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J a k e .M at t h e w .E l l i ot t Works in Architecture and Planning 2

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Intent: The presence of a human sensitive architecture is being increasingly diminished as modern technology takes hold of our industry. Time is money, and therefore becomes a primay driver in the development of architectural projects. In this timeline driven process, we seek flashy images and intillectual motif’s to pursuade potential clients, while frequently losing sight of the daily habitation of these long term interventions and the way in which we engage the built environment. In an attempt to gain a better understanding of this contemporary trend towards a visual-centric built environment, I have adopted a 3 scaled approach to design. First, we must consider the physical manifestation of our ideas; understanding the way in which we interact with architecture is the only way to understand human sensitive. Second, we must understand the organization of this manifestation through an analysis of activity and intended uses. Finally, we must understand the way in which our interventions interact with its surrounding context. In using this 3 scaled approach to design, the built environment will gain human sensitivity due to its analysis of interactions at all levels. As the built environment becomes more and more dense, this approach to design becomes increasingly imperative. It is my objective to utilize my time before gradute school to gain first hand experience working in an architecture firm, while researching the urban conditions of Sacramento, California to achieve these aims of creating a more human sensitive built environment.


Jake Matthew Elliott

2672 Curtis Way Sacramento, California 95818 elliott.arch@gmail.com 916.889.6551

Education:

Experience:

Portland State University | 2010-2013

American Institute of Architecture Students | 2006-Present

BS in Architecture | Class of 2013

Cosumnes River College | ~2003-2009 Architecture, Business, Graphic Design, Web Design

Sacramento City College | 2008 General Education

Software Proficiencies: Revit AutoCAD Kerkythea SketchUp Photoshop Premier

Illustrator InDesign M. Office Diva Rhino 3D

Awards & Achievements: AIAS West Quad Conference Chair www.portlandwestquad.com Arcbazar International Design Competition | Second Place 2012 Institute for Sustainable Solutions Grant | 2012 PSU Design Build SEED Public Interest Design Certification USGBC Natural Talent Design Competition | Second Place 2008

Chapter President & Conference Chair Vice-President Secretary Historian

Through my years with the AIAS I have had the opportunity to plan and organize multi-day conferences, single day events, create organization project teams and workflows, design marketing material and teach emerging professionals the tools necessary for their projects. At Portland State University I piloted an architectural trade’s workshop series called TechTalks, where I taught workshops on digital and hand modeling techniques, various rendering techniques and obtained outside speakers for additional workshops.

Basic Initiative | 2011-2012 Working with Basic Initiative, a non-profit architecture design initiative that works with global low income communities has opened my eyes to the lack of habitability in the developing world. In creating large and small scale sustainable interventions, our mission is to create a more sustainable future for these developing regions where monetary support may not be available. My duties have included concept development, construction detailing and fabrication, project renderings, master plan developments and presentation packages that are used to encourage project investments.

Transcend Technologies Group | 2006-2011 Electronic Data Interchange Analyst Customer Service Representative Job Trainer Web Graphics Designer Data Entry Clerk

Starting off as a temporary data entry clerk for an insurance management software company, I was eventually hired on full time before receiving several promotions through my 5 years with the company. My development into a job trainer and customer service representative taught me leadership, adaptation, communication, and presentation skills that I used and expanded on in my pursuit of a degree in architecture, and becoming a student leader at Portland State. References Available Upon Request


MULTI

PLY CITY

Plans Project 2: Design for a Dynamic Urban Corridor

Project 3: Master Plan for Economic Capacity Building

Project 1: Multi-Family Housing

Project 4: Live/Work

Project 6: Independant Cinema

Project 5: A Sustainable Materials Laboratory

Project 7: An Eco-Roof Analysis

Project 8: Public Interest Design

Buildings

Builds


A Helping Hand | Design for Transitions Where: Outer SE, Portland, Oregon

The design for a local non-profit organization, Central City Concern, who caters to transitioning homeless and drug users, needed to be sensitive to the inhabitants and the neighborhood alike. Directly adjacent to a public park and major roadway, security and privacy became a major issue on the site. The R1a zoning prohited extreme density, which opened up opportunities for showing the client the importance of common spaces that could facilitate community interaction and strengthen the transition success rate. This materialized into a dual courtyard scheme that provides personalized porches and natural lighting to all units, while leaving room for the managerial spaces that acts as the face of the project to the neighborhood and protect the residents from the highspeed traffic bordering the east side of the lot.


Temporal Expression Bringing Identity through Materiality

As a metorphor for the transitional residents within, the varying patina’s on the copper cladding is a temporal reminder of the time the residents have been in the program while bringing a sense of identity to the individual units. Before a new resident moves in, the patina would be wiped clean, leaving a dynamic skin that is indicative of the transitional nature of the inhabitants.

The Gable

Homogenous wood slat facade to accentuate gable form and representation of house

The Dwelling

Copper cladding as transitional individuality

The Porch

Kalwall circulation/porch to represent delicate process of transitional rehabilitation

The Support

Bar Scheme for Efficiency

Steel structure as the supportive organization that facilitates the transitional rehabilitation

Introduce Courtyard for Daylighting and Community Interaction

Provide Couryard Access to all Residents


1 Bedroom Unit 2 Bedroom Unit

3 Bedroom Unit (with adaptable in-house childcare)

Second/Third Floor Plans

2 Bedroom Units 1 Bedroom Units 3 Bedroom Units Community Spaces Managerial Space

Ground Floor Plan


Roof & Wall Detail Deck & Wall Connection Detail

Section

South Elevation


Multi-Ply-City | Providing Access and Opportunity Where: South Waterfront, Portland, Oregon

MULTI

PLY CITY

Portland Oregon is a city abundant with active streets and public spaces, exquisite food and drink, dynamic transportation services and direct access to nature. As the city’s population begins to grow exponentially faster and urban dwelling begins to densify, there will be a large demand on access to food, water, transportation and places to socialize or have solitude. The Gibbs Street site sits between two major developments, yet lacks accessibility to basic living amenities such as outside public space, grocery facilities, employment opportunities and access to nature. These proposals seek to utilize the cities multitude of complex layers in creating a dynamic destination place in the cities fastest growing development.


A Game of Frogger

Phase 2

Taking back the roadway for people

Creating friendlier pedestrian pathways

In creating a cross walk and removing a portion of the center-divide, pedestrians would be free to move throughout the area without the worry of being hit by a car or bus. This enhances both the walk and bike friendliness of the neighborhoods in this area and will provide more access to the businesses in the South Waterfront.

Gibbs Housing Opportunities for dense living

An opportunity for diverse living

Phase 3

In creating the mid rise residential tower, this will create leverage for the enhancement of the pedestrian crosswalk at Gibbs and Naito Parkway and will help connect the Lair Hill and Corbet neighborhoods. In addition, the site’s location and topography will allow the development of several floors without blocking views from surrounding buildings.

Neighborhood Divides

Future Development


Lookout Shops

Phase 2

A place to eat, shop, energize and view!

Filling a voided community link

As traffic increases on the bridge, a shop at the overlooking end will be an opportunity for commuters and visitors to grab a cup of coffee or food to and from their work or residence.

10 Minute Access

Transportation

The Mural

Phase 4

Increasing community pride Experience enhancement

This would not only enhance the experience of the walk across I-5, but it would also create a destination place for people to walk their kids, significant others or a walk by themselves.


Gibbs Street Corridor Central between the city center and Portland’s fastest growing development of the South Waterfront, Gibbs Street is the ideal interventin point due to a lack of activities, diverse employment and existing funding for development.

The Scoop

Phase 1

Why just touch when you can take a scoop? Not another roadway, a new waterway!

This not only provides more riverfront property, but it also creates more potential natural habitat for wildlife and impervious surfaces for the eco-district. As the land is removed from inland Gibbs street, it would be cleaned up to standards and placed out on the existing riverbank to expand the land area of the current waterfront.


Waterfront Place

Phase 1

A place to work, shop, earn and play!

Enabling Portland’s entrepreneurs

A 90,000 sf existing building has the potential to increase diverse employment opportunities. The space could also facilitate permanent commercial rentals as well as a much needed market in order to boost economic and environmental stability for the neighborhood.


The Village of Los Piletones | Economic Capacity Where: Southern Buenos Aires, Argentina

Having already spent a summer with the community of Los Piletones, a colleague and I sought out to develop a plan for building economic capacity. The ensure long term sustainability and community acceptance, we analysed the needs and skill sets of the inhabitants, then created a closed-loop system of economic development that would enable short-term and long-term economic stability. The analysis of the community included balloon mapping and ground surveys to gain a better understanding of the community’s structure; then, after creating a series of proposals, we proposed these interventions to the community and potential investors. This lead to a several hundred thousand dollars in grant money for funding selected interventions.


FARMING

WASTE MANAGEMENT

INCUBATOR +

COOPERATIVE


The Incubator-Plus

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Phase 2

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Creating nodes of collaboration and opportunity

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Expanding upon successful initiatives

Located on the outskirts of Los Piletones, the incubator encourages job growth by providing job training, workshop space and grant searching resources. Despite these efforts, a large majority of community members remain unemployed due to lack of additional resources and access to external job sources and locations. The incubator-plus seeks to expand the current facility and provides a designated meeting place for day-laborers.

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Building Heights

Products sold at market or to stores.

After

Open Space


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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Utilizing the willing with existing opportunities

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Artificial Lighting

Potential Expansion

Long Term Sustainability

A few cooperatives, including a textile workshop and pasta factory currently exist within the community. Investments in supporting existing and new cooperatives could create self-sustaining economic epicenters where residents are empowered to participate equally for mutual benefit and job security. Resources invested in cooperative.

Products sold at market or to stores.

After

Before


Urban Farming

Phase 1

Providing sources of food, employment and recreation Thinking Long-term Sustainability

The pileton provides many opportunities for economic and environmental sustainability. The first step in creating this future is to clean the trash, providing immediate job opportunities. Once the trash is cleaned, reintroducing the natural habitat will allow the march to act as is intended and start cleaning the watershed, leaving research opportunities for local universities. Once the habitat has been reestablished, creating farm plots throughout the lake will allow the production of agriculture and enable space for the much desired recreation space.

Compost made from community waste used in soil.

Plant seeds/soil used to create more gardens.

Products sold at market or to stores.

Existing Condition

Phase 1: Waste Removal

Phase 2: Reestablish Habitat for Recreation and Farm Plots


Phase 3: Facilitate the Distribution of Goods and Services


Hanging by a Thread | A Paper Maker’s Live/Work Where: Inner SE, Portland, Oregon

Collecting, grinding, boiling and molding of plant or fabric fibers are the integral processes of paper making. As the gathering and preparation steps are made, bundles of fibers are added to a vat of boiling water before rocked back and fourth through a filtering screen can compress the fibers into a solid homogenous form. As an expression of these processes, the design of this paper maker’s live/work environment integrates a waffle grid concrete living wall and stairs that flex when walked on as a sensory reminder of the moulding process that is so crucial to paper making. These architectural expressions create a dynamic display of the paper making process and compliment the neighborhood’s artisanal history.


Third Floor Sleeping

Second Floor Living

Passive Strategies Providing Multi-Function Systems

Paper making both requires fibers for the creation of pulps, and creates an abundance of heat through this pulping process. In providing a bioswale gardening space, not only can the paper maker grow their own fibers, but they can cool their workshop through evaporative cooling and the stack effects. Ground Floor Workshop


mat [lab] | Material Explorations

Where: Shattuck Hall, Portland State University The halls of the School of Architecture building, unadorned and acoustically challenged, needed reason for interactive engagements. An idea to create an interactive learning wall to spark dialog and curiosity was chosen by the Institute for Sustainabile Solutions to educate students about sustainability in the built environment. 2 Colleagues and I sought to design a permanent installation that would frame curated displays of examples of sustainability, while an example in itself. Built with salvaged plate steel and floor joists, the project was built with over 80% reused materials, and has brought visitors from across the city to the halls of Portland State’s School of Architecture to find examples of sustainable architecture.


Activating the Void | An Independent Cinema Where: North Portland, Oregon

Made of brick, made of wood, painted over, rusted out. Fast and loud, the crowd’s reduced, the transit cruises through. Small and sparse, tables and chairs, interaction’s losing touch. A design for an independent cinema in an up and coming residential neighborhood seeks to slow the speed of traffic, create opportunities for community interaction and activate the activities within the community. In respecting the neighborhoods low scaled brick gabled bungalow vernacular, the design integrates massive brick columnar elements as a frame for the activities within. The submerged viewing rooms allows for the scale of the building to remain consistent, and allows for street side activation of the internal activities through the bar space and its viewing room display screens.


Bar/Lounge Viewing Room Kitchen Dining Box Office Egress Second Level

Restroom Office

Programmatic Activation

Ground Level

Activity Enhancement through Community Participation Section

By introducing a community activity in a neighborhood where it has never been present before, it is imperative to its success that it have a presence in its context. The curtain wall street presence allows for the internal programs to be cinematic to the community, just as the films in the cinema are to the users of the buildings. The screens in the bar are to activate the congregation space of the ground floor by displaying the activities within the viewing rooms.

Exposed Seating

Covered Seating

Interior Seating

Wind Break

EFFECT ON NEIGHBORHOOD

NORTH KILLINGSWORTH

ENTIRE NEIGHBORHOOD

MULTI-FAMILY

SINGLE-FAMILY

NO

NORTH KILLINGSWORTH

RTH R NO

RT

Community Interactions

Sounds

BUSES

CARS

Basement Level

SMELL ANALYSIS

WO

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IL HK

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BAD SMELLS

CLIMATE BASED ARCHITECTURAL SOLUTIONS

SOUND ANALYSIS

TRANSPORTATION METHODS TO NODES

NORTH KILLINGSWORTH

BAD SOUNDS

CLIMATE BASED POPULATION FLOW

BUS

Zoning & Accessibility CAR

BIKE

WALK

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EXHAUST

Smells

TRASH


SHEL Plaza | An Eco-Roof Analysis

Where: Shattuck Hall, Portland State University Extensive community involvement has provided many opportunities for architecture students at Portland State University to put thier skills to use. As a center for sustainable research, the Shattuck Hall Ecological Learning Plaza (SHEL Plaza) was created to study ecological roof and wall systems while providing a space for community interaction and education. The Eco-Roof analysis portion of the plaza was a way for students to learn about the roof systems and feasible slopes, while informing the design community for future projects such as the planned 30,000 sf green roof at the Portland Zoo which will use the SHEL PLaza research. This eco-roof project was a team effort in which I was a main contributor to the construction and implementation phases of the project.


The Village of Los Piletones | Impactful Additions Where: Southern Buenos Aires, Argentina

After arriving in Buenos Aires with Basic Initiative and exposing ourselves to the living conditions of the cities souther slums, the need for additions and restorations was quite evident. The delapidated library was lacking adequite storage and education facilities, while the community kitchen which served food to thousands of hungry community members lacked adequite lighting. While one team set out to create a master plan of potential inteventions, eight other students and I began to charrette concepts for enhanced learning and dining facilities. As outsiders of the community, it was imperative for the longterm success of these interventions that we integrate community particiation into our design-build process. The most rewarding part of this project was witnessing the success and utilization of these spaces after returning a year later as a master planning project lead.



Architecture and Planning Portfolio