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Grayson College Online Course Policy The Grayson College Online Course Policy and Online Course Review Rubric (which is an integral part of the Online Course Policy) are based on the requirements, recommendations, and best practices for electronically delivered courses described in the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools’ (SACS) Distance Education Policy, the Southern Regional Education Board’s (SREB) Principles of Good Practice, and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board’s (THECB) Principals of Good Practice for Academic Degree and Certificate Programs and Credit Courses Offered Electronically. This policy and rubric guide the development and delivery of quality online courses and provides necessary support and guidance to faculty teaching online. 1. Purpose of ELAC and Online Course Approvals The E-Learning Advisory Committee (ELAC) Committee will provide mentoring and pedagogical support for all faculty who wish to teach online courses. The purpose of mentoring and pedagogical support is to assist instructors with the design of online courses for effective teaching and learning and to share our experiences with online course structure and implementation. The ELAC review team will be responsible for the complete online course review using the Grayson College Online Review Rubric. 2. Blackboard The Learning Management System (LMS) for online courses at Grayson College is Blackboard. The E-Learning department will facilitate all training and support for faculty with their online courses in Blackboard. The E-learning department will also assist faculty in the preparation and creation of online materials; and the integration of outside educational materials from publishers, 3rd party vendors or Open Educational Resources (OER). 3. Course Evaluation and Approval The purpose of course evaluation and approval process is to ensure that new online courses meet the standards set by SAC’s, SREB, THECB and Grayson College and existing online courses adhere to these standards. The process of getting new courses approved is composed of the following steps: 1) Faculty creates proposal for new online course and gets permission from Chair to create it at least 3 months prior to the first day of the proposed class. 2) Chair confers with appropriate academic dean for approval. 3) Dean requests that a shell be set up for the new course in Blackboard. 11/14/2012

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4) The chair directs the faculty in setting up the course with the basic required elements on the Quick Review checklist. 5) The faculty notifies the ELAC Director when all the elements on the Quick Review checklist have been loaded into the shell. 6) The ELAC Director will evaluate the shell using the ELAC Quick Review Rubric and notify the faculty who proposed the course and to that person’s chair (or dean if it is a chair) of any changes that need to be made. 7) Once the ELAC Director approves any necessary changes, the faculty populates the required fields in the shell, adhering to the standards of the ELAC Full Review checklist and notifies the ELAC Director that it is ready for submission for full approval. 8) The ELAC Committee reviews the full course and gives its recommendation for changes to the faculty and to the chair. 9) The chair gives final approval for scheduling the class. For existing courses in order to obtain and maintain best practices in online learning, Instructional Services at Grayson College has made the decision to develop and implement a certification procedure for all online courses. This certification procedure has been chosen to meet best practice recommendations from SACS-COC and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Review of selected online courses will occur each semester on a rotation basis based on the needs of departments and the availability of reviewers on the ELAC teams. The Course Review will be addressed as stated per the E-Learning Procedures for Course Reviews and Certification.

Every online course will be re-evaluated and approved in accordance with the regularly scheduled faculty evaluation process.

4. Definitions Computer assisted classes are defined as face-to-face classes that have supplemental online components. Computer assisted classes can be changed into full online courses only after an instructor has received the necessary training and certification from the ELAC and E-Learning Department. Hybrid class - Classes in which the majority of the instruction occurs when the student and instructor are not in the same physical setting. A class is considered a hybrid class if students receive 33 -99% of the instruction or testing at a distance.

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Online class - Classes in which 100% of the instruction and testing occurs when the student and instructor are not in the same physical setting.

5. Online Course Information Availability The online class Syllabi have to be available online at least one week before the start date of classes. 6. Course Assignments The Department Chair assigns instructors to teach online courses at least three months before the start day of a course unless documentation is provided validating a shorter time. If an instructor who has never taught online is needed to teach an existing online class, the instructor must be approved by the department chair and ELAC Director. The instructor may be required to go through a Quick Review or a Full Review either before or after starting the course. 7. Students’ Evaluation of Online Courses. Students will participate in the online faculty evaluation process by taking the CourseEval Online Course Survey during the last week of semester. All online instructors are required to encourage their students to fill these surveys out when they become available.

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E-learning Procedure for Course Reviews and Certification In order to obtain and maintain best practices in online learning, Instructional Services at Grayson College has made the decision to develop and implement a certification procedure for all online courses. This certification procedure has been chosen to meet best practice recommendations from SACS-COC and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Review of selected online courses will occur each semester on a rotation basis based on the needs of departments and the availability of reviewers on the ELAC teams. Steps: 1)

Quick Review -- Department Chairs will be oriented and trained on how to review online courses using a quick review rubric. Utilizing the quick review rubric Department Chairs will review each online course offered in their area and make a determination whether the instructor’s course passes the review and is eligible for full ELAC review.

A.1. Pass review – All courses passing the quick review will be submitted to ELAC for full review. A.2. Unsuccessful Review -- Courses that do not pass the quick review will have an action plan developed and recommended to the instructor for the improvement of the course. Appropriate training for pedagogical and/or technical training, agreed upon between the E-Learning Department and the instructor will be available. The E-Learning department will work with the instructor to complete the needed trainings. Once the course has been corrected sufficiently, it will rotate back into the ELAC full review process. 2)

Full Review Procedures Once the faculty member’s course has been through the quick review process successfully, the faculty member will receive an email detailing the full review process, including a faculty review worksheet. The faculty review worksheet will allow the faculty members to inform the review team of pertinent information that might help the review team obtain a better understanding of the course as they are applying the rubric and making comments.

Next, the ELAC Committee will assign a three person team to conduct the full review. The review team will consist of two ELAC faculty representatives and the director of E-Learning. The team will independently review the course utilizing the review rubric for “quality


assurance�. The review team will meet to discuss the independent reviews and score the course as a group. The director of E-Learning will contact the instructor to discuss the score from the rubric and any recommendations from the review team. Successful Review: If the course passes the full review, the professor will be contacted and all comments will be shared. The professor may continue to teach the course online.

3)

Unsuccessful Review: If the course does not pass, a plan of action will be given to the faculty member on how to correct any deficiencies noted. The faculty member will have a full semester to implement the changes required to correct the deficiencies. When improvements are made the course will be resubmitted to the review team. Once the course passes the review, the course will be certified and the professor may continue to teach the online course. The chair, dean and VP of instruction will be notified.

Timelines

Review teams will have one full term semester to complete a review, though it can take less time in some cases. Once the review has been completed by the review team, the faculty member will have one long term semester to make any necessary changes to the course and to receive any technical training needed to make changes. If the changes are not completed, the faculty member will not teach the course online until the course successfully completes the full review.


Chair Review for Online Courses Chair conducts quick Review

Review is successful and goes to ELAC for Full Review

Review is successful or has deficiecies

Review does not pass and faculty is sent to E-Learning for training and certification

Review is successful or has deficiecies

Course is accepted or faculty fixes deficiencies

Instructor fixes deficencies and is sent for review

Course Sent to ELAC

Course ELAC Certified

Chairs will be trained to conduct the online quick review to vet the courses for the correct faculty training or course certification process. The chairs will work with the E-Learning Department to provide a list of all online full-time and adjunct faculty who are currently teaching online or are preparing to teach online. From this list the chair and E-learning department will work on a timeline to complete the reviews for the faculty courses.


Reviewed Instructor: Reviewer: Date Reviewed: Grayson College - ELAC Quick Review

Specific Review Standards: *I.1 Navigational instructions make the organization of the course easy to understand. (3)T *I.2 A statement introduces the student to the course and to the structure of the student learning. (3)T I.4 The self-introduction by the instructor is appropriate. (1) II.3 The learning outcomes of the course are clearly stated and understandable to the student. (2)T *III.3 Assessment and measurement strategies provide feedback to the student. (3)T

Yes

No

Notes:


*III.6 All major grades are located in the Blackboard Grade Center. (1) *V.2 Learning activities foster instructor-student, content- student, and student-student interactions. (3)T *Indicates Essential Standards (X) Indicates the Point Value for the Standard a requirement for THECB

Additional Notes:

S Indicates it is a requirement for SACs

T Indicates it is


Grayson College ELAC 1 0 0 % O nl i n e Course Review Instructor Worksheet This worksheet represents the self-reporting component of the peer course review process. It is designed for the Course Faculty Developer to provide initial and supplemental information about the course that will assist the Peer Course Review Team. Please type or print clearly. 1. Instructor Name: ______________________________________ 2. Course Name: __________________________________________ 3. Department:___________________________________ 4.Date and nature (Self, Peer, Administrative, Other) of last review: _________ 5. Is this course an online section of a course with other sections taught on campus? ___ Yes ___ No 6. Who is the creator of this online course? ___ Course Fulltime Faculty (Self) ___ Course Adjunct Faculty (Self) ___ Other 7. What is the source(s) of the course objectives? ___ mandated by the institution ___ Created by course faculty ___ Course Fulltime Faculty (Other) ___ Other 8. Does the syllabus of this course incorporate the components of the standard syllabus developed by the institution? ___ Yes ___ No If NO, please describe or explain: 9. Is the syllabus available online for review at the beginning of the semester/ course period? ___ Yes ___ No 10. Does the course use a standard textbook? ___ Yes ___ No If No, please describe or explain: 11. Does the course use audio/visual components?


___ Commercially produced Telecourse components via CDROM? ____ Audio/visual learning objects or links to audio/visual components on the Internet? ____ College/instructor produced audio/visual components? ___ Publisher produced audio/visual components? ___ Other: 路 If so, please describe how reviewers will be able to gain access to the materials. 12. Are there any special prerequisite computer skills or competencies required in order to access course technologies, software, programs, etc. ___ Yes ___ No If YES, please describe or explain: 13. What are the minimum technology requirements (course specific) needed to access this course and view its elements? 14. Does the course use support materials (other than audio/visual) provided by the textbook publisher? Are the test banks/pools using the current edition? ___ Yes ___ No If YES, please describe or explain: 14. a. Are the test banks/pools from the current edition? ___ Yes ___ No If YES, please describe or explain: 15. Does the course use any synchronous instructor/student interaction? ___ Yes ___ No If YES, please describe or explain: 16. Is any course content or instructor communication done by individual emails rather than posting online? ___ Yes ___ No If YES, please describe or explain 17. Are there any unresolved copyright issues apparent with regard to the materials used in this course? ___ Yes ___ No If YES, please describe or explain: 18. Are course information and all instructional materials (except the text of tests) that the student will access over the duration of the semester incorporated in the


course website and accessible to the review team? ___ Yes ___ No If NO, please describe or explain how review team can gain access to the material: 19. Are all instructional materials (necessary to achieve the learning goals) complete and incorporated in the course website? ___ Yes ___ No If NO, please describe or explain: 20. Is student-to-student interaction appropriate in this course? Why or why not? 21. Is Instructor-to-student interaction appropriate in this course? Why or why not? 22. Is content-to-student interaction appropriate in this course? Why or why not? 23. Please provide any other information you want to communicate to the Review Team about your course. Identify any particular areas and/or issues in this course where the instructor wants to ask for feedback from the review team.


Reviewed Instructor:___________________________ Reviewer:____________________________________ Date Reviewed:_______________________________ Grayson College - ELAC PEER COURSE REVIEW - RUBRIC

Alignment: Critical course components – Learning Outcomes (III), Learner Interactions and Activities (V), Resources, Materials, and Technology (IV and VI), Assessment and Measurement (III) - work together to ensure that students achieve the desired learning outcomes. Specific standards included in Alignment are indicated in the rubric annotations.

I. COURSE OVERVIEW AND INTRODUCTION General Review Standard: The overall design of the course, navigational information, as well as course, instructor and student information are made transparent to the student at the beginning of the course.

Specific Review Standards: *I.1 Navigational instructions

Points 3

Annotation: What's the idea? Instructions provide a general course overview,

make the organization of

guide the new student to explore the course

the course easy to

website, and indicate what to do first, rather

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understand.

than list detailed navigational instructions for the whole course. Instructor may choose to incorporate some of this information in the course syllabus. If so, students should be directed to the syllabus at the beginning of the course. A useful idea is a "Read Me First" or "Start Here" button or icon on the course home page, linking students to start-up information. Examples: • A course "tour" •

Clear statements about how to get started

in the course •

A "Scavenger hunt" assignment that leads

students through an exploration of the different areas of the course areas *I.2 A statement introduces the

3

The instructor's statement gives the new

student to the course and to the

student an idea of how the learning process is

structure of the student

structured including schedule, communications

learning.

modes, types of activities, and assessments. These features are often found in the course syllabus. Look for some or all of the following: • The course schedule (self-paced, following a set calendar, etc.)

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• Course sequencing, such as a linear or random order • Types of activities the student will be required to complete (written assignments, online self-tests, participation in the discussion board, group work, etc.) • Course calendar with assignment and test due dates • Preferred mode of communication with the instructor (email, discussion board, etc.) • Preferred mode of communication with other students • Testing procedures (online, proctored, etc.) • Procedure for submission of electronic assignments I.3 Netiquette expectations

2

Expectations of student conduct online are

with regard to discussions and

clearly stated, however brief or elaborate

email communication are clearly

they may be. The expectations themselves

stated.

are not evaluated. Examples: • Rules of conduct for participating in the discussion board • Rules of conduct for email content • "Speaking style" requirements, (i.e. use of

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correct English required as opposed to net acronyms) • 1

Spelling and grammar expectations, if any

The initial introduction creates a sense of

I.4 The self-introduction by the

connection between the instructor and the

instructor is appropriate

students. It should present the instructor as professional as well as approachable, and include more than the essentials, such as the instructor’s name, title, field of expertise, email address and phone.

The self-introduction helps students get to know the instructor. It could include: • Information on teaching philosophy • Past experiences with teaching online classes • Personal information such as hobbies, etc. • A photograph I.5 Students are requested to

1

The student introduction helps to create a

introduce themselves to the

supportive learning environment and a sense of

class.

community. Students are asked to introduce themselves and given guidance on where and how they should do so. Student introductions themselves are not evaluated. Instructors may ask students to answer specific questions (such as why they are taking the course, what concerns they have, what they expect to

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learn, etc.) or may choose to let the student decide. Instructors may provide an example of an introduction and/or start the process by introducing themselves. I.6 Minimum technology

1

Explanations of technical requirements and

requirements (these

skills, and prerequisite knowledge and skills may

requirements are specific for

be found within the course, in documents linked

this course, minimum

to the course, or in supporting material not on

requirements for the college will

the course site. Look for a link to that content

be included on the Student

and/or a reminder of it for the entering student.

Services Menu item), minimum student skills, and; if applicable,

Technology requirements may include

prerequisite knowledge in the

information on:

discipline, are clearly stated.

• Hardware •

Software and plug-ins

• ISP requirements Examples of technology skills may include the capability to: • Use email with attachments •

Save file in commonly used word

processing program formats (e.g. MS Word) • Use MS Excel or other spreadsheet programs Discipline knowledge prerequisites should include academic course prerequisites.

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II. LEARNING OUTCOMES (COMPETENCIES) General Review Standard: Learning outcomes are clearly defined and explained. They assist the student to focus learning activities.

Specific Review Standards: *II.1 The learning outcomes of the

Points 3

Annotation: What's the idea? Measurable learning outcomes ensure instructors

course describe outcomes that are

precisely describe what students are to gain from

measurable.

instruction, and then guide instructors to accurately assess student accomplishment. Outcomes should describe student performance measurable in specific, observable ways. If this is not possible, (e.g., internal cognition, affective changes), check for clear indications that the learning objective is meaningfully assessed. Special situations: In some cases (check the Instructor Worksheet), outcomes for the course are institutionally mandated and the individual instructor does not have the authority to change them. For such cases, review Standard II.1 in connection with Standard II.5 below. If the specific learning outcomes on the module/unit level are measurable but the institutionally mandated learning objectives for the course are not, Standard II.1 should be considered as met for scoring purposes.

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Please note in the "comments" box that the institutionally mandated learning outcomes for the course are not measurable. Examples of measurable outcomes: •

Select appropriate tax strategies for different financial an situations

• Develop a comprehensive, individualized wellness action focused on overcoming a sedentary life-style

Alignment: This standard is included in Alignment. (Critical course components work together to ensure that students achieve the desired learning outcomes) *II.2 The learning outcomes

3

Examine the learning outcomes (course and unit

address content mastery, critical

level) as a whole for all three types of skill. Every

thinking skills, and core learning

single outcome may not contain all three

skills.

components. Content mastery should be appropriate for the type and level of the course. Ask the Subject Matter Expert (SME) for guidance. Critical thinking skills may include the ability to: •

Distinguish between fact and opinion

Distinguish between primary and secondary

sources • Revised on 4 May 2012

Identify bias and stereotypes


Evaluate information sources for point of

view, accuracy, usefulness, timeliness, etc. • Recognize deceptive arguments Core learning skills may include: • Written and oral communication skills • Manipulation and organization of information in various ways or using different tools • Understanding what one knows and how one knows it, and also understanding what one does not know and what one needs to find it out. Alignment: This standard is included in Alignment. (Critical course components work together to ensure that students achieve the desired learning outcomes.) II.3 The learning outcomes of the

2

Students can easily grasp the meaning of the

course are clearly stated and

learning outcomes. Use of jargon, confusing terms,

understandable to the student.

unnecessarily complex language, and puzzling syntax are avoided. Special situations: In some cases (check the Instructor Worksheet), objectives for the course are institutionally mandated and the individual instructor does not have the authority to change them. For such courses, review Standard II.4 in connection with Standard II.5 below. If the specific learning outcomes on the module/unit level are clearly stated and understandable to the student but the institutionally

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mandated learning outcomes for the course are not, Standard II.4 should be considered as met for scoring purposes. Please note in the "comments" box that the institutionally mandated learning outcomes for the course are not clearly stated and understandable. II.4 Instructions to students on

2

Instructions may take various forms (e.g. narratives,

how to meet the learning

bulleted lists, charts) and may appear at different

outcomes are adequate and easy

levels within the course, such as module-based or

to understand.

weekly assignment sheets. Instructions are clear and complete. Examples: • Module-based or weekly assignment pages in narrative, bulleted list, or chart form, indicate a list of steps that guide the student to meet learning outcomes for each week • Information indicates which learning activities, resources, assignments, and assessments support the learning objectives

II.5 The learning outcomes of the

2

Module or unit level outcomes may be written by the

course are articulated and

instructor or come from the textbook. If no module or

specified on the module/unit

unit level outcomes are found or referenced on the

level.

website, reviewers should communicate with the instructor to gather more information.

III. ASSESSMENT AND MEASUREMENT General Review Standard: Assessment strategies use established ways to measure effective learning, assess student Revised on 4 May 2012


progress by reference to stated learning outcomes, and are designed as essential to the learning process.

Specific Review Standards: *III.1 The types of assessments

Points 3

Annotation: What's the idea? Assessments, learning outcomes, and learning activities

selected measure the stated

align in a clear and direct way. The assessment formats

learning outcomes and are

provide a reasonable way to measure the stated learning

consistent with course activities

outcomes.

and resources. Examples of inconsistency: • The outcome is to be able to "write a persuasive essay" but the assessment is a multiple choice test. • The outcome is to "demonstrate disciplinespecific information literacy" and the assessment is a rubric-scored term paper, but students are not given any practice with information literacy skills on smaller assignments. Examples of outcome/assessment alignment: • A problem analysis evaluates critical thinking skills • Multiple choice quiz tests vocabulary knowledge • A composition assesses writing skills Some assessments may be geared towards meeting outcomes other than those stated in the course; for example, a course may have a writing component as part of a college-wide "Writing Across the Curriculum"

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requirement. In that case suggest including appropriate outcomes in the course. Alignment: This standard is included in Alignment (Critical course components work together to ensure that students achieve the desired learning outcomes.) *III.2 The grading policy is

3

Review the clarity of presentation to the student, not the

transparent and easy to

simplicity or complexity of a given grading system itself. A

understand.

relatively complex grading system can still be unambiguous and easy to understand. Example: •

A list of all activities, tests, etc. that will affect the

students' grade is included at the beginning of the course. *III.3 Assessment and

3

Students learn more effectively if they receive frequent,

measurement strategies

meaningful, and rapid feedback. This feedback may come

provide feedback to the

from the instructor directly, from assignments and

student.

assessments that have feedback built into them, or even from other students. Examples: • Instructor participation in a discussion assignment • Writing assignments that require submission of a draft for instructor comment and suggestions for improvement • Self-mastery tests and quizzes that include informative feedback with each answer choice • Interactive games and simulation that have feedback built in

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III.4 The types of assessments

2

selected and the methods used for

Assessments make use of the technologies and security typically online classroom.

submitting assessments are appropriate for the distance

Examples that DO meet the standard:

learning environment.

Submission of text or media files by the assignment

tool • Exams given in a proctored testing center • Quizzes with time limitations, printing disabled, and other Security measures • Multiple assessments which enable the instructor to become individual students' work and which discourage "proxy” (someone other than the student completing and submitting work) Examples that do NOT meet the standard: • Required assessments that cannot be submitted online, such as a lab practicum in a science course. • A course in which the entire set of assessments consists of 5 multiple choice tests taken online, with no enforced time limit, the print function enabled, and minimal security features in place. III.5 "Self-check" or practice types

1

Students have ample opportunity to measure their own

of assignments are provided for

learning progress. Look for examples of "self-check"

quick student feedback.

quizzes and activities, as well as other types of practice opportunities that provide rapid feedback. These types of assignments should be voluntary or allow multiple attempts.

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Examples: • Practice quizzes • Games, simulations, and other interactive exercises • Practice written assignments • Peer reviews *III.6 All major grades are located

1

Per Grayson Policy set forth by the division dean’s

in the Blackboard Grade Center.

IV. RESOURCES AND MATERIALS General Review Standard: Instructional materials are sufficiently comprehensive to achieve announced learning outcomes and are prepared by qualified persons competent in their fields. (Materials, other than standard textbooks produced by recognized publishers, are prepared by the instructor or distance educators skilled in preparing materials for distance learning.) Specific Review Standards:

Points

*IV.1 The instructional materials

3

Annotation: What's the idea? Instructions should provide meaningful content in a

support the stated learning

variety of ways, including the textbook, PowerPoint

outcomes and have sufficient

presentations, websites, lecture notes, outlines, and

breadth and depth for the student

multimedia.

to learn the subject. Decisions on this standard may be particularly difficult for individual reviewers whose expertise is not in the course discipline. Reviewers should consult with the SME (subject matter expert) and use common sense to determine if the content is robust enough to support the course. Alignment: This standard is included in Alignment. (Critical Revised on 4 May 2012


course components work together to ensure that students achieve the desired learning outcomes.) *IV.2 Instructional materials are

3

Students who have the required technical equipment and software can view the materials online.

presented in a format appropriate to the online environment, and are easily

If some of the course resources, including textbooks, CD-

accessible to and usable by the

ROMs, etc., are unavailable within the framework of the

student.

course website, determine how students would gain access to them and examine their ease of use. Examples: • Textbooks and/or CDs, if used; include titles, authors, publishers, ISBN numbers, copyright dates, and information as to where copies can be obtained A navigation button or area in the course is devoted to "Resources" and appropriately tied in with the overall course design • Required software plug-ins are listed, along with instructions obtaining and installing the plug-ins Examples of some visual format problems: • Text size may be too inconsistent for typical View/Text Size • Large text files are presented without table of contents or unit numbering •

Science lab courses may include learning activities

that are not easy to format for online learning IV.3 The purpose of the course elements (content, instructional Revised on 4 May 2012

2

Students can easily determine the purpose of all materials, technologies and methods used in the course


methods, technologies, and

and know which materials are required and which are

course materials) is evident.

recommended resources. For example, a course may be richly garnished with external links to Internet resources, but it is not clear whether those resources are for background information, additional personal enrichment, or required for an assignment. Examples: • Links to external web sites indicate the purpose of the links or are completely selfevident. • The functions of animated games or exercises are clearly explained or are completely self-evident.

IV.4 The instructional materials,

1

Online courses often use multiple types of instructional

including supporting materials -

materials. Students can easily understand how the

such as manuals, CD ROMs, and

materials relate to each other. The level of detail in

computer software - are

supporting materials is appropriate for the level of the

consistent in organization.

course. For example, a course requires students to use the following materials: a textbook divided into chapters, video segments ordered by topics, a website organized around specific skills, and a tutorial CD-ROM that has an opening menu consisting of "practice quizzes," "images," and "audio examples." Reviewers would need to determine if such diversely formatted course materials are integrated well enough to be useful to the

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uninitiated student. Example: • An introductory Gen Ed course does not require materials meant for upper level intensive study in a major. Decisions on this standard may be particularly difficult for individual reviewers whose expertise is not in the course discipline. Reviewers should consult with the SME (subject matter expert) and use common sense to determine if the materials are appropriate to this course. IV.5 All resources and materials

1

Materials created by the instructor and those borrowed

used in the online course are

from other sources are distinctly identified. Text, images,

appropriately cited.

graphic materials, tables, videos, audios, websites, and other forms of multimedia are appropriately referenced according to the institution's copyright and intellectual property policy. Courses that use an e-pack or course cartridge may provide a blanket statement acknowledging that a significant portion of the course materials came from the publisher rather than include individual citations for each instance of publisher materials.

V. LEARNER INTERACTION General Review Standard: The effective design of instructor-student interaction, meaningful student cooperation,

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and student-content interaction is essential to student motivation, intellectual commitment and personal development.

Specific Review Standards: *V.1 The learning activities

Points 3

Annotation: What's the idea? Learning activities are various including class discussions,

promote the achievement of

case studies, simulation exercise, practice quizzes, tests,

stated learning outcomes.

etc. Activities align with and support the learning outcomes. Most of the outcomes can reasonably be achieved by students completing the learning activities. Examples of mismatches between activities and objectives: • The objective requires students to be able to deliver a persuasive speech, but the activities in the course do not include practice of that skill • The objective is "Prepare each budget within a master budget and explain their importance in the overall budgeting process." The students review information about this in their texts, observe budgets worked out by the instructor, and produce only one of the several budgets Alignment: This standard is included in Alignment. (Critical course components work together to ensure that students achieve the desired learning outcomes.)

*V.2 Learning activities foster

3

All online courses should include interaction between the

instructor-student, content-

instructor and the students and between the students

student, and student-student

and the content. The degree and type of student-to-

interaction.

student interaction may vary with the discipline and the

Revised on 4 May 2012


level of the course. Examples of learning activities that foster the following types of interaction: •

Instructor - student (consider for ALL courses):

Self-introduction; discussion postings and responses; feedback on project assignments; evidence of one-toone e-mail communication, etc. •

Student- content (consider for ALL courses): Essays, term papers, group projects, etc. based on readings, videos, and other course content; selfassessment exercises; group work products, etc.

•

Student- student (if appropriate to this course): Self-introduction exercise; group discussion postings; group projects; peer critiques, etc.

Refer to the Instructor Worksheet to determine if studentstudent interaction is appropriate for this course. If the Worksheet indicates that such interaction is appropriate then consider this in deciding if this standard is met. If the Worksheet indicates that such interaction is not appropriate, then focus only on instructor-student and student-content interaction to decide whether this standard has been met. Where possible, include recommendations and comments where student-student interaction can be incorporated in this course. *V.3 Clear standards are set for

3

Information clearly indicates how quickly the

instructor response and availability

instructor will respond, when feedback will be

(turn- around time for email, grade

provided, and when the instructor is available to

posting, etc.)

meet.

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Information clearly indicates instructor response time for key events and interactions, including e-mail turnaround time, time required for grade postings, discussion postings, etc. Standards also include instructor availability, including e-mail response time, degree of participation in discussions, and availability via other media (phone, in-person) if applicable. This standard does not prescribe what that response time and availability ought to be. V. 4 The requirements for the

2

course interaction are clearly

A clear statement of requirements should indicate the criteria for interaction.

articulated. For example, students required to participate in discussions are told how many times each week they must post original comments, how many times they must post responses to other's comments, what the quality of the comments must be, how the comments will be evaluated, what grade credit they can expect for various levels of performance, and whether the interaction is required or optional. V.5 The course design prompts the

2

Students know that the instructor is approachable and will

instructor to be present, active,

regularly interact with prompts the instructor them.

and engaged with the students.

Opportunities for interaction will vary with the discipline of the course. Examples: • An actively used and well organized instructor-

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facilitated discussion Board • Optional "electronic office hours" provided in the chat room or chat sessions on selected topics, archived/edited and posted as a FAQ for other Students • An invitation for the class to email the instructor with individual concerns • Current announcements, either in the classroom or via email

VI. COURSETECHNOLOGY General Review Standard: To enhance student learning, course technology should enrich instruction and foster learner interactivity. Specific Review Standards:

Points

*Vl.1 The tools and media

3

Annotation: What's the idea? Tools and media used in the course support related

support the learning outcomes of

learning outcomes, and are integrated with texts and

the course and are integrated

lesson assignments. Students know how the tools and

with texts and lesson

media support the assignments and how they support

assignments.

the learning outcomes. Technology is not used simply for the sake of using technology. For example, a course might require viewing video materials, but it may not be clear how the video

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materials illustrate or support any learning outcomes. Alignment: This standard is included in Alignment. (Critical course components work together to ensure that students achieve the desired learning outcomes.) Vl.2 The tools and media

2

Tools and media used in the course help students actively

enhance student interactivity

engage in the learning process, rather than passively

and guide the student to become

"absorbing" information.

a more active learner. Examples: •

Automated 'self-check' exercises requiring student

response • Animations, simulations, and games that require student input • Software that tracks student interaction and progress • Use of discussion tools with automatic notification or 'read/unread' tracking feature Vl.3 Technologies required for

2

For this standard, the term "technologies" may cover a

this course are either provided or

range of plug-ins such as Acrobat Reader, media players,

easily downloadable.

etc. In addition, courses may require special software packages (spreadsheets, math calculators etc.). Clear instructions tell students how to obtain needed plug-ins and software packages.

VI.4 The tools and media are compatible with existing

1

Course tools, media, and delivery modes meet current standards for widespread accessibility.

standards of delivery modes. For example, if most students have access to DVD players or use streaming media, use of those delivery modes in Revised on 4 May 2012


an online class meets this standard. If the typical student cannot be expected to have access to a technology at his or her out-of-the box home computer off campus, that technology should probably not be used in the course. VI.5 Instructions on how to

1

Online students need to know about and be able to obtain

access resources at a distance

access to educational resources by remote access.

are sufficient and easy to

Information on these resources is readily visible with clear

understand.

instructions on how to access these resources. Examples: • The instructor mails to students a custom CD he has prepare for the course • An explanation of how to obtain full text journal articles is provided in the assignment that requires their use

VI.6 Course technologies take

1

As innovative technologies appear on the market all

advantage of existing economies

the time, online course technology should be current.

and efficiencies of delivery.

Courses not recently developed may need to be updated. (Check the Instructor Worksheet). Example: • Using compressed files to reduce file downloading time • Delivering Audio files in a common file type such as Windows Media or RealPlayer

VII. LEARNER SUPPORT General Review Standard:

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Courses are effectively supported for students through fully accessible modes of delivery, resources, and student support. Specific Review Standards: VII.1 The course instructions articulate or link to a clear

Points 2

Annotation: What’s the idea? Technical support for online students differs from institution to institution.

description of the technical support offered.

Technical support includes information about such topics as how to log in, how to use the software, and how to upload files. It does not include help with course content, assignments, academic or student support services (see Standards VII.2 and VII.3 below). Look for evidence that students have access to technical support services from within the course. The purpose is not to review the adequacy of those services on an institutional level.

Examples: • A clear description of the services, including a link to a technical support website • An email link to an online learning helpdesk • A phone number for an online learning helpdesk

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VII.2 Course instructions

2

Academic support for online students, and the scope of

articulate or link to an

what "academic support" entails, differs from institution

explanation of how the

to institution. For the purposes of review, academic

institution's academic support

support includes access to library resources, readiness

system can assist the student in

assessment, testing services, tutoring, a writing center, a

effectively using the resources

math center, supplemental instruction programs, and

provided.

teaching assistants. Look for evidence that students have access to academic support services from within the course. The purpose is not to review the adequacy of those services on an institutional level.

Examples: • A clear description of the academic support services and how to access them. • A link to the academic support website, along with a definition of academic support VII.3 Course instructions

1

Student support services for online students, and the

articulate or link to an

scope of what such support entails, differs from

explanation of how the

institution to institution. For the purposes of this

institution's student support

review, student support services include advising,

services can assist the student in

registration, financial aid, student life, counseling, etc.

effectively using the resources provided.

Look for evidence that students have access to student support services from within the course. The purpose is not to review the adequacy of those services on an institutional level.

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Examples: • A clear description of student support services and how to access them • A link to the student support website, along with a definition of student support services 1

VII.4 Course instructions

Online students' access to tutorials and help files

articulate or link to tutorials

related to writing, technology, research, etc. differs

and resources that answer

from institution to institution.

basic questions related to

This item does NOT refer to:

research, writing, technology

Students getting help from another person

etc.

Tutorials and resources specifically related to course content

Look for evidence that students taking the course DO have access to those support services from within the course, for example, a clear description of the tutorials available and how to get them.

VIII. ACCESSIBILITY General Review Standard: The course is accessible to all students.

Specific Review Standards: *VIII.1 The course acknowledges

Points 3

Annotation: What's the idea? All online courses should direct students to the institution's

the importance of ADA

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) services on their

requirements.

campus. There should be a statement in the course that

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tells students how to gain access to ADA services at their institution. To meet this standard a course must have both a statement that tells students how to gain access to an institution's ADA services AND be on an approved Course Management System (Blackboard) or documentation provided by the CMS that it is ADA compliant. Encourage faculty to consult the office on their campus that provides disability services for the wording of an ADA Statement appropriate to their institution. VIII.2 Web pages provide

1

Alternative means of access to course information are

equivalent alternatives to auditory

provided for the vision or hearing impaired student, such

and visual content.

as, equivalent textual representations of images, audio, animations, and video in the course website. Presenting information in text format is generally acceptable because screen reader software (used by the vision impaired) can read text. Examples: • Audio lecture has a text transcript available • Video clip, image, or animation is accompanied by text transcript

VIII. 3 Web pages have links

1

Instructors provide links to Internet content that includes

that are self-describing and

useful descriptions of what students will find at those sites.

meaningful.

These descriptions enable the vision impaired student to use screen reader software to understand links.

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Examples: • All file names and web hyperlinks have meaningful names. For instance, the link to take a quiz should say "Take Quiz 1", not "click here" • Icons used as links should also have HTML tags or an accompany text link VIII. 4 The course demonstrates sensitivity to readability issues.

1

The course employs appropriate font, color, and spacing to facilitate readability and minimize distractions for the student. Examples: • Formatting such as bold or italics in addition to color coding text • Web page provided in an alternate, non-colorcoded format • Formatting and color coding serve instructional purposes. For example, format and color are used purposefully to communicate key points, group like items and emphasize relevant relationships, etc.

Meets Expectations if: Answered 'Yes' to all 3-point Essential Standards: I.1, I.2, II.1, II.2, III.1, III.2, III.3, IV.1, IV.2, V.1, V.2, V.3, VI.1, VIl.1 AND 68 points or more *Indicates Essential Standards (X) Indicates the Point Value for the Standard a requirement for THECB Revised on 4 May 2012

S Indicates it is a requirement for SACs

T Indicates it is


Date Reviewed with Instructor:______________ Recommendations made and agreed upon: ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Date to be completed for approval:_______________________ Signature: _____________________________________________________________________________

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Grayson E-Learning Complete Review Packet  

This ebook contains the policies and procedures for the Grayson E-Learning Online Course Review.

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