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37

th

ANNIVERSARY

COMMEMORATIVE e-JOURNAL

“knowledge .... the now factor of production”

DRAFT December 2010 37th Anniversary e-journal


GOVERNOR-GENERAL’S MESSAGE FOR JAMAICA COMPUTER SOCIETY’S 37TH ANNIVERSARY SUPPLEMENT

In 1973 a pioneering group of young IT visionaries took the decision to create the Jamaica Computer Society (JCS). It was a society of professionals driven by the belief that by continually building and sharing knowledge, there would be positive outcomes for themselves, their communities and the country. Thirty

seven

organisation

years

later,

that

has

the

JCS

delivered

has

proven

substantial

to

be

a

highly

training,

professional development to a vast number of Jamaicans.

resilient

learning

and

The Annual BizTech

Forum is a staple on both the local and international calendar of events and is renowned for quality and excellence. I congratulate the JCS on achieving this significant milestone and support your thrust to speed Jamaica’s transformation to a truly globally competitive knowledge-based economy.

Patrick L Allen Governor-General

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MESSAGE FROM PRESIDENT of JAMPRO JAMPRO is pleased to extend congratulations to the Jamaica Computer Society (JCS) on the occasion of its 37th anniversary, Throughout its existence, the JCS has made an invaluable contribution to the development of professionals in the field of information technology, which is an industry that has been identified by JAMPRO as a priority sector, based on its potential for job creation, knowledge transfer, linkages with other industries and scope for enhancing export performance. Jamaica is widely recognised as the leader in information and communication technology (ICT) services in the region, a position that the country has attained through the efforts of entities like the JCS. The commitment of the Society to delivering essential learning experiences to its membership has undoubtedly contributed to the unleashing of the ingenuity of our high value human capital in the ICT industry. JAMPRO again offers sincerest congratulations to the JCS and looks forward to continued collaboration as we seek to establish the island as a key player in the global knowledge economy. Sancia Bennett Templer President JAMPRO

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MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE PSOJ ON THE OCCASION OF THE 37TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE JAMAICA COMPUTER SOCIETY

On behalf of the Executive Committee and the wider membership of The Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica (PSOJ) I extend heartiest congratulations to the members of the Jamaica Computer Society (JCS) on the occasion of th

your 37 Anniversary. During the last 37 years, the JCS has been faithful to your raison d’être, despite the challenges encountered during this period and must therefore be commended for this achievement. The business community has certainly benefitted from your sustained efforts to make the knowledge and use of Information Technology an important tool of business operations. This has contributed in a meaningful way to our being more effective and efficient, more competitive and better able to survive in the local and global marketplace. In fact, we share the view of Bill Gates who observed that “Information technology and business are becoming inextricably interwoven. I don't think anybody can talk meaningfully about one without the talking about the other”. As the members of the JCS celebrate this milestone, the membership of the PSOJ wishes for your association continued success in all your undertakings as you facilitate greater learning and awareness of Information Technology.

JOSEPH M. MATALON, CD PRESIDENT 2010 DECEMBER 9

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CONGRATULATORY MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE JCC, MILTON J. SAMUDA It gives me great pleasure on behalf of the Jamaica Chamber of Commerce to extend congratulatory greetings to President Mr. Silburn Clarke, Governing Council and Members of the Jamaica Computer Society (JCS) on the occasion of their celebration of 37 years of service to Jamaica. We salute the enlightened and forward looking group of Jamaican IT professionals who founded the Society, grasping as they must have done that information technology and the electronic use of knowledge and information, would be vital to our future success. In 2011, the Jamaica Chamber of Commerce will be advancing “The Growth Agenda”: the assertion that all stakeholders - Government, Opposition, Private Sector, Unions, Civil Society and Citizens generally, must sign on to the imperative of Economic Growth and that all national strategies and programmes must be geared towards producing or Jamaica constant, robust economic growth. In that endeavour, the Jamaica Computer Society has a vital role to play especially in light of the fact that its primary objective is the continued professional development of individuals who have chosen IT as a career. Like the Society, the Jamaica Chamber of Commerce embraces the vision of “Jamaica being a significant participant in the global Knowledge Economy. We see IT Knowledge and Innovation driving production, driving efficiencies, driving competitiveness and thus transforming individuals, firms, communities and our Nation. On behalf of the Board and Members of the Jamaica Chamber of Commerce, I congratulate the Jamaica Computer Society on its thirty-seven years of seminal work and I pledge the continued support of the Chamber. We wish the Society continued success.

MILTON J. SAMUDA President December 10, 2010

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MESSAGE FROM THE JAMAICAN CONFEDERATION OF TRADE UNIONS The world is presently undergoing rapid changes. The requirements for successfully participating in the globalised world of work over the lifetime of productive employment undergo increasingly more changes everyday. Today's workers find that many of the skill-sets of the past have to be constantly reviewed and upgraded and in some cases unlearned and replaced. The Jamaica Computer Society (JCS) and its affiliate the Jamaica Computer Society Education Foundation (JCSEF) have been at the forefront of helping to prepare workers to confront these lifetime changes and challenges through their renowned education and training programmes. The Jamaica Confederation of Trade Unions congratulates the JCS on the sterling role it has clearly played since its formation 37 years ago and implores the organisation to continue to be a vehicle for building and upgrading the knowledge and skill-set of workers across the country and in every sector as we strive, as a society, to successfully engage with the globalised knowledge economy

Lloyd Goodleigh President Jamaican Confederation of Trade Unions

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Message from the Mona School of Business, UWI The thirty-seven years of existence of the Jamaica Computer Society (JCS) is half the lifetime of the Information Technology (IT) discipline if the baseline is Dr. John Atanasoff’s and Clifford Berry’s introduction of their electronic digital computer in 1937. Part of the significance of the celebration, though, may reside in the obscure fact that the number 37 is the first irregular prime, in contrast to the JCS, which has been both regular and prime.

Throughout the lifetime of the JCS, the convergence of information and communications technologies (ICT) has reshaped the paradigms of social and business interactions globally. Locally, we boast an awesome ICT infrastructure, however, ICT-enabled innovation and application generation have been virtually non- existent and Jamaica has not sufficiently infused ICT into important national processes in order to build resilience to our growing array of economic and social hazards.

Over the years, the JCS has worked assiduously, losing momentum and vibrancy occasionally but in recent times recommitting its support for positioning ICT to positively influence Jamaica’s economic development. In this regard, MSB remains its ready and willing coactivist. Professor Evan Duggan Executive Director and Professor of MIS Mona School of Business

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Message from the Computer Industry Association of America (CompTIA)

On behalf of the CompTIA let me express our heartfelt appreciation and gratitude for the outstanding professionalism and efficiency of the JCS in cementing a strategic agreement with us to transform the IT certification landscape in Jamaica and in doing so impact meaningfully on the lives of thousands of Jamaicans. Our mutually completed Agency Agreement which took effect on December 1st, represents a significant milestone on both our organisation’s journey and signals the beginning of another great leg in our relationship.

CompTIA envisions Jamaica being a significant participant on the global Knowledge Economy and to this end identified and sought out Jamaica as a strategic partner to align with us in realizing our long-term goals and objectives for using IT Knowledge and Innovation for transforming individuals, firms and communities. At the recently concluded annual BizTech, Leonard Wadewitz was an invited speaker and Seminar Leader. His visit by all measures was a resounding success and demonstrated the alignment of values and goals of both our organisations.

Todd Thibodeaux Chief Executive Officer

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MESSAGE FROM JAMAICA COMPUTER SOCIETY EDUCATION FOUNDATATION

The (JCSEF) was initially established by the JCS as the agency which would place computer labs in secondary schools and tertiary institutions. Over the years the mission has been significantly expanded and the JCSEF has acquired vast experience and expertise in a wide range of services related to the implementation and appropriate use of technology in education and training. Some examples are: The JCSEF is the Caribbean licensee for the world’s largest ICT skills certification programme - the International Computer Driving License (ICDL); was responsible for the Jamaica 2000 project which had as its major goal, the installation of a 15-station networked computer lab in all secondary and tertiary public education institutions; The initial training of hundreds of teachers and the implementation of several international projects. The JCSEF is proud of its record as a major agent of the JCS and wishes the JCS many more years of productive engagement with the Jamaica society.

Dr. A. W. Sangster Chairman Jamaica Computer Society Education Foundation

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Message from the President of the Jamaica Computer Society The Jamaica Computer Society was formed by an enlightened group of Jamaican IT professionals with the primary objective being the continued professional development of individuals who have chosen IT as a career. Over its long history, the JCS has been at the forefront of developing and delivering many innovative learning experiences to our membership, the ICT VAR community as well as to the general public and vast numbers of students. The JCS envisions Jamaica being a significant player in the global Knowledge Economy and so has embarked on several initiatives, aligned to our long-term goals and objectives for using IT Knowledge and Innovation for transforming individuals, firms, communities and the society in general. Our recently concluded annual BizTech Knowledge Forum was hugely successful and will be followed by an international conference on Knowledge Strategies for Enhancing Global Competitiveness in April next year. We look forward to continuing to serve and support the local community of IT professionals Warmest regards,

Silburn Clarke President Jamaica Computer Society Dec 01, 2010

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37th Anniversary e-journal


The Governing Council of the JCS for Administrative Period 2010-2011 Silburn Clarke, President Dainsworth Richards, Immediate Past President Delroy Ellis, Deputy President Maurice Coke, VP Membership Dean Smith, VP Finance and Operations Rohan Morris, VP Education Glenice Leachman, VP Communication Cara Murray, Council Member The Certification Committee is responsible for the establishment of standards and a programme of certification for the IT services industry in Jamaica. Chaired by Delroy Ellis, Deputy President The Membership Committee seeks to increase the quality of the service offerings to our membership and ensure that the objectives of the JCS, as they relate to development and support of membership, are efficiently and costeffectively discharged. This committee organises the Monthly Members ICT Meetings. Chaired by Maurice Coke, Vice President The Education Committee seeks to ensure that Jamaica has a well-trained cadre of IT professionals, that IT is encouraged at all levels of Jamaica's education system, and that there is a general increase in the IT literacy of the population at large. Chaired by Rohan Morris, Vice President The Events and Conferences Committee has among its activities the planning and staging of all major events of the Society including the Annual BizTech Conference, the specialist ICT TechForum, the BizTech Knowledge Fora, the CompTIA Training Programme and all other major events. The Convenor of this Committee is Silburn Clarke, President. The Finance and Operations Committee is in charge of all activities which are geared towards managing the dayto-day operations of the Society through its Secretariat as well as being the prudent custodian of the Society’s financial assets. Chaired by Dean Smith, Vice President The Communication Committee is charged with engaging the Jamaican society with a view to building awareness and understanding, through dialogue and demonstrations, of the value of ICT Innovations in transforming future outcomes. Chaired by Glenice Leachman, Vice President For further information contact us at : www.jamaicacomputersociety.org, www.youtube.com/mycomputersociety www.twitter.com/myjcs email: inform@myjcs.com (general) admin@myjcs.com ( membership information) tel: 1-876-497-1442

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Excerpt from the Address by Maurice Coke, VP Membership to 2010 BIZTECH KNOWLEDGE FORUM Nov 15, 2010, Mona Visitors Lodge Information Communications Technology, abbreviated ICT, is very dynamic and always advancing. Dynamic denotes: constant change, constant activity; an industry full of energy and new ideas. Publilius Syrus quote, “A rolling stone gathers no moss”, amply depicts the pace of the industry that we are a part of; ICT, an industry that we cannot afford to gather any moss in Jamaica, or else we will be left behind by the rest of the world. The ICT landscape is so dynamic that it is virtually impossible for any ICT professional to declare that he/she has mastered all areas of ICT. Such declaration is of the past, never to return again. Those “jack of all trades” in ICT are gone with the wind. What would be your response upon receiving a Curriculum Vitae with the applicant stating: “I master graphic designing, web development, database administration and optimizing. I am proficient in all programming languages, an expert broadband technologist, MCSE, ITIL, Cisco certified and can fix all computer hardware. I am a business/systems analyst, and project manager. I am an expert in IT Security to such a level that I can examine the hexadecimal addresses in the header of data packets and immediately decipher the illegitimate ones. I master machine language and all the logics that surround the building blocks of computing, memory and transportation of data.” Would anyone ever consider hiring such an applicant? I do not know about you, but I need you, your expertise in your various ICT fields is of great value to us all. The Jamaica Computer Society seeks to facilitate this wealth of knowledge and experience for the advancement of us all; for the development of Jamaica. There is a great urgency about the now. When I say that ICT is very dynamic and always advancing, the advancement is not just about improvement in existing ICT but also about the constant analogue conversion additives. Every analogue equipment and systems that can be converted has been, or will be, digitized. For example, most PBX, Video Surveillance and Security systems are now digitized. Digitization usually brings more user friendliness and increased control and accuracy. Digitization also brings more duties and responsibilities to the ICT professional who is now being asked to administer or at least backup a growing list of digital systems. No one ICT professional will possess all the requisite knowledge and skills to give expertise to the full computerisation scope. It is therefore instructive to have collaboration and harmonization amongst ICT professionals in Jamaica. We need to pool our ideas and skill sets. We exist in every industry in this country, so near and yet so far. The JCS seeks to provide the knowledge forum, IT certification and the communication platform for ICT professionals to network and share our skill sets. I endeavour to remind you that ICT is one of the few industries where there is virtually a level playing field; it resides on a knowledge based platform. As a nation, success in the ICT industry is skewed towards harnessing inherent skills than towards setting up “brick and mortar”. Let us leverage this productive opportunity to make Jamaica into an ICT icon. The JCS will facilitate this orchestration. Join us.

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37th Anniversary e-journal


Strategic Collaboration with CompTIA Delroy Ellis, Deputy President The principal aim of the JCS is to establish and maintain standards for Information Technology professionals. In keeping with this mandate, the JCS as of December 1, 2010 has established an agency agreement with the Computer Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) as a global quality certification standard for the Jamaican marketplace and for supporting the repositioning of Jamaican ICT professionals in the global ICT industry. CompTIA is the non-profit trade association advancing the global interests of ICT professionals and companies including manufacturers, distributors, resellers, and educational institutions. Since 1982 CompTIA has supported and led the global ICT industry through educational programs, market research, networking events, professional certifications, and political advocacy. CompTIA is known worldwide as the leading provider of vendor-neutral ICT certifications and to date has issued over 1.25 million certifications globally. CompTIA certifications identify ICT professionals who prove their aptitude in various fields, viz:

Courses

Certification

Target Audience

Security

Security+

ICT professionals who wish to specialize in the field of ICT security

Network Administration

Network +

ICT professional interested in a career in managing, maintaining, troubleshooting, installing and configuring basic network infrastructure. Entry-level IT professional & experienced computer technicians

Computer Repairs

A+

Server Administration

Server+

Experienced ICT professional interested in providing Server Management

Printer/MFC/Copiers/

PDI+

Entry-level IT professional & experienced Office Equipment technicians

CTP+

Delivers competence to experienced ICT professionals who have a career interest in convergent technologies including data networking & telephony along with implementation and management of basic data components and voice and multimedia applications.

Scanner/Fax Repairs VOIP/Telephony

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Radio Frequency Identification

RFID+

ICT professionals who wish to specialize in the field of RFID

CDIA+

ICT Professionals who has a career goal in document imaging management system.

Linux

Linux+

ICT professionals who wish to develop the knowledge, competence and skills for fundamental Linux Administration

Project Management

Project+

Project Managers -covers the business and technical project management skills needed to successfully manage business projects

Strata Green IT

Strata Green IT

Ideal for ICT senior professionals who are charged with the responsibility to incorporate emerging technologies along with their current knowledge to shape the Green IT strategy for their organization.

Strata IT for Sales

Strata IT for Sales

Ideal for students or individuals entering a sales career as well as seasoned sales professionals new to selling technology products and solutions.

Certified Trainer

CTT+

Professionals who are interested in becoming a certified instructors in the ICT industry.

IT Fundamentals

Everybody who uses the Computer to perform their work as well as individuals and students new to the IT job market

Document Architect

Imaging

Technical

Strata IT Fundamentals

CompTIA has a global reach, serving members from over 140 countries and with offices in Australia, Canada, China, Germany, India, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, the United Kingdom, and the United States. CompTIA certification includes the world renowned vendor neutral A+, Network+, Server+ and Security+ certifications. Now, through JCS's strategic collaboration with CompTIA, members of the JCS and the public at large will enjoy access to the comprehensive best-of-class CompTIA resources, available through the JCS, as they work to develop professionally and to maintain their global edge.

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The Jamaica Computer Society (JCS) and the global Computer Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) forging strategic alliances in Kingston at the successfully completed BizTech 2010 forum held at the Mona Visitor’s Lodge. The JCS now leads CompTIA IT certification efforts in Jamaica. Participating in the occasion are Rohan Morris VP Education, Leonard Wadewitz CompTIA, Silburn Clarke President and Delroy Ellis Deputy President.

The Computer Technology Industry Association of America (CompTIA) and the Jamaica Computer Society (JCS) sign a Strategic Agreement to collaborate in the certification of Jamaican knowledge workers. From L-R, Leonard Wadewitz CompTIA, Silburn Clarke President JCS and Delroy Ellis Deputy President and Chairman of the JCS Certification Committee

Members of the JCS Certification Committee are caught in a celebratory mood on the Commencement Day of the CompTIA Agency Agreement, December 1st 2010. From L-R, Delroy Ellis Deputy President and Chairman of the Certification Committee, Kerry-Ann Mahabeer Member, Silburn Clarke President, Mark Anthony Green Member and Rohan Morris VP Education savour the moment

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37th Anniversary e-journal


THE JAMAICA COMPUTER SOCIETY EDUCATION FOUNDATION Michele Baboolal, Technical Director The Jamaica Computer Society Education Foundation (JCSEF) was established in 1990 by the Jamaica Computer Society as a private not-for-profit organisation to place computer labs in secondary and tertiary schools, in an effort to facilitate students taking examinations in Computer Science. Subsequently, the mission was expanded to incorporate ‘the use of information technology to improve the quality of education and its contribution to national development’. The Foundation is directed by a Board of Directors, and the day-to-day running of the organization is managed by a Technical Director, along with a small capable staff of professionals. The vision, foresight and commitment of these administrators to the Foundation, combined with their expertise in the fields of education, information technology, financial and administrative management, training, and strategic planning, have been prime factors in the success of our projects. The JCSEF’s Vision is to be the foremost authority in the advancement of the effective use of ICTs in the education process, In influencing public policy development in technology in education processes, and to be the leading provider in basic ICT and soft skills certification. Our Mission is to empower the Jamaican workforce and educators by knowledge dissemination, providing leadership, promoting professional international standards, and support of technology-based educational initiatives, through our world-class services, products and advocacy, as well as local and international partnerships. The JCSEF has acquired vast experience and expertise in a wide range of services related to the implementation and appropriate use of technology in education and training, basic ICT Skills training and certification, as well as considerable know-how in managing large grants from multi-lateral donor agencies. The JCSEF is the Caribbean licensee for the world’s largest ICT skills certification programme, the International Computer Driving License (ICDL). The partial listing of projects below shows the bandwidth of the organisation to include offering technology services to schools and other education and training institutions, such as technology planning, sourcing of computer equipment, installation of computer laboratories and other instructional models, selecting appropriate educational software, training of teachers and instructors in technology integration, and maintenance and technical support;. JCSEF’s internal capabilities developed over past two decades include; •

Development and implementation of sound procedures, accepted by the donor agencies (World Bank, IDB, USAID, CIDA), for the evaluation and selection of suppliers for hardware, educational software and education technology consultancy

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Development and implementation of creative marketing and promotional programmes, attracting funding and other support from various partners and donor agencies, local and overseas. This included the staging of annual Conferences, sometimes in association with the Ministry of Education, Youth and Culture, which showcased some of the work being done in the project schools, and shared innovations and strategies and techniques being used in Jamaica and other countries, including the USA, Canada, UK, and the Caribbean Building of creative partnerships with the private sector, the school community and various Ministries and Government Agencies, including the Business Partners in Education programme, which resulted in over 70 business entities, individuals, school alumnae, and other organizations, local and overseas, contributing to the interventions in the schools Conceptualization and coordination of the development of certification programmes for the training of teachers and instructors in the integration of technology into the curriculum

A partial listing of successfully executed projects

Jamaica 2000 In carrying out its mandate, the Foundation’s principal goal was to ensure that by the Year 2000, all graduates of Jamaican secondary schools, teachers colleges and community colleges will have access to technology-based education – an important part of their preparation for effective functioning in the competitive work environment. The Jamaica 2000 project was formulated and had as its major goal, the installation of a 15-station networked computer lab in all secondary and tertiary public education institutions. The Ministry of Education, Youth and Culture fully endorsed and supported the project through its presence as a permanent directorship on the Board of Directors, assistance with the development of the curriculum for teacher training, advice on policy issues and the considerable financial support given by the HEART Trust/NTA. . Through the programme, of the targeted 166 secondary and tertiary institutions, 141 of them were provided with computer labs of varying sizes. The project also included a teacher and lab administrator training component. The breakdown was : 98 secondary, 18 tertiary, 22 primary and 3 vocational. The remaining 25 schools benefitted from a CHINA/GOJ cooperative agreement. The value of the Jamaica 2000 programme was J$253,000,000.

Teacher Training The initial training of teachers in computer science was carried out in conjunction with UTech (then CAST) and UWI. Over 400 teachers were trained during the summers of 1991 – 1994. Subsequently, with computer science teachers being trained by the Teachers’ Colleges and the Universities, the JCSEF turned its attention to the training of teachers in the use of the technology in instructional delivery, and its integration into the curriculum. Since 1995,over 300 teachers have been exposed to this training.

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Ed-Tech 20/20 Project for Primary Schools – IADB The Ed-Tech 20/20 Technology in Education project was initiated by the Round Table Think Tank on Education – a body which included representation not only from the Foundation, but from the education and government planning sectors, several private sector companies and the media. In 1995, the project received funding support of US$1 Million from the IADB through its Multi-lateral Investment Fund. This funding facilitated the implementation of a pilot project in school clusters in 4 parishes – St. Elizabeth, St. Mary, St. Catherine and Clarendon. 17 primary schools, as well as 15 secondary schools benefited from the project which included inter alia, equipment for the primary schools, training for teachers in the use of the technology in the teaching and learning process for all schools in the project, and a literacy programme involving about 400 primary students. The main objectives of the pilot programme were : 1. improvement in literacy and numeracy, and stimulation of creative thinking and higher level learning through selection of appropriate software. 2. Promotion of the private/public sector partnership to foster sustainability. 3. Improvement in the capability of teachers to utilize the technology in instructional delivery. 4. Increase in the availability of technology to the adult population in areas which have computer labs, thus making such adults more suited to the world of work. The Adult Computer Education Pilot Programme The Adult Computer Education Pilot Programme was implemented under a partnership arrangement, involving the JCSEF, the JAMAL Foundation, and the Workforce Development Consortium (WFDC). The Programme sought to equip adults with skills more applicable to the requirements of business and industries in the areas in which they live, and to enhance the employability of these adults by making them eligible for certification for HEART Trust/NTA and other tertiary/vocational/technical training. A pilot project for the programme was launched in May 1997 by way of an initial 2-day Teacher Orientation workshop, and classes in basic ICT Skills were held for displaced workers of the Manchester Garment Factory in the summer.

Canada Fund for Local Initiatives (CFLI) 1997 In 1997, CFLI funded the implementation of 4 station computer labs in 4 primary schools. The JCSEF was the executing agency for the project which included the installation of computers and printer fully networked, numeracy/literacy software and teacher training in ICT skills and Curriculum Integration. The value of this project was CDN$50,000. 1998

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In 1988, CFLI funded the implementation of 4 station computer labs in 3 primary schools. The JCSEF was again selected as the executing agency for the project, which included the installation of computers and printers, surge protectors, numeracy/literacy software and teacher training in ICT skills and Curriculum Integration. The value of the project was CDN$50,000. 2001 In 2001, CFLI funded the implementation of 4 station computer labs in 3 primary schools. The JCSEF was again selected as the executing agency for the project, which included the installation of computers, scanners and printers, UPS Systems and surge protectors, numeracy/literacy software, teacher training in ICT skills and Curriculum Integration, and lab administrator training . The value of the project was CDN$50,000.

Global Teenagers Network (GTP) Project The Global Teenager Network Project (GTP), sponsored by the International Institute for Communication and development (IICD) was active in Jamaica for the period 1999 - 2002, with the JCSEF being the local coordinator. The project, an initiative of IICD, is a network of students from schools located in developing and developed countries, with local education partners as coordinators in each country. GTP began in 1999 with South Africa and Netherlands; and involved more than 2,500 pupils from 95 schools in Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, Europe and the Middle East. The life of GTP is the Learning Circle (LC), which involves groups of 8-10 classes from different schools linking up via the Internet, to exchange e-mails about a selected topic. The teacher plays the vital role of coach, as classes work on selected themes. Each circle works as a team, e-mailing questions and using a structured method to do the research required to complete the task. Jamaica’s first entry into the GTP saw seven (7) schools signing up for participation. The GTP methodology inspires teachers as it provides a new and exciting way to deliver lessons, while giving students an opportunity to practice international learning as they meet and make lifelong friendships via the Internet. The project also allows teachers to discover different teaching styles and strategies being used to tackle Global Education issues.

National Housing Trust – Computers in Education Project in Primary Schools In 2001, the National Housing Trust, as a part of its 25th anniversary celebrations, decided to demonstrate its commitment to support national development through educational improvement in Jamaica, by installing a computer lab in 19 primary schools islandwide. The primary objective of the project was to:

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"Improve Literacy & Numeracy in Jamaican schools by establishing Technology Resource Centres to facilitate the raising learning levels in these areas through the integration of technology in the curriculum”. All schools in the project received fully networked centers of between 6 and 15 computers , as well as : • • • • • • • • • •

Approximately 72 hours of ICT Integration training for 4 teachers from Grades 1-4. Approximately 35 hours of training for a lab administrator. Approximately 12 hours of ICT Integration training for Principals. Technology Planning training sessions for Principals. CAI Software for numeracy/literacy – Grades 1-4. Computer furniture. Air conditioning units. UPS systems. Insurance of the resource centres for 2 years. Full Maintenance of the centers for 2 years.

The JCSEF was the Executing Agency and Project Manager for the programme, and provided the following services : • • • • •

Project Design Procurement of computer hardware, software, furniture, air-conditioning units and UPS systems by a tendering process. All installation of computer hardware, software and networks. Training for Principals, Teachers and Lab Administrators. Maintenance services.

The total value of the project was approximately J$62,000,000.

International Computer Driving License Certification Programme In October 2002, the JCSEF became the first test centre in Jamaica for the International Computer Driving Licence (ICDL) Certification. ICDL is an internationally recognized computer skills certification with over 7 million participants spanning 149 countries, and is the global standard in end-user computer skills, offering candidates an internationally recognised certification that is supported by governments, computer societies, international organisations and commercial corporations globally. Known as the European Computer Driving Licence for countries within Europe, the programme has been enjoying phenomenal worldwide recognition and growth, and is now recognized as the world’s leading computer skills certification. In 2003, the JCSEF was appointed the ICDL Licensee for the Caribbean Region, and so far training and testing centres have been established in the islands of St. Kitts, St. Vincent, St. Lucia, Barbados, Grand Cayman, Curacao, Dominica and Trinidad. 37th Anniversary e-journal


Basic ICT Skills Training The JCSEF also provides Basic ICT Skills training for organizations, tailoring the courseware for their specific requirements. We have done training for ;

• • • • • • •

RADA field officers; Security Supervisors and Security Officers of MILEX Security Services and Brigade Security Services; Entrepreneurs; Library Assistants of the Jamaica Library Service; All teachers and admin staff of Mona Prep School; Bureau of Standards (pilot group of 20 employees). Micro and Small Enterprises (MSEs) in Jamaica’s Traditional Banana Growing Parishes/Communities.

Our courseware is based on the ICDL Syllabus.

ICT Integration Training for Teachers The JCSEF also provides ICT Integration Training for teachers based on requests.

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37th Anniversary e-journal


Delroy Ellis, Deputy President JCS makes a point to Leonard Wadewitz of CompTIA while Dainsworth Richards, Immediate Past President JCS looks on. Occasion was the BizTech 2010 Knowledge Forum put on by the Jamaica Computer Society

BizTech Planning Team shows their appreciation for a job well done to Glen Guzman from Affina Systems, who led Workshop on “Server Virtualization�. L-R, Silburn Clarke President JCS, Cara Murray, Akeilah Edwards, Delroy Ellis, Glen Guzman, Teisha Hibbert and Maurice Coke VP Membership.

Grace Solas of the Project Management Institute, Jamaica Doctor Bird Chapter coaching a group of IT Project Managers at the recent JCS BizTech Knowledge Forum

Fujitsu Caribbean awards 5 Student Assistantships each to Portmore Community College and UTECH. Sharing the occasion with Michael Hamilton of Fujitsu Caribbean (4th right front row) are Tanya Graham Lecturer of PCC at 1st left front row, Paulette Sutherland Lecturer of PCC at 1st right front row and some of the students from PCC

Mark Barnaby of Microsoft, tutor of the Windows Server 2008 Workshop, takes his students through their paces at BizTech

Kyle Foster, Sales Executive Power Systems, IBM Canada Ltd, Leonard Wadewitz, CompTIA and Gordon Foote, Sales Manager, IBM Jamaica chat about the benefits and powerful advantages of IBM's POWER7 Systems. CompTIA and IBM sponsored the well received lunch-time tech talks on the first and second day of BizTech respectively

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A LITTLE HISTORY of JCS CONFERENCES  The Jamaica Computer Society (JCS) was initially formed by a small group of visionaries and pioneers who in 1973 sought to address the need for a forum for professional IT practitioners to network and to develop and extend their knowledge-base.  The JCS was legally incorporated in 1975.  The first President of the JCS was William “Bill” Phillips of CSP (Computer Services & Programming)  The first JCS conference was held in 1978 at the Shaw Park Hotel, Ocho Rios  The initial policy decision was to stage a conference every 18 months  The second JCS conference was held in May 1980 at the Hilton Hotel, Ocho Rios (property now known as Sandals Dunns River).  The third JCS conference was held in October 1982 at the Mallards Beach & Intercontinental Hotels in Ocho Rios (property now known as the Renaissance Jamaica Grande).  With an overwhelming endorsement from the membership, a policy decision was taken for JCS conferences to be staged annually.  The JCS staged 18 annual conferences between 1982 and 2001.  JCS membership went global with the establishment of the international chapters commencing with the Toronto Chapter in 1993.  As a consequence of organizational dislocations and looming National Elections, plans to stage the 2002 conference were scuttled.  The staging of annual conferences resumed in 2003.  In 2003, the JCS introduced The Lifetime Excellence Achievement Award. Winston Atkinson was the first recipient of that award.  The annual conference was re-branded as BizTech Forum in 2005.  The exhibition has been a feature of conferences since 1983.  In 2010 the JCS added the BizTech Knowledge Forum to its schedule of major events  JCS conferences have been distinguished by the participation of presenters and attendees from across the globe particularly the Caribbean, USA, Canada, UK and Europe

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Maheshwar Boodraj MSB UWI participating in discussions on the requirements for the CompTIA certification programme

NCB awarded 10 Student Assistantships to the Portmore Community th College. With Lavern Francis of NCB (4 right front row) are Kerene st Graham Head of IT Department at PCC ( 1 right front row), Tanya nd Graham Lecturer PCC (2 left front row) and the beaming students f

Craig Perue of PMI Jamaica Doctor Bird Chapter takes his Project Management seminar through its paces

Glen Guzman Affina Systems, Citrix partner Costa Rica gets congrats at BizTech closing by Silburn Clarke, President on a great seminar

Tanya Graham PCC and her students rap with Lavern Francis of NCB

Teisha Hibbert JCS congratulates Ordinor Tucker on winning an Apple iPAD from Spatial Innovision at BizTech 2010. Cara Murray looks on

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37th Anniversary e-journal


ICT in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) SME’s are typically owner-managed and can be characterised as social formations in which interpersonal relationships with family, friends and other businesses often influence their e-business adoption decisions (Simpson and Docherty, 2004).

The small business sector in

Jamaica generated employment and income accounting for 26% of the country’s gross domestic product, registering the highest rate of growth in the economy (2.6%), compared to a national growth rate of 0.5% and a growth rate among large businesses of 1.8% (Trevor Hamilton and Associates 1989 cited in Huck and McEwen, 1991).

SMEs now play a vital role of increasing importance in the economy (especially when their contribution to the generation of jobs as well as the social-economic development of the community where they are located is considered (Harrington, 2005). Small firms are important for economic progress in many countries and contribute a large portion of jobs to job pool (Lawrence, 2007; Fuller-Love & Thomas, 2004).

SMEs have increased the competitive

intensity of the market and reduce the monopolistic positions of large organizations and encouraged the development of entrepreneurial skills and innovation (Todd & Javalgi, 2007).

However, critical to the growth, survival and subsequent development or creation of sustainable competitive advantage of SMEs, is the inclusion and integration of ICT into their business operations. SMEs which have implemented ICT have seen its impact on their overall competitive position (Sharma & Bhagwat, 2006).

A distinction, however,

has to be made between generic, ubiquitous information

technologies available to all firms, which while being valuable and necessary, are not sufficient, and those firm-specific higher-value IT-enabled applications, systems, processes, capabilities and routines that competitively distinguishes the firm from its rivals.

For firms to enjoy

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sustainable competitive advantages they must coral resources and capabilities that go beyond being valuable. They must also be rare, costly to imitate and be wrapped by a organizational context and practices which are difficult to replicate in the marketspace (Barney 1991, Ghoshal & Bartlett, 1994).

Despite the increasing availability of ICT, many SMEs have not developed ICT strategies and hardly extend them for competitive use. (Maguire 2007, Matula & Brakel 2006). While the engagement of ICT in SMEs is relatively extensive, it is primarily rudimentary, mainly through the use of spread sheets and accounting packages, email and the internet. (Taylor & Murphey 2004, Maguire 2007, Shiels et al 2003) and would not create sustained competitive advantages.

The national health check provided by the 2010-2011 World Economic Forum Global Competitive Report had us with more failing grades in the Business sophistication and Innovation pillars than anywhere else. In firm-level technology absorption, Jamaica was ranked 75 out of 139 countries globally; in company spending on R&D – 83 of 139; in production process sophistication – 92 of 139; in capacity for innovation – 107 of 139 and in availability of scientists and engineers – 123 of 139. competitiveness and global

For Jamaican firms to get to higher levels of global

resilience, their business systems, applications, processes,

capabilities and routines will require increased and sustained infusion of IT-enabled innovations harvested from the knowledge, ideas and creativity of the firm’s human capital within a dynamic organisational context created by supportive leadership.

(Adapted from Clarke Silburn, Crooks Sherry-Ann, Gray Denis, Morgan Cheralee, Nelson Charmaine, Paul Leroy and Shelley Dwight, “ICT in Small and Medium Enterprises”, 2009)

37th Anniversary e-journal


37th Anniversary e-journal


JCS President delivers Opening Keynote Address : Caribbean Conference of the Urban and Regional Information Systems Association (URISA) The 5th URISA Caribbean GIS Conference under the theme "Geospatial Technologies: Connecting our Industries in Meeting the Region's Challenges" got underway from the 6th to 10th December, 2010 at the Cascadia Hotel in Port of Spain, Trinidad. Over 250 registrants from across the Caribbean region as well as the USA, Canada, the UK participated in the 5 day event. The Opening Keynote address to the conference was delivered by the President of the Jamaica Computer Society and Chairman of the Land Surveyors Association of Jamaica (LSAJ) Think Tank, Silburn JCS President Clarke FRICS who spoke on the topic "Strategies for Silburn Clarke Professionals in Reshaping Caribbean Economies for Global Success" with subtitle "We likkle but we tallawah". He charged the conference to leverage knowledge, ideas, creativity and innovation to deliver quantum leaps to Caribbean organisations, economies and societies. Kindly visit www.urisa.org for more details on the conference and www.youtube.com/mycomputersociety for the slide presentation of the keynote address.

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REFLECTIONS “ I always considered the JCS to be an excellent professional society,

blessed to have as members, and to have as friends, persons who gave superior voluntary service in the interest not only of themselves and their profession, but of the wider society. I thought it was a product that should have been exported or expanded to the rest of the Caribbean. It deserves to have its history preserved and maintained. On the Secretariat, credit should go to President Rod Heaven for the implementation of that administrative element of the JCS. It was what made easier the institution of annual conferences cum trade shows. But he also sought and found an excellent person to be the first Administrative Manager in the shape of Ruth Jankee who took unto herself the aims and objectives of the Society and passionately pursued the initiatives of its Council. Good Luck “ Past President Melville Shah Hosein 1987-1989

37th Anniversary e-journal


JCS 2011 CONFERENCE ON KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY STRATEGIES FOR ENHANCING GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS Objective In April 2011 the Jamaica Computer Society will host a Conference on KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY STRATEGIES FOR ENHANCING GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS. The objective of this conference is to impart a deeper understanding of applied Knowledge Economy Strategies for Enhancing the Global Competitiveness of Jamaican firms, society and economy in support of national development. To that end, the modules and sessions will draw upon the wide ranging Knowledge Economy experience and expertise of two world-renowned international experts who will lead the training in conjunction with a number of Jamaican experts in ICT, Innovation, Agriculture, Education and Creative Industries. “Knowledge and technology are the heart and mind of the global economy. The countries that thrive will be those that encourage their people to develop the skills and competencies they need to become better workers, managers, entrepreneurs, and innovators. Today’s policy makers must extend their country’s existing strengths through careful investments in education, institutional quality, and relevant technology. They must create enterprises that are knowledgeable enough to recognize new competitive opportunities—and skilful enough to convert those opportunities into wealth. In short, they must build a knowledge economy. The model is not new. In recent years, several economies, such as Chile, Finland, Ireland, Korea, Malaysia, and Singapore have been its avatars. China and India are following the same path. Why, then, have many developing countries been slow to identify the strands of global knowledge that, when woven together with unique pieces of local knowledge, will produce the tapestry of the knowledge economy? If the basic components of the knowledge economy are readily available, why not appropriate them for growth and innovation? The answer lies in limited awareness, disincentives, and weak institutions. Together these challenges can keep the knowledge economy from taking root, preventing countries from forging powerful combinations of the best that the globe has to offer them and the best they have to offer the rest of the globe.” (World Bank 2000)

Overview of Daily Conference Programme Day One: The morning session will build upon the pre-reading material disseminated to participants to establish a shared understanding of key terms and concepts. The focus will be on the importance of knowledge society, knowledge economy and competitiveness and appropriate strategies for development at this point in the 21st Century. The afternoon session will review and analyse specific Knowledge Industries and Sectors in the Jamaican economy Day Two: The second day will be devoted to the examination of issues and policies related to two critical knowledge economy pillars – education and innovation. This will be followed by an afternoon session focused on brainstorming the essential components of a National Strategy and Action Plan for development of a Jamaican Knowledge Society and Economy for successful participation in the global economy

37th Anniversary e-journal


37th Anniversary e-journal


What is the likkle .... but tallawah framework ?

Tallawah, alt Talawa “1. Sturdy, strong, not to be underestimated; tough, stubborn, tenacious.” Dictionary of Jamaican English; second edition edited by F. G. Cassidy and R. B. LePage; Cambridge University Press 1967, 1980; page 436.

Likkke “1. Little, small”

“likkle .... but tallawah”

is the rallying cry for encouraging our IT community to

strive for leapfrogging, quantum leaping or leapjumping (as the Finns term it) our IT knowledge, skills and practices so as to punch above our weight class globally.

“likkle” is further elaborated as a set of twelve core values, principles and factors to ground our actions and behaviours as our community takes on the globe.

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ICT an Engine of Growth Herman Athias Past President 2005-2006 Business and Technology Consultant and Associate Teaching Fellow Mona School of Business hathias@gmail.com

(The following is a summarised preview of a fuller article to be published by the author later this year)

How do we rise above the economic storm and return Jamaica to its rightful place as one of the leaders in the global economy ?

I posit that ICT can be the engine,

the financial

sector can be the fuel and education and training can be the key and our people the drivers. We live in a very dynamic world. A new model of leadership is required if we are to benefit from ICT. Government cannot do this alone. We need a private and public sector partnership. An integrated approach that is business driven and not technologically driven is required. Too often organizations allow technology to drive the business. The probability of failure is much greater when this happens. Developed country status requires pervasive use of ICT. We need a plan that is implementable. Quality education and training (3Rs+I)1 is no longer an option; it’s a must. Training and retraining of our workers at all levels must be undertaken by all sectors. Every basic school should have a corporate sponsor. Broadband services must be available in every nook and cranny and it must be affordable (universal broadband). There should be no digital divide; we cannot afford this. The ICT sector providers and users must be properly represented by one of the existing ICT organizations or a yet to be created organization. ICT is 4% of our imports and only 0.3% of our exports. We have to clearly state what role we want to play in the global ICT market and be best in class. That is not second or third. but number one. Jamaica should be the centre of excellence in that segment/niche from R&D to service delivery and support. Moving up the outsourcing value chain is not an option. Whatever role we choose to play in the global ICT industry lets make sure we take the opportunity to use our local resources so we can learn, grow our industry and build our competence. Our ICT exports must be significantly greater than our imports.

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Portmore, East and Western Kingston, Montego Bay, and facilities within a two mile radius of each tertiary institution should be made ICT free trade zones. We should encourage local and international product and service producers to set up manufacturing and service facilities in our inner cities. The private and public sector operations must be reengineered to be competitive and more customer friendly. Most of our processes are archaic and too paper driven. Dematerialization of processes increase productivity and is beneficial to the environment. If we can accomplish some of the points raised in the (fuller) paper, we would have achieved,

among other things,

a reduction in the migration of our knowledge workers,

repatriation of knowledge workers who have been highly trained in one of the industrialized/developed countries, more employment, a healthy middle class, less poverty, productivity improvement, reduction in crime, significant improvement in our balance of payment and a consequent revaluation of our currency. The net result would be a much healthier economy and better quality of life for all Jamaicans. The Vision 2030 mantra is "Jamaica, the place of choice to live, work, raise families, and do business.” I want that Jamaica to be realized before 2020. Ring the Alarm !!

There must

be a sense of urgency. (Note 1: “3Rs+I” refers to Reading, writing , arithmetic and ICT)

RECOLLECTIONS “As a part of the “Computers in Schools” project the JCS established a Teacher Training Curriculum Committee consisting of Dahlia Fuller, Cedric Harold, Charmaine Duncan, Dr. Earl Brown, Sandy Buckland and a couple others. This committee developed the curriculum which would be used in the training of teachers to teach computer studies for the students doing grade 11 GCE exams. A year after, when CXC were about to introduce I.T. certification, they contacted the JCS and asked for their recommendations as to what should be included in the syllabus and curriculum. We gathered that they in fact similarly contacted all stakeholders in the region. This matter was referred to the JCS’ Curriculum Committee to develop a proposal for a curriculum and syllabus for I.T. for CXC. The JCS submitted what was proposed by the committee. Interestingly the resultant CXC curriculum that was published seemed to have been the same as was proposed by the JCS with little or no emendations.” Past President Winston Atkinson 1991-1993 1st JCS Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient

37th Anniversary e-journal


JCS joins World Information Technology and Services Alliance (WITSA)

L-R: Luis Stein, Chilean ICT Association, Dr. Jimson Olufuye, Information Technology Industry Association of Nigeria (ITAN), Dr. James H. Poisant, Secretary General, WITSA, and Dainsworth Richards, then President, Jamaica Computer Society (JCS) at the induction of the JCS into WITSA during the GPPS 2009 meeting in Bermuda October 30 – November 3, 2009.

On November 1, 2009, at the Global Public Policy Summit (GPPS) in Bermuda, Immediate Past President Dainsworth Richards actualised for Jamaica a place of honour with the admission of the Jamaica Computer Society (JCS) into the World Information Technology and Services Alliance (WITSA). WITSA is the leading voice of the global ICT industry. WITSA is a consortium of over 70 national ICT industry associations with members representing more than 90 percent of the world ICT market. The JCS was not only admitted as a new member of WITSA at GPPS 2009, but through IPP Dainsworth, played a key role in the planning and execution of the regional pre-conference workshop leading up to the GPPS event. IPP Dainsworth served on the steering committee for one year ahead of the main event, and was one of the speakers at the pre-conference workshop that hosted high-level policy leaders from several countries across the region, representing the Caribbean, Central and South America. The preconference workshop focused on fostering ICT industry growth through technology incubator development. As the leading recognized voice of the global ICT industry, WITSA (www.witsa.org) is dedicated to: •

Advocating international public policies that advance the industry’s growth and development; 37th Anniversary e-journal


• • • •

Facilitating international trade and investment in ICT products and services through its global network of contacts, leveraging initiatives such as its Global Partner Program and Global Trade Portal; Promoting industry cooperation and strengthening its member national associations through the sharing of knowledge, experience, and critical information; Publishing global ICT research to shape the industry, such as those found in it marquee publication, Digital Planet; Hosting WITSA’s signature events - World Congress on Information Technology (WCIT) and Global Public Policy Summit (GPPS); and Organizing Global ICT Excellence Awards to recognize outstanding ICT users.

The goals and aspirations of the JCS find synergy with those of WITSA and therefore, as the JCS strives towards our next stage of evolution and development, we look forward to taking full advantage of these global relationships for the acceleration and growth of our members and Jamaica’s economy.

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2011 Biztech Knowledge Forum Series featuring CompTIA Training and Certification The JCS will be launching the Biztech Knowledge Forum featuring CompTIA Training and Certification Seminars with the first set of seminars in the first quarter of next year as described in the tables below: Jamaica Computer Society Members Rate Bundled Price (Training and Exam ) Training Only CompTIA Courses

Combined Price

Training

Certification Exam Fee

CTT+

$90,000

$130,000

$85,000

$45,000

Project+

$40,000

$58,000

$35,500

$22,500

Green IT

$55,000

$63,000

$52,000

$11,000

A+

$45,000

$75,000

$42,000

$33,000

Network+

$46,000

$65,000

$42,500

$22,500

Security+

$50,300

$75,000

$50,000

$25,000

Sales IT

$46,000

$53,000

$42,500

$10,500

Fundamental IT

$53,000

$60,000

$50,000

$10,000

Jamaica Computer Society Non-Members Rate Bundled Price (Training and Exam ) Training Only CompTIA Courses

Combined Price

Training

Certification Exam Fee

CTT+

$95,000

$135,000

$90,000

$45,000

Project+

$43,000

$61,000

$38,500

$22,500

Green IT

$58,000

$66,000

$55,000

$11,000

A+

$48,000

$78,000

$45,000

$33,000

Network+

$49,000

$68,000

$45,500

$22,500

Security+

$53,300

$78,000

$53,000

$25,000

Sales IT

$49,000

$56,000

$45,500

$10,500

Fundamental IT

$56,000

$63,000

$53,000

$10,000

We invite you to contact us at inform@myjcs.com for further information as we set out to achieve our goal in repositioning Knowledge, Innovation and ICT as critical factors in charting our way forward as a society.

37th Anniversary e-journal


37th Anniversary e-journal


Geographic Information System (GIS) in Utilities It is a widely known fact that good data is the basis upon which any business will make sound decisions. When data is linked to a geographic location on a map, it is now possible to visualize the big picture – which provides a powerful decision ‐making tool. Geographic Informat ion System (GIS) provides you with an efficient platform for data management, planning and analysis, workforce automation, and situational awareness. Any utility company can leverage these capabilities since GIS can easily be integrated with your existing information technology infrastructure. In the utility industry, on any average day there are several users who employ a number of systems to manage and respond to the requirements of the business. There are engineers in operations units who may use number of systems to monitor the current network load and demand. Customer service may be located elsewhere to process calls for assistance and reconnection. Each of the elements has a location. The GIS allows the viewing and analysis of this information to determine if there is a pattern which may be identified as the source of a problem. Similarly, the GIS can be used for planning and forecasting purposes. The introduction of a GIS allows the maze of assets, hardware, software, staff, resources and clients to be represented as it really is‐ a set of intricately interrelated components that need to be managed and allocated carefully. Traditionally, GIS was implemented within a department with little or no transference of knowledge or information to other departments. The emergence of Enterprise GIS has caused a shift to a new paradigm, where GIS is utilized by an entire organization and is no longer localized. As the Caribbean’s leading GIS solutions provider, regional distributor of Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) software and a Telvent business partner, Spatial Innovision prides itself on being able to deliver a myriad of solutions to our client base. Our utility solutions group is highly trained in enterprise GIS systems and is able to nurture the client’s needs from conceptualization to implementation. The future of utility distribution systems lies with “reliable intelligence” that can be delivered through Telvent’s ArcFM Enterprise GIS solution for utilities. ArcFM is based on ESRI’s ArcGIS® 37th Anniversary e-journal


technology and is specifically designed for the utility industry, enabling the architect to model, design and manage their critical infrastructure. By integrating utility data and advanced geographical maps, ArcFM provides a graphical view of your infrastructure that supports cost reduction through simplified planning, analysis and operational response times. Telvent's ArcFM™ product suite adds value to ArcGIS®, ESRI's market-leading geographic information systems software. Users of both systems could benefit from the most powerful and comprehensive set of GIS and mapping software options available. Spatial, Telvent and ESRI have dedicated themselves to continued development to maintain ArcGIS's role as the world's leading enterprise GIS platform. Designed for electric, gas, water and wastewater utilities, ArcFM applications gain leverage for enterprise GIS through the use of open technology. Three key components of this strategy are the Open Development Environment, Open Databases, and COM technology. With the enterprise solution, utility businesses can edit, view, map and manage spatial data in a multiutility context. Its integrated environment and scalable architecture offer a solution for both project GIS and large multi-departmental businesses, providing the capability to access and use data that reside anywhere on the network.

Spatial Innovision Limited founded in 1998, is the Caribbean’s leading Global Positioning System (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) solutions centre. SPATIAL has been an advocate for the widespread implementation of GIS/GPS solutions throughout the Caribbean region serving over two hundred and fifty (250) government agencies, ‐government non organizations and private businesses. Since its inception, SPATIAL has worked alongside various public and private sector businesses locally and regionally in transforming their mapping operations to leverage their spatial information for realizable business benefits. SPATIAL is the regional distributor for Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) and is a Telvent business partner. For more information, send an email to gis@spatialvision.com

37th Anniversary e-journal


JCS 2010 Governing Council caught in a light mood: L-R; Maurice Coke VP Membership, Rohan Morris VP Education, Silburn Clarke President, Dean Smith VP Finance, Cara Murray Council Member and Delroy Ellis, Deputy President and Chair Certification committee. Council members not in picture are Glenice Leachman VP Communication and Dainsworth Richards Immediate Past President

37th Anniversary e-journal

Jamaica Computer Society 37th Anniversary Commerorative e-Journal  

37th Anniversary Commerorative Journal of the Jamaica Computer Society

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