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VOL. 2, NO. 5 /JUNE 3, 2010

• Celebrate Dad! • Today’s Youth, Tomorrow’s Leaders • Spring Home Improvement Trends for SWLA


WE SOLVE PROBLEMS WITH: Raccoons • Squirrels • Skunks • Foxes • Rabbits • Groundhogs Mice • Sparrows • Starlings • Pigeons • Bats • Snakes Rats • Armadillos • Moles • Woodpeckers• AND MORE

Our wildlife deserves the very best treatment in the most humane conditions possible...

Call A All Animal Control (337) 287-4447 • www.aallanimalcontrol.com E-mail: swla@aallanimalcontrol.com

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JUNE 3, 2010

Volume 1 • Issue 1


GENERAL 715 Kirby St., Lake Charles, LA 70601 Phone: 337-436-7800 Fax: 337-990-0262 www.thejambalayanews.com PUBLISHER Phil de Albuquerque

contents

publisher@thejambalayanews.com

NEWS MANAGING EDITOR Lauren de Albuquerque lauren@thejambalayanews.com

EDITOR Lisa Yates lisa@thejambalayanews.com

CONTRIBUTORS Leslie Berman Sarah Blackwell George Cline Dan Ellender Maria Alcantara Faul Mike McHugh Mary Louise Ruehr Brandon Shoumaker Steve Springer, M.D. Karla Tullos ADVERTISING SALES CONSULTANT Patricia Prudhomme SALES ASSOCIATES Jody Barrilleaux Katy Corbello Faye Drake Todd Elliott Karla Tullos GRAPHICS ART/PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Darrell Buck ART/PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Michelle LaVoie BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER Kay Andrews

Humane Removal of Nuisance Animals

REGULARS 6 14 15 16 19 20 24 36

June 3, 2010 • Volume 2 • Issue 5

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26

COVER STORY 26

On Cover: Unharmed, the adult raccoon sits in a cage held by his captor, Tim Moss, owner of A All Animal Control of SWLA. Photo courtesy of A All Animal Control of SWLA.

The Boiling Pot The Dang Yankee Tip’s Tips Doyle’s Place Zestful Life Greener World What’s Cookin’ Sports Report

FEATURES 5 32 34 51

Today’s Youth, Tomorrow’s Leaders ‘Home’ Work Celebrate Dad Condulac II

ENTERTAINMENT 38 40 41 42 43 47 52 54

Red Hot Books Funbolaya Family Night at the Movies Killin’ Time Crossword Society Spice Jambalaya Jam The Local Jam Eclectic Company

32

24

20

Legal Disclaimer The views expressed by The Jambalaya News columnists are their own and do not necessarily reflect the position of The Jambalaya News, its editors or staff. The Jambalaya News is solely owned, published by The Jambalaya News, LLC, 826 Ford Street, Lake Charles Louisiana 70601. Phone (337) 436-7800. Whilst every effort was made to ensure the information in this magazine was correct at the time of going to press, the publishers cannot accept legal responsibility for any errors or omissions, nor can they accept responsibility of the standing of advertisers nor by the editorial contributions. The Jambalaya News cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or illustrations, even if they are sent to us accompanied by a selfaddressed envelope. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Copyright 2010 The Jambalaya News all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without prior written permission is prohibited. Volume 1 • Issue 1

34 We are now accepting credit cards! JUNE 3, 2010

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A Note From Lauren Good-bye, El Niño… If we don’t have enough problems already with the horrific BP oil spill disaster, we can add an “active to extremely active” hurricane season to the mix, according to the seasonal outlook issued recently by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center – a division of the National Weather Service. Across the entire Atlantic Basin for the six-month season, which began June 1, NOAA is projecting a 70 percent probability of the following ranges: • Fourteen to 23 named storms (top winds of 39 m.p.h. or higher), including: • Eight to 14 hurricanes (top winds of 74 m.p.h. or higher), of which: • Three to seven could be major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of at least 111 m.p.h.) Just what we need. The main reason for this is due to the dissipation of our good friend El Niño, who kept the monsters at bay last season. Wind shear, which can tear apart storms, will be much weaker because of this. Then we have that warm Atlantic Ocean water to deal with. There are already record warm temperatures – up to four degrees Fahrenheit above average –in that region, and sea surface temperatures are expected to remain above average. Basically, the situation is ripe for La Niña to develop. And when that happens…well, we’ve all been there before. I’d been wondering if a potential hurricane could be affected by the oil spill—in a negative way (for the hurricane). Let’s face it, the conditions in the Gulf have been drastically altered. I was hoping for a silver lining in this dreadful cloud. But, according to the folks at NOAA, there doesn’t appear to be much hope of that. They report that most hurricanes span an enormous area of the ocean (200-300 miles) — far wider than the current size of the spill. If the slick

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remains small in comparison to a typical hurricane’s general environment and size, the anticipated impact on the hurricane would be minimal. They don’t expect the oil to substantially affect either the intensity or the track of a fully developed tropical storm or hurricane. And the oil slick would have little effect on the storm surge or near-shore wave heights. The high winds could distribute oil over a wider area, but the NOAA really can’t pinpoint where the oil could be transported. The movement of the oil would depend on the track of the hurricane. Conceivably, storm surges could carry oil into the coastline and inland as far as the surge reaches. And the debris resulting from the hurricane not only may be contaminated by oil from the spill, but also from other oil releases that may occur during the storm. In other words, it’s not looking that good for us here on the Gulf Coast. With that in mind, make sure you all have a hurricane preparedness plan. If you have to evacuate, know where you’re going. Make sure you board up your windows, and take your pets with you. Bring water, food, first aid supplies, important papers (in a waterproof container), a flashlight, all of your family’s prescription medication, pillows, blankets, and enough clothes for a week. Remember what you did when Rita hit—and see if it you can’t improve on it. Learn from the mistakes you made (and we all did, since most of us were first-time evacuees). Your life, and the lives of your family, depends on it.

TJN

– Lauren de Albuquerque

Volume 1 • Issue 1


Civic Engagement Training Institute for Youth participants.

Family & Youth is working hard to help turn today’s youth into tomorrow’s leaders by teaching them about civic engagement and making a difference in their communities. “We have a vested interest in teaching the young people about civic engagement,” said Julio Galan, executive director of Family & Youth. “They will be making decisions for us when we are the elderly population. I’m confident these young people will do a great job.” Even before they can vote, young people can make an impact on their communities. Youth from several Southwest Louisiana high schools experienced what it takes to make a difference during the Civic Engagement Training Institute for Youth, held recently at L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort. Family & Youth hosted students from Barbe, Iowa, Sam Houston, St. Louis, Starks, Sulphur, Vinton and Washington Marion High Schools, along with Southwest Louisiana Marine Institute and Team 5. They all reported positively about the opportunity to make new friends from other schools. With such a short timeline, the students needed to get to know each other quickly. Staff from Family & Volume 1 • Issue 1

Youth’s Leadership Center for Youth led the group through several ice breaking and team building activities. While they were laughing and having fun, they realized these activities were helping them become a team. The next order of business was to decide which issues to address. They discussed and debated issues affecting Southwest Louisiana from their perspective. They chose: • Education for life • Supporting children and youth in Louisiana: excelerating the education system • Reform of federal assistance programs • Job losses in Louisiana • Unemployment/Welfare Reform They researched their chosen topics; uncovering important statistics and facts, then developed their solutions and recommendations, which they presented to local officials. Adults were on hand to help with the process. They commented that the young people were doing such an outstanding job that they hardly needed adult input. Local officials listened to the presentations and recommendations, then asked questions and led discussions. Officials included Mike Byrne with Calcasieu Parish Sheriff ’s Office;

Willie King, Jr., with King’s Transmission; Annette Ballard with Calcasieu Parish School Board; Ester Vincent with City of Lake Charles; Patricia Philmon with Chamber Southwest Louisiana; Ronnie Rossitto with Calcasieu Parish District Attorney’s Office; and Buddy Hamic with Calcasieu Parish Sheriff ’s Office. Discussions centered around changes to the current education system; for example, a year-round school year, more hands-on classes, communicating options other than four-year colleges and universities, and employment opportunities. The well-informed young people answered questions with information they found during their research, and defended their recommendations with confidence. One group put forth the idea that school should teach more life skills, such as budgeting. An official pointed out that he takes great care to ensure that he teaches his children about this, and asked why they thought these lessons needed to be taught in school. The student replied that not all parents teach those skills to their children, and challenged that our society would be better off if young people could manage their finances and stay out of debt.

Overall, the event was a huge success. Many of the students commented that they felt empowered and enjoyed the challenge. Several students who participated in the Civic Engagement Training Institute for Youth are also members of Family & Youth’s Youth Action Forum (YAF). The YAF members traveled to Baton Rouge with the Chamber Southwest to put their training in action. They sat in on sessions of the House and the Senate, met elected officials, and enjoyed the shrimp boil. Some of the participants have also been selected to go to Washington, D.C. in July. Funding for the Civic Engagement Training Institute for Youth program was provided by Louisiana Disaster Recovery Foundation. Family & Youth, a United Way agency, believes that all individuals possess the ability to solve their own challenges and live full and healthy lives when support is available.  It is the mission of Family & Youth to provide affordable and professional support through programs and services dedicated to the advocacy, counseling, and education for the people of Southwest Louisiana.  For more information, call (337) 436.9533, or visit www.fyca.org. TJN JUNE 3, 2010

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Please submit press releases to lauren@thejambalayanews.com

DR. KEITH MENARD OPENS MENARD EYE CENTER Optometrist Keith Menard, O.D., is pleased to announce the opening of Menard Eye Center at 4448 Lake St. in Lake Charles. His new clinic will provide eye care for all ages and urgent care during and after hours. Dr. Menard has been serving the eye care needs of patients at Hart Eye Center since 2003. He graduated with honors and received his doctorate in optometry from the Southern College of Optometry in Memphis, Tennessee. Dr. Menard accepts most insurance and provides medical and routine eye care as well as glasses and Dr. Keith Menard contact lenses. Appointments can be scheduled by calling (337) 478-4733, and urgent care is available during and after business hours. For more information, visit www.menardeyecenter.com or contact Jen Breen at (337) 478-0503 or jbreen@ocarroll.com.

CALCASIEU MEDICAL RESERVE CORPS GIVEN NATIONAL AMBASSADOR AWARD The Calcasieu Medical Reserve Corps has been chosen to receive the prestigious Ambassador Award from the Office of the Civilian Volunteer Medical Reserve Corps. The Ambassador Award honors Medical Reserve Corps units that meet the Surgeon General Priorities in improving health literacy, increasing disease prevention, eliminating health disparities, and improving public health preparedness. The Calcasieu Medical Reserve Corps was nominated for the award by the State Citizen Corps earlier this year and was one of two recipients out of 80 nominees across the nation. Calcasieu’s Medical Reserve Corps currently has 400 volunteers. The mission of the CMRC is to mobilize a trained medical and non-medical support unit to augment emergency operations and responses during man-made or natural disasters and address community needs on a daily basis.

Left to Right: Gary Curtis, CEO and President of eQ Health Solutions, Terry Saucier, RN, WCCH Surgical Services, Kris Conner, RN, WCCH director of surgical services, Katie LeJune, RN, WCCH Nursing, Melissa Valenti, RN, WCCH Nursing, and Rebecca Hightower, QI Specialist with eQ Health Solutions. Left to Right: Nikki Fontenot, Roy M. Raftery, Jr., and Mechele Nortman CAMERON STATE BANK DONATES TO INTERVIEW FOR LIFE Cameron State Bank recently donated $10,000 to Interview for Life, a local organization dedicated to helping high school and college students focus on techniques and skills that will enhance their professional image. Founded by Nikki Fontenot and Mechele Nortman, Interview for Life is a three-day session available in all Calcasieu Parish high schools and on an individual basis as requested. Topics covered include: body language, attitude, respect, interview skills, resume writing and appearance. More information can be found at www.interviewforlife.com. PAGE 6

JUNE 3, 2010

WCCH RECEIVES HIGHEST HONOR AT LOUISIANA HOSPITAL QUALITY AWARDS West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital has received the Platinum Level 2009 Louisiana Hospital Quality Award, presented by eQHealth Solutions, the Medicare Quality Improvement Organization for Louisiana. With this award, West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital has been recognized for improving the quality of health care given to their patients. The hospital is the only hospital in the Lake Charles/Sulphur area, and one of only 26 hospitals in the state, to receive this award for 2009. Staff members from West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital have been working with quality improvement specialists from eQHealth Solutions to use proven, evidence-based practices to improve care for their patients. For more information, please visit www.wcch.com. Volume 1 • Issue 1


Left to Right: Troop 83 Boy Scouts Cameron Banister, Derek Henry, John Wayne Bourgeois, David Billodeaux, and Brett Billodeaux weighing food donated by the Sulphur community for Care Help of Sulphur during the Post Office's "Stamp Out Hunger" food collection. CARE HELP GETS ASSISTANCE WITH SULPHUR POST OFFICE’S STAMP OUT HUNGER CAMPAIGN Boy Scout Troop 83 of Sulphur helped load 6,226 lbs. of food for Care Help of Sulphur during the Sulphur U. S. Post Office’s “Stamp Out Hunger” Campaign recently.  Members of Westminster Presbyterian Church also volunteered at Care Help sorting and organizing the food for Care Help’s food pantry. WOMEN & CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL OFFERS NEW ADVANCEMENT TO TREAT CHRONIC HEARTBURN Women & Children’s Hospital (WCH) is collaborating with Keith Chung, M.D., a board-certified general surgeon and independent member of the WCH medical staff, to offer patients a non-invasive treatment for GERD—better known as chronic heartburn. Dr. Chung is the only physician in the Lake Charles area and one of only a few in the state of Louisiana to use the Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication (TIF) procedure using a natural orifice surgical device to innovatively treat gastroeDr. Keith Chung sophageal reflux disease through the mouth without an incision. This greatly improves the quality of life for patients by eliminating the need for incisions, shortening recovery times, reducing the dependence on GERD medication and allowing patients to consume the foods and beverages they previously avoided. Dr. Chung will offer a free educational seminar on Tues., June 22 at 6 p.m. in the WCH First Floor Classroom, located at 4200 Nelson Rd. For more information, call (337) 475-4075. DELTA TECH AWARDS 2010 SCHOLARSHIPS TO AREA STUDENTS Delta Tech has awarded their 2010 scholarships to the following graduating seniors: Taylor Ardoin and Katie Faulk – Welsh High School, Hailey Fontenot – Kinder High School, Shelby Calcote and Aleisa Cooper – Rosepine High School, Brittany Kern –DeRidder High School, and Roseanna LeDoux – Lacassine High School. Every year, Delta Tech receives numerous scholarship applications from high school seniors from throughout the region that includes Allen, Beauregard, Calcasieu, Cameron, Jefferson Davis and Vernon Parishes. This scholarship entitles the recipient to select any associate degree or diploma program offered by Delta Tech. For more information, call (337) 439-5765 or online at www.deltatech.edu. KATHRYN MATTE ELECTED CHAIR OF THESPIAN SOCIETY’S STATE BOARD Kathryn Matte of The Children’s Theatre Company was elected chairperson for the 2010-2011 State Student Board (SSB) of the Louisiana Thespian Society at the 2010 Louisiana Thespian Festival held in January. The SSB conducts leadership workshops, Kathryn Matte attends festival planning meetings and organizes the annual festival. Also attending the festival were CTC actors Alex Landry, Brianne Guidry, Ciarra Woods, Maegan McBroom and Dylana Smith. Kerry Onxley is their director. Volume 1 • Issue 1

• Automatic Transmissions • 250cc Liquid-Cooled Engines • Built-In Radio and MP3 Adaptor

* 2 Year Unlimited Mileage Warranty

JUNE 3, 2010

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NEW CALCASIEU ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY District Attorney John DeRosier is pleased to announce the addition of Assistant District Attorney Marcus Myers to the staff at the Calcasieu Parish District Attorney’s Office. Myers is a 2001 graduate of Barbe High School. He earned his B. S. degree in Political Science from LSU in 2005 and his Juris Doctorate in 2010 from Southern University. Myers will be filling a vacancy as a Misdemeanor Prosecutor.

Swing from Vines & Climb the Trees! VBS is the Place to Be!

June 7-11 • 9 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Daily 5 Years thru 12 Years Old (K-5th Grade)

(337) 439-9761 • www.blvdchurchofchrist.org 2801 Enterprise Blvd • Lake Charles

www.thejambalayanews.com • (337) 436-7800

“Our ad has made the phones ring off the wall! It has been amazing. Phil & Lauren have been wonderful. A special thanks goes to Faye Drake whom I would not want to be without. Teamwork has helped push us over the top.”

L’AUBERGE DU LAC CASINO RESORT Marcus Myers AWARDED FIT-FRIENDLY DESIGNATION L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort has been recognized for a second consecutive year as a Start! Fit-Friendly Company by the American Heart Association for promoting physical activity and health in the workplace. L’Auberge again earned Gold recognition for its workplace wellness programs, only the second Southwest Louisiana business to earn the honor. Among the health initiatives cited, L’Auberge has a full-time health educator on staff. Kristie Evans, LDN, RD conducts health seminars for employees, offers complimentary dietary counseling and oversees property wellness efforts. L’Auberge holds its own version of The Biggest Loser called “L’Auberge Loses Pounds” on an annual basis. Participants in the 12-week program lost 1,340 pounds collectively in 2010 with174 employees participating. L’Auberge also holds an annual health fair for employees offering complimentary screenings and flu shots. The company also encourages physical activity through an established walking program. Employees receive complimentary pedometers and maps for on-site walking routes. As a Start! Fit-Friendly Company, L’Auberge will be recognized on the American Heart Association Web site and at events in Southwest Louisiana supporting the program. ANNUAL CMN TELECAST SET FOR JUNE 4 AND 5 The 2010 Children’s Miracle Network Telecast is scheduled for Fri., June 4 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. and Sat., June 5 from 12:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. The Telecast will be broadcast live from Ralph Squires Theatre at McNeese State University and aired on KPLC-TV. Donation pledges will be accepted by telephone during the eight and a half-hour live broadcast. The telecast will feature inspiring miracle stories of local children. Viewers will also learn how Children’s Miracle Network funds are being used to help improve pediatric medical care services and health education opportunities in the Southwest Louisiana region. For more information, call the Children’s Miracle Network of Southwest Louisiana at (337) 491-7750. SWASHBUCKLERS WIN LEAGUE AWARDS Wide receiver Marcus Wilridge and linebacker Courtney Brooks of the Louisiana Swashbucklers were named the offensive and defensive players of the week, respectively, by the Southern Indoor Football League. They won the awards due to their performance against the Albany Panthers, whom the Bucs defeated recently in the Smuggler’s Den by a score of 67-43. In that same contest, Albany kicker Juan Bongarra won the special teams player of the week award. Wilridge had 211 receiving yards, which broke a league record. His 11 catches tied a mark in the SIFL that has also been set by three other wideouts in the 2010 season. Brooks contributed to the defensive play of the Bucs with a safety and a fumble recovery, which he returned for a 44 yard touchdown. Brooks also had five unassisted tackles and two sacks to his credit. For information on tickets, call the box office Mon. – Fri. 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. at 491-1432 or visit www.labucs.com. TJN

– Dixette’ Williams, Owner Slender Solutions

1602 W. McNeese St, Lake Charles • (337) 562-9400 PAGE 8

JUNE 3, 2010

Volume 1 • Issue 1


Library Adds Marvel Comic eBooks to Collection Just in time for summer reading, the Calcasieu Parish Public Library has added 179 Marvel Adventure comic books in downloadable eBook format to the Overdrive Digital Library collection. Library users can relive the adventures of the Fantastic Four, Spiderman, Hulk, Iron Man, X-Men, and more in a new format. The list of available titles can be found by searching the digital library for “Marvel Adventures.” Included are Marvel illustrated Treasure Island, The Three Musketeers, The Iliad, The Man in the Iron Mask, The Picture of Dorian Gray, The Last of the Mohicans, Kidnapped, Moby Dick, and Jungle Book. Once downloaded to the library user’s account, the Marvel eBooks can be viewed on any PC or a Mac. Among the compatible devices the comic eBooks may be downloaded to are: Sony Reader Daily Edition™,

Sony Reader Pocket Edition™, Sony Reader PRX-505, Sony Reader PRS-700 and Sony Reader Touch Edition™. To find the catalog for the digital library, visit http://calcasieulibrary.org and click on Overdrive Digital Library. Audio, eBooks, music and videos are available for iPods™, iPads™, iPhones™, mp3 players, smart phones, and more. Classics, popular reads, mysteries, travel and health books, and more, are all available in the digital collection. The most downloaded works of fiction from the digital library last month were: The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown, The Help by Kathryn Stockett, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson, and The Last Song by Nicholas Sparks. The most downloaded nonfiction works were Blink and Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell, and Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert. TJN

LSMSA Celebrates 26th Graduating Class The Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts (LSMSA) held its graduation ceremony recently in Northwestern State University’s Prather Coliseum in Natchitoches.  The 134 members of the graduating class of 2010 becane LSMSA’s 26th graduating class. Since the school’s establishment in 1983, over 4,000 graduates have earned more than 163 million dollars in merit-based scholarships. 100 percent of the graduates also qualify for TOPS. LSMSA is proud to have students from almost every parish in the state. Calcasieu Parish students who are a part of LSMSA’s 26th graduating class are:  Jade Casteel, daughter of Candy Casteel of Sulphur, Robert Volume 1 • Issue 1

Coyle, son of Matthew and Victoria Coyle of Vinton; Amanda Granger, daughter of John and Theresa Granger of Iowa; Farihah Haque, daughter of Muhammed and Christine Haque of Lake Charles; Laura Johnson, daughter of Donald and Valerie Johnson of Lake Charles; Baylea Jones, daughter of Angela McBride of Vinton; Brittney Naylor, daughter of Kelvin and Cynthia Naylor of Lake Charles; Shukan Patel, son of Pravin and Arpita Patel of Lake Charles; Jimmy Rushing, son of Jim and Melissa Rushing of Lake Charles; and Brooklyn Schlamp, daughter of Kevin Schlamp and Maureen Lannan of Sulphur.

TJN

JUNE 3, 2010

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Sasol Accepting Applications for Teacher Institute Sasol is now accepting applications for its 14th Annual Summer Teacher Institute.  The institute will take place from Mon., June 21 through Fri., June 25. Participating educators will have the opportunity to enhance their knowledge of employment opportunities with area industry and how to best prepare students for these jobs. According to Nancy Tower, event coordinator, the workshop will include chemistry demonstrations, team building exercises, tours of the complex, safety and environmental presentations, employee shadowing, and information about specific job requirements. Enhancing education

Lake Area Classes, Seminars, Workshops

through interaction is important to Sasol’s long-term success in our area. Not only are local teachers preparing our future workforce, but in many cases they are teaching the children of Sasol employees. The Summer Teacher Institute is available to instructors of all disciplines and grade levels with special preference given to junior and senior high school science, chemistry and math teachers. Those participating will receive 25 continuing education credits, a $25 stipend per day and will have breakfast and lunch provided.  The deadline to register for Sasol’s Summer Teacher Institute is June 4. TJN

Student Trainer Workshop to be held at McNeese Beginning Sun., June 13, approximately 75 high school athletic trainers from throughout Louisiana and East Texas will be practicing beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced injury treatment techniques as part of Southwest Louisiana’s athletic trainer workshop for students. Hosted by the Lake Area Athletic Trainers’ Association, the Student Trainer Workshop provides an opportunity for students who have completed grades 8 through 11 to learn the skills necessary to help out on the sidelines. “Student trainers are an asset to high school athletic programs,” said Jim Murphy, coordinator of Memorial Hospital’s Sports Medicine. “They assist the athletic trainers in the proper care of athletes in the prevention and care of athletic related injuries.  In this capacity, they become an important link between the athletes and other individuals involved in their care.” “A quick response to a sports injury prevents further damage from occurring, and very often can pave the way for a quick, less complicated recovery,” said Dr. Brett Cascio, board certified orthopedist and sports medicine specialist. Dr. Cascio is the medical director of Lake Charles Memorial Hospital Sports Medicine, which provides services to all area high schools, McNeese State University and many recreational groups. PAGE 10

JUNE 3, 2010

The workshop, which ends at noon on Tues., June 15, includes sessions on ankle and foot anatomy and ankle taping labs for Beginning student trainers, knee anatomy sessions and knee taping labs for Intermediate student trainers, shoulder anatomy and shoulder rehabilitation labs for Advanced student trainers, and low back and abdominal anatomy and special conditions for Advanced II student trainers. The various sessions will be held in the McNeese State University Athletic Department. Workshop topics will also include athletic trainers’ responsibilities, treatment and evaluation of athletic injuries, terminology, and equipment fitting. The individual labs will focus on proper taping techniques. The fee for the student trainer workshop is $175 for overnight campers, which includes meals and accommodations in the dorms, or $135 for commuters. The Lake Area Athletic Trainers’ Association is a non-profit organization that was founded by members of McNeese Sports Medicine and Memorial Hospital Sports Medicine for the purpose of providing athletic training opportunities throughout Louisiana and East Texas. For more information, or to register, call (337) 562-4320.

TJN

In celebration of the opening of its new wing, West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital will hold a free community health fair on Sat., June 12 from 7 a.m. – noon. To access the health fair, community members will need to enter the hospital via the Stelly Lane entrance.  A variety of free health screenings will be offered, including lipid profile (LDL and HDL cholesterol), blood pressure, blood glucose, prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test for men over 40, glaucoma and vision screening and diabetic foot assessments.  Fasting is recommended. The free screenings will be offered until 10 a.m.  Representatives from over 30 local health care agencies will be on hand to answer healthrelated questions. For additional information, call 528-4735. FREE EYE SCREENINGS AT HART EYE CENTER JUNE 12 AND 26 Hart Eye Center of Lake Charles will hold free eye screenings on June 12 and 26 to help you protect your vision from the damaging effects of cataracts, glaucoma and macular degeneration. These are serious eye diseases that cannot only damage vision, but if left undetected or untreated, has the potential to cause blindness. To schedule a free screening, call Hart Center at 439-4014 to make an appointment. For more information, visit www.harteyecenter.com or call 439-4014. ENGRAVING AND SILVER POINT CLASS JUNE 17 On Thurs., June 17, MSU professor Gerry Wubben will be teaching a class on engraving and silver point in the Creative Arts Center at Gallery by the Lake at 106 W. Lawrence St. The class will be held from 6 - 8:30 p.m. The fee is $35 and includes all supplies. To register, call Nancy Czejkowski at 855-9202 or Gallery by the Lake at 436-1008. PUBLIC INVITED TO RIDE THEIR HORSES AT THE BURTON ARENA ON THURSDAYS The Burton Arena is now offering “Public Ride Sessions” to Calcasieu Residents who would like to practice their riding skills for free. Public Ride will be held on Thursdays from 8 a.m.-9 p.m. in the summer, and 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. in the fall through spring.

Riders will need to provide their own horses and any equipment (barrels, etc.) they need to practice. Anyone under the age of 17 requires parental supervision to participate. Coggins papers need to be provided to the Burton Coliseum office before any horse enters the arena. Also, no livestock or alcoholic beverages are allowed. In the event a public ride is cancelled due to scheduling conflicts at the Burton Arena, advanced notice will be given. For more information, contact Jared LeBlue 5624040. BONE HEALTH SEMINAR AT ST. PATRICK HOSPITAL JUNE 24 A free seminar on bone health for the entire family will be held on Thurs., June 24 at 6 p.m. at CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital’s Garber Auditorium located at 430 Dr. Michael DeBakey Drive. Orthopedic surgeon Lynn Foret, M.D., will share the latest information and treatment options for a range of bone issues including carpal tunnel, hip and knee replacements, and sports injuries in young athletes. Dr. Foret is board-certified in orthopedic surgery and currently serves in CHRISTUS St. Patrick’s surgical services department. Seating is limited.  Call 491-7577 to register today.   SUMMER COWBOY CAMP JULY 9 The third annual summer Cowboy Camp will be held from 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. on July 9 for those first-time freshmen and transfer students attending McNeese State University this fall who want to learn more about McNeese history and Cowboy traditions. Students will take a crash course on what it means to become “a die-hard Cowboy” at McNeese, including tours, taking pictures and learning chants and trivia, all led by McNeese student leaders from student organizations. The camp is limited and cost is $20 per student, which includes lunch, a T-shirt and the chance to win over $1,000 in scholarships and McNeese gear. For more information, contact the McNeese Student Union Office at (337) 4755609 or by e-mail at campuslife@mcneese.edu. TJN

Volume 1 • Issue 1


Receive Emergency Alerts This Hurricane Season With “CalcaShout”

Warn Your Children About Online Predators As the popularity of the Internet increases, so does the number of children who are being solicited by online predators. Although the Internet can be a great educational resource for children, as well as a means to stay in contact with friends and family and a source of entertainment, it can also be a minefield of unscrupulous adults who may attempt to lure children into a false sense of security and intimacy. According to a 2006 survey commissioned by Cox Communications and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children: • 14 percent have actually met a person face-to-face that they’ve only spoken to over the Internet (9 percent of 13-15 year-olds, 22 percent of 16-17 year-olds). • 33 percent of 13 to 17-year-olds and 48 percent of 16 to 17-yearolds reported that their parents or guardians know “very little” or “nothing” about what they do on the Internet. • 22 percent of those surveyed reported their parents or guardians have never discussed Internet safety with them. • 71 percent of teens reported receiving messages online from someone they don’t know. • 45 percent have been asked for personal information by some one they don’t know. • When teens receive messages online from someone they don’t know, 40 percent reported that they’ll usually reply and chat with that person.

• Only 18 percent said they’d tell

an adult. PRACTICE SAFE INTERNET HABITS While these statistics are startling, the good news is that prevention efforts have been proven to work. By following these suggestions, parents can help to ensure that their children practice safe and smart habits when using the Internet. • Establish clear rules as to what information they should not give out, how long they can spend on the computer, who they can and cannot chat with, etc. • Install security software. • Keep control of screen names and passwords. • Keep computers in a room where they can be monitored. • Select kid-friendly search engines. • Be familiar with what they are doing on the computer and get involved. • Have open communication with your children. • Report suspicious and inappropriate contact. • Keep on learning about the Internet and the latest technology.

Nothing is more important during an emergency situation than getting accurate information out to the affected public in a timely manner. The CalcaShout Emergency Alert System is a free service of the Police Jury that sends emergency information quickly to subscribers through phones, e-mail, and text messages.  The program is managed by the Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness. CalcaShout was first initiated in 2008, shortly before Calcasieu Parish was affected by Hurricanes Gustav and Ike.  The emergency alert system sent important messages via text and e-mail messages to approximately 20,000 subscribers throughout both weather events.  No matter where a subscriber had evacuated to, as long as the location was in the United States, CalcaShout was able to keep them informed. While the service is free, residents do have to sign up for it. Also, residents who are already subscribers of the service are asked to update any

contact information that may have changed recently to ensure that alerts are being sent to the appropriate place. The system is only activated in emergency situations where there is a harmful risk to the public. CalcaShout is also designed to be used for any type of emergency, not just weather events. Residents can sign-up or change their existing subscription information at www.calcashout.com. If a resident cannot access the Internet, they can sign-up by calling the Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness at (337) 721-3800. Emergency contact information given to CalcaShout is strictly used for emergencies and is not shared with any other agency or the public. The CalcaShout system is powered by FirstCall systems. For more information, please contact the Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness, at (337) 721-3800.

TJN

Prevent Child Abuse Louisiana offers Internet Safety workshops for parents and children. To get involved, call KIDLINE at 1-800CHILDREN (244-5373). For more information on Internet safety, visit www.pcal.org.

TJN

Kevin Davis hosts the Big O Trading Post on Super Talk 1400. This show invites listeners to call in and sell their items on the air. It has been a huge success and we are proud to now have the show on KAOK Super Talk 1400 AM on Saturday mornings from 9am-12noon. Volume 1 • Issue 1

Host, Kevin Davis JUNE 3, 2010

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Public libraries across Cameron Parish are gearing up to offer summer reading programs for students and adults of all ages. Events, crafts, and other fun activities will promote the enjoyment of reading a good book. School is letting out for the summer, so parents may want to stop by their local library for information on how to keep their children engaged in reading and learning. The summer reading program theme at Cameron Branch Library is “Make A Splash—Read.” The program runs through Aug. 3 and is available for children ages 1-12. The children’s program includes weekly prizes, activities and performances. New teen and adult programs have also been scheduled. Participating teens have a chance to win a notebook computer; participating adults have a chance to win a guided fishing trip worth $500. Studies show that students who do not read during the summer can experience “summer setback,” returning to school less ready for the next year than when they began their summer break. While school is out, there is no better place to be inspired and to stay in the learning mode than at the local public library. Library cards are free, and many libraries are open late and on Saturdays for your convenience. So, take a book along to the park, an audio book on a long car trip, or even break out the comic books at the beach. The library has free loans of new and popular DVDs and magazines to help you beat the heat! SUMMER READING PERFORMERS SCHEDULE HOBGOBLIN HILL PUPPETS Grand Chenier Library - June 15, 10 a.m. Cameron Branch Library - June 15, 2 p.m.

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JUNE 3, 2010

Hackberry Library - June 16, 10 a.m. Johnson Bayou Community Center - June 16, 2 p.m. Grand Lake Recreation Center June 17, 10 a.m. Lowry Library - June 17, 3 p.m.

Volume 1 • Issue 1


ALICE’S MUSICAL STORYTIME Grand Chenier Library June 22, 10 a.m. Cameron Branch Library June 22, 2 p.m. Hackberry Library June 23, 10 a.m. Johnson Bayou Community Center June 23, 2 p.m. Grand Lake Recreation Center June 24, 10 a.m. Lowry Library - June 24, 3 p.m. EARLY’S STORIES Grand Chenier Library June 29, 10 a.m. Cameron Branch Library June 29, 2 p.m. Hackberry Library June 30, 10 a.m. Johnson Bayou Community Center June 30, 2 p.m. Grand Lake Recreation Center July 1, 10 a.m. Lowry Library - July 1, 3 p.m.

Cameron Branch Library July 28, 2 p.m. Hackberry Library July 29, 10 a.m. Johnson Bayou Community Center July 29, 2 p.m. Grand Lake Recreation Center July 30, 10 a.m. Lowry Library - July 30, 3 p.m. These shows are supported by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council as administered by the Arts and Humanities Council of SWLA. All shows are free to the public. Crafts, games, and more programs are scheduled at each individual library and are not included here. For more information, contact your local Cameron Parish library, call 598-5950 or check out the library’s Web site at www.cameron.lib.la.us. TJN

HARVEY RABBIT AND FRIENDS Grand Chenier Library July 28, 10 a.m.

Phone (337) 494-AMRI • Fax (337) 494-2694

2770 Third Avenue, Suite 125 • Lake Charles, LA 70601 Volume 1 • Issue 1

JUNE 3, 2010

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Dang Yankee The

By Mike McHugh

Confessions of a Parrothead Yes, I am a Parrothead. Now, don’t get confused. There is a distinct difference between a Parrothead and a Birdbrain, although in my case, certain friends would say that both labels apply. To set the record straight, a Parrothead is a fan of that greatest living American philosopher, Jimmy Buffett. (If you don’t think he’s really a philosopher, just listen to his song, “The Wino and I Know.”) For a Parrothead, the definition of

Paradise is to attend a live Jimmy Buffett concert, which I had the opportunity to do one evening last week at The Woodlands, just outside of Houston. It was on this occasion that I learned how much work it is to be a true Parrothead. The right way to kick off the day of a Buffett concert is always with the pre-party. On this particular occasion, the festivities were held at a local bar located minutes from the concert venue. Although I arrived there early

in the afternoon, it was definitely “5 o’clock” inside the place. There were Parrotheads from all over Texas and Louisiana in attendance, all groovin’ to the most excellent sounds of the Texas beach band, Hanna’s Reef. The Lake Charles Parrothead contingent was well represented, including my friend, who for this purpose we’ll call “Mark.” He showed me a calendar he’d picked up from a sunglasses company. It featured bikini-clad beauties proudly sporting the firm’s products. He and I spent some quality time admiring the beautiful pairs of sunglasses that adorned the pages, or at least that’s what we told Mark’s wife. I met a number of high-spirited Parrotheads from throughout the region (or maybe they were just high on spirits), including Lady Ta-Ta’s, from the Houston chapter. She posed for many photographs that day, but, sorry guys, this is not an illustrated article. I can say, though, that it was obvious this lady’s wristwatch is pretty much stuck on 5 o’clock all the time. The pre-party was such a good time that it was hard to believe that things were going to get even better once we made it to the venue. Getting there was no problem, but getting in was quite another issue. First, you

had to wait in a line that was longer than the one that forms at J.C. Penney where the men return neckties after Father’s Day. Security was making everyone empty their pockets. I happened to be wearing a pair of those cargo shorts, and every one of the 17 pockets was stuffed with items I’d acquired throughout the day—Landshark Beer koozies, a coaster, an application to join the Houston Parrotheads—you name it. Luckily, a girl searched me; otherwise, the sunglasses calendar probably would have been confiscated. Another friend, who for this purpose we’ll call “Perry,” had it worse than I did, though. He had a penknife in his pocket. In this day and age, they brand you as a terrorist for trying to carry something like that into a concert. For all the security staff knew, he intended to use it to take a concession worker hostage and demand a frozen margarita as ransom. After helping to rescue Perry from a near-certain, long stint at Guantanamo, I headed off to the beer stand (a Parrothead must have his priorities in order). There, the person behind me in yet another long line informed me that if I just wanted a beer, I would find a shorter wait at another stand up in the lawn-seating area. I wasn’t sure if she was just making a ploy to move up in line, but I gave her the benefit of the doubt. So, there I trudged up to the lawn seating, clinging for dear life to my ticket stub. I needed this to gain access to my seat under the pavilion; otherwise, I would have been relegated to the lawn for the rest of the evening. This is something you absolutely do not want to do, as the lawn at a pavilion concert differs from a refugee camp only in that it has a beer stand. When I got to the beer stand, I soon found out why the line was short. The drinks there were so expensive that they checked your credit report as well as your ID. This particular stand was supervised by a Beer Nazi who sternly warned her staff not to sell more than two drinks to any customer. I admired her concern for the clientele, mindful of the serious risk of spillage when trying to carry more than one beer in each hand. What about the show itself, you ask? Well, you really had to be there. I can say that Jimmy did a fabulous encore that included the philosophically titled “Last Man Standing.” After the day I had, that song didn’t describe me. As I said, it’s hard work being a Parrothead.

TJN

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JUNE 3, 2010

Volume 1 • Issue 1


By George “Tip” Cline

Checkpoint Dilemma The recent grants for the local law enforcement agencies have resulted in many police checkpoints being set up around our area. I have mixed feelings regarding these en masse traffic stops. Of course, we’re all against drunk drivers on our roads, but having hundreds of citizens stopped without any personal provocation is disconcerting. There was one instance where is was reported that over 700 drivers were stopped and only two drivers were issued DUIs. Don’t get me wrong, this is not sour grapes. I’ve gone through one of these checkpoints and was passed quickly through by a very polite officer without any problem. I just happen to be one of those people that believe that our liberties are precious and should be maintained. Yes, I believe that stopping a drunk driver before someone is hurt is also a good thing. Balancing our liberties and responsibilities is a heavy burden for our officers of the law, since they see things that we would make us cringe if we were aware of them. The law provides that a blood alcohol level of .08 is the determinant for being legally intoxicated. That would permit an alcoholic beverage to be consumed and still permits you to legally drive. If you couldn’t have a glass of wine or other adult beverage when dining out, there wouldn’t be many restaurants left in business. More Bang for Your Buck Several national chain restaurants are putting out coupons for discounts on their meals. Some are in newspapers, while others are sent via e-mail to customers that have Volume 1 • Issue 1

registered with the chain company Web sites. It’s nice to get a little extra from a restaurant that you support. You might want to see if your favorite place can get you some coupons. This also applies to other providers of goods you may use, like Lowes and Home Depot. They send out some decent discounts as well. Nothing like getting more bang for your buck. Look Ma, No Hands While out of town for a few days, I was sitting on a hotel balcony overlooking a fairly busy street. As I watched the flow of traffic, I began to notice just how many people were using hand-held cell phones while passing below me. I picked one spot and started counting the number of drivers going past in just one direction and using their phone . Now, this was not a scientific sample, but I counted 14 out of 50 drivers with their phone in one hand and the steering wheel in the other. Some were texting and others were talking. This only goes to show one example of just how ingrained the use of cell phones has become. I don’t believe that legislation alone would lessen the practice. Cell phones should come with either a Bluetooth device or a corded headset. If you don’t have either, then get one. It won’t stop people texting, but at least they can talk without using their hands to hold the phone. Eventually, the auto companies will put built-in, hands-free phones in all cars as standard equipment. Until then, you’ll have to provide for yourself.

In the United States in 1923, a first class U.S. stamp cost two cents, a gallon of gas was 22 cents and unemployment was at 2.4 percent. President Warren G. Harding died from an unexpected illness, and a whooping cough (pertussis) vaccine was developed. In world news, Sir Frederick Banting and John J. R. Macleod received a Nobel Prize in medicine for the discovery of insulin. In a small town in Louisiana, Amilcar Boudreaux opened the New Drug Store in 1923, the year Time magazine made its debut. Much has obviously changed since 1923, yet the Boudreaux family is still serving folks in Louisiana from what is now called Boudreaux’s New Drug Store, located at 503 W. Sallier St. This independent pharmacy is owned by pharmacists Douglas Boudreaux (Amilcar’s grandson), and Clint Daniel. While they have embraced new technology and modernization over the years, the staff of Boudreaux’s New Drug has worked at maintaining a good portion of their history. “Customer service is still the foundation of our business,” said Daniel. “We exist to serve the people of the Lake Charles area as best as we possibly can.” Interestingly, one of the primary areas in which the pharmacy carries out this task dates back to the time of its origin: pharmaceutical compounding. Compounding is the science and art of making customized medications to help meet unique physician and patient needs. In the 1920s, 80 percent of the prescriptions filled in U.S. pharmacies required knowledge of compounding. By the 1970s that number

had fallen to 1 percent. Compounding prescriptions had become a lost art. Due to demand and need, the preparation of customized medications began a comeback in the 1980s, with one organization leading the way, the Professional Compounding Center of America (PCCA). Robert and Jerry Boudreaux, the owners of New Drug at that time, eagerly joined PCCA in an effort to further serve the people of Lake Charles. “They truly became pioneers in the field of compounding, and in the process, discovered new and exciting ways to meet the health care needs of their customers,” Daniel explained. “I really feel we are just carrying on their legacy and tradition, which is the one their father left them.” Daniel has also brought homeopathy, herbal medicine, and nutritional supplements back to the pharmacy. “Historically, it was pharmacists who had the most knowledge of natural medicine, and I feel it should be the same today,” he said. “Who better to integrate the worlds of modern and natural medicine? It just makes sense when you think about it. We should be looking at everything available to help us get well, stay well, and feel better.” As Boudreaux’s New Drug looks to continue its service in the future, its mission remains focused on people. “We want to dispense hope,” Daniel said. “We call ourselves problem solvers. This does not mean we have all the answers, but it does mean we will utilize all of our experience and resources to partner with you and your health care providers in finding the answers you need.”

TJN

JUNE 3, 2010

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oyle By Jim D

The Hobgoblins of Little Minds

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JUNE 3, 2010

One of my favorite lines from the last election cycle was from Mike Huckabee. “I’m conservative,” he said, “but I’m not mad at anybody about it.” Would that this were universally true. There’s a nasty odor in the air today, some of it probably from both sides of the political discussion, and it ain’t the smell of tea brewing. People seem to be mad about lots of things. It starts with the government. Maybe it’s just me, but do you see anything inconsistent about anti-government protesters saying the government should do more about some problems, but less about others? I think you’re either for big government or against it. If you want a fence on my border, you’re just going to have to accept that my government is going to get involved in other issues, too. And if your state legislature is going to pass a bill that gives local police the authority to deport people, you have to expect some pushback from the Feds, who have this strange idea that’s their department. If you don’t think the Feds are doing enough, but you’re anti-government generally, how can you support any state’s right to take over? Isn’t that government, too? And if you lean towards the Libertarian ideal, as some in the conservative movement clearly do, what about their ideas on drug legalization, gay marriage, abortion, assisted suicide, and other things? Do you support their position that government should stay out of our private lives, period, or do you still support governmental intervention in those areas you want the government to prohibit? The Defense of Marriage Act, passed in 1996, limits the legal definition of marriage to “opposite people,” as the former Miss California might say. The Senate passed legislation giving special jurisdictional status to the

federal courts in the Terry Schiavo case. And let’s not forget the U.S. Supreme Court decision on the 2000 election, which caused even conservative justice Antonin Scalia to delve into the intent of state law, normally outside the scope of the High Court’s deliberations. All those examples are “big government” actions, which I would bet, without a formal poll on the subject, are supported by a large majority of the small-government tea party folks. People are mad. But they’re not consistent. As with most things, where you stand is where you sit. I guess consistency is too much to hope for. After all, as Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “a foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.” Unfortunately, I hear the ranting of lots of little minds out there. I remember a time, not that long ago, when our political discussion was civil and robust. There’s nothing wrong with talking politics, but these days, those conversations develop into shouting matches. I know I’m accused of having a particular point of view on the subject, but when I see our sometimes too-cool president patiently responding to a group of Republicans in the health care debate without name calling or even raising his voice, then see a group sporting tea-bag hats vilifying and spitting on members of Congress, I choose to blame those people for the execrable tone of our current political debate. What has happened to this country? We elected a president with 53 percent of the vote, and instead of accepting that result, 25 percent of Republicans believe he was born outside the U.S. and is serving unconstitutionally, and 24 percent believe he is the Antichrist! No merde, pardon my French. It’s in a Harris Poll from March 20 of this year. Hey, I understand anger. I’d just like to see it limited to actual facts. Volume 1 • Issue 1


I know the Republicans are approaching nirvana contemplating this year’s elections, and maybe they’re right. But if we establish the precedent in this country that one party can “just say no” and use that as a platform for governing this very complicated republic with extremely difficult problems, I’m afraid we’ve taken a giant leap into chaos that gridlock won’t be an adequate word to describe. Politics isn’t the only taboo subject for civil discussion, of course. I made the mistake (didn’t think it was at the time) in a recent Facebook post of calling the Dalai Lama “His Holiness,” which is his title, and ending my introduction to a piece he wrote describing the similarities of the many paths mankind can take to God by saying “God is Great. Allahu Akbar.” Well, you’d have thought I started a bonfire with everybody’s family Bible. I know I’m a walking contradiction, but among other things, I’m a traditional Christian in my religious beliefs, with all that entails. I don’t even attend church regularly! Anyway. . .the point of the article was a good one. There is, indeed, much commonality in the Abrahamic religions, which include Islam and

Volume 1 • Issue 1

Christianity. But there is so much universal anger directed against Muslims these days that the Christian message gets lost in the translation. I actually had one guy respond by saying Christians could never commit terroristic acts because of their religion. What about Scott Roeder of Operation Rescue, who shot an abortion doctor, in church, in front of his family? Sounds pretty terroristic to me. Hey, I get the anger, both in the political and religious realm. My argument is with the tone, including the decidedly non-Christian attitude towards mankind. As you will find in the Gospel of Matthew: Judge not that ye be not judged. And why beholdest thou the mote in thy brother’s eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye? We (and I include myself) would all do much better to pay attention to the beams in our eyes before we poke our brothers in the eye, politically or otherwise. Until we do, Obama might have a Napoleonic warning for us all: “Apres moi, le deluge.” Get your umbrellas, folks. See you on the flip. TJN

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JUNE 3, 2010

PAGE 17


Cameron State Bank presented a $250,000 donation to the Veteran’s Initiative, a program of the national Senior Housing Crime Prevention Foundation (SHCPF). In making this contribution, Cameron State Bank joins SHCPF, the American Bankers Association (ABA) and the Independent Community Bankers of America (ICBA) to ensure that 40,000 Veterans living in 160 State Veteran Nursing Homes in the U.S. are able to live out their lives in safe, secure, enhanced quality-of-life environments free from the daily fear of crime, abuse, neglect, hostility and deprivation of personal freedom, as provided through the SHCPF’s Senior Crimestoppers program. “One out of every six American citizens is a veteran, and protecting our nation’s elderly veterans living in long-term care facilities is a need that must be addressed,” said SHCPF Vice President George Clinard, who traveled to Lake Charles from the foundation’s home office in

Memphis, Tennessee, to accept the donation recently. “Cameron State Bank is stepping up to make sure these veterans are provided with the security they deserve for the sacrifices they made in service to our country.” “America’s service men and women dedicate their lives to ensuring our freedom and making our country a safer place to live,” said Roy M. Raftery, Jr., president and CEO of Cameron State Bank. “We feel it is our responsibility to honor that service, both for our country’s veterans, and also for those who are currently serving. That is why, in addition to this donation to the Veteran’s Initiative, we are also proud to introduce Patriot Checking, which is available to veterans, active duty service men and women, reserve personnel and their families.” Patriot Checking is a free interest-bearing checking account that provides exceptional benefits for those who are eligible, including: • No monthly fees • Free online banking, mobile banking and bill pay services

• No required minimum monthly balance • Free check imaging • Free overdraft protection up to $100 • Free patriotic checkbook cover • Free first order of patriotic checks In addition, for every Patriot Checking account that is opened, Cameron State Bank will donate $5 to the Wounded Warrior Project and $1 to the American Red Cross. An American flag blanket will also be given to every person who opens an account. “The sacrifice of our service men and women, as well as that of their family members, truly is immeasurable,” Raftery said. “This is our humble way of recognizing and honoring their dedicated service.” Information about Patriot Checking is available at any of Cameron State Bank’s 21 locations in Southwest Louisiana, or by calling (337) 310-2265. TJN

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Volume 1 • Issue 1


Formula is made to give babies all the water they require.” The same is true for breastfeeding mothers; however, a breastfeeding mother cannot always provide milk any time. Water is recommended if nothing is available. It’s also acceptable as your child grows older, but it should never take the place of formula or milk. Remember, dehydration is serious— contact your doctor or go to the emergency room if your child has symptoms of dehydration. Speak with your pediatrician about your child’s particular needs for the

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Keep Your Kids Safe This Summer By Sara Blackwell It’s just the beginning of the summer season, and it’s already smoldering out there. There are many fun activities to do in Southwest Louisiana that require spending a great amount of time outside, so it’s important to keep your children (especially infants) safe in the hot summer sun. You shouldn’t have to miss out on anything just because there’s a baby in tow. But it’s imperative to follow some simple guidelines. Robin Mercer, a pediatric nurse at Lake Charles Memorial Hospital, and a mother of three, has been working with children for 12 years. She offers some suggestions to keep your family safe. Young children should be kept out of the direct sun and heat as much as possible. Many outside areas offer

Volume 1 • Issue 1

summer heat. Each child is different due to age, weight and specific life experiences. Use common sense. Have a great time in a safe and healthy way this summer. Visit the Sulphur water park, go camping, swim, take family walks, jump on the trampoline, and do everything else that you all love to do. Just be vigilant in the care of your child. Disclaimer: This article offers informational advice only; please consult your physician if you have any questions/concerns. TJN

some form of shade. However, if shade is insufficient, create it with umbrellas or hats. Use sun block that is specified for infants and/or children. It will offer more protection and is less irritating to a child’s skin, especially if it’s sensitive. Put it on them every time they’re outside. Sun block should be lathered on every inch of your baby’s body that is exposed to the sun, from the top of the head to the bottom of the feet, since crawling will leave their feet vulnerable to sunburn. Avoid contact with their eyes. “Babies and young children are made of more water than adults, and require more to stay well hydrated,” Mercer explained. Babies and children dehydrate quicker than adults. Dehydration can be detected by checking for a sufficient number of wet diapers (four to six) throughout the day. Check the mouth and lips for moisture and pay attention to whether there any tears when she cries. If your baby is demonstrating any signs of dehydration, immediately take her somewhere cool and offer baby formula. Mercer explained that it is important that an infant on formula be given formula rather than water. “Water will fill their belly with liquid, but not give them any of the calories or nutrients they need.

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A Greener

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By Lauren de Albuquerque

There’s an old saying that “everything old is new again,” and so it has always been with herbal medicine. For centuries, native populations have known that certain plants and roots have incredible healing properties. Phytotherapy — the use of medicinal plants to heal and restore balance — is an age-old tradition that is gaining more interest in the United States. More people are turning to natural supplements as an alternative to traditional medicine. One of the most popular is Maca, which is gaining worldwide attention as a safe, natural and highly effective alternative to HRT (hormone replacement therapy). Maca is a cruciferous root vegetable indigenous to the high Andean mountain plateaus of Peru. Also called Peruvian Ginseng, Maca is an exceptionally hardy plant growing where no other crops can survive. At altitudes of 14,000 ft., Maca must endure extreme conditions, ranging from freezing cold, fierce winds to intense sunlight, often within a period of 24 hours. Herbalists

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JUNE 3, 2010

believe that resilient plants are especially valuable from a medicinal perspective. Many health professionals are integrating Maca into their practices and promoting it as an excellent treatment for menopause since it offers an entirely different, and reportedly safe approach to hormones. Maca is touted as a rejuvenator for the entire endocrine system, encouraging the body to manufacture its own natural hormones, and in the correct portion to each other. Maca is sold at Pure Foods in Lake Charles under the MacaSure label. Owner Shively Lampson not only carries the product; she also uses it. “I made a very important decision for myself: to take charge by using wisdom and balance for my health and well-being,” she said. “I began to supplement Maca to minimize my menopause symptoms after I stopped taking hormone replacement.” She finds it to be very effective, but explained that with any good supplement, you must make wise overall choices. “My clients that are

Volume 1 • Issue 1


peri-menopausal supplement Maca into their diet, along with healthy choices and really see their symptoms decrease and energy increase,” she added. Many women are reluctant to try alternative remedies because they’re uncertain about safety. They think that because a pharmaceutical drug has been studied in a laboratory, regulated by the FDA and prescribed by a doctor, it has to be safe. To date, there have been no known toxic side effects to Maca. It’s actually considered a food, and just as a common potato or turnip will not interfere with medication and supplements, neither will Maca, according to Lampson. Maca will assist the body in utilizing supplements to their optimum capacity as it helps to further digest and assimilate the nutrients. Fitness instructor and dancer Keyon Bernal says that energy and endurance are the keys to her success.  “In addition to a healthy balanced diet, I supplement the Maca

powder daily into my smoothies. My clients comment often on my energy—they want some of what I’m taking! I tell them about Maca and the wonderful benefits I’ve experienced.” In addition to increased strength and endurance, she finds it helps to keep her hormones in balance.

the adrenal glands to increase the production of cortisol (the stress hormone). Obviously, our bodies are not designed to function under long-term stress, so continued high levels of cortisol have a detrimental effect upon our health. As an adaptogen, Maca tones and strengthens the adrenal glands,

...Maca tones and strengthens the adrenal glands, and thus the entire body, giving it the ability to resist disease and effectively combat stress. Maca is known as an adaptogen—which is a substance that brings the body to a heightened state of resistance to disease through physiological and emotional health. As an adaptogen, Maca can help balance, strengthen and support any area of the body under compromise due to stress. Stress , either mental or physical, affects the hypothalamus, causing

and thus the entire body, giving it the ability to resist disease and effectively combat stress. Maca is commonly available in capsule, tablet and powder form. While more convenient to take, the capsules and tablets are significantly more expensive on a per gram basis because you are paying the additional costs for encapsulation or tablet pressing and packaging. The powder

is much more economical. Pure Foods client Janet Seymar uses the MacaExtreme Powder. “It really helps with my endurance and daily mental health,” she said. “The powder is very potent; however, I prefer it because it assimilates quickly and is most effective for me.” She’s developed her own mixture to help with the taste. “I mix a tablespoon of the MacaExtreme with the raw cacao powder(chocolate) and add a little agave powder to sweeten,” she said. “I recommend the MacaExtreme for overall endurance, energy, healthy moods, etc. It works for me!” Maca can be taken before, with, or after meals. Since it’s a natural whole food, taking less than 1,500 mg. a day may not be effective. “My goal for all of you is to take charge and clean up your diet,” said Lampson. “Eat more whole foods, grains, drink plenty of water and get moving! For more information, contact Pure Foods at (337) 905-PURE.

TJN

109 W. LaGrange, Lake Charles • (337) 477-6868 Volume 1 • Issue 1

JUNE 3, 2010

PAGE 21


It’s amazing what a few minerals and some protein can do. Our bones hold us up, help us move, protect our vital organs and produce millions of blood cells every minute. “Good nutrition, regular exercise and a healthy lifestyle help keep them healthful and strong for a lifetime,” says orthopedic surgeon Lynn Foret, M.D. with CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital. Built for strength Bones have a hard outer shell and a spongy center. The spongy portion consists of collagen, an elastic protein, and minerals such as calcium and phosphorus. The collagen fibers form a slightly flexible, scaffold-like structure. Mineral crystals attach to this structure, hardening and strengthening it. “Ounce for ounce, bone is stronger than steel or reinforced concrete,” Dr. Foret said.

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What do they do? The skeleton’s primary duty is holding us upright. The spine takes on most of this work, serving as the foundation of the entire body and supporting and linking all other sections of the skeleton. The skeleton also plays a role in all movement by providing the muscles with a base to attach to and leverage for pushing and pulling. Three vital organs count on the bones for protection: the brain sits in the skull; the heart and lungs are enclosed in the rib cage. Bones also help maintain the balance of minerals in different parts of the body by absorbing, storing and releasing minerals as needed.

Upkeep Our bones undergo a constant process of breaking down and rebuilding. During our younger years, bone is built faster than it’s broken down, according to Dr. Foret. This growth levels out around age 30. After age 35, bones begin a slow process of weakening, when old bone breaks down faster than new bone is added. Throughout every stage of this process, bone-friendly choices can help ensure the long-term strength and health of the skeleton. Dr. Foret recommends these bone-preserving steps from the American Medical Association: • Choose a healthful diet that includes plenty of calcium and vitamin D. Your body needs healthy food to build strong bones. • Exercise to keep your bones in shape. Much like muscle, our bones get stronger when we use them and weaker when we don’t. • Avoid smoking and drinking alcohol. Both are bad for your bones. • Women should talk to their doctors about bone density around the time of menopause. The drop in estrogen around menopause can cause a period of rapid bone loss. Your doctor can advise you on preserving your bone strength with diet, exercise, supplements or medicine. Dr. Foret will be hosting a free seminar on bone health for the entire family on June 24 at 6 p.m. at Garber Auditorium, located at 430 Dr. Michael DeBakey Drive. Seating is limited. Call 491-7577 to register today.

Volume 1 • Issue 1


By Steve Springer M.D.

Men:

What Do We Really Need to Do?

You know, when you think about it, women seem to have gotten the short end of the stick when it comes to the amount of health screening they endure for most of their lives. Pap smears for cervical cancer, breast exams for breast cancer, bone mineral densities for osteoporosis are just a few. I think men often have the attitude that there really isn’t that much they need to do. I can’t tell you how many times I hear, ”Been healthy all my life, Doc!” or “There’s really not that much for me to be concerned with, right?” The short answer to that question is yes, we have fewer screening procedures required of us; but as men, and as part of Men’s Health Awareness Week this month, we should have some basic knowledge of our “to-do” list. Let’s look at a few things recommended by the Men’s Health Network:

Is this list a little more comprehensive than you would think? I want to be very clear that the above list of guidelines is not an absolute list with perfect timing and final recommendations. For example, I make it a point to see all of my patients at least yearly, as compared to the recommendations above. Any of the multiple health organizations as well as professional medical societies could all argue the specifics of this list. Again, it is put forward as a list of screening guidelines that are generally accepted in most disciplines. Just know that as your doctor, the above list contains just a few of the things I may be thinking about when you swagger into the office, after not being seen for several years, already thinking of what else you need to be doing before I even walk in the room. Take a look at the latest All-Cause Mortality Rates for Men in the list below and see if you can correlate how any of the screening techniques above may help you along the way. All Males, All Ages

Percent*

1)

Heart disease

27.2

2)

Cancer

24.3

3)

Unintentional injuries

6.1

4)

Stroke

5.0

5)

Chronic lower respiratory diseases

5.0

6)

Diabetes

3.0

7)

Influenza and pneumonia

2.3

8)

Suicide

2.2

9)

Kidney disease

1.7

10) Alzheimer’s disease

1.6

TJN

• General Physical Exam: 20-39 years old: every 2-3 years; 40-49 years old: every 2 years; 50+: yearly. • Blood Pressure: 20+: yearly. • Blood Tests and Urinalysis: 20-39 years old: every 3 years; 40-49 years old: every 2 years; 50+: yearly. • EKG: 40-49 years old: every 4 years; 50+: every 3 years. • Tetanus Booster: 20+: every 10 years. • Rectal Exam: 50+: yearly. • (PSA) Prostate-Specific Antigen: 40 years old: yearly if African American with family history, 50 +: yearly otherwise • Hemoccult (Test for blood in stool): 40+: yearly. • Colorectal Exam/Colonoscopy: 40 years old (if high risk of colon cancer): every 3-4 years; 50 +(average risk): every 3-10 years depending on type of exam and results. • Chest X-Ray: 45+ (smokers): discuss frequency with your doctor. • Self-Exams (testicle, skin, oral, and breast): 20+: yearly. • Bone Health: 60+: discuss frequency with your doctor. • Testosterone Screening: 40+: consider with your doctor if clinical symptoms of deficiency. • STD’s: 20+ if you are involved in at-risk behavior. • AAA (Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm): 65-75 years old: one-time screening if smoker. Volume 1 • Issue 1

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What’s Cookin’ Peto’s Meat Market/Deli Feeding the Lake Area for 10 Years Peto’s has a lot of fans—and it comes as no surprise. The deli/meat market has been in business for 10 years in Moss Bluff and is known for their fresh meat, prepared foods and friendly customer service. Now there’s a second location on I10 at exit 59 in Roanoke. Owner L.W. “Peto” Sellers worked at a store when he was younger and always thought it was a good business to be in. He has no regrets. “I enjoy everything about it, “ he said. “Especially meeting new people every day. Peto’s has a little bit of everything. “Our specialty is boudin, steaks, boudin balls and cracklins,” Sellers said. “And our Moss Bluff store has a huge selection of wine.” All together, Peto’s employs about 70 people. “My wife Tina has helped me with everything from the beginning,” said Sellers. “Our son Cody has been working since he was 16, and our other

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son Travis helped build Roanoke from the ground up and helps every day.” Daughter Stacey just graduated from McNeese with a MassComm degree, and is planning to assist with some marketing and PR. Seller says there’s no secret to his success. “I’ve worked hard for many years to get to where I am,” he said. He’s excited about the new Roanoke location, which is still growing. Peto’s has two locations: 104 Bruce Circle, Lake Charles (337) 855-3555 and Peto’s I-10 on 15125 Hwy. 395, Roanoke (337) 753-2042. Peto was nice enough to give us—what else?—a special jambalaya recipe for our readers! Let us know how it turns out!

Volume 1 • Issue 1


Peto’s Pork & Sausage Jambalaya INGREDIENTS • 3-lbs pork, cubed • 4 cups rice • 2-lbs. Peto’s sausage • I cup onions • ½ cup green onions • ¼ bottle kitchen bouquet • 3 tablespoons of dark roux • Salt, pepper, garlic powder and Peto’s seasoning to taste • Water

PREPARATION Cook rice, set aside. Brown pork, sausage and white and green onions till dark brown. Cover meat in water, adding kitchen bouquet, salt, black pepper, garlic powder and Peto’s seasoning. Bring to a full boil, and add the dark roux. Stir well to dissolve. Cook pork until good and tender—about three hours. Mix meat mixture with rice. MMMMMMM…….Good! Enjoy!

TJN

KIM ANDERSON, PHYSICAL THERAPIST What is manual therapy? Manual therapy is a clinical approach utilizing skilled, specific hands-on techniques to treat impairments of the muscles and joints. Kim B Anderson, PT, DPT completed a graduate program which focuses on the hands-on techniques of manual therapy and has extensive experience in applying these techniques. Kim also enjoys working with patients who may have experienced a decrease in balance indicated by increased falls at home. It makes her smile to think that she can help someone to be safer and more independent at home. Here at Hope Therapy Center, our skilled therapists treat patients from infants to geriatric adults and garner positive results in part because our patients receive one on one treatment with a licensed therapist. We love what we do and it shows. If you feel that you would benefit from physical therapy, ask your doctor for a prescription and get started on increasing your function!

Call today for more information or to schedule an appointment with Kim at 478-5880.

Volume 1 • Issue 1

JUNE 3, 2010

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s By Lisa Yate

deer, bears, migratory birds and alligators. Moss said these species are protected and must be handled through LDWF’s local regional office. “When they get backed up with a lot of calls, they can call me in to help,” he said. “I work very closely with the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. Their biologists Kori and John are very helpful with any questions I have about species. They are wonderful to work with and very, very helpful.” As an expert, Moss is well-versed in current state statutes and maintains the proper credentials, insurance and licensing. You can call him at (337) 287-4447, or (337) 8024382 with questions about wildlife removal from your home or business.

Unharmed, the adult raccoon sat in a cage held by his captor. “I caught him at a home in the Vinton area,” said Tim Moss, the 41-year-old owner of A All Animal Control of Southwest Louisiana. “He was getting in trash cans, eating trash and stealing the cat’s food at night.” The raccoon had been scattering garbage throughout the homeowner’s shop area before being caught recently. His captor, Moss, is a Nuisance Wildlife Control Operator (NCWO) licensed by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) to provide nuisance animal control or removal services. NCWO’s are permitted to handle most species except PAGE 26

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SNAKES ARE A BIG PROBLEM Whether it is squirrels running through the attic, a colony of bats in a building or the destructive behavior of a raccoon or other critter, people call Moss. “Snakes are a big problem now,” he said. “In drought conditions like we’ve been having, they’re looking for water near air conditioner overflow lines, potted plants, or wherever they can get it. I was just in Moss Bluff, where two nuns – sisters – saw a snake outside their house near the air conditioning unit.” Although many snakes are harmless, he said there are many venomous species in our area including rattlesnakes, coral snakes and aquatic snakes such as the copperhead and the cottonmouth. If a snake gets in your house or pool, you need a wildlife specialist like Moss to remove it. Volume 1 • Issue 1


Wild hog caught tearing up a beautiful yard

Owners: Tim, Britta, Megan, and Tana

Baby bobcat captured trying to steal some baby ducks

“I was in a restaurant eating recently, when the manager recognized me and called me to remove a snake in the bathroom,” he said. He said it was a harmless chicken snake that must have come inside when the back door was open. Moss went out to his truck, got his equipment and removed it without alarming anyone. Snakes, bats, rodents and even beavers are all typical calls for Moss, an operator at SASOL who started his business this year after moonlighting for his brother and sister-in-law, Brian and Josie Moss, owners of A All Animal Control in Houston and Dallas. “My younger brother talked about doing something like this when he retired from the military,” he said. “When he opened his business in Houston, I started working with him on my days off. We received so many calls from Louisiana I decided to open an A All Animal Control here.” Though he doesn’t handle insect calls, Moss deals with all kinds of wildlife, with customers “from Beaumont to Lafayette, Alexandria to the Gulf of Mexico.” Moss uses no poisons, preferring instead to trap animals and transport them to remote locations, for which he has a permit from LDWF. “I like dealing with wildlife,” he said. “This job is for people with a passion for animals who care what’s done to them. A lot of times in this area, the way people deal with a nuisance animal is by shooting it. I use a live cage trap that doesn’t harm the animal.” KEEPING IT IN THE FAMILY Keeping it in the family, Moss runs A All Animal Volume 1 • Issue 1

Control with the help of wife, Megan, and their children Britta, 11, Tana, 15, and Caleb, 21. “Britta and my wife help on some calls,” he said. “Tana prefers to work in the office as an office manager. My son helps when he can. Right now he is in seminary school in New Orleans studying to be a youth pastor. It’s a family business.” Although he doesn’t look anything like Billy Bretherton, Moss is often compared to the reality TV personality who stars in A&E’s Billy the Exterminator. “Billy the Exterminator has brought awareness to the service we provide,” he said. “Kids will ask do I know Billy.” He doesn’t. However like the reality TV star, Moss (also, a former military man) gets into some tricky situations. That’s when his father Junior Moss steps in to help. “My dad helps out, especially on bat jobs,” he said. Moss said bat jobs can be one of the most serious and complex animals-inattic cases. He said they often live in large colonies and leave large amounts of droppings (guano) which grow mold and create a lung disease called histoplasmosis. They can also carry rabies.

Below: Brian and Josie Moss, owners of A All Animal Control in Houston and Fort Worth/Dallas. Brian is a retired U.S. Army Veteran of 22 years.

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PAGE 27


This beaver was tearing up a beautiful pond. It was captured and relocated to a swamp in Central Louisiana. A mother opossom and her babies were rescued from an attic and taken to a new wildlife home.

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“Bats are good for the environment because they eat a lot of mosquitoes,” he said. “The problem is their waste is toxic. Histoplasmosis can be fatal to very young or elderly people.” Bats inside your house must be removed to keep your family safe, but by law, they cannot be killed. That’s why pros like Moss use exclusion devices like netting that allow the bats to fly out, but not return. “All of the bats don’t leave at night,” he said. “They eat and work in shifts.” Moss said it can take anywhere from three days to a week before all of the bats leave. “It’s best not to rush this type of a job,” he said. “We want to be sure all of the bats are out before we seal the hole. Usually within a week to 10 days all the bats are gone.” How do they get in? An expert like Moss will show you where those access points to your home or business are. He can carefully inspect your roof and attic areas inside and out, and repair flaws in construction or damage caused by animals. “If it’s a bad problem, like water leaking or water damage, I work with a licensed contractor who is very reasonable,” he said.

DANGEROUS UNWANTED GUESTS A large percentage of Moss’ calls come from town and city residents, while the rest are from rural landowners. “With all the suburbs popping up all over, we’re moving into their territory,” he said. “It’s not their fault. They don’t know any better.” He said as areas become more urbanized, the wild animals aren’t just disappearing. Since they’re adaptable, animals make do with what is available to them. That often means sharing space with humans by means of entering sheds, garages or even attics. Food and water are readily available, if you consider pet food bowls, garbage cans, bird feeders and swimming pools. Moss said wild critters look adorable in the park, but they quickly lose their charm when they seek shelter within the cozy confines of your home. “Although you look at these furry animals and think they’re cute, when they’re trapped in your house they become vicious; and, they can attack and bite you,” he said. “You definitely need to call someone, if you have an animal problem.” He said some animals carry pests and diseases, not to mention the damage they can do to your property. “Damage animals cause is in the thousands of dollars,” Moss said. “They can chew through wiring and that can get costly. You can’t just splice wires together, you have to follow codes. When a piece of wire is damaged, you have to pull the whole wire and get an electrician to run a whole new wire.”

Volume 1 • Issue 1


He said a chewed upon and exposed electrical wire is a fire hazard. In fact, a fairly high percentage of house fires of unknown origin are believed to be a result of rodent wire exposure. Squirrels can climb almost anything, and they are spectacular chewers, so they have no problem climbing to a vulnerable area of your roof and chewing their way inside. Like all rodents, squirrels chew and gnaw in order to wear down their teeth. Moss said they like to chew on all sorts of surfaces, such as the lead piping around plumbing stacks, vents, wires and of course wood. He’s even seen cases in which they’ve chewed through and burst PVC plumbing piping, resulting in flooding or water damage.

He said raccoons are one of the most destructive animals, because they are large and strong. Moss said they are crafty animals, and great climbers, and they can rip their way right through your roof and get into your attic. “One time, the sheriff ’s department called me at 2:30 a.m. because some raccoons broke through a ceiling fighting and now were in the people’s house,” he said. BABY ANIMALS Most often, a raccoon in the attic is a female with a litter of young, according to Moss. “I was called to do a job by a lady who thought she had squirrels in her house,” he said. “When she

Bats leaving a home through a bat excluder net so they cannot return to cause more damage. These bats caused the homeowner thousands of dollars in damages.

A cute baby raccoon abandoned by his mother was taken to a wildlife rehabilitator who will check it out and raise it until it can be returned to the wild to take care of itself. Here is a raccoon just relaxing after being caught tearing a hole into a $800,000 home. This caused rain to leak down the inside interior wall, costing thousands of dollars in damage to the home and its contents.

Add some spice to your life! The Jambalaya News is looking for a Media Sales Representative. Full-time position, prior sales experience required. E-mail resume to publisher@thejambalayanews.com or call (337) 436-7800 ext. 106 for more information.

715 Kirby Street, Lake Charles, 70601 Volume 1 • Issue 1

JUNE 3, 2010

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Two skunk traps.

This opossom was caught after killing numerous baby chickens.

Sealing up a department store where bats were getting in and roosting - just one of the many services A All Animal Control provides.

opened the door to her storage room, she came face-to-face with a mama raccoon and four babies. She slammed the door and called me.” Moss said the mother raccoon got out through a hole in the roof before he arrived. “I set out traps to catch her and relocate her, but she never came back,” he said. “I took the babies to Heck Haven, which is run by Suzy Heck, a certified wildlife rehabilitator. I checked back with her and the babies are doing fine.” He said when routed from their dens and nests, wild animals are aggressive and dangerous, particularly if they are protecting their young. Moss said for your safety, removal and clean up should be handled by experienced professionals. “One bad scenario is when you remove the baby raccoon and then the mother shows up,” he said. “That’s not a good feeling.” Adult animals can be trapped, but babies must be found and removed by hand, he added. If you don’t remove them, they will die and the nauseating smell of decay will permeate your home. Moss said the process of ridding your home of nuisance animals involves completely eliminating access to nesting sites, removal of nests and feces, disinfecting the area to remove parasites and disease organisms, and deodorizing the site. “We don’t use any harmful chemicals,” he said. “Our sanitizers and deodorants are made of natural stuff – nothing harmful to your family or the environment.” When animals live in the attic, they can leave large amounts of droppings and urine that’s not only unsightly or bad-smelling – it could potentially pose a health risk. Most droppings grow mold over time, and most droppings contain salmonella. Animals also leave scents behind that are potent lures to other animals, including predators. Moss said sometimes a raccoon will break into an attic that has a squirrel scent; or, other squirrels or animals will enter looking for a place to live and mate. He said that’s why it’s a good idea to clean up, decontaminate and deodorize your attic.

PREVENT WILDLIFE PROBLEMS Moss said A All Animal Control will work with you to animal-proof your home or property to prevent future wildlife problems. He said your home and property are your biggest investments, so go with a company that can completely solve your problem the first time. As a wildlife management pro, Moss provides a complete solution – including the repair of animal damage. He warns: Beware of companies that are not licensed and insured. If they damage your property or become injured on your property, you may be held liable! Some of the services A All Animal Control offers include: • Animal removal of all species from mice to raccoons; • Animal biohazard removal – skunk and dead animal odor removal; • Animal waste cleaning of attics, crawl spaces, roofs and re-insulation; • Beaver dam removal and culvert clean outs; • Complete wildlife control services; • Coyote control programs; • Custom attic vent screening; • Home sale/purchase wildlife inspection; • Mice, rat and snake prevention; • Minor carpentry, soffit and fascia repairs; • Roofline flashing to prevent bird, squirrel, opossum and raccoon entry. TJN

Tim and Brian

For more information, call (337) 287-4447, or (337) 802-4382; e-mail: SWLA@aallanimalcontrol.com; or visit www.AAllAnimalControl.com. PAGE 30

JUNE 3, 2010

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By Maria Alcantara Faul

With the economy’s slow recovery from the recession, one might think that home construction and renovation projects have come to a complete halt. This is not so in Southwest Louisiana. According to Ken Robbins, President of the Home Builders Association and owner of Robbins Construction in Moss Bluff, “the magnitude and type of construction, as well as renovation projects, have changed—but work has been pretty steady.” According to Robbins, the construction of the big, mega mansion-type homes is not as common as they used to be. People are now more practical and increasingly budget-conscious when building homes. “Most new constructions are in the $250,000 and under range,” Robbins stated. The trend in new home construction is back to basics. “Even the pool is a no-frills deal,” he said. About the only area where homeowners may be prepared to splurge a little is the master suite. And decorating trends tend to lean towards the sleek and practical, yet sophisticated and comfortable style of furniture and home accessories. As far as home remodeling is concerned, the trend toward making minor improvements to home exteriors is likely to extend into next year, and for good reason. Aside from freshening up the look of one’s home, a renovation gives homeowners a good bang for their buck when it comes to selling their homes. For most families, owning a home is something they dream of for years before it becomes a reality. A home purchase represents one of the biggest PAGE 32

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investments they will ever make. Protecting and increasing the real estate market value of that investment is extremely important. Even if you’re not planning on selling your home, regular maintenance, repairs, and remodeling efforts are important to protect your investment, enhance house usability, and keep it as attractive and comfortable as possible. Most homeowners focus on the kitchen and bathrooms when they redecorate or start a home makeover. Modern kitchens have evolved into a lot more than a place for food preparation. Because they are now family gathering places, even centers to entertain guests, they need to be comfortable, convenient and easy to maintain. Most homeowners are replacing their old countertops with granite or ceramic tile. Tile—ceramic or otherwise—seems to be a popular material for both kitchen countertops and floors. “Tile requires less upkeep. It’s more durable than most materials, and during the summer, ceramic offers a cooler air flow for the home,” Robbins said. Tile also offers a variety of decorative options for the homeowners. “There are all sorts of decorative pieces available on tiles, from fleur de lis designs to mosaic patterns,” he added. Replacing carpet with hard floors is a popular renovation project. Hard floors provide easy maneuverability for wheelchairs, mobile storage units and cabinets and require simple regular maintenance such as dust mopping, sweeping and vacuuming to keep the floors looking great. In addition, Volume 1 • Issue 1


hard floors do not trap allergens such as mold spores and dust. For this reason, they often are recommended by doctors for individuals with allergies or asthma. Next to in-home renovations, homeowners are also undertaking projects to increase the “curb appeal” of their houses. The biggest curb appeal impact factor is the home exterior. If siding is old, faded, chipped or damaged, it needs to be replaced or repaired. New siding not only gives a home a major facelift, but return on investment is generally high. In fact, it’s one of the top home

renovation projects that show the greatest return at resale. More homeowners are choosing cement board to replace, or repair, their home’s exterior walls. According to Robbins, “Cement boards offer either a smooth or wood grain look, providing more options for the homeowner to get the look that they want. The material also holds better than vinyl, although it’s a bit more expensive than vinyl.” Homeowners are taking more initiative these days, designing their living areas and doing their own repairs and renovations. Robbins, on behalf of the

Homebuilders Association, cautions homeowners on acting as their own contractor. He states that there are a numerous difficulties involved with dealing with sub-contractors. “Some do not finish the job, and a good amount of disputes come up over the actual job done,” he added. He also stated that a good amount of sub-contractors are not insured, so the homeowner has to take on a lot of liability. “All licensed contractors in Louisiana are required to have insurance, and they are required to obtain Continuing Education Units (CEU’s) every year, to make sure that they are

up to speed with new construction codes.” Regardless of your project, most area contractors and home improvement stores are ready to help with your needs. Robbins’ showroom offers a variety of design options for customers to consider. Whether you’re contemplating a fresher, newer kitchen, a new floor, or a new home exterior, options abound. For more information about licensed contractors in the area, visit the Homebuilders’ Association Web site at www.hbaswla.org. TJN

• Local Lake Charles Honey • Galvanized Tubs and Trashcans • Gumbo and Soup Bowls (restaurant style) • 7 cup Aluminum Drip Coffee Pots

Reduce Stress & Add years to your life! Kittens and cats now available for adoption at Downtown Animal Hospital.

113 W. Clarence St. Lake Charles, La. (337) 439-4330

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By Lauren de Albuquerque

Any man can be a father, but it takes a special person to be a dad. The ties and aftershave that just sit in the closet and medicine cabinet, respectively, belong to the past. Nowadays, there are all kinds of fun and creative gifts to give to that very important man. Just zero in on what he loves. To be fair, my dad was a white-collar worker who wore ties every day and loved nice-smelling men’s cologne, so when I was growing up, he received lots of them—and always enjoyed his gifts. But as I got older, I got more creative. For example, my father collected stamps, and there’s lots of philatelic paraphernalia out there. The old Jordan Marsh department store in downtown Boston had a section in their book annex devoted to stamp collectors, so it was the perfect place to shop for him. He was also an amateur artist, so art supplies, art books and other items that he wouldn’t ordinarily buy for himself made it on the list. And I remember when Ralph Lauren came out with his polo shirts in the 80s, I bought him a couple. Let’s face it; my dad would never have bought them for himself. I have them now, and I’ll wear one once in a great while. My dad is no longer with me, but I remember the good times with him, and the Father’s Days that are long gone. And it’s fun to see what’s out there for the fathers of today. If your dad is a sports fanatic (if he’s from SWLA and hasn’t been living in a cave, then he probably is), there are all kinds of stuff out there to make him happy. Retro-Sports in Lake Charles has a dizzying array of sports cards, mini-helmets, T-shirts, jerseys, autographs, wall clocks, blankets—you name it. If you can’t find something for the sports lover here, you can’t find it anywhere. There’s also a little LSU shop in the Target mall that has a lot of purple and gold items! Tickets to a sporting event will also score big with dad—such as an Astros Game in Houston. If he’s a golfer, he’ll love a day of golf (Mallard Cove is very reasonable). If he’s never golfed but has always wanted to learn, maybe it’s time he started—the local courses offer lessons. PAGE 34

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If dad’s a gardener, a special plant from a local nursery is a (hopefully) permanent gift that will grow in his garden for years to come that will always remind him of the occasion. Related items such as a fountain, statuary, or patio set will surely be appreciated. Father’s Day is a great time to get the family together to do something that everyone will enjoy. Go to the family-friendly Petro Bowl or the nearby Putt-Putt Golf and have a blast! A day at Sam Houston Jones State Park in Moss Bluff can include picnicking, hiking and fishing from the banks of the river or the lagoons. Rental boats are also available at the park. There are even cabins if you want to make a weekend of it. Finally, something that’s personally created will always be extra special—whether it’s a home-cooked meal that the entire family pitches in to make, or drawings and ceramics created by the younger kids in the family. Dad will remember them most of all. Whatever you do, celebrate your dad. He won’t be with you forever, but the happy memories will. TJN

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By Lauren de Albuquerque

The United States is one of the few countries in the world that has an official day for children to honor their fathers. On the third Sunday in June, dads are given presents, taken out to dinner by their family, or just made to feel special. Sonora Louise Smart Dodd, from Spokane, Washington, greatly admired her father, a Civil War veteran, who struggled to raise his six motherless children. Dodd felt he had done an outstanding job, and wanted to honor him. So, inspired by Anna Jarvis’ efforts to promote Mother’s Day, she began a rigorous campaign to have Father’s Day celebrated in the U.S. In 1909, Dodd approached her minister and others in Spokane about having a church service dedicated to fathers on June 5, which happened to be her father’s birthday.

Sonora Louise Smart Dodd

That date was too soon for her minister to prepare the service, but he spoke a few weeks later, on June 19. The Spokane Ministerial Association and the local Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) supported her cause. From then on, the state of Washington celebrated the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day. Though there was some initial hesitation, the idea eventually gained popularity. States and organizations began lobbying Congress to declare an annual Father’s Day. In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson approved the idea, but it was not until 1924 when President Calvin Coolidge made it a national event to “establish more intimate relations between fathers and their children and to impress upon fathers the full measure of their obligations.”

After an extended struggle of over four decades, President Lyndon Johnson signed a presidential proclamation declaring the third Sunday of June as Father’s Day in 1966. In 1972, President Richard Nixon established a permanent national observance of Father’s Day. Dodd was honored for her contribution at the World’s Fair in Spokane in 1974. She died four years later at the age of 96.

TJN

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ker n Shouma o d n a r B y B

The U.S. and The World Cup “They” have a lot of sayings. For instance, they call soccer “the beautiful game.” Poetic folks, “they” are. But what I saw from the United States men’s national soccer team in their international friendly against

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the Czech Republic was anything but pretty. Good thing it was a tune-up. Good thing the Americans already have a spot reserved in the 2010 World Cup, the greatest sports tournament in the universe. Good thing it was mostly the Americans’ “B” team out there, young guys looking to fill the last remaining spots on the Cup squad headed for South Africa in June. The Americans’ real heavy artillery watched the loss from the luxury boxes, eating burg-

ers while resting up for the first-ever Cup held in an African country. Because the last thing the Americans want is a repeat of the 2006 World Cup disaster, a sorry affair in which they were embarrassed by the Czechs in the opener (in much the same manner as this most recent meeting) and managed to draw with eventual champs Italy (playing with nine men to Italy’s 10) before being bounced from the tournament by upstart Ghana. And while the Americans scored just one goal of their own (their

lone goal in the Italy game came courtesy of an Italian own goal) in 2006, the U.S. defense was by far the more pathetic group. They say “defense wins championships.” Apparently, the U.S. didn’t get that memo in 2006. This time, however, the American offense looks like it could propel the team to its first quarterfinals since 2002 and maybe beyond. That is, as long as the defense holds together. The 2010 squad consists of three defenders, team captain Carlos Bocanegra, Steve Cherundolo, and Oguchi Onyewu, who started games

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in the 2006 Cup. All three are experienced international players, but both Bocanegra and Cherundolo are 31 years old, maybe a little past their athletic primes, and Onyewu struggled against the Serbs in their recent friendly, so it will be interesting to see whether they can shake off their ’06 experience and come to South Africa prepared to support goalkeeper Tim Howard. The American offense returns much experience as well with superstars Landon Donovan and Clint Dempsey leading the way. DaMarcus Beasley also returns, but, after nearly playing his way off the team in the past couple of years, one has to wonder whether he’s still got what it takes to play at the international level. The U.S. will also feature superstar-in-the-making Jozy Altidore, who, at age 20, scored a goal against powerhouse Spain in the 2009 Confederations Cup, as well as midfielder Stuart Holden, who, with his sniper-like crosses and expert set-piece play, has been compared to David Beckham. It’s definitely not going to be easy, but, compared to 2006, the Americans should feel relatively comfortable in group play. The U.S. opens the 2010 Cup with England, which, while owning a considerable historical advantage over the Americans (7-2-0 record all-time) and claiming a trio of feared strikers (Wayne Rooney, Jermain Defoe, and Peter Crouch), has experienced major turmoil in the form of a team sex scandal and has failed to advance past the quarterfinals in every Cup since 1990. The U.S. then plays Slovenia, a relative newcomer to the world soccer stage first attempting to qualify for the Cup in 1998 (the country itself only gained independence in 1991). This is only the second time the Slovenians have reached the Cup and, with only one striker (Milivoje Novakovic) with more than 10 goals in international play, the Americans look to have little to fear. The Americans close out Group C play with the Algerians, who this year qualified for their first Cup appearance since 1986. Rafik Saifi is a dangerous player the Americans should keep an eye on, but, again, the U.S. should get little resistance from Algeria. So, assuming they at least beat Slovenia and Algeria, the Americans will reach the knock-out stage where they will likely face Volume 1 • Issue 1

either Germany or Australia. If you see me with my fingers crossed, just know that I witnessed the Americans’ 2006 debacle in its entirety. From there, the U.S. will then run into either Les Bleus (France) or arguably the world’s best player in Lionel Messi of Argentina in the quarterfinals. So, can the Americans do what they’ve only done twice since 1930: reach the quarterfinal round? It’s possible. There are some

good teams standing in the way, but the draw seems a little less rigorous for the U.S. this time around. Could they possibly win it all? Unfortunately, it’s not likely. The world’s top five teams (Brazil, Spain, Portugal, The Netherlands, and Italy) would still await the Americans beyond the quarterfinals. It would take a historic, heroic run by the U.S. to earn its first World Cup championship. But, you know, they say there’s a first time for everything.

Brandon Shoumaker is a graduate of McNeese State University and has covered sports for more than seven years for various publications. Coaches Brandon Shoumaker or parents with story tips may contact Brandon at bshoumaker@yahoo.com or send him a message on Twitter (@bshoumaker).

TJN

JUNE 3, 2010

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By Mary Louise Ruehr

Questions of Identity Think Twice by Lisa Scottoline is a thriller about identical twin sisters, separated at birth: a good twin versus a bad twin. One is a successful lawyer in Philadelphia (fans of Scottoline will recognize Bennie Rosato). The other (Alice) is only good at getting in trouble. The book wastes no time getting down to business, with a pretty intense action-filled sequence — and a bit of violence: “It’s a box. Am I in a box? … It couldn’t be. … She told herself not to panic. The air felt close.

She squinted against the darkness, but it was absolute. … The top was sealed. There was nothing inside the box. No air, food, water. No hole to breathe through. … It wasn’t a dream, it was real.” With the good twin in the box and assumed dead, Alice assumes Bennie’s identity. Will she get away with it? Will the good twin’s friends and coworkers be able to tell it isn’t the same woman? How about her boyfriend? Or her dog? Meanwhile, will Bennie somehow escape from her prison?

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JUNE 3, 2010

must identify an unnamed camp guide who has been left a bit of money in the will of a wealthy American woman. He was very helpful to her when she visited a safari camp on the edge of the river at the Okavango Delta, a camp that “bore the name of a bird or animal.” So Mma Ramotswe and her terrified assistant, Mma Makutsi, head for the wild country near the river, where deadly hippos, crocodiles,

Will she survive? “Maybe any one of us, pushed to the brink, is capable of evil,” says one of the characters. It’s one of Scottoline’s trademark nail-biters — made more frustrating because the reader knows the truth throughout the page-turner and the characters don’t — and it’s spiced with a bit of humor in the form of eccentric neighbors and relatives. There’s even a “witch queen” who runs around putting curses on people. Credit Scottoline, as always, with some pretty ingenious plot points (even though a couple of them require the reader to just trust the author, suspend disbelief, and go along with the story). Make sure you’ve fed the pets and disconnected the phone, because once you start this one, you won’t want to be disturbed. In The Double Comfort Safari Club by Alexander McCall Smith, Mma Precious Ramotswe of the No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency in Botswana

snakes, lions, leopards and elephants are likely to appear at any time. And that is just one of the problems confounding the ladies of the detective agency. There are strange goings-on that lead to questions of marital infidelity; a horrible accident injures the fiancé Volume 1 • Issue 1


problem in life that can’t be solved by a kind, generous, traditionally built lady from Botswana and a nice pot of red bush tea. In The Weed That Strings the Hangman’s Bag by Alan Bradley, finding the identity of a killer is only one of the challenges facing Flavia de Luce in this second mystery featuring the delightfully precocious 11-yearold. Events are set in the English countryside in 1950. Flavia and her two cruel older sisters live with their father on his estate, Buckshaw, in the village of Bishop’s Lacey. The village is filled with colorful, quirky characters. One of the freshest and most inter-

esting mystery-solvers around, young Flavia straddles a bizarre line between child genius and juvenile delinquent. She has a natural bent toward chemistry and has taken over her Uncle Tarquin’s chemistry lab. There she frequently carries out experiments and complicated pranks against her vile sisters, who do hateful things such as telling Flavia they’ve voted her out of the family. She also loves making scrapbooks; only hers are filled with news articles about famous criminal poisoners. When a popular entertainer comes to the village and is talked into putting on a puppet show, tragedy

strikes, and Flavia is the first to ascertain that a murder has taken place. She goes on — having to work around the local constabulary, who make the mistake of thinking she’s an “ordinary” child — to solve the crime. And she also solves another, much older village mystery. I had a little more fun with the first book — the wonderful “The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie” — but I thoroughly enjoyed this second visit with Flavia. Copyright © 2010 by Mary Louise Ruehr. TJN

of Mma Makutsi, and his bullying aunt makes life very difficult indeed. In addition, an old adversary turns up in a very surprising way. But mostly, there’s the wonderful Mma Ramotswe, around whom everything revolves. She gives us her take on social values (“That was the curious thing about Botswana; even when people were rude — and some degree of human rudeness was inevitable — they were rude in a fairly polite way”) and on the joys of living in her beloved Africa (she says that in the wind from the Kalahari Desert she could smell “a fragrant mixture of dryness and emptiness and waving grass”). I adore these books. They feature mysteries, but they aren’t like whodunits; there’s so much going on that a reader could revisit them again and again. The characters and situations are so fresh, so out of the realm of anything we’re used to encountering in the mystery genre. The gentle humor just sort of keeps drifting to the top and making me smile. And this one, the 11th in the series, made me laugh out loud several times. As they head for the river, the rather large Mma Ramotswe tells her assistant she couldn’t swim, but she could float: “‘It was very pleasant. I did not have to move my arms — I just floated. ... It was good to discover that I could do a sport after all.’ Mma Makutsi was not certain that floating could be called a sport. Was there a Botswana floating team? She thought not. What would such a team do? Would they have to float gently from one point to another, with the winner being the one who arrived first? Surely not.”) I loved it! In fact, I believe this book is my favorite of the series so far. It could restore your faith in human nature, and you’ll begin to believe there is no Volume 1 • Issue 1

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box and take another turn. When all dots are connected, the player with the most boxes wins.

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der useum n e l l n E dren's M a D By e Chil of th r o t c Dire

Shrek: The Final Chapter (DreamWorks, 2010) Poor Shrek. He now has a wife, three kids (triplets), friends coming over all day, and his home is on the celebrity tour of the stars. He can’t even have a mud bath in peace and quiet. In fact, although he’s loved and admired, Shrek is having a full-blown mid-fairy tale crisis. This is the fourth and last film of the series based on the lovable fractured fairy tale ogre, started by DreamWorks in 2001. Shrek is based on a 1990 story by William Steig. In Yiddish “shrek” means “terror” and that is what our current Shrek is not. If Shrek represents Everyman,

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then Shrek: The Final Chapter represents our own coming of age, something that young adults today are foreseeing and dreading. This film is for them as much as their children. Burned out by the responsibilities of parenthood and popularity, Shrek longs for the days when he was a terror to the villages and free to go where he pleased. He’s sick and tired of autographing villagers’ pitchforks and changing poopy diapers. Along comes the villain of this movie, Rumplestiltskin. He’s a cross between Conan O’Brien and Chucky, but his voice is that of Walt Dohrn, a formerly unknown storywriter and artist who earned the part. Stiltskin is by far the strongest character in the film, annoying, whining, and ready to take over the kingdom of Far Far Away by means fair or foul, preferably foul. It turns out that he had his chance long ago when Princess Fiona, in the first Shrek movie, was trapped in Dragon’s castle. We’re shown a prepre-prequel in which Rumplestiltskin almost closed a deal with the King

and Queen for their daughter’s freedom in exchange for their kingdom. The keyword is “almost,” as an ogre named Shrek showed up, saving the Princess and ruining Rumple’s plans. So now Shrek is missing the old days, before Fiona, wishing he could go back to them. Rumple tricks him into signing a contract to do just that. And then, in a Jumanji-esque scene, Far Far Away is transformed into a dark world. Or was it Back to the Future 2? Or was it Legend? Or It’s a Wonderful Life? More on this later. This new world is ruled by Rumplestiltskin, who has turned the royal castle into a Taj Mahal and holds parties with a troupe of dark disco witches. All of Shrek’s friends are still here: Donkey, Dragon, Puss’n’Boots, even the Three Little Pigs. But now they’re all in servitude to Rumple, who isn’t above melting the occasional witch when it suits him. Now, for all its borrowed themes and similarity to stories we’ve seen before, I have to admit this movie won me over. For one thing, the animation is superb. For another, the characters are wonderfully acted. But it’s the story, a true fairy tale that I won’t give away here, that touches the heart amidst all the conflict, dark-

ness, and frenzy that you might expect in an animated movie. And after a slow start, there is frenzy aplenty, as Shrek fights to get his old life back. The movie is full of broom chases, crashes and villagers, dancing, and touches of humor for all ages. Speaking of all ages, these alternative past/future stories had their beginning way back with Charles Dickens, a master storyteller who wrote A Christmas Carol, Tale of Two Cities, Oliver Twist, and others. You can download his books for free. My prediction? Your whole family will enjoy Shrek: The Final Chapter. But you may want to cover your toddler’s eyes when the Gingerbread Man gets eaten. (It’s an alternate reality, remember?)

TJN

JUNE 3, 2010

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SAVE THE DATE!

League of Women Voters presents Legislative Wrap Up 2010 • June 25th, 11:30 a.m. JOIN UP AND JOIN IN! P.O. Box 180, Lake Charles, LA 70602 • www.lwv-lc.org • (337)474-1864

Killin’ Time Crossword

Crossword puzzles provided by BestCrosswords.com (www.bestcrosswords.com). Used with permission. PAGE 42

JUNE 3, 2010

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AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION’S HEART BALL It was a heart-racing evening at the Black & Gold Heart Ball held in the extravagant historical Calcasieu Marine Bank. After a little wining and dining, the Saints were Marchin’ In when Masters of Ceremonies John Bridges and Karen Lambert introduced guest speaker Tracy Porter, cornerback for the New Orleans Saints. Several cardiologists and cardiovascular surgeons of SWLA were honored at this elegant celebration. Hal McMillin kept the ball rolling as he auctioned several exquisite donated items, with proceeds benefiting the American Heart Association. A toast to the betterment of heart health. The Beat Goes On!

Leah Bossano and Anne Marie Hebert

Karen Lambert, Hal and Sue McMillin, and John Bridges

Robert and Ruth Pumpelley

Peggy Kelley and Beau Styron

Joey and Heather LaFleur

Tommy Drake, Joe Tullos, Devyn Adams, Tracy Porter, Faye Drake

Jamie and Rikki Gilmore

AN EVENING WITH TONY GREEN The Art Associates group of Lake Charles threw A Jazzy Art Party at historical Central School. It was a spectacular evening celebrating the centennial birthday of the gypsy jazz giant Django Reinhart. On display were the bold paintings of artist Tony Green, a popular New Orleans native better known for his ability to capture the city’s architectural detailing and the character of its people. His musical star has risen as well; he is a regular performer in New Orleans and gave this jazz-loving audience a taste of gypsy jazz music. This crowdpleasing “Jazz Fest” earned rave reviews! Sally and Victor Picheloup Volume 1 • Issue 1

Betty Swift and Eleanor Carmouche JUNE 3, 2010

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Charlie Snead and Tony Green

Jean Cleaton Kaufman and Joyce McKeehan

Reve and Jill Greenburg

WILD BEAST FEAST Talk about a Beastin’, Feastin’ Good Eatin’ time at the Brick House! The Lake Charles Symphony recently presented its Ninth Annual Wild Beast Feast. This festive occasion stirred up a large crowd of mouthwatering supporters eager to savor the unique foods prepared by teams of chefs cooking up all sorts of wild beasts and sweet treats! Local chef Donald Link kept it real, autographing his new Cajun-style cookbook and offering some spicy tastes as well. Fabulous food, fun, drinks, and live music by the Crawford Band— ”it don’t get much better than this!” Emilee Papadimitriou, Mary Grace and Hannah Leger and Anna Liggio

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Paul Zimmerman and Julien LeBleau

Bethany and Mitzi Wilkinson

Arlene Bosdick and Bernadette Abrahams

Paula Myers and Becky Goodloe

Larry Hoffpauir, Lindsey Comeaux and Cindy Hoffpauir

Julie and Jason Vines with Jay Reyes

Lauren Stroh, Jill Findley and Robert Knox

JUNE 3, 2010

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THE WHISTLE STOP’S DANCING CLASSROOMS Cha Cha Cha…..Oooh La La, these kids can dance!!! At this packed event in the Bulber Auditorium, supporters cheered for their favorite teams during the 2nd Annual Whistle Stop “Colors of the Rainbow” competition finals. More than 57 classes in over 20 public schools in SWLA have participated in “The Dancing Classrooms” under several participating teachers, learning the Merengue, Fox Trot, Rumba, Tango and Swing. An extra “Bravo!” to Daniel Gonzalez and the Jennings Elementary “Raspberry Team” for winning the Gold Challenge trophy! Dancers, step out and take a big bow--you’re all winners! Jill Daggett and Kelly Fontenot

Aja McGlotheen and Victoria Kent

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Meagan Touchet and Skylar Cormier

Deneetra and Devin Jack

Daniel Gonzalez and Katie Dorr

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MAC BURNS / WEST CAL-CAM HOSPITAL FOUNDATION GOLF TOURNAMENT What a “Combo Platter” of a day! This dual golf tournament featured former and current NFL pro football players along with many other supporters. Each year, the tournament is held in memory of Mac Burns, a former Sulphur High graduate tragically killed in a car accident. Due to the overall success, this tournament has established self-perpetuating funds for MSU golf and academic scholarships. This year’s proceeds will benefit WCCH’s health care resources. Now, when you’re expecting football players, you best be serving up lots of spicy jambalaya from Hollier’s Kitchen, cold icy drinks throughout the day and be prepared to duck a few wild balls--all for fun--and fun for all! Cheers to a successful event! TJN Martha Sarver, Buford Jordan, Buzz Sarver

Maggie Ray and George McInnis

Dan Simien, Ed Landry, Red Iguess and Ron Griffith

Debby Nabours, Bill Hankins and Sandra Moss

Todd and Laurie Stelly

As we enter Hurricane Season, we are dedicated to informing you of any weather threatening Southwest Louisiana. Part of our dedication to keeping you informed and up to date is our KYKZ 96 Hurricane Tracking Chart sponsored by Cameron State Bank and Dale Bernard State Farm Insurance. The KYKZ 96 Hurricane Tracking Chart will be available June 1 at our sponsor locations or at the KYKZ 96 station. More information at www.kykz.com.

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Lost by Josh Guimbellot

VISION/VERSE EXHIBIT OPENS JUNE 5 The Arts and Humanities Council of Southwest Louisiana is pleased to announce the opening of this year’s Vision/Verse exhibit at the Art Associates Gallery located at the Central School Arts and Humanities Center. The opening will be on Sat., June 5, from 6 to 9 p.m., with a poetry reading at 7 p.m. The annual exhibit brings together 20 artists and poets from across the nation to examine the role of inspiration in the visual and literary arts. In November 2009, the members of Yellow Flag Press, the local independent press behind Vision/Verse, accepted over 100 art and poetry submissions for the show’s second installation. The ten selected poets each chose one of the ten chosen artist’s pieces and created a new poem using the piece of art as inspiration. Simultaneously, each artist chose one of the poet’s poems and used that poem as a springboard for a new piece of art. Yellow Flag Press will be on hand to sell limited edition broadsides of each featured poem. For more information, call 439-2787 or visit www.artsandhumanitiesswla.org. POKER RUN FOR ABUSED KIDS JUNE 5 The second annual Poker Run For B.A.A.K (Battered and Abused Kids of SWLA) will be held on June 5. Registration is from 8:30-9:30 a.m. at The Spot Sports Bar and Grill 5402 Common St. in Lake Charles. Last bike out is at 9:30 a.m., last bike in at 3:30 p.m. There will be BBQ

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dinners, live and silent auctions, 50/50 jackpot, and music. Cost is $20 per rider and $10 per passenger. T-shirts available. For more information, go to www.baakpokerrun.com. CHARITY GOSPEL CONCERT IN DERIDDER JUNE 5 God’s Food Box is proud to announce a charity gospel concert scheduled for Sat., June 5 at DeRidder High School’s auditorium. Featuring brilliant talent from Grace, First United Pentecostal Church, and First Baptist Church, the stage will burst with gospel music at 6 p.m. sharp.   The night’s line-up includes featured performances by The Spiritual Aires, Jerry Day, Kellie Blackmon, Roy Mosby, Billy Wilson, and John Davis.  Graybow Riot is schedMaking Waves by Chris Marcello uled to close the night’s show.  The charity concert is designed to raise the spirits of the community as well as raise funds for God’s Food Box.  Tickets will be available at the door for $5, and advance tickets are available at CBG, Beauregard Federal Savings Bank, Grace, First Pentecostal Church, and First Baptist Church. For more information, contact Buckie Nugent at (337) 462-3182, or Chuck Cannon at (337) 460-2037. OLD TIME BOXERS’ REUNION JUNE 5 Calling all Louisiana high school boxers from 1931-1958 for the Old Time Boxers’ Reunion! Catch up on great stories with great people. The event will be held on June 6 at Burton Coliseum on Gulf Highway in Lake Charles. Purchase your $5 reunion raffle ticket today for a chance to win an autographed George Foreman Boxing Glove with display case, a 1930s boxers’ painting and a George Foreman Grill. For more information, contact Sonny Brunson at 528-2483. CATCH-A-CONCERT SERIES MONDAYS JUNE 7-JULY 4 If you like good music and the great outdoors, then grab your favorite blanket or comfy lawn chair and soak in the music each Monday evening during the Catch-a-Concert Series by the Lake Charles Community Band. The free concerts start at 7 p.m. at the Lake Charles Civic Center Arcade Pavilion. Music-lovers are encouraged to bring a picnic dinner and enjoy the sunset over the lake. The band, under the direction of Rod Lauderdale and Leo Murray, will play musical favorites from past and present. In case of rain, the concerts will be

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held at the Mezzanine at the Lake Charles Civic Center. For more information, contact the Southwest Louisiana Convention & Visitors Bureau at (337) 436-9588 or visit www.visitlakecharles.org.    CAJUN COWBOY CLUSTER DOG SHOW JUNE 10-13 Tails will be wagging at the Burton Coliseum June 10-13, as the Calcasieu Parish Kennel Club teams up with the Acadiana Kennel Club of Lafayette to host a combined American Kennel Club (AKC) sanctioned confirmation dog show, the Cajun Cowboy Cluster. The Acadiana Kennel Club of Lafayette will be featured on June 10-11, and the Calcasieu Kennel Club will be featured on June 12-13. Arpproximately 900 entries from the 150 breeds recognized by the AKC will be at the shows. Competitions include conformation, junior showmanship, obedience and best puppy competition. Vendors will be on hand to sell those hard-to-find items and a CERf and MicroChip clinic will be held on Sat., June 12. A veterinarian will be on-site to MicroChip and give the CERf certification. Show hours are 8:30 a.m.—8 p.m. daily with free admission for the general public. Neither strollers nor non-competing dogs will be allowed in the Coliseum. For a complete list of events, contact Rachel Geroir at (337) 852-1875 or Sallie Shepard at (337) 304-5788. CONVENTION DU LAC—JUNE 11-13 Convention Du Lac is a weekend of science fiction, science fact, paranormal research, medieval arts and crafts and combat demonstrations. In addition, costuming classes and author workshops will be offered. Attendees of all ages are asked to dress up in their

favorite sci-fi costumes for an intergalactic costume masquerade ball to be held on Sat. evening. There will also be a presentation of various medieval fighting tactics from the Amtgard and SCA groups from Lake Charles. Tickets are on sale now through June 11 and are available at www.condulac.net. Convention du Lac is presented by the Southwest Louisiana Science Education Foundation, a non-profit corporation. For more information, contact Justin Toney at 513-8927 or visit www.condulac.net. BIKERS ON THE BOUDIN TRAIL JUNE 12 The Kiwanis Club of Southwest Con du Lac Guest, Luciana Carro, Contraband proudly presents Bikers known for her role as Kat on on the Boudin Trail. This run takes Battlestar Galactica riders along Southwest Louisiana’s path with five stops to taste a little bit of the local flavor in boudin. All proceeds go to the Kiwanis Club to distribute to those in need in Calcasieu Parish. Registration begins at 9 a.m. at Veteran’ s Memorial Park on Lakeshore Drive in Lake Charles. Stops include Rabideaux’ s Sausage Kitchen (Iowa), Peto’s Deli (Moss Bluff ), Comeaux’s Cajun Gold, (DeQuincy), the

MONDAYS - CHEESE & WINE NIGHT 1/2 price wine, 7-11pm

TUESDAYS - 2 FOR 1 TUESDAYS, 9-10PM WEDNESDAYS - LADIES NIGHT! All ladies drink FREE, 6-8pm

THURSDAYS - ROCK THE CLOCK!

Domestics • $2.50 (9-10pm), $1.50 (10-11pm), .50¢ (11pm-Close) MUST BE HERE BY 9PM TO GET SPECIALS.

FRIDAYS - HALF OFF EVERYTHING, 10PM-12AM SATURDAYS - LADIES NIGHT PART II

All ladies get $1 domestic beer and $1 Silver Shelf Drinks, 7pm-10pm

3606 Ryan St, Lake Charles • (337) 478-0606 OPEN Mon. - Sat., 3pm - until • Sun., Opens at midnight MUST BE 21 TO ENTER

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Sausage Link (Sulphur), and the Frosty Factory in Lake Charles. For more information, call (337) 794-2626 or e-mail angelawp@bellsouth.net. THE BEST LITTLE WHOREHOUSE IN TEXAS JUNE 12-27 Dust off your cowboy boots and head down to ACTS Theatre to see the high-energy musical comedy, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas! This exuberant and bawdy musical comedy recounts a real-life story of small-town vice, statewide political sidestepping, and that great American pastime—sex. Tickets are $30 each for general admission and $15 with student ID. Performances begin at 7:30 p.m. (3 p.m. on Sun.) at ACTS Theatre, One Reid St. in Lake Charles.. For more information and specific performance dates, call (337) 433-ACTS or e-mail mail@actstheatre.com. ADOPT-A-KID COCOA SOIREE JUNE 18 Southern Touch Entertainment has teamed up with the Adopt-AKid Foundation to present the “Cocoa Soiree,” a chocolate-themed cocktail party, which will be held Fri., June 18 at The Gathering Place Event Facility in Lake Charles. Renowned jazz musician Tony Henry of Houston will provide entertainment and there will be a chocolate bar, complete with chocolate desserts and cocktails. Cost is $25 for individuals, $40 for couples and $300 for corporate tables of ten. To RSVP, contact Don Thomas at 309-4720. The Adopt-A-Kid Foundation is a nonprofit organization designed to sponsor students ages 12 years of age or younger. Students who qualify for sponsorship receive financial support to cover the costs of school supplies, uniforms, shoes and normal grooming needs. To learn more about Adopt-A-Kid, visit their Facebook page. To make donations, call 309-4720.

Meet Prissy Prissy is a smart little hound dog mix just under two years old. She’s been in a foster home since Thanksgiving and is the perfect housedog. She loves people and enjoys playing with other dogs. Sweet, affectionate, outgoing, and well behaved, she has lots of energy to play. She would make a great companion

for any family, especially a family with kids! She’s also is a great “dog park” kind of dog, as she loves the outdoors. Prissy is spayed and up to date on her vaccinations. You can complete the adoption application online at www.4PawsSocietyInc.com and submit it electronically, or fax it to (337) 558-6331.  You can also e-mail to fourpawssociety@aol.com. For more info on Prissy, call her foster parent at (337) 529-0101. Please give Prissy the Forever Home that she deserves!

TJN

MARDI GRAS RETURNS TO SIOUX CITY JULY 1 The annual Krewe de Charlie Sioux Mardi Gras Festival will be held on Thurs., July 1, at the Orpheum Theater, 520 Pierce Street, in downtown Sioux City Iowa. This year’s theme is “Party Like a Rock Star,” and the event will once again feature lavish costumes constructed for the Krewe de Charlie Sioux by members from Lake Charles (Sioux City’s Sister City for over a decade). Authentic Cajun food will be served under a large tent on Pierce Street. Doors to the Orpheum Theatre open at 6 p.m.; the gala performance starts at 7:30 p.m. Free tickets to the costume gala are available on a first-come, first-served basis at the Tyson Event Center box office. Reserved sponsorship tickets are also available, starting at $15 for main floor seating. Tickets for the Cajun buffet are $10 and are available at the Tyson Events Center Box Office, all Ticketmaster outlets, at www.Ticketmaster.com, or by calling (800) 745-3000. TJN

Calcasieu Parish has the highest child abuse rate in the state. If you suspect that a child is being abused, call your local police department immediately. You can make the difference in a child’s life.

Volume 1 • Issue 1

JUNE 3, 2010

PAGE 49


Taylor Simon, Kathyrn Matte and David Sonnier have been past workshop favorites at CTC’s Summer Starz Series!

Join us all summer for Crafty Tuesdays and Amazing Thursdays. Both days will offer something different and fun! June 3: Amazing Thursdays – “Whale Tales” At 11:30 a.m., Beki Derise of the Red Cross will talk to the children about water safety. Afterwards, join us in ArtSpace where we will make colorful fish. The Children’s Theatre Company and Kerry A. Onxley, artistic director, are proud to present the annual Summer Starz Series. These summer theatre workshops are designed to introduce newcomers to the world of theatre and challenge young veterans to perfect advanced theatrical concepts and production techniques. All workshops culminate in performance demonstrations. The workshop sessions offered this season are as follows: Wild Things! July 7-9, 10-11:15 a.m. Ages 5-8 Years. $65. (Includes T-shirt) This workshop introduces children to theatre through the use of creative drama, theatre games, creative movement, stage makeup and musical theatre. A demonstration follows the last day of the workshop. A wonderful introduction to theatre! Acting For The Camera! July 7-9, Noon-1: 30 p.m. Ages 8-18 Years. $85 (Includes T-shirt) This workshop covers auditioning for commercials, reading commercial scripts, exploring different commercial techniques, and beginning improvisational skills.  Information and samples are shared on creating resumes, head shots and finding the best agent or manager. Students participate with hands-on camera experience! PAGE 50

JUNE 3, 2010

Midsummer Fun! July 19-23, Ages 5-18 Years. $85 (Includes T-shirt) 5-8 Years 10-11:15 a.m. 9-18 Years 10 a.m.-Noon Learn the language, ideas and adventures of William Shakespeare. Students perform excerpts from some of Shakespeare’s most popular plays while experiencing the technical aspects of lighting, set designs and creating costumes. The workshop concludes with a free public performance starring all of the students. Kidz In Showbiz! August 2-6, Ages 5-18 Years $85 (Includes T-shirt) 5-8 Years 10 a.m.-11:15 a.m. 9-18 Years 10 a.m.-Noon Students will learn musical theatre techniques by acting, singing and dancing to songs from Broadway shows. The final class features the students in a performance demonstration highlighting musical theatre skills learned. No experience is needed for the workshops. They all have limited enrollment and are held at Central School of the Arts & Humanities Center (809 Kirby Street). For registration information, contact the theatre at (337) 433.7323 or visit the Web site at www.childrenstheatre.cc TJN

June 8: Crafty Tuesdays – Japanese Fish Mobiles Design your own Japanese fish mobile! Classes begin at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. and are limited to 15 children. Please sign up in the front office. Tuesday, June 8: Domino’s Dough Raising Night The Second Tuesday of Every Month is Domino’s Night for the Children’s Museum in the Lake Area! When you place and pick up your order, tell Domino’s it is for the Children’s Museum and 20 percent of the order will be donated to us! June 10: Amazing Thursdays “All About Weather” At 2 p.m., KPLC meteorologist Kellie Hutchinson will discuss hurricane preparedness and hand out hurricane tracking guides. Saturday, June 12: Sasol’s Second Saturday Science Show At 11 a.m., Sasol employees will perform experiments designed to show cool things done with pressure and the importance of pressure. They will inflate a balloon with lemon juice and baking soda, create a cloud in a bottle and blow up a balloon inside of a bottle!

June 15: Crafty Tuesdays – Lantern ArtSpace Workshop Paint your own lantern! Classes begin at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. and are limited to 15 children. Please sign up in the front office. June 17: Amazing Thursdays – “Lowe’s Workshop for Kids” We will hammer and build different projects with Denise Jones from Lowe’s. Class begins at 3:30 p.m. and is limited to 15 children. Please sign up in the front office. June 22: Crafty Tuesdays – Princess Wands and Fast Boomerangs Workshop Design your own precious princess wand or a fast boomerang! Classes begin at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. and are limited to 15 children. Please sign up in the front office. June 24: Amazing Thursdays – Power Tumbling and Cheerleading Demonstration See amazing athletes from RayGyms at 11 a.m. They will demonstrate power tumbling and cheerleading techniques. June 29: Crafty Tuesdays – Patriotic Fan Just in time for the 4th of July, we will make a beautiful patriotic fan. Classes begin at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. and are limited to 15 children. Please sign up in the front office. The Children’s Museum is located at 327 Broad Street in Downtown Lake Charles. Museum hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Admission is $7 for children and adults. Birthday parties and memberships are available. Contact the Children’s Museum at (337) 4339420 or visit www.swlakids.org for more details events.

TJN

Volume 1 • Issue 1


By Leslie Berman

If you saw any of the news coverage of the 40th Comic-Con, San Diego’s gi-normous pop culture convention (125,000+ attendees) that was held last summer, you might have noticed that the same kind of red carpet celebrity attention usually paid to, well, celebrities, was trained on the creators and fans of science fiction and fantasy writing in comics, roleplaying games, and the Japanese graphic novel form, manga.   Comic-Con has a very specific focus, but it barely scratches the surface of the sci fi and fantasy fan world, which expresses itself in hundreds of annual conventions worldwide, including the Lake Area’s own expo, Condulac (convention by the lake), now in its second year, from June 11 – 13 at the Lake Charles Civic Center. The expanded Condulac, hosted by the Southwest Louisiana Science Education Foundation, is produced by an all-volunteer group dedicated to enjoying and spreading sci fi and fantasy fan pursuits, such as gathering to share insights and information about sci fi movies, television series, comics, graphic novels and other books, as well as participating in making and displaying costumes, gaming, and a myriad of related activities.  This year, Condulac will feature numerous well-known figures in the sci fi and fantasy field including actresses Luciana Carro, who was featured as Viper pilot Louanne “Kat” Katraine in Battlestar Gallactica for three seasons (and also played Priyah Magnus in the Battlestar Gallactica prequel spinoff Caprica) and Chase Masterson, wellknown among Star Trek Deep Space Nine fans for her recurring role as Leeta, as well as her portrayal of Xela in Star Trek V:  Of Gods and Men. I spoke with Carro about her role at Condulac, and about her work as a performer, and learned that an actor may be said to be “resting” between roles, Volume 1 • Issue 1

but the rest is not really restful.  “I take a lot of classes – acting, scene study, dance, auditioning technique, Alexander Technique – when I’m not working on a specific role,” Carro said. “You have to stay prepared for the work when it comes up.”  Carro explained that for television or film, each actor usually prepares her/his role alone, and rarely gets time to rehearse with the other cast members until the location or set shooting takes place.  “We rehearse while they’re setting the lighting,” she told me, “so you have to be ready to go from your own previous work on your lines and character.” I asked what the director does, and Carro and I laughed when she said she wasn’t entirely sure.  “They set up the shots and make sure that they have what will be needed to edit the scenes to reflect the emotion and meaning of the storyline.”  I asked if any directors had given her specific instruction about her characters’ demeanor. Carro remembered one special moment: “Directors have occasionally helped me understand my character’s place in the story or at the moment in time that we’re shooting.  One director was coaching me to understand what “Cat” was feeling when she was in her Viper and could see blinding lights ahead of her in space.  He told me to imagine I’d just seen the face of God. That was a powerful explanation, and the look on my face in the finished scene told the whole story.” Condulac organizer Justin Toney spoke with me about the much-expanded programming for Condulac II.  “One thing led to another, and everyone wanted to help.  When we knew we would have the Civic Center, we could plan on bringing out more programming and events to touch on things a broader audience is interested in.”  In addition to Carro and Masterson,

Condulac will feature Roger Nygard, who directed both of the Trekkies fan documentary films as well as episodes of The Bernic Mac Show and The Office; and Larry Nemecek, whose Star Trek TV series’ connections range from writing to acting and consulting on Deep Space Nine, Voyager, Next Generation and more. Also appearing is anthropologist and pop culture theorist Darryl Frazetti, whose recent work includes an analysis of Star Trek and the role science fiction plays in higher education and Pastor Curtis Webster of the Encino, California First Presbyterian Church, who leads a monthly discussion titled the “Spirit of Star Trek,” and has appeared at numerous cons to speak about the mythic dimensions of sci fi and fantasy. Each guest will participate in numerous programming options over the course of Condulac, including panels, Q&A sessions, photo and autograph signing events, meeting and greeting fans, and more.  Carro and Masterson will judge the masquerade costume contest, and Masterson will perform her jazz and torch songs in a Saturday night concert.  Nygard will exhibit his recently completed film, The Nature of Existence, which asks the question, “Why do we exist?” of hundreds of people all over the globe, such as evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins (The God Delusion and director Irvin Kershner (Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back), and many more.  Due to the nature of some of the film’s scenes, this showing will be for those over 18 only. And for those of a literary bent, like myself, Condulac will feature authors such as Denise Roper, author of The Lord of the Hallows: Christian Symbolism and Themes in J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and M. B. Weston, author of The Elysian Chronicles, a fantasy series about

guardian angel warfare and treason. You’ll also get to meet D.B. Grady, a former paratrooper with U.S. Army SpecOps, whose work has appeared everywhere from Boys’ Life to The Atlantic and whose debut Sci Fi novel, Red Planet Noir, was released in December 2009, and McNeese State employee Judith Leger, whose fantasy romances include Love’s True Enchantment and Dragon Wish. Being an avid recreational reader, my idea of a great party is a convention where authors and others gather to talk about writing and ideas over good food and drink.  Luckily, that’s one kind of sci fi convention readily available, because many fans are voracious readers with catholic tastes – as anyone who’s shopped recently in Books-AMillion might guess from their lengthy aisle filled with science fiction and fantasy novels in its many sub-genres.  Not to mention the packed racks of comics, graphic novels, role-playing card games, and other Sci Fi, fantasy, and manga offerings at Paper Heroes on Ryan St. in Lake Charles. Paper Heroes sells more of the indies.  “The customers are loyal,” Kevin Cinquemano, owner of Paper Heroes told me.  “They come back all the time, but especially when the new editions come out.”  Customers can earn loyalty points and subsequent discounts for their purchases, just like the chain stores offer, and when I was in the store, one twenty-something lingered over a display case and his purchase, then discussed the loyalty program with Cinquemano. “I can really get something special with that many points,” he said, beaming. Paper Heroes also offers in-store gaming, and will be sponsoring a Magic tournament at Condulac.  Go on, get your game on.  And your costume too. 

TJN JUNE 3, 2010

PAGE 51


To list your event e-mail: lauren@thejambalayanews.com

The

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Dave Pellerin @ Micci’s Piano Bar, 7 p.m. 

• Andrew

THURSDAY, JUNE 3

• Don Fontenot & Les Cajuns de la Prairie @ DI’s • • • • • • • •

Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. Los Lonely Boys @ Party by the Pool, L’Auberge du Lac Casino, 7 p.m. Brad Brinkley/Brian David @ Micci’s Piano Bar, 7 p.m. Forever Falls @ Luna Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. Mike Zito @ The Porch, 8 p.m. Mambo Jazz Kings @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. Jeff D @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 9 p.m. Chubby Carrier & The Bayou Swamp Band @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. DJ Cage @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. 

FRIDAY, JUNE 4 • Static @ Downtown at Sundown, 6 p.m. • Errol Jenkins & Louisiana Tradition @ DI’s Cajun

Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Chris Shearman @ Micci’s Piano Bar, 7 p.m. • TBA @ Aucoin’s Cajun Restaurant, Hayes, 7 p.m. • Clay Walker @ Texas Longhorn Club, Vinton, 8 p.m.

• • •

Atkins/Mellow Down Easy @ Luna Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. Mambo Jazz Kings @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8:30 p.m. Some Assembly Required @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. Meriwether @ AJ’s Bar & Grill, 10 p.m. DJ Cage @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 5 • Mack Manuel & The Lake Charles Ramblers @ • • • • • • •

DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. Almost Somebody @ I-10 Beach, 7 p.m. TBA @ Aucoin’s Cajun Restaurant, Hayes, 7 p.m. Mambo Jazz Kings @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8:30 p.m. Outlaw Nation/Idle of the Peach @ Luna Bar & Grill, 9 p.m. Tommy G & Stormy Weather @ Hawg Wild, Sulphur, 9 p.m. Some Assembly Required @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. DJ Cage @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m.

THURSDAY, JUNE 10 • Felton LeJeune & The Cajun Cowboys @ DI’s

Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Poptart Monkeys @ Party by the Pool, L’Auberge

du Lac Casino, 7 p.m. • Matthew Moss @ The Porch, 8 p.m. • Boomerang @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs,

Vinton, 8 p.m. • Bernie Alan @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino,

Kinder, 9 p.m. • Time Machine @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill,

L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m.  FRIDAY, JUNE 11 • Howard Noel & Cajun Boogie @ DI’s Cajun Food

& Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • TBA @ Aucoin’s Cajun Restaurant, Hayes, 7 p.m. • Rodney Carrington @ L’Auberge du Lac Event

Center, L’Auberge du Lac Casino, 8:30 p.m. • Boomerang @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs,

Vinton, 8:30 p.m. • Brandon Ledet & The Creole Touch @ Ms. Vera’s

Place, Sulphur, 9 p.m. • Danica @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • Don Fontenot et Les Amis de la

Louisiane @ Club 1Sixty5, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • Static @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 10 p.m. • Rockstar Karaoke @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. 

PAGE 52

JUNE 3, 2010

Volume 1 • Issue 1


SATURDAY, JUNE 12 • Brent Rodgers @ The Porch, 9:30 a.m. • Briggs Brown & The Bayou Cajuns @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • ThingFish w/Trip Wamsley @ The Porch, 7 p.m. • TBA @ Aucoin’s Cajun Restaurant, Hayes, 7 p.m. • The Lakeside Gamblers @ VFW Post 2130, 7:30 p.m. • Rodney Carrington @ L’Auberge du Lac Event Center, L’Auberge du Lac Casino, 8:30 p.m. • Boomerang @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8:30 p.m. • Danica @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • Don Fontenot et Les Amis de la Louisiane @ Club 1Sixty5, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • HipBootJoe @ Yesterday’s, 9:30 p.m. • Toby Templet @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m.  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. THURSDAY, JUNE 17 • Homer LeJeune & The Kajun Kings @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m.

• The Molly Ringwalds @ Party by

the Pool, L’Auberge du Lac Casino, 7 p.m. • Ka-Nection @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Jaryd Lane @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. • HipBootJoe @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m.  FRIDAY, JUNE 18

• TBA @ Aucoin’s Cajun Restaurant,

Hayes, 7 p.m. • ThingFish/Looks That Kill @ Nate’s

Place, 8 p.m. • Brian Pounds @ The Porch, 8 p.m. • Mel Waiters/Denise LaSalle @ Delta

• •

• Joe Simon & Louisiana Cajun @

• • • • • • •

DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. TBA @ Aucoin’s Cajun Restaurant, Hayes, 7 p.m. Wendy Colonna @ Luna Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. Trip Wamsley @ The Porch, 8 p.m. Ka-Nection @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8:30 p.m. No Idea @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. Butt Roxx @ AJ’s Bar & Grill, 10 p.m. After 8 @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 19 • Brent Rodgers @ The Porch,

9:30 a.m. • Al Roger & Louisiana Pride @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m.

• •

Event Center, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. Ka-Nection @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8:30 p.m. Brothers and Kings @ Luna Bar & Grill, 9 p.m. No Idea @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 9 p.m. After 8 @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m.  TJN

MONDAY NIGHTS: Abita Beer Night

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS: Mondo Martini Night

THURSDAY NIGHTS: Be Well Night

Whether you are dining in or calling in for takeout, let The Luna Bar and Grill do all the work. Come in today for one of our specialty salads, stellar sandwiches, or exceptional entrees. We offer many choices for the health conscious individual. We’re locally owned and the best place in town for live entertainment, food, and drinks. Fri. June 4 @ 9:00 MELLOW DOWN EAZY Sat. June 5 @ 9:00 OUTLAW NATION Fri. June 18 @ 8:00 WENDY COLONNA Sat. June 19 @ 9:00 BROTHERS AND KINGS Sat. June 26 @ 9:00 THE WILD BILLS & MORE Wed. July 7 @ 9:00 RADAR VS. WOLF

Volume 1 • Issue 1

JUNE 3, 2010

PAGE 53


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There ri p u a h h n u n C t c o i c n, w uitar wi he -Tr es o eaks out e lo Arts a r e o o a v h b t a s l v t u e s p n A c n s t i d h t k n g n h t o a Sta lo c int ura stic them g that br ets aroun and the b ing an J a N u l t n h t l i s t o i ’s n a e o c j e n w r a n k s n Joh man Manhatta of ethnic usic of sister, before played danci and in poc oncession e trucks. wn man, e at Trinity h, Johnson’s ntown At c g t o , a t d n r d n along less string eet while m out of o e o n r v w o f a f b ow ts’ r g be ason’s Do cking Cab , Sarabet d r n D o c n l a i t r y s M a i a u t a T d a an en g in the st ness pours player ow an ues ation of n rest il’s fundr e 2010 se tatic, a ro g l d a . i n n l d i c a D a r t u S c band, atic as a spe er interpre nter materi list bec mable wei nd tinny C ere—but Coun Friday is th , featuring d the Lake he a a t e a h r c t s S n p i w s ec se ,” y h un vo ar As dd in un Th hift P from ever mile-long wn clo gigged aro as “Cowlick ing to jo down to a Chapin C 7-year-old t s o e d k n a u s n y a a m r ,1 ar st Su At S and that’s tarted up as intend s, and ng on peake ember cals and M so gue w b louds s each spri 57th street Swift st Trinity m ney, will al armony vo party ince 1999. S the band w untry outla ., e h rt la f c focus om 37th to th Avenue Area s carnation o nky tonk co ny Cash, et ads One ynnn McCa ng Static on r , f in l. n l l i n l o n o n e o i s n a t h h i i t Ka , jo f the N od Festiva hat Lake ent l sea fixfirst l s, Jo y Twitty b l n c e e a r s w n e t b o i o p t J s o s n a t l 0 .  e F l r a a e 5 e w g y l a r f e n w G n o a c y i i D eo on r ty – ur Sto on am pla est rdi ernati here to t e block pa , like G ing some C bands like ish, Toad tambo eir first Ma ing and bec erforming t c i n d s I n u a m d ’m th ot th ,p Blowf s from ially ial, ad Well I version of s of From nd their fo vent circuit lic holiday s mater s pop song tie and the and essent n ’ o s u b i e e s o l u l f s stand r p , 0 o Static the specia rivate and as bar and s of Cha glorious se undown – block and ‘9 e Pilots, Ho and the like ock band. yp r a on er l ell four town At S ngside the est. Temp t Sprocket, ve country cordion pl om ture vic groups, dings, as w Static’s cov ck in i c i o e r , s r a f c d s s Down d proud alo ew York’s f ith for and at d we ose show ood-time o the W a progre w , n k p a e u , n e N s a d d w h e and t a ll partie ates. For th mporary g and has als forme they hooke their first ting with t hhat ar the babies ght t s e i e t b d t r r ni ut pa Sta the lub oug But con eup et in ring o this Friday c Led thickened. t ways thr fined a c ell-known n key, but th each lin ngths. b a t u s o u Y e i e es w er E the plot eren d has re has be dbabi usic, w wn str t.  N n diff music original m rial to its o laid down e- gran heck it ou TJ there, eup, and i ars, the ban ck classics, o c p e p s d t c n u d e an play ng the ma rrent gro couple of ; first li past 11 ye country ro n and Zyde ta e f ki gs cu a out th mashup o s, and Caju finally cre all twea t year, the iginals and others’ son o c e , Las of or ns of hem t uniqu ock anthem d rhythms they now tracks terpretatio n expect t e . t n l r e a h y r t d g s o s r i c d a e a h ing a Zyde soun cial in you c

Sun e h T t e e L t ’ M n n o D nO w o D Go

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JUNE 3, 2010

Volume 1 • Issue 1


photo by www.monsoursphotography.com Volume 1 • Issue 1

JUNE 3, 2010

PAGE 55



The Jambalaya News - Vol. 2 No. 5