide training, through a grant, to all eligible companies. Coming in summer 2011, we will offer the National Registry Basic EMT Course, along with computer-based training to better fit the needs of our mobile workforce. Staff: Clinical Manager, Bryan Hollingsworth; Training Manager, Stacy Byrd; Business Manager, David Drumwright, ; Training and Grant Coordinator, Erin Davison; Jack Drumwright, MD; Bonnie Drumwright, MD. www.businesshealthpartners.com Twitter: bhpsafety facebook.com/Business Health Partners

Volume 3 • Issue 1


Voted “Best Caterer” by Lake Area residents for eight of the last nine years, Reeves Uptown Catering is the place to go for all of your catering needs— both on and off-site. Owner Ryan Reeves graduated from LSU then went on to finish at the top of his class at the Culinary Arts Institute of Louisiana. After working in Colorado, he returned to Lake Charles and was head chef at Gray Plantation until he opened Reeves Uptown Catering in 2002. “We have a conference center with three conference rooms, the largest accommodating 48 guests,” he said. “Our large ballroom can accommodate up to 325 guests – perfect for wedding receptions,

Blazin’ Truck Parts & Accessories is owned by Sabrina McCoy and managed by her husband Scott, who has over 28 years of experience and expertise in the heavy-duty truck parts industry. “Our main focus is heavy-duty truck and trailer parts and chrome and stainless accessories,” said Sabrina. “Some of the brands we carry are Grand Rock exhaust, Baldwin and Caterpillar filters, Omega air conditioning parts, United Pacific chrome accessories, Road Works stainless accessories, and much more. We also carry parts for boat, utility, and cargo trailers.” She said they nurture their working

Volume 3 • Issue 1

large banquets and day-long meetings.” Reeves Uptown Catering hosts anniversary and Christmas parties, class reunions, and more. “With a professional staff of experienced banquet servers and chefs, we can handle all of your catering needs – at our location or the location of your choice,” said Reeves. The food is delicious, and there’s an extensive menu to choose from—which is why their customers keep returning. “If there were a contest for ‘Best Clients’ ours would win, hands down,” Reeves said proudly. Fax (337) 310-1634 uptowncatering@hotmail.com www.reevesuptown.com

Samantha

Hebert

Closet Tailors is now Tailored Living! For the last few years, Closet Tailors has been helping families improve the spaces in their homes by reducing the chaos and creating more functional spaces. “With our newest expansion, we’ll be able to offer you even more ways to organize and beautify your home,” said owner Samantha Hebert. There is nothing more frustrating than a room that doesn’t function properly. And we all have one or more of those: Closet floors covered with an

array of clothes and shoes, a garage crammed with sports gear, a home office overflowing with junk mail, pantry shelves that don’t adjust in size from canned goods to cereal boxes, a laundry room with limited hanging space, and an entryway floor puddled with book sacks and school papers. Sound familiar? We can help! We are experts at creating the perfect space designed around YOU and your habits! You can learn more about Tailored Living and our enhanced lines of services by scheduling a FREE in-home consultation. During our consultation, we’ll create a “Tailored For You Design Plan” that lets you envision how your new space will look. In the meantime, visit www.TailoredLiving.com to see more examples of how we can help you get more out of your home—and your life! shebert@tailoredliving.com facebook.com/Closet Tailors

relationships with an assortment of vendors because they are dedicated to providing the best products available in the trucking industry. “As a locally owned business, beyond providing exceptional service and products to our customers, we also believe in supporting our community,” Sabrina explained. “With that spirit in mind, Blazin’ Truck Parts & Accessories hosted a customer appreciation/anniversary celebration this past year which included a truck show for customers to display their big rigs, with all proceeds benefiting the Parkinson Association of the South.” They hope to make this an annual event. Come by and see ‘The REAL Heavy Duty Truck Parts Specialist,’ conveniently located at Exit 36 off of I-10, with lots of big rig parking available.

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Whether you’re looking for a new ride, doing some home repair or renovation, or just want to have some fun, our experienced lenders can design a loan to meet your needs. Call or stop by today! MAIN OFFICE: 433-3611 Mike Carr Alana Corry Shara Dowers MCNEESE: 480-0180 Lynn Calles OAK PARK: 477-6204 Dee Jackson NELSON FINANCIAL CTR 480-0806 Mike Doland Ryan Hess

SULPHUR: 625-5388 Russell Castille Vanessa Strickland WESTLAKE: 439-3062 Ricky Foreman MOSS BLUFF: 855-4545 Michael Clifton DERIDDER: 462-2425 Shelley Theriot

FFBLA.COM Volume 3 • Issue 1

APRIL 7, 2011

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By Lisa Addison

Kent Seale, MD, General Surgeon

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Joseph O’Donnell, MD, General Surgeon

Walter Ledet, MD, General Surgeon

Stephen Castleberry, MD, General Surgeon

For a community hospital to be successful and to continue to grow, it must have a few key ingredients. Sure, it has to have great physicians and nurses, as well as other important personnel. A good location is vital and the right equipment certainly helps. Bill Hankins, CEO of West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital, says all of those things are very important, but he always throws in what he considers that special ingredient - support of the community. “We’ve asked the community to support us, and they have; over and over again,” said Hankins. “For this hospital to be able to break out and be such a quality facility to the point that we are now serving a much bigger region than in the past is something I attribute to strong facilities, top of the line equipment, strong personnel, and overwhelming community support,” he said. In 2006, voters approved a $25 million bond issue, enabling the hospital to upgrade its facilities and a build a state-of-theart ICU, as well as state-of-the-art Cardiology and Radiology departments. “The community rallied around us in a phenomenal way,” Hankins added. “In return, we are meeting our mission of taking care of our community.” In fact, some of the physicians at WCCH aren’t just taking care of patients and their immediate needs, but have invented new procedures that will affect the long-term health of patients. Volume 3 • Issue 1


New Approach to Gall Bladder Surgery For instance, Sulphur surgeons Walter Ledet and A. Kent Seale pioneered a new approach to gall bladder surgery, the minicholecystectomy. They have successfully performed the procedure for several years with impressive results. The new technique came about because both physicians had experienced some dissatisfaction with results they were seeing from traditional gall bladder surgery; specifically, the large incision necessary, a longer recovery time, and the physical toll that a major surgery had on a patient’s body. The new technique requires a much smaller incision, and doesn’t require a long hospital stay like the traditional surgery.  “By adding injectable steroids and antibiotics, we could reduce postoperative pain and allow our patients to be discharged on the day of surgery,” said Dr. Seale.  The technique is done as day surgery at WCCH, with patients returning to work in the office setting two to three days after surgery, and one to three weeks for heavy labor.  Both surgeons say they’ve seen tremendous results since implementing the procedure several years ago. This technique is now used by surgeons all over the world. In a twist on “paying it forward,” the surgeons began teaching the method to

Steven Hale, MD, Orthopaedic Surgeon

other surgeons. One surgical colleague from Sweden, Erik Nilsson, MD, learned the technique, began using it on his patients, and is seeing positive results. Another person who has become very familiar with the new gall bladder surgery technique, but from a different angle, is Marilyn Dawdy, founder and owner of Marilyn’s Flowers & Catering. The Sulphur resident had gall bladder surgery on March 7 with Dr. Walter Ledet, followed by knee replacement surgery on March 15 with Dr. Geoffrey Collins.

staff “identified themselves, their job, and always expressed concern for my well being.” She was impressed by the cleanliness of the patient rooms, the professionalism of each team member, and that everyone was so attentive to her needs. “I don’t plan to have any more of my ‘parts’ to break down but if I do, I know that WCCH is my hospital. To live in this area with our

phenomenal physicians and our great hospital makes a community healthy and happy,” she said. Hip Replacement Alternative Another local physician implemented an innovative alternative to hip replacement that is returning people to pain-free, active lifestyles. Orthopaedic surgeon John Noble Jr., MD, with the Center for

Marilyn Dawdy with Dr. Walter Ledet and Dr. Geoffrey Collins.

Complete Confidence in Surgical Teams “My knee surgery was due to my inability to admit that this aging body would no longer repair itself,” Dawdy said. “Waiting too long resulted in bone-on-bone movement and a complete knee replacement was in order. I won’t say I wasn’t a bit apprehensive with two surgeries so close together. But I had complete confidence in the surgical teams.”   Dawdy came through both of her surgeries with flying colors and is full of compliments about WCCH. “Thanks to West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital and the great physicians, nurses, and staff who work there, each stay was remarkable,” said Dawdy. She recalls that, during her surgeries,

Geoffrey Collins, MD, Orthopaedic Surgeon

James Perry, MD, Orthopaedic Surgeon

George Trappey, MD, Orthopaedic Surgeon

John Noble, MD, Orthopaedic Surgeon

rse d during the reve Components use ent procedure shoulder replacem rey Collins, M.D ff performed by Geo

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Ben Darby, MD, Obstetrics/Gynecology Scott Bergstedt, MD, Obstetrics/Gynecology

FROM “FEARS TO CHEERS”

What causes children to fear the water?

“Fear of the Unknown” can trigger crying or fear and is a normal response to things we do not understand. “Separation Anxiety” can also turn a happy child into a tearful toddler momentarily when they have to leave mothers side to swim, both are normal and usually disappear quickly. It is the job of the instructor to not only make sure the child is safe while learning, but also to make sure they “FEEL” safe! Parents are urged to “give the child and instructor some space” and let the Swimsational Instructors work their magic! With their gentle help, those fears will soon turn into cheers! A child can drown in the time it takes to answer the phone. “U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission”

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Orthopaedics and on the medical staff at WCCH, was among the first surgeons in the United States to begin using the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) system more than four years ago. He was one of eight physicians chosen to serve as a principle investigator in a 10-year multicenter outcome study after the FDA granted approval to BHR in 2006 without the usual stringent pre-approval requirements for clinical outcome studies in the United States. Since that time, he has been very satisfied with the treatment for hip pain and has received a great deal of positive feedback from his patients.   As Noble explains it, rather than replacing the entire hip joint, as in a total hip replacement, BHR is a bone-conserving approach that preserves more of the patient’s natural bone structures, covering the joint’s surfaces with an all-metal implant that more closely resembles a tooth cap than a hip implant. This approach reduces the postoperative risks of dislocation and inaccurate leg length, and because the all-metal implant is made from tough, smooth cobalt chrome, it has the potential to last longer than traditional hip implants.

Although resurfacing had been around for years, BHR was the first hip resurfacing implant ever approved by the FDA. Noble explained that while the BHR implant closely matches the size of a patient’s natural femoral head (hip ball), it is substantially larger than the femoral head of a traditional total hip replacement implant. This increased size translates to greater stability in the new joint, and it decreases the chance of dislocation of the implant after surgery. Dislocation is a leading cause of failure after total hip replacement. “BHR is one of the most exciting hip procedures introduced in the past two decades,” says Noble. “It offers an ideal solution for younger, active patients who suffer from hip pain. A lot of my patients are staying physically active much later in life and this gives me an alternative to offer that accommodates their age and lifestyle.”  As the first hospital in the area to have computer-assisted navigation technology for joint replacement, according to Hankins, WCCH continues to be a leader in the industry. The technology, offering real-time feedback along with greater precision and accuracy, is

Michael Jones, MD, Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist Tyson Green, DPM, Foot and Ankle Specialist

Volume 3 • Issue 1


WCCH Surgery Group

customized for the patient’s own anatomy. With well over 1.5 million joint replacement surgeries occurring each year in the United States, developing systems to provide patients with excellent care and recovery has been a focus for hospitals across America. WCCH is proud to provide outstanding care in the area of joint replacement. Reverse Shoulder Replacement Although these procedures are impressive and are helping people to live more productive lives, the physicians affiliated with WCCH aren’t content to rest on their laurels. They are continually working to fine-tune various procedures or come up with new ones. Geoffrey Collins, MD, orthopaedic surgeon and shoulder specialist with the Center for Orthopaedics and on the staff of WCCH, has been focusing on giving patients relief for shoulder pain. As he puts it, “Over time, repetitive motion on the job or during sports activities may lead to shoulder pain.” Collins uses a relatively new procedure called the “reverse shoulder replacement,” which is designed to eliminate pain and restore function in people with

severe shoulder arthritis who also have a rotator cuff tear. Collins says the rotator cuff is “essentially a cushion that prevents cartilage from rubbing on bone, while at the same time providing an attachment for the four muscles needed to raise the arm.” In layman’s terms, the rotator cuff keeps things easily moving. But when it’s damaged, it can cause pain and loss of mobility. Before he began utilizing the new technique for helping patients relieve shoulder pain, Collins said he could relieve pain to a certain extent for a patient but normal motion wasn’t restored to satisfactory levels. With this new procedure, he’s able to relieve pain and restore motion. He’s pleased that WCCH is the facility he works with to perform these procedures. “The surgical team at WCCH is exceptional,” said Collins. “The hospital’s commitment to providing the latest technology and the highest level of patient care is clear.”   One patient who is very grateful for Collins and the work he does is Mable Moore, 66, of Moss Bluff. She had spent years working in a school cafeteria and as a janitor. Once she had retired, she realized that she

Kourtnie Romero, RN and Jarrod Hubert, RN deliver on WCCH’s exceptional patient care commitment.

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Lake Charles League of Women Voters Annual Banquet APRIL 12, 2011 • 6:00 PM | 1639 Ryan St. Reeves Uptown Catering

Dr. Philip C. Williams, President McNeese State University $30 for LWV/Chamber • Non-Members $35 RSVP to publicrelations@lwv-lc.org or leave a message at (337) 474-1864.

had developed severe arthritis in both of her shoulders. “The pain was so bad I could barely lift my arms,” Moore said. “I couldn’t do anything around my house. I couldn’t even wash my hair. That’s when I knew I had to do something.” She ended up having both of her shoulders replaced over the past two years, enabling her to return to enjoying everyday life including precious time with her young grandson. “I have full use of my shoulders again and have returned to doing everything I want to do,” she said. “I’m so glad Dr. Collins offered this type of procedure and that I could have it done right here at WCCH.” Platinum Level Louisiana Hospital Quality Award Moore isn’t the only satisfied patient. When it comes to patient satisfaction, you might say that WCCH is hitting it out of the ballpark. For the second year in a row, WCCH has received the Platinum Level Louisiana Hospital Quality Award, presented by eQHealth Solutions, the Medicare Quality Improvement Organization for Louisiana. With the award, WCCH was recognized for improving the quality of health care given to its patients. Additionally, it was the only hospital in the Lake Charles/Sulphur area and one of only 28 hospitals in the state to receive the Platinum Louisiana Hospital Quality Award for 2009 and one of only 10 hospitals in

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the state to receive the award two years in a row. The Hospital Quality Award honors Louisiana hospitals that successfully implement quality initiatives directed toward improving patient care in the hospital setting. The award recognizes facilities that are actively engaged in improving care in one or more of the following areas: Acute myocardial infarction (heart attack), heart failure, pneumonia, and surgical care. Hospital is a Real Stand-Out The physicians and other personnel at WCCH, along with its facilities and state-of-the-art equipment, are just some of the things that make this hospital stand out. WCCH, which opened in 1953, is also the secondbusiest trauma emergency room in the five-parish area, according to Hankins. “That’s because of our location, physician support, and facilities,” he said. The business of saving lives is a noble one. As Cicero put it, “In nothing do men more nearly approach the gods than in giving health to men.” Providing health to patients, helping others to have a second chance at life, or even just performing procedures that can help a person to have a better quality of life is what the physicians at WCCH strive to do each day. Lisa Addison has been a writer for more than 30 years. She writes for local, regional, and national publications. TJN

Volume 3 • Issue 1


It’s Time for Art Walk! On Friday, April 8, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., downtown Lake Charles will come alive with a celebration of local artwork in downtown venues during the highly anticipated Spring Art Walk and the first Art Battle, two showcases of Southwest Louisiana talent hosted by the Arts and Humanities Council of Southwest Louisiana. Every year, this event creates a new vision of what historic downtown Lake Charles can be as coffee houses, bars, businesses, restaurants, and even vacant buildings are transformed into trendy art galleries for the evening. Twenty locations featuring over a hundred local artists will thrill the senses, and art

mediums will range from sculpture and photography to clay and canvas. Live music will fill venues across the Charleston Cultural District, and the Art Walk will feature its first ever Art Battle in the parking lot of the Central School Arts and Humanities Center where teams of artists will compete to create a mural in only an hour. Art Walk walkers will not only be able to see the competition first hand but will also be able to choose the winning mural. Art Walk maps are available at each location at online at www.artsandhumanitiesswla.org. For more information, call the Arts Council at (337) 439-2787. TJN

Meet Celia! Celia is a pure blackmouth cur who was surrendered to us by owners who said she wouldn’t hunt. One thing she DOES do very well is give love. This girl is so sweet and beautiful, and seems so grateful to be with people who cherish the gift of love and joy she has to give. Celia is 18 months old, about 45 pounds and is spayed, up to date on shots, and requires a secure, private fenced yard to play in. Celia is housetrained, great with kids of all ages, and great with cats and other dogs as well. So, if you’re lacking love in your life, come meet Celia and change that! For more info, call (337) 488-3478. An application can found online at

www.4PawsSocietyInc.com and faxed to (337) 558-6331 or e-mailed to fourpawssociety@aol.com. A vet reference and home visit is included with each adoption process. If you live outside the general area, a “virtual” home visit can be done. TJN

• Fri., April 8

6:30 p.m. - Baseball vs. Sam Houston St.

• Sat., April 9

1:00 p.m. - Softball vs. Sam Houston St. (doubleheader) 3:00 p.m. - Baseball vs. Sam Houston St.

• Sun., April 10

1:00 p.m. - Softball vs. Sam Houston St. 1:00 p.m. - Baseball vs. Sam Houston St.

• Wed., April 13

6:00 p.m. - Softball vs. LSU

• Tues., April 19

6:30 p.m. - Baseball vs. UL-Lafayette

Please contact the special services and equality office at least 72 hours before any home event to request accommodations for individuals with disabilities. This includes the need for materials in an alternative format such as large print or Braille, sign language interpreters, accessible seating, and accessible parking information. Ph: (337) 475-5428.

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Sponsored by

ker n Shouma By Brando

The Art of the Board Game Today, I’m not here to talk about sports. Well, not exclusively, I mean. Oh, you’re right. The sign says “Sports Report.” So, what do I mean I’m not here to talk about sports? Well, I tend to play a little fast and loose with the vocabulary

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sometimes. I like my words to bend a little, like they were made out of balsa wood. And sure, I do frequently talk about sports in this corner of the magazine; baseball, basketball, and football all make regular appearances in this space. But, sometimes, I like to get down to the essential element that makes not only sports but also a multitude of activities more exciting. Competition. I like to compete as much as the next guy but, as I’ve mentioned in previous columns, work and other more lazy pursuits

often prevent me from hitting the basketball court or the golf course. Which is why I enjoy (and write about) the competition of bar trivia, pick-up baseball games, and the like. Besides, I think it adds a little spice and, hey, where else in Lake Charles are you going to read about roller derby, mixed martial arts, bar trivia, or the Real Housewives of New Jersey in a sports column? This brings me to board games. I’ll be the first to admit that I sometimes take board games a little too seriously. Once, about five years ago, I was banned by a friend from

reading questions during a particularly pitched Trivial Pursuit battle. Incidentally, she and I are no longer friends, though her question-reading injunction may or may not have had anything to do with that. Trivial Pursuit is one of my favorites and Monopoly is another. My brother-in-law is also a big Monopoly fan, but it took some tweaks to the rules to get our wives and their friends on board with us. We instituted rules on the Free Parking space, loans to other players, real estate swaps and other slight changes to make the game more active. We also renamed

Volume 3 • Issue 1


(using more, well, adult-appropriate language) some of the areas of the board; areas that, when festooned with houses and hotels, cause lots of pain upon landing there. Add dinner and refreshments and you’ve got one heck of a board game night. I am also a huge fan of Scrabble, and I remember growing up being jealous of the kids who had the Deluxe Scrabble where the board had depressed areas for the tiles to keep them from sliding all over the board if anyone moved a muscle. Now, you don’t even have to have a board, just a Smartphone. For a couple of bucks, you can download Words With Friends, a Scrabble-like game that can be played against opponents anywhere. Typically, these games can last a week or longer, one player playing a word, then the other taking their turn five days later and so on. However, given my competitive streak and some equally competitive friends, a game against one of us may only take two days to finish. And these games are brutal. One friend and I spend much of our matches trying to screw over the other as hard as humanly possible. Two-letter opening words, seemingly fictitious words, stealing special squares, it all goes down in our matches. Words take on different definitions depending on how badly I’m losing. For example, the definition of plew is “a beaver pelt.” However, when you’re losing by 100-plus points and have terrible letters, plew means, “bereft of vowels —- see also, defeated opponent.” Often, the jingly little chime notifying me that she has played a word comes off sounding like an air raid siren, and I shudder to think about the linguistic napalm with which she’s doused our game board. I’ve certainly fantasized about throwing my phone against a wall when a 100-point play gets dropped on me. Does anyone else think it’s ironic that the acronym for Words With Friends is WWF? Another friend (and game opponent) brought that to my attention the other day, and I think it’s a pretty apt observation. Certainly, in the grand scheme of things, I don’t consider myself to be fighting for the

Volume 3 • Issue 1

cruiserweight title at the bottom, nor am I competing for the World Heavyweight Championship belt anytime soon. Nope, when it comes to WWF, I tend to think of myself more as a contender for the Intercontinental Championship belt. Kind of like a Shawn Michaels of Scrabble. It’s not the best belt in the world, but, hey, gold is gold. Scrabble isn’t the only board game you can now play on your phone. Yahtzee, Battleship, and Clue

are just some of the classic board games available at a fingertip’s touch. There is also a version of Risk available, but, if there were ever a game that would inspire me to actually throw my phone in disgust, it would be Risk. As competitive as I am, even I am not cut out to play Risk. Besides, unlike words, IPhones don’t bend like balsa wood.

Brandon Shoumaker is a graduate of McNeese State University and has covered sports for more than seven years for various publications. Coaches Brandon Shoumaker or parents with story tips may contact Brandon at bshoumaker@yahoo.com or send him a message on Twitter (@bshoumaker).

TJN

APRIL 7, 2011

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By Mary Louise Ruehr

Paris, the City of Love Imagine: We’re strolling along in Paris, the city of lights, the city of love, a city teeming with stories of passion and heartbreak — can’t you just smell the flowers and hear the accordion music? Our first stop is at the home of Hadley Richardson, the first wife of the writer Ernest Hemingway. Paula McLain has written Hadley’s fictionalized memoir, The Paris Wife. The story, told mostly from Hadley’s viewpoint, begins in 1920, when

Hadley, 28, meets Ernest Hemingway, 21, in Chicago. She has never encountered anybody like him before: “He seemed to do happiness all the way up and through. There wasn’t any fear in him that I could see, just intensity and aliveness.” It’s Prohibition, but there’s plenty of drinking at the private parties where Ernest shares with her his plans to become a great writer. After they marry in 1921, she discovers that her vibrant young husband has

Tickets available through membership, website and at the door.

For information on 2011 events call (337) 475-5123 or visit www.banners.org

The Carpe Diem String Rat Pack Is Back! Quartet Thu, Apr 14, at 7:30 pm F.G. Bulber Auditorium McNeese Campus

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Sat, Apr 16, at 7:30 pm Rosa Hart Theatre Lake Charles Civic Center

U.S. Air Force Concert Band & The Singing Sergeants Sun, Apr 17, at 3 pm F.G. Bulber Auditorium McNeese Campus

nightmares, is moody, needs to sleep with the light on, and requires continual reassurance: “He loved and needed praise. He loved and needed to be loved, and even adored.” When author Sherwood Anderson advises Hemingway to go to Paris to pursue his writing career, they set sail for Europe. She describes their first encounter with Paris: “Ernest loved the place at first sight; I was homesick and disappointed.” She says that “interesting people were everywhere just then … French painters and Russian dancers” and American expatriate artists — Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, Lincoln Steffens, Ford Madox Ford, James Joyce, John Dos Passos, F. Scott Fitzgerald, poet Archibald MacLeish, among many other colorful characters — but Hemingway is mostly unimpressed by them. The group was into excesses — alcohol, absinthe, opium, cocaine, sex. “There was the very real feeling, for many, of needing to up the ante — to feel more and risk more. It grew harder and harder to shock anyone.”

In the midst of all this, Hadley really is “the wife.” We see her and Ernest with the other artists and their partners and how the relationships affect their work. (This is an interesting perspective, but for me, none of them are really likable characters.) The Hemingways are really poor. While in Paris, she says, the “apartment was cold and damp” and her “clothes are falling to threads.” But when he gets word that his first book will be published, she writes, “He would never again be unknown. We would never again be this happy.” One of her new friends, Pauline, admits to wanting what she has, and Hadley notices that Pauline is growing closer to Ernest. For him, “she was a new country”; Pauline was a stylish intellectual who filled their conversations with brightness. Says Hadley, “I could love him like crazy and work very hard to understand and support him, but I couldn’t be fresh eyes and a fresh smile after five years. I couldn’t be new.” Pauline could play the sycophant well, agreeing with Ernest’s every idea, which leads to my favorite line in the book: “She fit so well inside his ear.” Hadley held her own amid these towering personalities so well that Hemingway later wrote of her in A Moveable Feast: “I wished I had died before I ever loved anyone but her.” This excellent book reminded me of Loving Frank by Nancy Horan. The writing is often elegant, but never elaborate — rather like Hemingway’s, really. But wait — this isn’t really Hadley’s voice … or is it? At the next address, we get a new experience: In 13, Rue Thérèse, Volume 3 • Issue 1


author Elena Mauli Shapiro has put together a kind of odd fictional puzzle, with actual items from the real world, and asks the reader to delve into the puzzle with her. The book messes with time and space, and it contains a love story in the present as well as in the past. The title is the address of a real house in Paris, where the author grew up. The main character, Louise, actually lived in the house.

When Louise died in 1983, no one came to collect her things, and the landlord offered them to the other tenants; the author’s mother salvaged a box of Louise’s mementos, which drove the young Elena to imagine stories built around them. The actual items, some dating back to World War I, are viewable at her Web site, www.13ruetherese.com. There are photos, letters, postcards, a tiny diary, a rosary, a scarf, coins and gloves, among other things. Shapiro builds her characters from the names in Louise’s letters and spins relationships for them. She adds a real sense of fullness to the secrets, passions and longings of Louise. It’s all a bit bizarre, like trying to fit together pieces from more than one puzzle. (This reminds me of the Griffin and Sabine stories of Nick Bantock.) In part of the story, the female author imagines that a man imagines what a woman was thinking — interesting, if a bit confusing. But the story part, the Louise part, is compelling. And some of the writing is poetic: “Her hazel eyes that changed color so strangely with the light, that had something a touch

hazardous in them like a faint electric crackle.” Our final stop is a present-day visit with six residents of Paris, most around the age of 40 — an age when they’re changing how they look at life and at themselves — who find love unexpectedly in Enough About Love by Hervé Le Tellier. The six include a lawyer, a writer, several doctors; some are married; one is a widower; some are lovers; some are the betrayed spouses. Their relationships act as mirrors of what people want or think they want, and of how that “want” can change so easily. We are immersed in the intimate details of their lives, yet we never get close to them, never become invested in their relationships. Rather than using a linear narrative, the author presents the chapters as encounters, each between two of the characters, sometimes even side-by-side narratives of what they’re saying or thinking. The book has a really French flavor. The writing, while a bit choppy at first, becomes rather lovely, with pretty images of Paris — “The evening shower has stopped, the pedestrians are no longer a ballet of

black umbrellas” — and interesting character portraits, such as a man described as “a pretty good-looking boy, the sporty type, with a very newscaster haircut.” Please note that all three books are of high literary quality and all have adult language and situations. Copyright © 2011 by Mary Louise Ruehr TJN

Lake Charles Civic Center April 8 & 9

Garage, Antiques, & Collectibles Sale Do you have unique, one-of-a-kind treasures to sell? Maybe you have more stuff than house. We will invite people to shop your new and used merchandise. ITʼS A FUN AND EASY WAY TO MAKE YOU MONEY!

Booth spaces are first come — first serve. Contact us today!

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U A B A F N OLY

Brought to you by Melanie Perry, Agent 108A Executive Drive, Moss Bluff, LA 70611 BUS: 337-855-7768 www.melanieperry.net State Farm, Bloomington, IL

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April Twenty Two Celebrate Community Earth Day Ecology

Environment Flower Green Mother Nature Organic

Peace Plant Recycle Seeds Spring

Volume 3 • Issue 1


der useum n e l l n E dren's M a D By e Chil f th o r o ct Dire

Limitless (Relativity Media, 2011) Think about it: What would you do if you got hold of a pill that made you smarter? For me, giving up movie reviews and doing travel reviews would be a start. Whatever your own answer might be, seeing Limitless is guaranteed to make you think twice. Eddie Morra (Bradley Cooper) is the lucky (?) guy who gets the chance to find out about the smart pill, called NZT. When his ex brother-in-law turns him on to the supposedly legitimate drug, Eddie is just a failed novelist with nothing to lose. His girlfriend has broken up with him, he’s behind on the rent, and he looks like he could use a bath more than anything else, let alone a smart pill. We find out that NZT is like caffeine or red bull except ultra-powerful. In a flurry of hyperactivity, Eddie fin-

Volume 3 • Issue 1

really means to be “smart.” That scene alone is worth price of the whole movie, not the least because De Niro is playing it. What amazed me is that his insightful words come and go so quickly that most people will miss it. But in ways we can’t foresee, the whole movie hinges on it. I expected this movie to be about the pharmaceutical industry, which sounds pretty boring. Limitless turns out to be about drug use and addiction, which points a finger directly at our current culture of medication, from alcohol and caffeine to Prozac and even Zyrtec. And where there is addiction, there lurks crime. Eddie, before his “breakthrough,” lives in pretty seedy surroundings, and the feel of the movie remains this way throughout. You never get the impression that he’s completely in the clear, because other people, most of them

thugs, also want the miracle drug, NZT. Even though the movie is PG-13, it’s sleazy enough that you probably shouldn’t bring the kids along. In a way, it almost makes drug use look appealing, if dangerous; something children have no business seeing. What keeps this movie going is that we know Eddie is really a good guy, and we want him to prevail. Moreover, he thinks he can prevail, and use NZT to make the world a better place. But can a drug really make the world a better place? Ask the folks around who remember polio, and smallpox, and a host of other diseases. Limitless will make you think about this question for a long time.

TJN

ishes half of his novel AND cleans up his apartment. It’s like he’s a whole army of Eddies. And when he comes down, there’s no real side effect. He’s just back to himself. Good old Eddie. If only he had more NZT, he could finish his novel. Through his brother-in-law, he gets hold of a supply of the drug, and things take off, which is, of course, where the movie really gets going. Before I tell you what happens (lie: I’m not going to tell you what happens) let’s take a look at Eddie. He’s basically a good guy. He’s also pretty smart already, in a common-sense sort of way, before taking the drug. He just has trouble focusing, and NZT changes his life. What could go wrong? If that were all there is to this movie, a three wishes kind of fable, I’d say skip it. But Limitless, although dressed up as a B-grade movie, has some undercurrents that make it very interesting. For one thing, Eddie comes under the radar of Carl Van Loon, a financier who is played flawlessly by Robert De Niro. In one very memorable scene, Van Loon explains to Eddie what it

APRIL 7, 2011

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(337) 478-8530 Ext. 120 CELL (337) 802-7410 FAX (337) 477-7217 bnavarre@flavinrealty.com www.flavinrealty.com

Effective Writing In The Legal Workplace Seminar/Workshop Friday, May 6, 2011 from 9am-4pm At Pat’s of Henderson 1500 Siebarth Dr., Lake Charles

$250 per person (5 or more $200 each) Early Bird Registration by April 20: $25 OFF Each Registration Certificate of Completion for six Professional Development Hours Lunch Included Register online, by mail or by phone.

We Say It Write, LLC

3221 Ryan St. Lake Charles

BOX 93226, LAKE CHARLES, LA. 70609 • (337) 292-1566 www.wesayitwrite.com • mcleodporter@wesayitwritecom.ipage.com

Killin’ Time Crossword

Crossword puzzles provided by BestCrosswords.com (www.bestcrosswords.com). Used with permission. PAGE 38

APRIL 7, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 1


CHAMBER SWLA BUSINESS EXPO It was a jambalaya of events at the Lake Charles Civic Center as various booth-holders representing our major industries and the small business community were “Open for Business.” Spicing it up this year, the Chamber allowed booth holders to market, sell, and accept deposits and broker deals. Crowds attended various business-related workshops and lucky prizewinners won special drawings. The Expo was followed by the Business Chamber luncheon featuring Don Begreaud of Begreaud Manufacturing, who went from a one-man operation to global entrepreneur. Hats off to a successful event!

Alysia Johnson, Megan Willis and Akalya Broussard

Ricky Hinch, Josh Marz, Kevin Casey and Karrson Livingston

Colleen Witherwax with Clair Whilock Skinner

Renee Moss with Monica Nicosia

Charlie Viccellio and Dallas Kingham

Christa Comeaux with Gail Brame

Dawn Daiz with Brooke Ellis

THE KREWE OF KREWES PARADE Fat Tuesday peaked with the glittering Krewe of Krewes parade. Costumes, candy and beads were tossed to the crowd from the krewe floats as parade-goers lined the streets shouting “Throw Me Something, Mister!” The only thing raining on this parade was a whole lot of fun, excitement and Mardi Gras madness! Staci Speed, Tonya Bertrand and Marilyn Boudreaux Volume 3 • Issue 1

Brittany Labbie, Tammy Williams and Jeff Daigle APRIL 7, 2011

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Kodey and Ashley Noel

Jayden, Micah and Kylie Ortego

Dr. Ken Wimberly and Craig Boudreaux

ON THE TOWN Hundreds of supporters of the Lake Charles Memorial Foundation stepped out for the entertaining premier event “On the Town” held at the Calcasieu Marine Bank Building. The evening’s menu consisted of delicious complimentary food and wine prepared by top local restaurants and silent auction bidding on exquisite gifts donated by local businesses, including The Jambalaya News. Featured musical headliner Chapter One took us back to the Motown Era, and the 1944 Big Band featured Lake Charles Memorial’s own Kathy Derouen and the suave voice of Leif Petersen. What a celebration under the Super Moon! Bravo! Kay Morgan, Pam Devall and Shannon Carter

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Ariel Caraway with Lauren Nunez

Rebecca Quarles with Monica Young

Henry and Karla David with Dionne Francois

Julie and John Conner

Rex and Tommie Townsley

Mary Stokes, Jackie Roe and Dennis Donald

Dr. Dale Archer with wife Valerie and LeeAne Archer

APRIL 7, 2011

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THE SALVATION ARMY EMPTY BOWL A large crowd of supporters turned up at L’Auberge du Lac Casino for a fundraiser to help the Salvation Army raise money to fight homelessness. Twelve restaurants served a different soup, including corn and ham chowder, Louisiana crawfish bisque and old-fashioned chicken noodle soup. Live entertainment, auction item bids and handcrafted bowls for each to take home were all part of “doing the most good.” Thumbs up for filling the bowls of the less fortunate!

TJN Mark and Caroline Crawford

Charles and Libby Timpa with Jane and Jim White

Billy Grisham and Kendall Groves

Kelley, Morgan and Shively Verrett

Tammy and Tim Andreas

Black Heritage Festival would like to THANK All of our Sponsors. L'auberge Du Lac Casino Resort u Play Makers Prints u Entergy Arts and Humanities Council u Calcasieu Parish Police Jury u AT&T Citgo u Louisiana Lottery u Cameron State Bank u Tobacco Free Living ConocoPhillips u Whitney Bank u Nissan of Lake Charles Delta Downs u Black Cotton Works u Chocolate Kingdom Cupcakes

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APRIL 7, 2011

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DRUM CIRCLE AT MSU APRIL 7 A drum circle, open to everyone with a percussion instrument, will take place at 6 p.m. Thurs., April 7, in the McNeese State University quad, located in the middle of the campus. The drum circle is sponsored by the McNeese Banners Cultural Series and is open free to the community. All ages are welcome. Everyone can participate, regardless of expertise. The drum circle will include instruction in Arab rhythmic modes called “Iqu’at.” In case of bad weather, the drum circle will move into the Parra Ballroom inside the Student Union Annex. The drum circle will be led by internationally recognized Arabic musician Simon Shaheen and percussionist Dafer Tawil. Shaheen is the leader of the group Qantara, which will be in concert at 7:30 p.m. Sat., April 9, in F.G. Bulber Auditorium as part of the Banners Series.

Peter Shire: Chairs

Drum Circle with Dafer Tawil and Simon Shaheen PAGE 42

APRIL 7, 2011

DEQUINCY RAILROAD DAYS FESTIVAL APRIL 7-9 Take a journey back in time…in the car of a train! The DeQuincy Railroad Days festival celebrates the railroad and DeQuincy’s history as a railroad town. And, you don’t want to miss a tour through the Railroad Museum, built in 1923. The Railroad Days Canine Caboose Dog Pageant will start the festival, followed that evening by Queens Pageant and the bicycle parade. The weekend of festivities will have you tapping your toes to live bands and will intrigue you as you marvel over the model railroaders. The festival will begin Thurs., April 7, from 5-11 p.m.; Fri., April 8, from 2-11 p.m.; and Sat., April 9 from 9 a.m.-midnight. For more information on the Railroad Days Festival, call (337) 786-8241. PETER SHIRE: CHAIRS AT OLD CITY HALL STARTING APRIL 8 The City of Lake Charles will host a new exhibition entitled “Peter Shire: Chairs.” The public is invited to the opening reception Fri., April 8 from 5-9 p.m. at Historic 1911 City Hall Arts & Cultural Center at 1001 Ryan Street. The exhibition will run through June 18. Part artist, part architect, and part designer, Shire continues the tradition of avant-garde design, working at the fringes of mainstream industry. His fanciful chairs connect popular culture, early aeronautics and classic modernism. Historic City Hall Arts and Cultural Center is open Mon.- Fri., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sat., 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free, but donations are gladly accepted.  For more information, please call 491-9147 or visit www.cityoflakecharles.com VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA’S BEATS & EATS APRIL 8 Volunteers of America will hold its Beats & Eats fundraiser on Fri., April 8 from 6 to 9 p.m. at Treasures of Marilyn’s in Lake Charles.  The casual event will feature a buffet, dancing to music by the Chris Shearman Experience, and a cash bar. Products and services donated by area businesses will be auctioned. Additionally, there will be a raffle for a trio of fleur de lis canvas prints by Candice Alexander. The proceeds will be used to support the lifechanging programs provided by Volunteers of America in Southwest Louisiana. Tickets for Beats & Eats are only $30 for individuals or $250 for a reserved table of 10.  To purchase event tickets, raffle tickets or sponsorships, call Volunteers of America at (337) 497-0034. MOVIES UNDER THE STARS FRIDAYS IN APRIL The 2011 Spring Series of Movies Under the Stars returns to Prien Lake Park beginning Fri., April 8, and continuing every Friday for the remainder of the month. This spring, each film selected was made by Walt Disney. April 8: Beauty and the Beast April 15: Secretariat April 22: Monsters, Inc. April 29: Mary Poppins   

Volume 3 • Issue 1


Movies Under the Stars takes place at Prien Lake Park at 3700 West Prien Lake Road in Lake Charles. Each movie begins at 7 p.m. Admission is free. Patrons are allowed to bring their own food, or they can purchase items on-site. Seating is not provided, so patrons are encouraged to bring a blanket or lawn chair. In the event of inclement weather, the event will be canceled. For more information, call 721-3500. USS ORLECK GRAND OPENING APRIL 10 The USS Orleck Naval Museum, Inc. (USSONM) has scheduled its grand opening ceremonies for April 9-10. The World War II-era destroyer, the USS ORLECK DD886, is currently located at 604 N. Enterprise Blvd., Lake Charles, and will be used to serve as a historic museum and veteran’s memorial. On April 9, private events are scheduled; however, on Sun., April 10, the Orleck will be open to the public from 1-4 p.m. with events geared toward family and children’s activities. Free hot dogs and soft drinks will be provided for the first 1,000 visitors, and all admission passes will be half price. For additional information, go to www.orleck.org.  For further information about the grand opening ceremonies, contact Ron Williams, chairman at (337) 526-2699 (ron.williams@orleck.org) or Penny J. Miller, director of marketing and PR, at (337) 438-3038 (penny.miller@orleck.org).  For general visitor and museum information, call (337) 433-4083. ANNUAL BOY SCOUT AUCTION APRIL 14 The 2011 Boy Scouts of America auction will be held at the Historic Cash & Carry Grocery Store (corner of Broad & Enterprise St.) on April 14. The event starts with a 5:30 p.m. social/preview followed by dinner/live auction starting at 6:30 pm. Entertainment will feature the Crawford Brothers along with silent/live auction items to bid on. Proceeds from the auction will support the 5,100 youth the Boy Scouts of America serves in its 5-parish territory. Individual tickets can be purchased for $25. For more information on the auction, table sponsorship ($325), or item donations, call the Calcasieu Area Council Scout office at 436-3376. JEFF DAVIS BUSINESS ALLIANCE GOLF TOURNAMENT APRIL 15 The Jeff Davis Business Alliance is having a golf tournament fundraiser at the Jennings Golf Club on Fri., April 15. Lunch will be served at 11 a.m., and Shotgun starts at noon. 4 Person Scramble is limited to the first 36 paid teams. Entry fee is $300 per 4-man team or $75 per player. Free practice on Thurs. (cart not included). For more info, call (337) 824-0933. WESTLAKE HS BENEFIT DANCE WITH SOUL VACATION APRIL 15 The Westlake High School Band Boosters will sponsor a Benefit Dance Fri., April 15 at the historic Charleston Hotel at 900 Ryan St. featuring Soul Vacation. Tickets are $15 in advance and are available at Pujo St. Cafe and Westlake High School. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar will be provided by Pujo St. Café, and there will be a silent auction and raffle. All proceeds will benefit music education programs at Westlake High School. For more information or to buy tickets, please contact Jay Ecker at 853-8800. Please help spread the word to make this event a success! ICM’S BOOGALOO 2011 ‘OOOH LA LA PAREE’ APRIL 16 Get ready for another fabulous fundraiser for the Imperial Calcasieu Museum! Boogaloo 2011 will be held from 8 a.m. – midnight in the Buccaneer Room at the Lake Charles Civic Center. Travel to the City of Lights with haute

Volume 3 • Issue 1

Soul Vacation

All events take place downtown on Adams, Elm and South streets.

9 AM Parade - followed by Opening Prayer Ellis r Vanico

FOOD BOOTHS OPEN 10 AM

BANDS

• 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Lagniappe Car, Truck & Bike Show Registration, Judging 2 p.m. • 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Lagniappe Farmers Market & Craft Show • 10:15 – 11 a.m. Welsh High Cheerleaders Performance • 11 a.m. Judging of Cracklin’ Cooking Competition, Contact Andrea @ 337-734-2231 for info

• 10:30 a.m. Ellis Vanicor & Lacassine Playboys • 12:30 p.m. The Lagniappe Accordion Players • 2 p.m. Battle of the Bands • 4:30 p.m. Cajun August Brousard & Friends • 7 p.m. T Broussard & The Zydeco Steppers

For event information call 337-734-2231 or www.townofwelsh.com 2011 Sponsor Jeff Davis Parish Tourist Commission APRIL 7, 2011

PAGE 43


cuisine by Chef Justin Rutley, music by Super T-Tyrone Smith Revue, and other surprises! Tickets are $50 each ($40 for museum members), and are available at the museum or at Gordon’s Drug Store. Call 439-3797 for more information. ADMINISTRATIVE PROFESSIONALS LUNCHEON APRIL 26 The International Association of Administrative Professionals (IAAP) would like to invite all office professionals, their bosses, friends and family to the 16th Annual Dutch Treat Community Luncheon on Tues., April 26 from 11:30 a.m.– 1 p.m. at the McNeese State University Parra Ballroom. There will be a vendor exposition from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m., along with entertainment and door prizes.  Mayor Randy Roach will be the guest speaker.  The cost is $25 per person, and vendor cost is $30 per table.  To register, or for more information, go to at www.iaap-magnolia.org/apw11.html or call Nancy Borel at 475-5083. ‘A BLUE AFFAIR’ BANQUET APRIL 28 State Senator Willie L. Mount will be the guest speaker at “A Blue Affair” fundraiser banquet honoring exceptional foster children and foster parents at Treasures of Marilyn’s on April 28. The event begins at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $50 per person and $550 for table of eight. There will also be a silent auction. All proceeds go to the non-profit organization “A Life Brand New.” For more information, call 222-1346. JOINING HANDS FOR AUTISM 5K APRIL 30 Three groups who offer support to persons with autism and their families are “Joining Hands.” On April 30, a 5K walk/run will be held to educate the public about the three organizations (Autism Services of SWLA, St. Nicholas Center, and Southwest LA Autism Chapter) and how they support persons with autism and their families. A French band will entertain you while a personal fitness trainer warms you up. There will

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APRIL 7, 2011

be local musical talent, and refreshments as you cross the finish line. The event will be held at Drew Park. Registration and participant check-in opens at 7 a.m., and the event begins at 8:15 a.m. For early registration, go to www.autismservicesswla.com. Attendance is $20 ($25 the day of the event) for the 5K, $15 ($18 the day of the event) for the 1 mile, and no charge for persons with autism. STATE CHAMPIONSHIP COWBOY MOUNTED SHOOTERS APRIL 30-MAY 1 The Blazin’ Cajun Mounted Shooters are holding the 2011 Louisiana State Championship Cowboy Mounted Shooters competition on April 30- May 1 at the Beauregard Parish Arena in DeRidder. The competition starts approximately 9:30 a.m. both days. Admission is free, and concessions will be available. For information, contact Charlie Haddad at (337) 349-5004 or Cindy Nielsen at (337) 344-7952. ‘PETER PAN’ SCHOOL PERFORMANCE MAY 5 “Peter Pan,” directed by Kerry A. Onxley, will play for area schools on Thurs., May 5 at 10 a.m. at the Central School Arts & Humanities Center (809 Kirby Street) located in downtown Lake Charles. A soaring and magical adventure of escape, J.M. Barie’s “Peter Pan” reveals a universal fear of death and the quest for eternal youth. Join Peter, Wendy, John, Michael and Tinker Bell, who along with the Lost Boys, do battle with the sinister Captain Hook and his pirate crew. Tickets are $7 per person. Seating is limited. Schools interested in booking should contact the theatre at (337) 433-7323 or visit www.childrenstheatre.cc. TJN

Volume 3 • Issue 1


To list your event e-mail: lauren@thejambalayanews.com

The

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • TBA @ The Cigar Club, 9 p.m. THURSDAY, APRIL 7 • Don Fontenot & Les Cajuns de la Prairie @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Mark Mestre @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • Twangsters Union @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Soul Vacation @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Frank Comeaux @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • Allison Collins @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, APRIL 8 • Howard Noel & Cajun Boogie @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Kris Harper @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • Foret Tradition @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. • Leroy Thomas & The Zydeco Roadrunners @ Club 1Sixty5, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 8 p.m. • Twangsters Union @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8:30 p.m. • Steve Riley & The Mamou Playboys @ The Porch, 9 p.m. • Brad Brinkley & Comfort Zone @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m.

• Trigger Proof @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • Chasing Scarlet @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. SATURDAY, APRIL 9 • Joe Simon & Louisiana Cajun @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Travis Matte & The Kingpins @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. • Leroy Thomas & The Zydeco Roadrunners @ Club 1Sixty5, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 8 p.m. • Twangsters Union @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8:30 p.m. • Soul Driven Train @ The Porch, 9 p.m. • The Pat Kelly Project @ Bob & Pete’s, Sulphur, 9 p.m. • Cold Sweat @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • Trigger Proof @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • Chasing Scarlet @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. SUNDAY, APRIL 10 • Creole Soul @ Yesterday’s, 5 p.m. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Open Mike Night @ Luna Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Tab Benoit @ The Porch, 9 p.m. • TBA @ The Cigar Club, 9 p.m.

THURSDAY, APRIL 14 • Pete Bergeron & The Bayou Boys @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • John Cessac @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • Boomerang @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Coal Train @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Warren Storm/Willie Tee & Cypress @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • Randy James @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, APRIL 15 • Briggs Brown & The Bayou Cajuns @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Tim Sonnier @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • The Bart Crow Band @ Yesterday’s, 7 p.m. • Boomerang @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8:30 p.m. • Serenity Now @ The Cigar Club, 9 p.m. • Craig Mouton & Slingshot @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • Bayou Katz @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • Rockstar Karaoke @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. SATURDAY, APRIL 16 • Al Roger & Louisiana Pride @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Damon Troy @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. • Boomerang @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8:30 p.m. • Swamp Boogie @ Bob & Pete’s, Sulphur, 9 p.m.

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APRIL 7, 2011

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• Ty Phillips & Southwind @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • Bayou Katz @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • Rockstar Karaoke @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. SUNDAY, APRIL 17 • TBA @ Yesterday’s, 5 p.m. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • TBA @ The Cigar Club, 9 p.m.

Puppies and dogs now available for adoption at Downtown Animal Hospital.

MONDAY NIGHTS:

113 W. Clarence St. Lake Charles, La. (337) 439-4330

THURSDAY NIGHTS:

Abita Beer Night

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS: Mondo Martini Night Be Well Night

NEW KITCHEN HOURS: Mon. - Tues. 11 am - 10 pm Wed. - Sat.11 am - 11 pm Closed Sunday

LUNA GOODS ON SALE: Luna Classic Tee $15 Luna Guitar Tee $15 Luna Ball Cap $15 Luna Dressings $6 (16oz.) Citrus Vinaigrette Balsamic Vinaigrette Raspberry Vinaigrette Cosmic

Fri., April 8 @ 9 pm FRESH NECTAR Sat., April 9 @ 9 pm JUDD BARES & SIX STRING RODEO Wed., April 13 @ 10 pm MIKE BENAVIDEZ (acoustic)

THURSDAY, APRIL 21 • TBA @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • John Cessac @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • Dog Hill Stompers @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Wild West Show @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Jake Landry @ The Porch, 9 p.m. • Don Fontenot et les Amis de la Louisiane @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • Cam Pyle @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, APRIL 22 • Felton LeJeune & The Cajun Cowboys @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Mark Mestre @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • Steel Shot @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. • Warren Storm/Willie Tee & Cypress @ Club 1Sixty5, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 8 p.m. • Krossfyre @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8:30 p.m. • The Loaded 44rz @ The Porch, 9 p.m. • Zydecane @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • Odyssey @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • DJ Cage @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m.

TJN

Fri., April 15 @9 pm THE 94'S Sat., April 16 @ 9 pm SUBROSA UNION Wed., April 20 @ 9 pm PAUL GONSOULIN (acoustic)

PAGE 46

APRIL 7, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 1


c i t c e cl

E

Y N A P M CO By

rman

Be Leslie

Leslie B e four dec rman’s career in ades, an music folksing er, mus d includes stin spans ic teach ts as a booker, e c tival dir oncert promote r, coffeehouse r e notes w ctor, music jou , publicist, fesriter, ar rnalist, trade o album tist ma na rg tainmen anization pre gerwwwww, sid t a the Mu ttorney, and ent, enterp sic Mu seum o resident of Louisian f a . musicall She prefers Southwest y GRAM eclectic, and v all things M Recordin Ys as a mem otes on the g Aca ber o reached at leslie@ demy. She c f the an leslieber man.co be m.

d ed o og le So I g And learn atomy : . An ow ic me prolif the sh MG! Grey’s t would co that had n e h t n i n O m c e s t rs o a k v co er tha ical E ng soundtr he produce partn roduction s , u n M o r t e y tp ow the -so he and M as ed b rs of t the sh a nine inmen Zadan ne Enterta led as fathe musical filmhe with y been rele ing before ack! quelle r i r t i a Storyl re now ha usical. The taken up ’s alread s this morn . A soundt ing popul g e t a n e v , h n o iTun air tonig mbers si d in prior pany n movie m ustries ha and Mer e e r n d o e a g n would , of cast m en embedd rn of a pop n mod cording i (see Zad ng Chica e i e a s e t s l i r d b e s r u r u e c y b ee e u ep ad and ted form ork, incl so suc musi- r nes that h s! Plus, th previousl s c w y e a f g r d w n w tu pe see a not al smay. s’ sho winni hat ha eason me song t viewers’ di e Tivo’d it ward- irspray), if s you won’t ithout a s a e a s u’v he ay sw usiular t ed! to som e plot if yo rez (a 2005 ed and H nd these d the board ase, with it ed a m c u t p e a h i l d p t , m e h o a y r a i p en r t il . scr full ’t spo but Sara R amalot) o ing dan p n deal tha uction oundtrack dvertising you n a d o Z o r w g p i p I o a , s i as S s g er ve cal 4, Cra al and tribut ch lat winner for Patrol’s “Ch aneou -pollinatin rtising, ha tively t t l a u w In 198 nder a dis med music , starring m i e to es ss la Snow award f il se ut s ontag of adv d, cro e a re mu Tony- ow singing fantasy m gs, and es cal fil d both the ies. Footloo w, was abo o fecun speaking y films hav dded, so it n t e o r be And hat man the sh There were e of the so guish scen chang ing indust John Lithg ance (and eo em trailer? t d i y d v o m ” l e . d a d c s d / o c p r i i r s o s lm g rd cy n Ca not reco Bacon an o dares t all oring us mu hole as a fi s marketin ene ficien rs.  We hea m c f o s s t e r s i a h e n u u i t d m n w o v i a 2 i i o n c e ( r w g n s h ) o u i g t h s e r Ke l e d t e r e e eath or o ting d up is th othe o cal r e us e ncity t opera he visuals f alick’s “Br erate,” Get can b ver dreame . Not only ittle captio a a big dancing in , despite lo ovie sold t N g t s p l Whoe ody geniu ith just a n speak to e were es of Anna ow We O ’s “Runnin incite stern town s the first m division, k H o w n a e g i s l & “ l a i c o m n b d repr Gomez’s sus Jacks Universe is a to be use e format they Midw ition. It w a recordi record co e “ Hell, h b AM),” ’s “Wait,” J Tunstall’s aster,” The prohi ibutor with nt that the track coor e- ready erlay, but t nce – kids. s. o , d e M T v r r k o e t G n e i o e e K o s m t u h i c d andy e d o g t ,” i o Se ad shine evik’s “Gra ife,” and Br n agre lease the s f the film, ue for in ole new au ke music v dan’s playb the a n u r S e d n h n e i o a r o w en e un Hav mZ eAL reach hey l releas would ey nd rev ,” Kate ow To Sav .” usic, t g a page fro e trying to is:  Music U m pany d with the visibility a hen th e w H r h y l n n “ t a s r l i e g e o s e ’s k e h t s e m r n t y a k S i o r T Fra dina reasing th make ack, w ose so ee it l “The and s ols fo ears b he and rlile’s some of th y in 2006, n’t bad. se film rations. I s rketing to ead y a e e h C t by inc roducts. m e tl s (r ene t ma film an so cI liked ared, mos rsions wer riate next g are perfec al audience and “fashboth p o said Zad er musical hen produ e p e v o p r p r ” s t ’s s p d th e Or first a casts’ cove en the ap w’s serious video n-tradition temporary because it of ano Meron wer to-be-close ical e k v f o , o e e o n s h ing n g” and “co cal movie ne music ic of th tening to hing the s n instead o we sp tner Neil ut a soon- nual mus s i s r i o . o c s n n o l i a r t u a u t nette ten But while wa “you e”) on m leap from ring of m his p ng! was ab ool’s last was co was b my at w l si h songs e divided ma Mia! can try ionab make the at’s just a st ghline. No ing. S lyn high sc ent. Zadan e right arti n m d u o v plot li cing it. Ma ow, but yo sical easy t to a film th ative throu een dictate Brook creation/e ould find th pinch of r n e n a u r b c r o a a r t – y e f e M h e a n l o d h a v r e n e i l e and v th on t if th a hat’s clea t’s o tomy : th mu ç i a i r p h , w o l t u f l b site gh s o e d e e g s o e e e t e n a W . c a s i W c t d t e n , n u i e e i ’s o v k v g v k o ABC , thou introd rey’s A ance t of roc g g bud ns. ’s a m d mar out G episode on . As for me -meettic an ay, a dash – he could generatio t’s there advertisin had the ch r producin e f w w a y Event for yoursel oice and r ly by the l, tonight, I formula fo the music ’s Broad lt sensibilit love) to ne because th v s l n n e t , e ’s u d u o s s g o z c l n o s r r s e d i W i r p a a e r ea ju ic ea po is f Rami gs I’ve prev hour I can dan/Musical films p in this s revid als (h loved mus as a teen y y a e c Z i k s i e l u n I th m e so but p med ul m as an ash-u an w w he g som the rest w ’m sticking dy ccessf rketing m e popular ( i-drama, I kno e met; Zad musical co .  One n u i s , a A d e th w me m oI g H ed al sa video al Event of g to me) m overhearin n’t enjoy get back. S eron’s dra it where when I wa al YM-YW dway reviv n M n c a Music ninteresti  While idly ow, I could ot never adan and Diva whe d friend l at our lo e to a Bro ening and u l Z t d u h . n m f p h a s y a y h l e e g t d , s g i ’s i p r m e t D e r fr w ou f lin ho Anato Drop umm tonigh e squi ster o n’t sel ng the series back this s for their Grey’s teasers for they were actors’ year, h aret starri as the Ma nin, pale s g t y b come ise waitin n. JN ABC’s oticing tha outing the like, like a of Ca us Joel Gre Tandy Cro ume and . a T t w H , n r s h o P e e l t e e s r i oth ed Peter fabu onies, w ter talent ally Bowl s help ; they we ting!  Lik r u c s s o S m a t r n e s m d o i o e r il ru m tw ive Ce ts f g! Wh ter of ly rev nt sea singin l! daugh , who faint red excelle ason. a a e music Jessic also procu ards that s d several r n a w Zada e Tony A lash forw ades, and F dec at th

e s a e e Pl M e s a e l e R

Volume 3 • Issue 1

APRIL 7, 2011

PAGE 47


The Jambalaya News - Vol. 3 No. 1  

April 7, 2011 West Calcasieu Cameron Exceptional Health Care Exceptional People. It's How They Operate

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