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Westmoreland Bridge Jamaica Infrastructure Development Programme China Harbour Engineering Company Ltd. JIE 2013 Project Of The Year

ENGINEERING CHANGE

“We must be the change we wish to see in the world” ISSUE 1

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

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INTRODUCING THE JAMAICA INSTITUTIO

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President— Dr. Noel Brown, PhD, PE

Introducing the JIE Council

MSc in Aeronautical Engineering-Kier Institute of Civil Aviation Engineers  MSc in Mechanical Engineering - University of Oklahoma  PhD in Mechanical Engineering - University of Oklahoma  JIE Member since 2009  Occupation: Associate Professor, Head, School of Engineering, University of Technology

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Members 201314 President’s Address

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Welcome New

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2013 And the Award goes to….

Vice President— Kevin Sinclair Brown, P.E., M.ASCE 

Members! Engineers’ Week

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BSc. in Engineering in Civil Engineering—Florida International University  MSc. In Civil Engineering—Florida International University  JIE Member since 2007  Occupation: Project Engineer, Jamaica Social Investment Fund

7 Vice President— Christopher Hamilton

Goat Islands:

protect environment or

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promote development? Extraordinary Engineering

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Mechanical Engineering- College of Arts Science and Technology (CAST) BSc. In Civil Engineering—UWI, St. Augustine MBA from University of Orleans JIE Member since 1997 Occupation: Project Manager - Port Authority of Jamaica

10 Vice President— Gary Walters

Upcoming Events and Notices

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  

BSc. in Civil Engineering- University West Indies, St. Augustine JIE Member since 2004 Occupation: Senior Project Manager - National Water Commission

Newsletter Team Richard Atkinson Rochelle Bramwell Melissa Townsend Gary Walters JAMAICA

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ENGINEERS (JIE) COUNCIL MEMBERS 2013-14

Immediate Past President— Dr. David Smith 

BSc. in Civil Engineering-University of the West Indies (UWI), St. Augustine  MSc. in Civil Engineering Hydraulics - University of London  PhD. in Coastal Engineering from Queens University in Canada  JIE Member since 1999  Occupation: Managing Director- Smith Warner International

President Elect— Andre White   

BSc. In Civil Engineering— UWI, St. Augustine JIE Member since 2008 Occupation: Civil Engineer - N.O.Whyte and Associates Limited

Chairman: Aeronautical, Agricultural, Chemical, Industrial (AACI) Division— Paula Henry    

B.Eng in Chemical Engineering Post Diploma in EducationUniversity of Technology (UTech) JIE Member since 2012 Occupation: Lecturer in Chemical Engineering at UTech

Honorary Secretary— Dwight Rickets  

BSc. In Agricultural Engineering—UWI, St. Augustine MEng in Water Resources Engineering -University of Guelph in Canada  JIE Member since 1997  Occupation: Director - Facilities and Property Management, Ministry of Agriculture & Fisheries

Honorary Treasurer — Dave Barnaby

Chairman: Electrical Division — Leighton Facey, P.E.

Diploma in Mechanical Engineering—College of Arts Science and Technology (CAST)  BSc. (Hons) in Mechanical Engineering—University West Indies, St. Augustine  JIE Member since 1983  Occupation: Managing Director-Barnaby Engineering and Testing Services Ltd

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BSc. Electrical And Computer Engineering-UWI JIE Member since 2006 Occupation: Senior MEP Design Engineer, Basil Nelson & Associates Ltd

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INTRODUCING THE COUNCIL (CONT’D) Chairman: Civil Division—Dionne Sampson  Diploma in Project Management, Management Insti   

tute for National Development BSc. In Civil Engineering from Central University of Villa Clara, Cuba MBA (General) - University of the West Indies, Mona JIE Member since 2008 Occupation: Programme Manager of the K-Factor Unit, National Water Commission

Chairman: Mechanical Division — Dr. Kavian Cooke     

Graduate Member— Melissa Townsend

B.Eng in Mechanical Engineering—University of Technology MPhil in Mechanical Engineering - University of Technology PhD in Mechanical Engineering—University of Calgary JIE Member since 2010 Occupation: Programme Director-Mechanical Programme, UTech

  

BSc. Civil with Environmental Engineering-UWI., St. Augustine JIE Member since 2012 Occupation—Project Engineer National Water Commission

Ordinary Member— Rochelle Bramwell, P.E.  

BSc. Chemical & Process Engineering -UWI, St. Augustine Joint European Masters In Management and Engineering of the Environment and Energy (Erasmus Mundus: Spain, France and Sweden)  JIE Member since 2010  Occupation- Energy Management Unit Coordinator - Petrojam Ltd

Graduate Member— Edward Shakes   

JIE West Chairman, Ordinary Member— Alaina Young

BEng. In Chemical Engineering -UTech JIE Member since 2009 Occupation—Project Engineer - National Water Commission

  

BEng in Chemical EngineeringUTech JIE Member since 2012 Occupation: Project Engineer National Water Commission

Ordinary Member— Lewis Lakeman  BSc (Hons.) Civil Engineering-UWI., St. Augustine  MBA in Finance-University of Manchester  JIE Member since 2006  Occupation—Project Engineer - National Water Commission

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Welcome New Members!!

PRESIDENT’S ADDRESS As Jamaica is confronted by numerous challenges, I recognize the role that organizations such as the JIE will have to play in guiding the country towards its goal of becoming a first world country by 2030. The economists continue to remind us that this goal can only be realized if we are able to grow our economy at a rapid rate for the next seventeen (17) years. I am convinced that the Engineering Profession can be one of the engines of growth in our society.

The JIE would like to welcome the following persons:

The engineering profession and our cadre of trained engineers have contributed significantly to the quality of life currently enjoyed by our citizens, through the design of essential infrastructure such as the electricity power grid, the water supply system, the waste water treatment facilities and the development of the National Building Code, just to name a few. However, Dr. Noel Brown—President, JIE despite our efforts we still have challenges such as: the high cost of energy, crime and violence that are affecting critical sectors of our economy such as manufacturing and tourism, thus retarding our growth. The JIE and its members are committed to working towards finding solutions to these and other problems.

Dr. Samuel Chamberlain

Candra Barnes Ancile Brewster Marlon Clarke Stephen Edwards Jan-Cherie Fraser Rayon Hamilton Chadrick Lawrence

In this Council year we will focus on the some of the changes necessary to move us forward as a profession and a nation. Our theme for the year is "Engineering Change", supported by a quote from Mahatma Gandhi, "We must be the change we wish to see in the world", therefore, we need to change in order to be the agents of change. The JIE will undergo a few structural changes to be more responsive to the needs of our members so that they can respond more readily to the needs of the country. We currently have over six hundred (600) members on roll but at anytime only three hundred (300) are paid up active members.

Richard Lawrence Gary Lewis Jayson Lindo

When I inquire, as to the reasons, the two most common responses are: 1) The subscription is high. 2) What are the benefits?

Omar Palarchie Dionne Sampson Omar Thomas

These are legitimate concerns that we must consider. Let me remind you that five years ago I was a naysayer, but I chose to get involved and make a change from within. So, all sideliners please get involved and “be the change you wish to see in the organization”. JIE is ours so we need your participation to make it better.

Balvin Thorpe Christopher Udeagha

Highlights of our Recent Achievements:

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Issued membership cards to identify our members.

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Negotiating preferential loan facilities at RBC and other financial institution for our members.

Our members will have access to the Calvin McKain Library at UTech, starting January 1, 2014. We will continue to seek out opportunities for our members.

Neckeisha Walcott

Started a JIE UTECH Student Chapter.

Damion Whyte Rochelle Bramwell (upgraded) Marcus Grant (upgraded)

Received two, four-year-scholarships from New Era Homes; the scholarships are for Jamaican citizen studying Civil Engineering at the University of Technology, Jamaica, starting September 2014. Negotiating preferential rates and Professional Labiality Insurance at Allied Insurance Brokers. Provide and continue to provide support for the Hope Gardens Restoration Project through our Race for Hope.

DID YOU KNOW

Highlights of our Recent Changes: 1. Starting this year we will have four divisions so that we can respond more readily to the needs of our mem- The JIE will be preparing your Membership Cards at the end of February bers. The divisions are: 2014. Cards will be prepared for all Civil, Electrical, Mechanical and AACI (Agricultural, Aeronautical, Chemical and Industrial).

members who are current up to that

2. We will break our silence in a controlled way by having a Comments Committee chaired by the President, date. With these membership cards, you can now access the number of to give our views on issues that we think are relevant to our members and can contribute to nation building.

books and vast amount of infor3. As a professional organization we think that after 36 years of existence we should seek to have a place to mation at the Calvin McKain Library at the University of Technolcall home. Therefore, we will form a Housing and Fund raising Committee to assist in making that a reality. ogy. Yes you can!! All you need is your In closing, I wanted to thank members and associates for their continued interest and support. As we head current membership card. This offer into this year of change, we look forward to working with you in all areas possible for the advancement of expires on December 31, 2014 so Engineering in Jamaica. make use of this opportunity.!! JAMAICA

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JIE ENGINEER’S WEEK 2013 The Jamaica Institution of Engineers (JIE) hosted its annual Engineer’s Week from September 22– 29, 2013. Engineer’s Week is the established event for Engineers throughout the Caribbean where leaders in Utilities, Consultancies, Telecoms and Government gather, discuss and find solutions. The activities of 2013 were centered on standards and their impact on the solutions to our energy and infrastructure problems. The theme for the week was in keeping with that for the professional group of “Engineers Embracing Change” The week kicked off with a Thanksgiving Service at St. Margaret’s Anglican Church on Sunday the 22nd. Members of the JIE and as- Guest Speaker Mr. Selwyn Hart (Centre) of Caribbean Development Bank greets Eng. Dr. David Smith (President JIE; Centre) sociates were able to at Official Opening of JIE Engineer’s Week Conference & Expo This was followed by a three-day conference that concentrated on 2013. Eng Andre White, looks on.

the need for the development and application of standards in a variety of engineering related areas such as energy, design and construction, environmental management, water and waste water, communication and technology, manufacturing as well as disaster risk management and climate change adaptation. Highlights of the conference included: 

Bridge Building Competition—Congrats to the UTech Mechanical Engineering Group for successfully ousting the competition!

Exhibition Booths were set up by the various Sponsors throughout the three days. Members of the public were encouraged to view these booths from 5 pm to 7 pm during the conferThe Winning Team from the Engineering Students Macaroni ence week

Networking was encouraged at the end of each day of conference. With the variety of disciplines and specialists attending the conference, the conference proved to be a good opportunity to conduct same.

Bridge Building Competition receive their prize from Eng. Andre White

Engineer’s Week 2013 would not have been possible without the hard work and dedication of the Engineer’s Week committee members. Special thanks are in order for the organizing committee members below:

Students various schools including Penwood High School attended sessions. This was done in an effort to encourage inter-  est and broaden the horizons of Jamaican students. 

On Saturday, September 28th, a site visit to the North-South leg of the Highway 2000 was conducted as one of the closing activities of the week. Attendees were exposed to the challenges being faced by the construction company and the plans for moving forward with the project.

Eng. Andre White - Committee Chairperson Eng. Christopher Hamilton – Deputy Committee Chairperson, Site Tour and Launch Eng. Anthea Reynolds - PR and Marketing Eng. Dionne Sampson – PR and Marketing Eng. Dr. David Smith - President, JIE Eng. Dr. Noel Brown, Coordinator of Utech Bridge Competition Eng. Trevor Bennett - Coordinator of Utech Bridge Competition Eng. Dr. Kavian Cooke, Coordinator Edit and Review Committee Eng. Hugh Gordon – Committee Chairperson, Race for Hope JIE Secretariat- Juliene Holt/Medease Harris/ Susan Martin

   

The week came to a close on Sunday, September 29th with the 6th  annual Race for Hope 5K event. This event was an initiative of the  Jamaica Institution of Engineers and is a fun and healthy way to contribute to the refurbishment of the Hope Zoo. The 2013 staging  of the event saw more than 700 participants. 

For video highlights, see link below: Race for Hope Highlights

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And the Award Goes To... The JIE annual awards banquet was held at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel on November 14, 2013. The event saw the gathering of various disciples in the field of engineering to recognize and honour excellence. Congratulations are in order to the recipients of the following awards shown below: The President’s Cup

Eng. Christopher Hamilton

Best Committee Award

Engineers Week Committee

Outstanding Graduate Member

Eng. Melissa Townsend

Most Outstanding Student in the Faculty of Engineering and Computing

Kerri-Lee Chintersingh (UTECH—Chemical Eng.)

Most Outstanding Student in the Faculty of Built Engineering

Pierre-Anthony Archer (UTECH— Construction Eng.)

Most Outstanding Student in the Faculty of Engineering

Renee Williams (UWI—Mech. & Manufacturing Eng.)

Engineering Project of the Year

The Westmoreland Bridge—China Harbour Engineering Co.

Award of Excellence in Engineering

Eng. Peter Morais

Award for Excellence in Engineering presented to Engineer Peter Morais Citation Engineer Peter Morais completed his Bachelor’s Degree in Civil Engineering at the Edinburgh University, Scotland in 1964. On his return to Jamaica in 1965 he worked for 5 years with Leonard I. Chang Engineers Limited. He then went on a quest to further develop his career in civil engineering by securing employment with Ove Arup & Partners, Edinburgh, Scotland where he worked for the next 15 years as a senior design and resident engineer respectively. Peter’s drive to broaden his civil engineering experience continued with a 4 year stint at Higgs and Hill Overseas Limited, London, England; he worked initially as a Resident Engineer on a 300 bed Hospital in Cairo, Egypt after which he worked as Project Manager for the construction of a Power Station in St. Lucia. Engineer Morais’ international exposure resulted in him working in a managerial capacity in a number of exceptional companies in the Public and Private sector on his return to Jamaica. This includes Caribbean Construction Company Limited where he served as Contracts Manager from 1990 to 1992. Caribbean Cement Company Limited and Conspec (Caribbean) Limited where he served as Managing Director. He transitioned from the private to the public sector in 1997 by joining the Urban Development Corporation (UDC) as the Chief Engineer. His tenure at the UDC has seen him involved on a wide spectrum of projects, which have helped to shape Jamaica’s development. He has been involved on projects in the areas of infrastructure development (road design and sewerage treatment facility in Hellshire), marine facility development (Dunn’s River Pier in Ocho Rios) and sports facility development (Catherine Hall sports complex in Montego Bay, St. James and the National Stadium for the World Junior Championships in 2002). He departed the UDC in October 2013 in the capacity of Consultant Civil Engineer, a post that he held for 4 years. Eng. Morais’ engineering experience led to him gaining recognition in a number of engineering institutions. He was JAMAICA

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made a fellow of the Institution of Structural Engineers and the Jamaica Institution of Engineers in 2011. He also serves as committee member, in the capacity of Vice President, of the Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE) Caribbean Division. As a committee member of the IStructE Caribbean, he was instrumental in organizing the regional bridge conference in association with the JIE in 2010 and was also responsible for the staging of the inaugural engineering student’s macaroni bridge building competition in this same year. This competition has become one of the most anticipated events at the annual JIE Engineers’ Week Conference. Peter has also been remarkable in providing mentorship to several cohorts of young engineers who have come under his influence. For outstanding contribution and dedicated service to the engineering profession, the Jamaica Institution of Engineers is pleased to present to Engineer Peter Ian Morais, Fellow of the Jamaica Institution of Engineers and Registered Engineer in Jamaica, with the award for Excellence in Engineering.

Eng. Noel Brown presents the Award of Excellence in Engineering to Engineer Peter Morais

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GOAT ISLANDS: PROTECT ENVIRON ENVIRO As an environmentally conscious coastal engineer with many years of experience in doing studies for developments along the coastline, I feel compelled to weigh in on the conversation on the Goat Islands development. First, I would like to clarify my position on this matter. Yes, I am an engineer who is pro-development, and, yes, I am for the protection of our environmental resources. And, yes, these two can coexist in one opinion, and might I say, should coexist if we are to reap longterm benefits from any sort of development. Let us go beyond the talks about who should "go to hell" and try to reason rationally. My caveat, however, is that we really do not know the full details of the plans for this development, and most of the various opinions may be based on speculation, such as the one you are currently reading. So working with what we have heard or don't know, here are some of the issues from my perspective. Are the Goat Islands the ideal spot for this sort of development? It may provide some shelter for ships, but aren't there other areas along the coastline which may be also suited for a port development of this nature? Does the location tie in well with the overall master plan for the logistics hub? For example, how does Vernamfield fit into this picture, and would the Port Authority still go ahead with the expansion of the Port of Kingston? Has the Government come to the decision to use Goat Islands because it was convenient to do so, or because it maximises on the social and economic benefits to be derived? While I can understand some decisions have to be taken quickly, is the Government now going to evaluate alternative locations? Might I add that such an alternative could still be within the Portland Bight area, just not on the Goat Islands. There needs to be a paradigm shift in how the natural environment fits in with economically viable development. First, neither the developer nor the environmentalist should believe the other is a hindrance to what should be our ultimate goal: improvement of the livelihood of all Jamaicans. There are significant long-term benefits to be gained from the natural environment (ecological, physical and social), despite what some of us may think. These are just harder to monetise, hence the reason such benefits are often seemingly less than the forecasted economic benefits from a development.

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If the Government is to go ahead will the physical environment suff mitigated?

1. The wetlands, which are home t ary to many species, could be signifi protect us from shoreline erosion after heavy rainfalls to protect the m

2. The offshore areas surrounding for fish development because of sanctuaries and nurseries will be ad opment, which will have economic hood of fishermen. Mitigation measures can take diffe avoid negative impacts where we c site-selection stage in choosing th ject. This brings us back to my first is the best option for this project. Next, we should attempt to minimi for development should be selecte least sensitive areas. In the case of have to be created to meet the r Where and how this is done shoul the impacts on the wetlands and ot

Then we should try to restore the For instance, if there are mangrov tion, attempts should be made to appropriate form of mitigation for speaks to the artificial creation of ment that will enhance marine life. This could include planting mangro source is being depleted, or build sanctuaries. These have been succ the world. This project would, of course, not b relative importance in Jamaica. We and, unfortunately, we have a histo for development. Montego Freepo result of dumping material on to r

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NMENT OR PROMOTE DEVELOPMENT? ONMEN

with the Goat Islands area, how ffer, and how can the impacts be

little regard for the environment. 21st-CENTURY THINKING

to mangroves and act as a sanctuficantly impacted. Mangroves also during storms and act as a filter marine life offshore.

the Goat Islands are a good area its sheltered nature. These fish dversely impacted with the develimpacts, as it will affect the liveli-

erent forms. First, we must try to can. This should happen from the he appropriate location for a propoint of whether the Goat Islands

ise impacts. For example, the area ed based on the presence of the f the Goat Islands, more land will reported 3,000-acre requirement. ld have the objective to minimise ther sensitive marine areas?

e damaged areas where possible. ves damaged during the construcreplant these. The last and most this project is compensation. This areas within the marine environ. oves in other areas where this reding artificial reefs to act as fish cessfully done in different parts of

be the first of its kind in scope and e have done several major projects ory of sacrificing the environment ort and parts of Ocho Rios were a reefs, and at the time, there was

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Much of Kingston Harbour has been reclaimed, and indeed, Portland Bight has reclamation, and shipping channels were dredged. However, the disregard for environmental issues has been changing. More recently, the Port Authority and other branches of the Government have been brought into 21st-century thinking regarding the environment, not necessarily as a result of public pressure through the media, but because of the Government's own regulations. The construction of Bogue and Soapberry sewage treatment plants is finally putting an end to the dumping of raw sewage into the sea; a massive coral-transplanting programme was undertaken at Rackhams Reef when the entrance to Kingston Harbour was last widened. Sustainable development is, therefore, not a foreign concept to Jamaica. As the debate rages on, let us recognise the environment should not be treated as a mere hindrance to development. Nor should the promotion of economically viable development be treated as a curse on the environment. We must continue to improve our standards for developing in an environmentally sustainable way. The approach to the potential Goat Islands project has, however, clouded the positive spin-offs that could be garnered and has shown disregard for the importance of consideration for the natural environment. We should hope the announcement was premature, and the proper investigations will indeed be carried out before final decisions are made on the project. We need cost-benefit analyses to determine the real benefits to the Jamaican people and we must evaluate our options so that we can maximise the social and economic benefits, while giving due consideration to the ecological benefits of maintaining our natural environment. Contributed by Jamel D. Banton. Jamel Banton is a company director with more than 15 years of experience in coastal and marine engineering. Email feedback to jamel@smithwarner.com

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EXTRAORDINARY LOCATION Marina South, Singapore

THE GARDEN BY THE BAY

CLIENT NAME Dr Tan Wee Kiat, National Parks,

The Gardens by the Bay is already an important attraction on

Singapore

the water’s edge of Singapore. The gardens include two magnif-

ARCHITECT Grant Associates; Wilkinson Eyre M&E ENGINEER Atelier Ten; CPG Corporation

icent cooled conservatories, a small forest of “super-trees” and an aerial walkway, all of which exemplify innovative structural engineering. The whole complex is underpinned by a commitment to energy conservation and the enhancement of nature. The conservatories have an usual structure where an arch pro-

PRINCIPAL

vides a spine to support a series of tensioned ribs – a highly

CONTRACTORS

original approach. The super-trees are sculptural objects in their

Woh Hup; EXPAND Construction

own right but provide a really intriguing combination of engineering and aesthetic role – as solar collectors, chimneys,

OTHER SUB CONTRACTORS

steam exhaust outlets and shade devices.

YYK; Yongnam Engineering & Construction; TTJ

Source: http://www.istructe.org/structuralawards/2013/categories/award-for-arts-or-entertainment-structures/2013/gardens-by-the-bay JAMAICA

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Y ENGINEERING ALTERNATIVE ENERGY Solar Wind One hundred billion times more power than humanity currently needs is available right now, out in space. It comes through solar wind, a stream of energized, charged particles flowing outward from the sun. Brooks Harrop, a physicist at Washington State University in Pullman and Dirk Schulze-Makuch of Washington State’s School of Earth and Environmental Science, think they can capture these particles with a satellite that orbits the sun the same distance Earth does. Their so-called Dyson-Harrop satellite would have a long copper wire charged by onboard batteries in order to produce a magnetic field perfect for snagging the electrons in the solar wind. The energy from the electrons would be beamed from the satellite via a infrared laser to Earth, since the infrared spectrum would not be affected by the planet’s atmosphere. This Dyson-Harrop satellite holds a few technical problems that researchers are currently trying to fix. It has no protection from space debris, and some of the power could be lost as it’s beamed through Earth’s atmosphere. Plus, finding a way to aim the laser beam across millions of miles of space is no small task. What seems more realistic is to use this satellite in order to power nearby space missions. Vibrations Go out and party, it may help the environment. Club Watt in Rotterdam, Netherlands is using floor vibrations from people walking and dancing to power its light show. The vibrations are captured by “piezoelectric” materials that produce an electric change when put under stress. The U.S. Army is also looking at piezoelectric technology for energy. They put the material in soldier’s boots in order to charge radios and other portable devices. Although this is an interesting renewable energy with great potential, it’s not cheap. Club Watt spent $257,000 on this first generation 270-square-foot floor, more money than it can recoup. But the floor will be reprogrammed to improve output in the future. Your dance moves really can be electric. Source: http://news.discovery.com/tech/alternative-power-sources/ten-bizarre-sources-alternative-energy.htm

A lawyer and an engineer were fishing in the Caribbean. The lawyer said, “I’m here because my house burned down, and everything I owned was destroyed by the fire. The insurance company paid for everything. “That’s quite a coincidence,” said the engineer. “I’m here because my house and all my belongings were destroyed by a flood, and my insurance company also paid for everything." The lawyer looked somewhat confused. “How do you start a flood?” he asked. Source : http://engineering-humour.com/engineering-jokes.html

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The offices of the Jamaica Institution of Engineers (JIE) have moved to 54 Molynes Road since February 1, 2014. Come visit us at our new location! JAMAICA INSTITUTION OF ENGINEERS 54 Molynes Road, Kingston 10, Tel :(876) 758-5559 Fax (876) 758-7412 E-mail: jie@cwjamaica.com website: www.jiejamaica.org To volunteer or contribute to the next newsletter Email: jie@cwjamaica.com with the subject ‘ NEWSLETTER’

UPCOMING JIE EVENTS DATE

TOPIC

March 1 –AAIC Social

The start time is 4:00 p.m. and the venue is Mais House, UTASU Common Room. This is behind UTECH right beside Hope water treatment plant and Hope gardens back gate. Take the left turn before UTECH’s main gate going towards Papine.

March 27—Mechanical Division

Change/Transition of an Engineer. Speaker: E.G. Hunter—CEO of NWA Time and Location: 5 pm at UTECH (exact location TBA)

April (Date TBD)—Civil Division

FIDIC Workshop / Training Seminar.

April 23—Second Quarterly Luncheon

TBA

April (Date TBD)—Mechanical Division

Project Management for Engineers and Technical Professionals. (Details to follow)

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JIE Newsletter - March 2014  
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