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B Y M I C H A E L G R O H S , C O N T R I B U T I N G E D I TOR

Eye on the Future There was a time,

says Fredric Lederer, director of the Center for Legal & Court Technology (CLCT), that the chance of having video evidence was small. Even one of the most famous events in U.S. history, the assassination of President Kennedy, which occurred in a public arena in broad daylight, was captured on only a few feet of film by a handful of people. The most complete footage, shot by Abraham Zapruder, was a silent, color film that lasted for 26.6 seconds that went on to become perhaps the most studied piece of film in history. It is the film most people associate with visual evidence of the crime. Now, says Lederer, video evidence is everywhere and will con-

tinue to proliferate. A huge amount of personal video recording takes place. There are cameras everywhere. Most people carry one in their pocket. We are in an age of social media. People commit a crime and feel compelled to boast about it on Facebook. Google Glass is expected to play a factor in courtroom presentation. More and more police officers are going to be wearing body cameras. Next it will be drones. “Courts will be flooded with video,” he forecasts. At present, Audio/Video is in a transitional stage. December 31, 2013 saw the “analog sunset,” which means that all newly purchased technologies connect only by HDMI, DVI, display port or other future digital connections. Malcolm Macallum, Chief Technology Officer

at VIQ Solutions Inc., also points out “the use of AV capture is exploding in terms of evidence but is only slowly being adopted in the AV capture of court proceedings.” He furthers that the state of AV technology has drastically improved over the past two or three years and networks are finally able to capture HD video at a “decent” rate across LANs. This technology did not even exist a few years ago, but “currently the growth in AV evidence is exploding while the courts are still catching up. That technological change is happening but requires massive upgrades in LANs, workstations, and operating systems. Even the change from PCs to laptop or tablets is a large undertaking for most jurisdictions.” The state of the AV technology

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February / March 2015