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JAMAICA INSTITUTION OF ENGINEERS

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Cast Iron Bridge Spanish Town, St. Catherine, Jamaica Designed by Thomas Wilson

ENGINEERING CHANGE

“We must be the change we wish to see in the world” APRIL/JULY 2014

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PRESIDENT’S ADDRESS

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: TOPIC

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President’s Address

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Intermittent Generation— Implications for the Operation of the

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Leading Change

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Luncheon 2014

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JIE UTECH CHAPTER: Beyond Engineering— Making a Difference

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JIE responds to the tariff review proposed by JPS

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Extraordinary Engineering

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Call for Nominations— JIE Project of the Year

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Announcements & Upcoming Events

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Newsletter Team Richard Atkinson Rochelle Bramwell Melissa Townsend Gary Walters JAMAICA

As Jamaica tries to recover from the global economic recession the profession and members of the JIE are not spared. In recent years we have seen a penetration of the local construction industry by large foreign firms, which when coupled with the global economic recession, has resulted in Dr. Noel Brown—President, JIE many small and medium size firms downsizing or closing their operation until things get better. This has had a multiplier effect on the rest of the economy including other companies that they do business with, the engineers and graduate engineers they employ and the support they are able to provide to the JIE. The JIE is a not for profit organization that survives mainly on membership subscriptions and sponsorship from our members and corporate Jamaica. Recently, we have seen a reduction in the number of members renewing their annual subscription and as such, close to half of our members have gone into arrears and not currently able to take advantage of all the benefits we are able to offer. I would like to remind members who are experiencing hardships that the JIE’s Council is empowered by the JIE’s Constitution and Code of Ethics to remit all or part of your arrears on a case by case basis. Therefore, if you are in arrears I encourage you to write to the Council requesting a write-off of some or all of your arrears so that you can continue to take advantage of the members’ benefits that are available. Despite the challenges faced, I would like to thank the members of the JIE and all Jamaicans who have worked hard and given sacrifices for a better Jamaica. While we are on an upward trajectory we still have some work to do in order to achieve the “Jamaica 2030 Vision”. The JIE’s theme for this year is “Engineering Change” which has been interpreted by us to mean that we need to focus on the changes taking place around us and come up with creative solutions for our own survival.

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INTERMITTENT GENERATION Implications for the Operation of the Grid The 1st Electrical Division Presentation held at UTECH on Thursday, January 23, 2014 was a success. The presenter was Dionne Nugent, Head of Engineering & Transmission Planning, JPSCo. The topic was "Intermittent

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Implications for the Operation of the Grid". Some of the topics explored were: 1. Imperatives of Renewable Energy Integration 2. The Jamaican Experience 3. Overview of Grid Integration Issues 4. Methodology for Assessing Maximum Grid Penetration 5. Grid Codes and Interconnection Rules 6. Smart Grid Technologies for Renewable Integration

Considerations for Future Integration of Renewables We look forward for the continued support from membership for upcoming presentations. Participants listen attentively as Dionne Nugent, Head of Engineering & Transmission Planning, JPSCo presents on "Intermittent Generation - Implications for the Operation of the Grid".

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Data indicates that the world is changing at an exponential rate. With changes in the world comes changes in roles of engineers. One of the many hats worn by engineers is that of leader. But how does one lead change successfully? John Kotter in his book ‘Leading Change’ highlights eight (8) steps for leading change. These steps are:

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Source: http://www.kotterinternational.com/our-principles/changesteps JAMAICA

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The JIE conducted its First Quarterly Luncheon on February 21, 2014 at the Knutsford Court Hotel. This Luncheon was aimed at garnering the expertise of our Past Presidents and to get feedback from our members to help the JIE to plan a successful future.

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LUNCHEON 2014

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The JIE held its Second Quarterly Luncheon on April 23, 2014 at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel in dedication to our Administrative Professionals. This luncheon featured Guest Speaker, Mr Glenford Smith - Author, Motivational Speaker and Career and Life Success Strategist who demonstrated to our Administrative Professionals that they are valuable members of our teams. He also reminded them that they will need to change in order to remain relevant in this fast-paced and changing environment. This function was also used to highlight how employers can continue to motivate staff during periods of change.

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JIE UTECH

BEYOND ENGINEERING— PRESENTATION BY:

CHRISTOPHER BURGESS CEO of CEAC Solutions Co. Ltd. On February 20, 2014, Mr. Christopher Burgess, a Civil Engineering graduate of the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine gave a presentation at one of JIE UTECH Chapter’s bi-weekly meetings. Mr. Burgess started his presentation by giving a brief overview of his past scholastic achievements and experience in the engineering industry. During his final year of university he had set his mind on pursuing a career which specialized in coastal engineering. Upon finishing his degree he knew that his next goal was to acquire a master’s degree in the field he declared to specialize in. Pursuing his passion led him to the birth of the company Civil, Environmental and Coastal Engineers and Planners (CEAC). Further on in his presentation Mr. Burgess spoke of the importance of entrepreneurship. He implored that

following your heart and passion will lead you to become a successful entrepreneur because it will be easier for you to find creativity in what you love to do. He made reference to the book “Rich Dad, Poor Dad” saying that it was one of his inspirations that motivated him in pursuing his dreams. He also urged us to get professionally qualified so that we could practice legally in the country.

Mr. Christopher Burgess was charismatic with his delivery; he had the undivided attention of the 40 plus members present. He proclaimed that one should not be focused on the financial aspect all the time, the learning opportunity is just as valuable as the financial loss or gain and may even far outweigh it. He also stated that as engineers it is always good to give back to society, doing charity work will help to build friendships. And he implored us to look for opportunities in the industry that are in demand with limited/no available service. The final point that Mr. Burgess ended his presentation with was “What you leave university with is what you keep for the rest of your life.” This statement was directed to the engineering programs that were not yet accredited. It is of great importance that students push for their respective programs to receive accreditation thus providing recognition internationally. “Your degree carries as much value in its own special way as other prestigious institutions.” Mr. Burgess iterated that students should take on challenges; to not just take the easy way out. Mr. Christopher Burgess made note of the brain drain implications as well; normally graduates seek to travel abroad to seek “greener pastures.” It isn’t always the only way out, and as an engineer one should try to build their country by helping to upgrade the country through technology. Contributed by the JIE UTech Chapter

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CHAPTER:

— MAKING A DIFFERENCE VISIT TO

JAMAICA NATIONAL CHILDREN’S HOME On Wednesday March 5th, a group of over 20 members of the JIE UTech Chapter gathered for a day filled with hard but rewarding work at the Jamaica National Children's Home in Carberry Court Mona, Kingston 7. The day's events included the painting of four

(4) rooms, and two (2) bathrooms. One of the two bathrooms had minor repairs done to the toilet bowl. There was also need for the skill of carpentry where two of JIE UTECH Chapter members performed door changes. There was the use of JIE UTECH Chapter’s electrical technicians soon to be Electrical engineers, for the instalment of several electrical socket covers. There was the general cleaning of the vicinity which helped in making the atmosphere more welcoming.

The workers were provided with lunch from the lovely ladies of JIE UTech Chapter. After playing their part in the painting they took the onus of preparing sandwiches for the other members and a few of the children on the compound. They also provided the children with different flavours of ice cream; we saw many smiling faces as they chose their preferred flavour. The evening ended with the presentation of clothes provided by the members of the Chapter

and canned foods provided by Grace Kennedy Jamaica. These were warmly accepted by the overseers at the children’s home. The day was filled with laughter and good cheer from the JIE members as well as the children of the Institution. The JIE UTECH Chapter left the Children’s home with a warm feeling in their hearts knowing that they had done some good and made a lot of children happy. Contributed by the JIE UTech Chapter

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JIE RESPONDS TO THE TARIF J P S P RO P O S E S … . . .

JIE RESPONDS…...

A PRICE CAP

Majority of the rate increase will be borne by Rate  10 & 20 customers. This is stemming from a cost of service study which highlighted that higher costs incurred providing service to the smaller  customers.  

This is the preferred method for transmission regulation internationally. It is an incentive base which forces the utility to achieve stated goals using reward and penalties. They optimise risk allocation. It favours Power Purchase Agreements because it remove the incentives for Utility Companies to sell large amounts of energy. We are in favour of retaining the price cap mechanism.

A WHOLESALE TARIFF 

We are in favour of the Wholesale Tariff

AN INCREASE IN SYSTEM LOSSES

The request for an increase is system losses to 22.5% from 17.5% indicates that JPS has given up the battle to reduce losses.

We are not in agreement with the passing on of this cost to consumers. Keeping the allowed system losses at 17.5% will be an incentive to JPS to continue to seek new methods to reduce the nontechnical losses.

PREPAID METERING

This will allow JPS to respond to market changes within a short period of time as technology is changing rapidly. This is within the context of price cap (i.e. rates will be less than the full cost of providing service). This will encourage larger customers to remain on the grid and hence reduce the upward pressure of prices on the remaining customers.

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Currently, postpaid metering takes away all control from the consumer. They have no idea of their daily, or weekly consumption. They don't know how much electricity their appliances use or are able to identify where they are wasting electricity. They are not aware of how much the bill might go up during different seasons. The utility company sends you a bill at the end of the month with very few details. JAMAICA

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We support the introduction of prepaid metering, as it will eliminate uncertainty and give the consumer more control and promote energy conservation.

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FF REVIEW PROPOSED BY JPS J P S P RO P O S E S … . . .

JIE RESPONDS…...

A FUEL PRICING MECHANISM 

What is the true structure of how we price fuel? Consumer Advisory Committee on Utilities’ (CACU) has been unable to get this information despite many attempts and meetings with Petrojam etc. CACU is of the opinion that there are at least 10 key items within that pricing structure but Petrojam states there are only 3 items.

Does the consumer pay for inefficiency of the refiner?

We are unable to comment on the fuel pricing There are some actions that the Government can mechanism because of the lack of information take immediately to provide relief to the consumer.

Why do we continue to bear ‘the cost’ of this CET?

Trinidad & Tobago are our partners in CARICOM and would not be happy if the CET was removed. What does T&T contribute?

CET is at 10% and because T&T is a CARICOM member state.

A GUARANTEED STANDARD

Reported compensatory pay-outs relating to these breaches was approximately $480,000 out of a po-  tential compensatory pay-out of approximately $32 million. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of the total pay-out was by way of automatic compensation. The Guaranteed Standards Scheme that aims to im-  prove the efficiency of service delivery of the JPS is not achieving the intended objective. Compensation mechanism is not assisting OUR in achieving its legislated mandate to undertake such measures as it considers necessary or desirable to protect the interests of consumers JAMAICA

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Low level of claims has not acted as an effective driver of efficient performance As a result, it is recommended that a review of the automatic and claimable compensation system be done with an aim to foster greater compliance with the Guaranteed Standards Scheme by JPS. OUR could consider levying a penalty on the JPS for breaches.

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EXTRAORDINARY THE WHOLE OF THE U.S COULD BE POWERED BY SOLAR ROADS By: Allison Blackburn. http://interestingengineering.com/the-whole-of-the-u-s-could-be-powered-by-solarroads/

Solar Roadways, a small US company, are in the midst of developing a road surface with a difference, which may change the way we use energy, the road surface is constructed of solar panels. If the solar road is installed nationwide it would have the ability, potentially, to produce more renewable energy than what is used by the entire country. A prototype has already been made and this was installed in a parking lot. The company are now looking for Crowdsourcing funds in order to be able to make some amendments to the design and eventually take it into production. The company was founded in 2006 and they have made glass solar panels in the shape of hexagons that come fitted with LED lighting. It can be installed on various surfaces and the company say that the panels would pay for themselves, along with benefiting both homeowners and businesses alike. The solar panels would generate enough energy from all the parking lots and drives so that they could power buildings, while excess energy from the panels would be sold back to the grid . Along with being superb sources of energy for buildings, the solar panels would also come with a heating element inside which would be able to melt snow and ice, this would make them a godsend in the winter months as they could help to reduce the amount of accidents. At the same time the surface of the solar panels could be used to provide electric vehicles with power, and perhaps at some point in the future they could even charge whilst the person is driving, thanks to mutual induction panels. It seems that the solar panels have no end to being useful as the company has said that they found out that headlights from vehicles can produce energy in the solar panels, so even when people were driving around in the dark, they would be providing electricity. You might think that it would be silly to use a glass surface and then place heavy vehicles on it. However in tests the panels stood this test well. The glass used for the panels is 10% recycled. The panels would be wired so if a fault did appear it would be very easy to detect it and make repairs To make sure that there are no ugly power cables showing, the company also designed what they have termed “cable corridors”, these also make it very easy when utility workers need to gain access. At the same time the corridors could double up as holders for fibre optic cables to deliver high speed internet. The company believes that in the US there is about 31,000 square miles of surface that they could use. If all of this was utilised by the solar panels, the system could essentially produce more than three times the amount of electricity the whole of the country uses. One of the benefits is that there would be a big decrease on being dependent on oil from foreign countries. At the same time the C02 emissions would also be cut down by a fairly large amount. Solar Roadways have an Indiegogo page and the company is hoping that they are able to raise $1 million. This money is required in order for them to hire engineers; they would then be able to make the final modifications needed, which in turn would allow them to go into production. Providing they do meet their target, installation of the projects could start towards the back end of the year. Of course if they want to cover all US roads, it is going to cost an arm and a leg. JAMAICA

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Y ENGINEERING

Cast Iron Bridge Spanish Town, St. Catherine, Jamaica

This bridge, which spans the Rio Cobre river at the eastern end of Spanish Town, can be seen from the bridge that is currently being used. The abutment of the bridge is constructed with cut stone while the bridge is cast iron. It is about 81ft long and 15ft wide. This bridge, erected in 1801, at a cost of four thousand pounds is the oldest bridge of its kind in the Western Hemisphere. So far the restoration of the Eastern face of the abutment wall in authentic masonry, as well as the reconstruction of the main support archway have been completed. The interior 'skin' of the abutment walls is now being reinforced with more stone work prior to the infilling and compacting of the cavity upon which the roadway will be built. The fixing of the roadway surface will be the final facet of the project. The bridge was declared a National Monument by the JNHT and was at one time placed on the UNESCO list of endangered world sites. It was designed by British Engineer Thomas Wilson, cast in 1801 and shipped to Jamaica in prefabricated parts which were assembled and mounted on its stone abutments in 1802. Artist: Susan S. ShirleyJ A M A I C A I N S T I T U T I O N O F E N G I N E E R S - Q U A R T E R L Y O B S E R V E R Commissioned by the JIE in 1998 Source: http://www.jnht.com/site_cast_iron_bridge.php


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UPCOMING JIE EVENTS DATE

EVENT

September 22-24, 2014

JIE Engineers’ Week Conference

September 27, 2014

JIE Engineers’ Week Site Tour to Maggotty Hydro Power Plant in St. Elizabeth

September 28, 2014

Race for Hope Hope Botanical Gardens

October 30, 2014

Annual General Meeting

November 29, 2014

Annual Awards Dinner and Ball Jamaica Pegasus Hotel

2014 JIE Project of the Year Award— CALL FOR NOMINATIONS The Awards Committee of the JIE invites nominations from the membership for the Engineering Project Award for 2013/2014. The 2014 JIE Project of the Year will recognize local engineering projects of particular merit which promotes creativity, innovation, ingenuity and excellence in the engineering profession while using local engineering input, human resources and materials while mitigating the environmental impacts and provide significant contribution to local and national economy. Eligibility Criteria  Projects must be completed within the period

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tober 1, 2013 to July 31, 2014.  Involve local engineering design and /or con struc-

tion input  Use and development of local human resources  Result in significant input to local /national economy  Compliance with time and budget

Judging Judging will commence after submission of initial nominations. Nominations will be shortlisted based on the eligibility and judging criteria. Shortlisted projects will be announced at the JIE Engineer’s Week Conference 2014. Shortlisted projects will be announced during the 2014 JIE Engineer’s Week Conference September 22—24, 2014 Award Presentation The JIE Project of the Year Award will be presented at the JIE Annual Awards Dinner and Ball Nominations Nomination should be submitted to the JIE Secretariat using the Nomination Forms, which will be available at the JIE Offices or on the JIE Website. Nominations should be completed as per the submission guidelines. Closing Date for Nominations:

August 29, 2014.

JAMAICA INSTITUTION OF ENGINEERS 54 Molynes Road, Kingston 10, Tel :(876) 758-8248, 758-5559 Fax (876) 758-7412 E-mail: jie@cwjamaica.com website: www.jiejamaica.org Facebook: Jamaica Institution of Engineers - JIE To volunteer or contribute to the next newsletter Email: jie@cwjamaica.com with the subject ‘NEWSLETTER’ JAMAICA

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Jamaica Institution of Engineers Newsletter Apr-July 2014  
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