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portfolio

j. gay, spring ‘11


contents 2 14 22

Lock Tower 30-level mixed-use skyscraper

12

Lock Tower pt 2 “design development�

Mound Homes 20-unit housing proposal

Sphere City lo-fi climate control

24

Profile House home for the close future


LOCK TOWER University of Illinois at Chicago, Fall 2009 Arch 553, Instructed by Jimenez Lai Program: ~500,000sf tower with offices, hotel, and multiple performance spaces Site: Downtown Chicago When designing a building this large and programmatically diverse, what can the outside possibly say about the inside? To paraphrase Koolhaas’ famous article on Bigness: “nothing”. I question that claim with a building that has no traditional ‘inside’. The core is pushed to the perimeter and covered in an unremarkable facade which has been somewhat lazily sampled from its neighbors on three sides. In contrast the ‘inside’ is something spectacular - a multitude of cantilevers without imitation and free from their context, each independent yet locked into its neighbor to form a whole.

The question of how to organize the program is given over to a system half parametric and half intuitive. This system, like the project itself, is sectional in nature and a way of organizing program in two dimensions but without floor plates, or in other words - vertical space planning. A building that is all outside - “The humanist expectation of ‘honesty’”* is not doomed but restored! * Koolhaas, “Bigness”, SMLXL, 1995. p501.


Millenium Park

Marina City

Hancock Center

Navy Pier

The Site

Self-conscious Facade

Urban “Telephone� Game

The site (orange) w/ replicated facades


Container

Contenders

3 massive walls Open to the south facing the river

Ideas for organizing the program

Chosen Hanging the program from the three massive walls expresses the container as structure.

HIGH

THEATER (LARGE)

LECTURE HALL

THEATER (SMALL)

LECTURE HALL CYBERHALL

FORMAL RIGIDITY

REHEARSAL SPACE

SOLOISTS’ PRACTICE ROOMS

CONFERENCE HALL

RESTAURANT

LOBBY (SMALL) RESTAURANT

RETAIL GREEN ROOM

LOBBY (LARGE) HOTEL LOUNGE

HOTEL

BAR

STAFF

MUSICIANS’ LOCKERROOM

STAFF

BAR

VIP LOUNGE

LOW

INFORMATION & SECURITY

ADMIN MULTI-PURPOSE HALLS

Heirarchy

OFFICE HOTEL SERV ICES

Determination of which program gets the location $$$$$$$$$$ it desires most when there is overlap.

-$

Overlap Combination of all desires.

REVENUE GENERATION PER S.F.

HOTEL LOUNGE VIP LOUNGE

BAR

CYBERHALL

LECTURE HALL

SOLOISTS’ PRACTICE ROOMS

REHEARSAL SPACE LECTURE HALL

OFFICE ADMIN

RESTAURANT THEATER (SMALL)

MUSICIANS’ LOCKERROOM CONFERENCE HALL

LOBBY (SMALL) STAFF

MULTI-PURPOSE HALLS

STAFF GREEN ROOM HOTEL THEATER (LARGE)

BAR

RESTAURANT RETAIL

HOTEL SERV ICES

INFORMATION & SECURITY

LOBBY (LARGE)

Resultant Elevation

+

+ Extrusions

VIP LOUNGE HOTEL LOUNGE

BAR

CYBERHALL

LECTURE HALL

SOLOISTS’ PRACTICE ROOMS

REHEARSAL SPACE

HOTEL

LECTURE HALL

ADMIN

RESTAURANT OFFICE

CONFERENCE HALL

MUSICIANS’ LOCKERROOM

MULTI-PURPOSE HALLS

THEATER (SMALL) LOBBY (SMALL)

STAFF

STAFF

GREEN ROOM BAR

RESTAURANT

RETAIL THEATER (LARGE) HOTEL SERV ICES

INFORMATION & SECURITY LOBBY (LARGE)

Resultant Depth

Massing Model, 1/32” = 1’-0”, chipboard, 6”x6”x16”; Void Model, 1/64”=1’-0”, museumboard, 3”x3”x8”


Charting Desire A series of 7 graphs depict the desire of each piece of program to be hung in a certain location on the wall. For example, in the graph immediately below the y-axis is public to private and the x-axis is servant to served. The results of this study were translated directly into the form of the building - the plane of the grid on this page corresponds to the wall and the colored shapes are cantilevers off from it.

LOBBY (SMALL)

LOBBY (LARGE)

HOTEL

HIGH

Each element of the program is given a distintictive shape related to its function. Blue is office, yellow is hotel, magenta is performance. There are 27 shapes.

HIGH

In other words, the graph is the elevation.

Program Parts

CE STAFF CYBERHALL HOTEL LOUNGE

LOBBY (SMALL)

MULTI-PURPOSE HALLS

LOBBY (LARGE) VIP LOUNGE

BAR

BAR

ADMIN

STAFF

FLEXIBILITY

SOLOISTS’ PRACTICE ROOMS

SOLOISTS’ PRACTICE ROOMS

RESTAURANT

GREEN ROOM

REHEARSAL SPACE

RETAIL

MUSICIANS’ LOCKERROOM

OFFICE

HOTEL

RESTAURANT

THEATER (LARGE)

LECTURE HALL

CONFERENCE HALL

OFFICE

THEATER (SMALL) LECTURE HALL

LOW

LOW

HOTEL SERV ICES

INFORMATION & SECURITY

OLD

YOUNG

OLD

OLD

YOUNG

OLD

YOUNG

CLEAN

CLEAN

HISTORICAL AGE OF PROGRAM

THEATER (LARGE) INFORMATION & SECURITY

SOLOISTS’ PRACTICE ROOMS

REHEARSAL SPACE

STAFF

WASTE GENERATION PER S.F.

GREEN ROOM

CONFERENCE HALL

ADMIN

MUSICIANS’ LOCKERROOM

LOBBY (SMALL)

LOBBY (LARGE)

CYBERHALL

THEATER (SMALL)

LECTURE HALL HOTEL

THEATER (SMALL)

THEATER (LARGE)

LECTURE HALL

STAFF

BAR

MULTI-PURPOSE HALLS

CONFERENCE HALL

BAR

WASTEFUL

HOTEL LOUNGE

RESTAURANT

OFFICE

RESTAURANT

HOTEL SERV ICES

CONGESTED

CONGESTED

UNCROWDED

CONGESTED

CONGESTED

WASTEFUL

RETAIL VIP LOUNGE

UNCROWDED

UNCROWDED

LOW

LOW

OCCUPANCY DENSITY / EXITING REQUIREMENTS

CYBERHALL

STAFF

ADMIN

HOTEL LOUNGE

ENERGY CONSUMPTION PER S.F.

MUSICIANS’ LOCKERROOM

RETAIL

REHEARSAL SPACE

REHEARSAL SPACE

VIP LOUNGE

GREEN ROOM

HOTEL

SOLOISTS’ PRACTICE ROOMS

OFFICE

LECTURE HALL MULTI-PURPOSE HALLS RESTAURANT

STAFF HOTEL THEATER (SMALL) LECTURE HALL

BAR LOBBY (SMALL) RESTAURANT THEATER (LARGE) BAR

RETAIL

HIGH

CONFERENCE HALL

INFORMATION & SECURITY

CONSERVATIVE

LIBERAL

HIGH

HOTEL SERV ICES

LOBBY (LARGE)

CONSERVATIVE

LIBERAL

CONSERVATIVE

LIBERAL

CONSERVATIVE

HOTEL LOUNGE

CYBERHALL

HOTEL LOUNGE MUSICIANS’ LOCKERROOM

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

HOTEL SERV ICES MUSICIANS’ LOCKERROOM VIP LOUNGE

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

PM

PM

HIGH

HIGH

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

POLITICS

THEATER (LARGE)

RETAIL

VIP LOUNGE

VIP LOUNGE

THEATER (LARGE) THEATER (SMALL)

STAFF MULTI-PURPOSE HALLS STAFF RESTAURANT

SOLOISTS’ PRACTICE ROOMS

BAR SOLOISTS’ PRACTICE ROOMS

RESTAURANT

LECTURE HALL

GREEN ROOM

LECTURE HALL REHEARSAL SPACE

ADMIN

BAR

LOBBY (LARGE)

MULTI-PURPOSE HALLS

THEATER (SMALL) REHEARSAL SPACE

VIP LOUNGE

GREEN ROOM RESTAURANT

LECTURE HALL

CONFERENCE HALL

LECTURE HALL

CYBERHALL

HOTEL LOUNGE

RESTAURANT HOTEL

BAR

LECTURE HALL

CONFERENCE HALL

BAR

CURRENCY

CYBERHALL

LOBBY (SMALL)

PEAK USAGE

DESIRE FOR VIEWS

PROGRAM PRIVACY

BAR

MUSICIANS’ LOCKERROOM

STAFF LECTURE HALL

CONFERENCE HALL CYBERHALL

LECTURE HALL

BAR

ADMIN

CONFERENCE HALL

RESTAURANT LECTURE HALL GREEN ROOM RETAIL REHEARSAL SPACE

MULTI-PURPOSE HALLS

OFFICE

REHEARSAL SPACE

BAR ADMIN HOTEL SERV ICES GREEN ROOM

MULTI-PURPOSE HALLS

OFFICE BAR

HOTEL

HOTEL

SOLOISTS’ PRACTICE ROOMS

LOBBY (LARGE) STAFF

RESTAURANT

OFFICE RESTAURANT HOTEL THEATER (SMALL)

THEATER (SMALL) OFFICE INFORMATION & SECURITY

STAFF LOBBY (SMALL)

HOTEL

STAFF LOBBY (LARGE)

MUSICIANS’ LOCKERROOM

HOTEL LOUNGE SOLOISTS’ PRACTICE ROOMS THEATER (LARGE)

INFORMATION & SECURITY

THEATER (LARGE)

STAFF

RETAIL LOBBY (SMALL)

HOTEL SERV ICES

LOBBY (SMALL)

STAFF INFORMATION & SECURITY

SERVED

PROGRAM HEIRARCHY

SERVANT

SERVANT

SERVED

HIGH

LOW

LOW

HIGH

EXCLUSIVITY

LOW

LOW

HIGH

SCARCE

CONSISTENT

CONSISTENT

SCARCE

FREQUENCY OF USE

CONSISTENT

CONSISTENT

SCARCE

-$

-$

AM

HOTEL SERV ICES

AM

LOW

INFORMATION & SECURITY

SERVANT

LOW

ADMIN

RESTAURANT

SERVANT

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

RETAIL

LOBBY (LARGE)

SERVED

SMILES

TEARS

TEARS

SMILES

TEARS

TEARS

SMILES

CLOWN FACTOR

Program Model, 1/64” = 1’-0”, matboard, 3”x3”x8”

Figure/Ground Cuts


8:00am ELEVATOR LOBBY

Hold it please!

Shouldn’t janitors be taking the service elevator?

Man I hate that guy.

8:10am JANITOR’S CLOSET

Good morning Julius.

NO! JULIUS COME BACK!

10:30am RETAIL LOBBY

What is he doing, stopping to smell the flowers?

People do that?

11:30am OFFICE W/ ADJACENT THEATER

Does he ever work, what’s he doing now?

Watching theater, unbelievable.


2:30pm SCHEDULED MEETING

4:30pm MEETING DRAGS ON

JULIUS! Stay put, i’m coming up there.

I asked you all here to this meeting to hear my new joke, wait, is that a bird?. There’ll be no birds in my office.

Fly away you nuisance.

*

4:35pm ROOFTOP CONFRONTATION

Hey! Watch it man!

You bastard, that’s my bird!

* **


LOCK TOWER pt 2 “Design Development� University of Illinois at Chicago, Spring 2010 Arch 564, Instructed by Dan Wheeler Building on the design studio project from the previous semester, this technology course developed systems of structure, HVAC, plumbing, life safety, fire protection, conveyance, and detailing.

Make it credible.


MOUND HOMES University of Illinois at Chicago, Spring 2010 Arch 554, Instructed by Juan Rois Program: 20 Units of Housing (25,000 sf) Site: Wicker Park, Chicago.

p

sloped up for views and enlarged balconies

hu

private court daylighting improved # views increased FAR required s.f. reduction

The point of this is to use the courtyard as an optical device, something that you would sooner look across than look into.

added views to street

Pus

ur t

Co

Ext ru

de

The courtyard housing type is underrepresented in Chicago and it was chosen here for the sense of collective space created at its center. The standard ‘c’-shaped

courtyard is typically paved or planted as a garden and used as a thoroughfare on the way to interior corridors or garden units. Here the type has been tweaked in two significant ways - first, the majority of units are entered from private roof terraces accessible by walking up the outside of the building; second, the courtyard is mounded with sod and resists the common characterization of the courtyard as a crucible, surveilled by all its tenants.

Mo un t

The formal strategy here addresses five essential criteria for every unit in the project: • a view to the main street • multiple windows facing a shared courtyard • entrance from the outside through a private deck • a double height living space • above-grade parking in the rear

yields corner covered parking rear entrance

turf!


ga tio n

Fac

es s

ad e

Ac c

Stru ctu re

Aggre


South Elevation (Front)

West Elevation (Side)

North Elevation (Rear)


Retail

Retail

Street Level, +3’


2nd Level, +13’


SPHERE CITY University of Illinois at Chicago, Fall 2010 Arch 556, Instructed by Sean Lally I’ve forgotten what it feels like not to have goose bumps. The weeks after I bought my first spheres were unbearable. The bumps felt like a rash, like that screeching discomfort you feel on your skin from raking nails across a chalkboard. At its worst I was on the verge of biting down on a rag and hysterically scrubbing them away with sandpaper. Jane talked me out of that, she bought her spheres a few years earlier and though her goose bumps went away (mine never would) she had vertigo for days on end, common for the first generation spheres. She was right though, the discomfort must have been psychological because shortly after the worst of it the sensation became tolerable and then even pleasant. I held out against buying any spheres longer than most and took some perverse pride in that. They were and still are prohibitively expensive ($1000 for an entry level used one from a budget manufacturer like Atmos and you need at least half a dozen for the system to work well), but I had the money. By the second generation they worked almost flawlessly: creating and maintaining your own personal climate better than even the most advanced hermetically sealed air conditioning systems could, even when you were outside. It was that the spheres tracked their owners everywhere that I couldn’t stand - bulky clanking metal bowling balls jittering along all around you as you walked, crawling up and rolling along the walls next to you, never too close but always there, just out of reach. A few years ago, as I watched the maintenance guys at the office carting up the last of the rusted, dead looking boiler units from the basement, I knew the fight was over. I had to buy a set of spheres- the management wasn’t heating or cooling the building anymore! It was the middle of winter and I shivered at my keyboard for the next two weeks, refusing to give in on principle until my superior made it clear that if my production didn’t return to its normal rate I’d be fired. On the train yesterday I sat next to a beautifully dressed old woman wearing a full length fur coat. It reminded me of a time when I wore fleece and tweeds and boiled wools and all sorts of rough, heavy fabrics. Now, like everyone else, I wear light cotton shorts and a t-shirt even in the dead of winter; anything else feels like a straight-jacket and irritates my bumped skin. She was sphereless, which isn’t uncommon for the very poor – the homeless sit out by busy intersections soaking up the ambient heat of passing pedestrians – but it is uncommon and generally suspicious for the well groomed, like her. I imagined her life, the voluntary withdrawal from society she slowly enacted by a simple act of refusal. I pictured her arguing with guests about the proper temperature in her antiquated home before they stopped visiting altogether because it was always too cold there without their spheres. In my daydream I sympathized with her annoyance in going through the front door at city hall and four or five spheres involuntarily popping out of the rental dispenser and swirling around her like paparazzi while she goes about her business there. The city looks different now. The sidewalk is twice as wide and feels like a highway. I keep my distance from other pedestrians and them from me. If one gets too close their climate contaminates mine and it gets uncomfortable, usually too warm and I hate being too warm. Yet I miss being close to strangers; seats on the train and at the DMV and in restaurants, everywhere, are so far apart now to leave room for the spheres. I can’t remember the last time I bumped into someone. Jane pointed out to me the other day that all my close friends share a taste for the same climate and she thought that was the funniest thing until she realized she has all the same friends that I do. It got me thinking though. Maybe it wasn’t Steve’s habit of telling embarrassingly racist jokes that finished off our friendship after all. Rather that his climate sucked the humidity out of the room.


PROFILE HOUSE University of Illinois at Chicago, Fall 2010 Arch 555, Instructed by Jeff Kipnis and Jimenez Lai Program: Single-family Home Site: The Close Future

So, this project looks like a full-on regression into ironic postmodernism, but i’m tellin ya it’s not man. First off, even if it was that wouldn’t be so bad. Maybe we threw the baby out with the bath water, ya know? They were talking about really fantastic stuff back then, but you ask anybody now and they’ll tell ya they wish the postmoderns never even existed. How can you say that about a whole generation? I mean, yeah, I’ve said that about the hardcore decon guys, but c’mon, completely different. And okay, so i’m with you that it was all the irony that sank it. I can’t defend that, irony’s like that Simpsons episode where Lisa submerges her tooth in a pool of Coke and inadvertently shocks it and a hyper-advanced miniature civilization springs up overnight and develops this machine they call the de-bigulator and they shrink her down to their size so they can ask her, their god, to save them from the devil. What I’m trying to say is that irony is a machine that will make you a small god, like real small, with a tiny constituency that you don’t give a shit about. Anyways, it’s not that. Try this out instead: “post ironic modernism”. Sounds good doesn’t it? Zago’s been scratching at this concept for a bit, but he’s resorted to advocating awkwardness as a panacea for both the earnestness of straight-up high modernism and the critical distance of the late postmodern project, somehow. I’m skeptical. To me the awkward is only shades away from the grotesque, you know- Hernan Diaz’s thing. By the way, did you see that Hernan has started putting little red flowers all over his designs? He calls it techno-romanticism, I love it. I lay in bed at night and think what I wouldn’t give to read one single page of his diary, you just know he’s got to have one and that it’s got to be impossibly charming. The problem with the awkward and the grotesque is the same problem I’ve got with all the other counter-intuitive design tools, including Kipnis’ own calculated misbehavior and Lehnerer’s bureaucratic ruses, it’s that they’re all subterfuge. And that won’t do, there’s no tolerance for Trojan horses in the post ironic modern movement. Okay fine, i’ll get to the point. The secret is abstraction, man. Not abstraction toward silence in the minimalist way or abstraction toward a deafening shout in the postmodernist way (Tigerman is the worst, his buildings are always yelling), but a new type of abstraction, where else but conveniently right in the middle. It’s communication that doesn’t plead in a low whisper or implore in a high pitched scream, after all we’re just chatting.


Formal Study Models, 4”x8”x4” ea. at 1/32”=1’-0”

Formal Development, 36”x48”


Plan, 1/16” = 1’-0”

Comic, 24”x36”


Model, 9”x14”x6” at 1/16”=1’-0”



JGay_AcademicArchPortfolio_Spring2011